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FREE • Friday, April 21, 2017

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RAINIERS GO BOOM

BE C A U S E CO M M U N I T Y MAT T E R S .

COALITION OF GROUPS PRIMING FOR ELECTION FIGHT, PROTESTS

PHOTO BY STEPHEN REECE LEONARD

TIDEFLATS. Members of several environmental and social justice groups staged a protest on the Tideflats against the construction of Puget Sound Energy’s liquefied natural gas facility. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

T

he community uproar originally started a year ago that prompted the death of a planned natural gas to methanol plant on the Tideflats continues to morph into other local environmental and social justice issues as like-minded groups merge and share resources. The grass-root effort Save Tacoma Water, for example, is gathering momentum for a ballot measure to

change the term limits for City Council members from the current 10 years with a “break in service” before running again. The group hopes voters approve a change that would set the limit to eight years followed by a break of at least eight years before the elected official could run for office again. RedLine Tacoma continues to protest the planned liquefied natural gas plant Puget Sound Energy is preparing to build. The 8 million gallon facility would provide fuel for TOTE container ships that run between Tacoma and Alaska but also serve as storage for natural gas customers to use during unexpected weather conditions. The

DO GOOD, DINE OUT Food, drink and community come together to fight AIDS

PHOTO COURTESY OF PCAF

By Jackie Fender jackie@tacomaweekly.com

Communing over food and drink has always been a fundamental aspect of the human culture. Dining together provides sustenance for the stomach and spirit, giving the diners a moment to reflect and connect, which is likely why dining out for a good cause is such a brilliant and successful fundraising model. Pierce County AIDS Foundation (PCAF) has this in mind when hosting their annual Dining Out for Life fundraiser, due to

occur this year on April 27. One Dining Out for Life supporter says, “This is probably one of my favorite events every year. Why, you ask? Because you get to help support a great cause just by eating! How much better could that be?” And seriously, how much better does it get? The idea is that folks can choose a participating restaurant of their liking and that establishment donates a percentage of proceeds from that day to the cause. The event boasts one of PCAF’s u See DINING / page A11

group worries that the facility will be an added danger to the area as well as further promote the use of fossil fuels rather than greener energy sources. Both groups are also recruiting candidates to run for political office, particularly the three seats up for votes in November on the Port of Tacoma Commission and the five open seats on the Tacoma City Council, including the mayor’s seat. “We could actually take over the council,” Save Tacoma Water organizer Sherry Bockwinkel said. “I hate to be a single-issue person, but in this county you sort of u See PROTESTS / page A11

PROSECUTOR’S OFFICE WINS TWO AWARDS The National Association of Legal Secretaries (NALS) of Pierce County presented two awards to the Pierce County Prosecutor’s Office. The first was the award for Outstanding Community Service, 2017. “Community service and community safety are among our main duties,” said Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. “We appreciate the acknowledgement of our many good people who do so much for the community.” The Outstanding Community Service award is presented to the Pierce County law firm that has “demonstrated a strong and ongoing commitment to community service.” The nomination letter specifically cited the office’s contribution to the Family Law Clinic for Veterans. Veterans often face a high rate of divorce, domestic violence, substance abuse, and homelessness. Some veterans struggling with mental illness, disabilities, and addiction have difficulty completing the necessary steps to address legal issues. The Family Law u See AWARDS / page A11

PHOTO BY LARRY LARUE

Store owners Matt Tatham and Jesse Ruano.

NEW COMICS STORE HONORS THE NAVY SEAL WHO INSPIRED IT By Larry LaRue

larry@tacomaweekly.com

No one will ever know what Michael Tatham’s last thoughts were, though it’s doubtful they were about comic books. They might have been for his family – his parents and younger brother Matt – back home in University Place. They might have been with his fellow Navy Seals, with whom he had served in Iraq and Afghanistan for six years and three deployments. They might have turned to the absurdity of being killed on a motorcycle while on a 2011 leave in Bali, Indonesia and not in any of the actions for which he was highly decorated. This much is known: Tatham’s family has not forgotten him. Mother Diane and brother Matt have rarely had a day without thinking of Tatham, who was 33 when he died. “I used to run gyms for people, and Mike said he’d u See COMICS / page A11 FACEBOOK: facebook.com/tacomaweekly

LIONS ON THE RISE

GUITAR FEST

‘ROSENCRANTZ & GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD’

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OUR VIEW

Citizens are speaking out, and the City and Port might finally be listening. PAGE A6

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Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 21, 2017

Pothole of the Week

TACOMA POLICE WARN OF ‘SKIMMERS’ ON 7-ELEVEN ATMS

By David Rose Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

E 25TH & E C ST

After so long, we have to assume that Percival our beloved Pothole Pig has simply vanished. However, there are still potholes in the city that need attention, so we simply – and sadly – must hire someone to handle his workload. We decided to give the candidates a trial run to see how they do in the field. This week Carter the Crater Gator gave his third shot at pothole finding by locating this street crack at East 25th and East C streets. Since the announcement of the candidates, which also include Charles the Chuckhole Chicken and Blighty the Blight-Seeking Beaver, several people voiced their thoughts that the permanent replacement should be one of Percival’s relatives, namely Peyton, who lives in Portland, and Perry, who lives in Parkland. Send your thoughts to stevedunkel@ tacomaweekly.com.

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TEAM 253 SWEEPS A PAIR FROM THE 206 DAFFODIL FESTIVAL GRAND FLORAL PARADE 2017 TWO BANK ROBBERS HIT THE SAME TACOMA BRANCH PYTHIANS SWEEP TACOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY AWARDS POWER RATES INCREASE UNDER HYBRID PLAN

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Tacoma Police are warning people to look closely at the ATM before you withdraw cash at a 7-Eleven store . Thieves are using “skimming machines” DAVID ROSE to steal bank account information off the magnetic strip and then cash out of accounts. “A ‘skimmer’ was detected and removed from an ATM by a customer at a North Tacoma 7-Eleven a couple of

weeks ago,” said Officer Loretta Cool. So far, seven people have filed reports of fraudulent ATM transactions on their accounts including Whitney Nelson. “It could happen to anybody. You need to check your bank account three or four times a day,” said Nelson. To spot a “skimmer,” shake the card slot to make sure it’s not loose and look inside for loose or dangling wires. “I didn’t even think about that. I thought that could never happen to me,” said Nelson. She hopes other ATM users out there will keep a close eye for these red flags before you stick

your card inside. “If it moves at all, don’t put your card in because it probably has a device that’s attached to it,” said Cool. “Once you remove your card, the bad guy has all of the information from your account saved.” If you are a victim of credit card skimming, police say file a report with them and make sure you notify your bank as soon as possible. If you have any information on the identity of the “skimming” suspects, you can report it anonymously by calling Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County at 1 (800) 222-TIPS.

Bulletin Board NORTHBOUND EXIT 133 CLOSES FOR SEVERAL MONTHS Drivers who use the northbound Interstate 5 exit to I-705 and State Route 7 will need to take a detour for the next several months. As of Friday, April 14, contractor crews working for the Washington State Department of Transportation closed the Tacoma city center exit (#133) through the end of the year to build new HOV connections between I-5 and SR 16. During the closure, detour signs will direct northbound I-5 traffic to use the SR 16/South 38th Street exit (#132) to reach downtown Tacoma destinations. WSDOT posted a video at www.youtube.com/watch?v=N83TS2Ad8R8&featu re=youtu.be showing the detour route to help drivers visualize the changes. This project is the third of three designed to improve the I-5/SR 16 interchange and connect HOV lanes between the two highways. Additional information on overnight ramp and lane closures for Tacoma area highways are posted online at www. tacomatraffic.com. LEARN ABOUT DIFFERENCES AT CONVERSATIONS AROUND RACE Now more than ever, honest conversations around the issue of race and racism are needed. With high profile police shootings of people of color, as well as rhetoric from the new presidential administration regarding the Latino, Black and Muslim communities, thoughtful response from the Tacoma communities of faith is being mobilized. Personal stories are a way to engage people, educate others and bring a human face to an issue that is difficult to talk about. An interfaith, intergenerational and multiracial coalition has organized the third in a series of storytelling events on Tacoma’s Hilltop. “Telling Our Own Stories: When I Learned About Peoples’ Differences” is the third installment of a series of storytelling conversations presented by Conversations Around Race, a coalition of four Tacoma-area Christian churches and a Buddhist temple. Led by both clergy and laypersons, this action committee has worked together for six years. Storytellers: Brendan Nelson, Hilltop community leader and youth mentor; Kayla Hoy, Lincoln High School student; Judy/Joanriksmais Soeum, Lincoln High School student; and Alma Cox Crawford, educator, who grew up in the Jim Crow

South. “Telling Our Own Stories: When I Learned About Peoples’ Differences” will take place on Friday, April 21 at the Urban League Building, 2550 S. Yakima Ave., Tacoma, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free admission, refreshments will be served.

STEPPING IT UP IN PIERCE COUNTY Creating safer routes to school and transit, improving our sidewalks and streets for all users, and connecting our crosscommunity trail system. This is just a taste of what the regional Pierce County team is working on as a part of a recent call to action to step it up from the U.S. Surgeon General. Downtown On the Go’s next Friday Forum will be an opportunity to discuss these initiatives with the team on April 28 from noon to 1 p.m. at Court House Square, 1102 A St., in The Gallery next to Lift Bridge Coffee. The event is free and open to the public. The Puget Sound Regional team, one of just 10 teams selected across the nation, recently returned from training with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors in Atlanta. Attendees of the Friday Forum will hear about this work from the entire team of Diane Evans, Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department, Meagan Kula, Downtown On the Go, Ryan Mello and Meredith Soniat, City of Tacoma, Kimberly Scrivner, Puget Sound Regional Council, and Shawn Phelps, Pierce County. “Walking is fundamental to our community and it affects everyone. I’m excited about the strength of our Pierce County team and the collaborative work that we’re embarking on to make Tacoma and Pierce County more walkable for everyone,” said Councilmember Mello, a long-time advocate for walkable communities. “This is about a healthy, equitable, and connected community that encourages smart growth and puts people first.” Thank you to GeoEngineers for their generous sponsorship. Downtown On the Go is the transportation advocate and resource for downtown Tacoma. Friday Forums bring together local leaders, experts, and the community to talk about transportation issues facing Tacoma and our region. For those who cannot attend, join the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #DOTGForum and following @ downtownonthego.

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Friday, April 21, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

LINK EXPANSION PLANS CHUG INTO FINAL DESIGN PHASE

RENDERINGS AND MAP COURTESY OF SOUND TRANSIT

LINK. Engineers and designers will finish up the station design concepts as well as select station names and announce construction schedules this summer.

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The expansion of the Tacoma Link lightrail system from its current terminus in the Theater District loop up to Martin Luther King Jr. Way is entering its final design phase. The current Link route started in 2003 and runs 1.6 miles from the Tacoma Dome Station to the Theater District Station near the corner of Commerce and Ninth streets. The planned expansion will add 2.4 miles and include seven new stations between the Theater District and Hilltop, five new vehicles, and an expansion of the existing Operations and Maintenance facility on East 25th Street. The project currently is at the 60-percent design stage, with construction scheduled to begin in 2018. The project team is now focusing on station designs, signs, art and color schemes

as well as station names, which people can comment on through an online survey through the end of the month after also providing their thoughts at a recent open house. The station names must be brief and not include commercial names since businesses around a station could change over time. Suggestions for station naming include swapping the Theater District name to the 11th and Commerce station since the current theater station will be relocated by about a block. That station could be renamed Old City Hall or Spanish Steps, to better articulate its location. Other stations could be named Wright Park or Stadium District as the light rail heads uphill to MLK, which will have four stops. They will be located at MLK and South 3rd, MLK and South Sixth, MLK and South 11th before ending at MLK and South 19th. Stations will be in the center of the street rather than on the sides of the streets to preserve

TRAINS. The link light rail will connect to the existing route and loop up from the Theater District to the Hilltop neighborhood.

parking in the area, averaging eight parking spaces per station. The next milestone will come in July, when the Sound Transit Board will have updated cost estimates and a more detailed construction schedule. Final design is expected this summer as well. One issue yet to be resolved fully is how the system will be funded. City of Tacoma has allocated $40 million for the project, of which about $33 million is secured grants and other sources. Sound Transit has allocated $50 million from the voter-approved measure in 2008 and is set to receive $75 million in federal grants that were authorized under former President Barrack Obama’s administration. President Donald Trump, however, has put some of those grants at risk since

the grants were authorized but not appropriated. Trump’s budget proposals would cut the Federal Transit Administration’s grant program. The extension is projected to cost $175 million. Sound Transit officials are working with the state’s Congressional delegation to keep those grants in the federal budget. While construction of the Hilltop expansion moves forward, the third extension starts its design process after voters approved South Transit 3, which included an extension of 3.5 miles from Hilltop to the Tacoma Community College campus at a cost of about $478 million. But that extension isn’t slated until 2041. The survey about station names can be found at soundtransit.org/tacomalinkexpansion.

BANK ROBBERY

Tacoma Police detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible for a bank robbery. At 5:35 p.m. on Friday, March 31st, 2017, the pictured suspect robbed a Columbia Bank located in the 200 block of S. 84th St. in the City of Tacoma. The suspect entered the bank, walked up to the counter and showed the teller a note stating he was armed with a gun, demanding cash, and threatening to shoot if his demands were not met. The suspect grabbed the money and

walked out of the bank. The suspect is described as a dark skinned black male, 20 to 25 years old, approximately 6’ tall, with a slender build and had

Fridays at 10:30pm on

acne pock marks on his face. The suspect was seen wearing aviator style sunglasses, a bright orange beanie cap, a gray suit jacket, and a dark blue polo shirt.

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case.

Call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) All Callers will remain anonymous

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Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 21, 2017

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT Supporting the Economic Growth of Our Community

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Federal, regional, state and local leaders gathered with the Puyallup Tribal Council to officially cut the ribbon on the Tribe’s new state-of-the-art Salish Cancer Center (SCC) in the spring of 2015. Joining in on the event were (back row from left): former Fife Mayor Tim Curtis; former Congressman Norm Dicks and Puyallup Tribal Council Vice-Chairman Larry LaPointe; (front row from left) Puyallup Tribal Council Members Marguerite Edwards and Sylvia Miller; Puyallup Vice-Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove; Senator Maria Cantwell; Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud; Gov. Jay Inslee; then Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen; Congressman Denny Heck; and Puyallup Tribal Council Members David Bean and Tim Reynon.

The most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians continues to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce County’s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its

own membership, but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County. With a payroll of more than 3,100 people who work in the Tribe’s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities – approximately 70 percent of whom are non-Native –

employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2015 the Tribe spent more than $491 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more.

From sponsoring local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and healthcare, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its destiny as “the generous people,” the meaning of the Tribe’s very name “Puyallup.”

PUYALLUP TRIBE SUPPORTS AREA NON-PROFITS Spirit of 12 Partners, Toy Rescue Mission, Emergency Food Network, Northwest Harvest, Toys for Tots and Tahoma Indian Center all gifted with major donations During the 2015 fiscal year, the Puyallup Tribe contributed more than $2.5 million from its charity and general funds into the local community with donations to various key charities and organizations. These generous donations will go a long way in helping these organizations to continue their vital efforts in the communities they serve. “It is truly humbling to know that there are so many people in need,” said Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud. “I feel immense joy in us having the ability to take care of those who need it most. We, as tribal members, know what it is like to grow up with nothing. It gives us all great joy to make someone’s Christmas happier than it would have been otherwise.” “The donations we made ensure the vitality of the people in our community,” said Puyallup Vice Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove. “It is critical to ensure families and community members, suffering from long or short-term setbacks, that they have resources available to get them moving forward in life. The Puyallup Tribe of Indians is not unfamiliar with difficult times. We relied on the support of our community organizations not long ago and it is of great honor that we, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, are able to pay it forward.” SPIRIT OF 12 – PARTNERSHIP WITH SEATTLE SEAHAWKS Founded in 2004, the Spirit of 12 Partners program embodies the Seattle Seahawks’ commitment to the Pacific Northwest community and its fans. The Puyallup Tribe gifted the Spirit of 12 Partners with $550,000 to help it continue its mission. This gift to the Spirit of 12 Partners is the largest since its inception in 2004. At every home game, Pacific Northwest youth service organizations partner with the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation and Seahawks fans to raise funds for kids’ programs. These non-profit partners include YMCA of Greater Seattle, Treehouse (for foster children), Rainier Scholars, Boys & Girls Club of Washington State Association and Camp Fire Snohomish County. As Spirit of 12 Partners, members of community-based nonprofits distribute the Seahawks Gameday Magazine, keeping 100 percent of the proceeds that are then matched by the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation. In 2014, more than $527,000 was raised in the Spirit of 12 Partners program and more than $3 million in total funds since 2004. Grant programs advance the areas of arts and culture, poverty alleviation, economic relief, education and scientific research. “In the old days, in our aboriginal language, we were known as the S’Puyalupubsh, meaning ‘generous and welcoming behavior to all people (friends and strangers) who enter our lands,’ said Vice Chairwoman Hargrove. “It is with great pride, and boundless excitement, that the Puyallup Tribe of Indians will be supporting the Seattle Seahawks Spirit of 12 program. We hope that our donation of $550,000 is able to advance community programming and create innovative opportunities for children and families throughout our state. The Spirit of 12 program not only generates diverse outlets for personal success, but continues to advance the human spirit. The Puyallup Tribe of Indians humbly thanks the Seattle Seahawks for their steadfast efforts, friendship, and dedication to our community. GO HAWKS!!” TOY RESCUE MISSION Tacoma’s Toy Rescue Mission received $100,000 for its work

to refurbish and recycle gently used toys for disadvantaged children and seniors in care facilities while providing meaningful volunteer opportunities for the young at heart. Not only does the Mission make birthdays, Easter and Christmas bright for children and seniors, its way of recycling toys is environmentally friendly too. At Christmas time, the mission typically serves more than 125 families a day starting around Dec. 2. In total last year, the mission served 11,152 children and seniors, 7,000 of those in December alone. The mission provides for children’s birthdays throughout the year and is at its busiest at Christmas, Easter and back-to-school time. Serving the South Sound for more than 20 years, the Toy Rescue Mission is nearly 100 percent volunteer run and receives no state or federal funding, nor is it affiliated with DSHS or any other state agency. Toy Rescue Mission Director and Board President Martha Davis said the Tribe’s donation is the largest one the Mission has ever received, and she was floored to receive it. “I was in a state of shock to be honored in such a way that I can continue serving the children of Tacoma,” she said. That the donation came at Christmastime, the Mission’s busiest time of year, is the icing on the cake. “We have already served nearly 900 families in eight days and I still have until Dec. 23. I wonder each day how many families will be coming in and if I have enough stuff, and now I don’t have to say no.” NORTHWEST HARVEST A longtime supporter of Northwest Harvest, the Tribe gave $50,000 to this organization, in keeping with generous donations of years past. Northwest Harvest is Washington’s own statewide hunger relief agency. Its mission is to provide nutritious food to hungry people statewide in a manner that respects their dignity, while fighting to eliminate hunger. Northwest Harvest’s vision is that ample nutritious food is available to everyone in Washington. “We are so grateful for our ongoing partnership with the Puyallup Tribe in feeding hungry people statewide,” said Northwest Harvest CEO Shelley Rotondo. “Their most recent gift of $50,000 at Home Team Harvest puts the Tribe’s total contributions to Northwest Harvest at more than $1 million, which is over four million meals since 2005. With their ongoing commitment to strengthening the community, the Tribe’s most recent generous grant shows respect and concern for all of our neighbors in need. This is especially helpful since the demand for nutritious food continues to grow at a time when donations are down, yet one in five children in Washington are at risk of going hungry. The Tribe’s gift truly makes it possible for us to work toward our goal of ending hunger.” TAHOMA INDIAN CENTER Tahoma Indian Center received $100,000 to enhance its services to assist Native individuals to overcome their barriers to permanent housing, employment and self-sufficiency in a loving, protective environment. A program of Catholic Community Services, the Center serves 1,100 Native people a year free of charge, including serving 50-55 midday meals five days a week. It provides individualized and tailored case management to assist in accessing

support resources, offers free laundry facilities and acts as a mailing address for more than 250 people. Native cultural and spiritual ceremonies and social activities are held there as well. Through the Bridges Village housing program, 10 permanent and supportive housing units are available for Native families who have experienced homelessness. Among the many ways in which the donation will be used, the Center will expand its housing search and rent assistance programs, increase staff hours to provide more direct assistance, build a wheelchair ramp and reinforce stair railings (individuals in wheelchairs are currently carried up the stairs). “It’s an awesome, humbling gift. It will really make a huge impact. This donation will allow us to save Native lives,” said Program Manager Steve Gallion. “That’s the most important thing we can do.” EMERGENCY FOOD NETWORK Emergency Food Network (EFN) received $100,000 to assist in its efforts to provide Pierce County with a consistent, diverse and nutritious food supply so that no person goes hungry. EFN partners with 73 food banks, hot meal sites and shelters, providing them with food at no cost to them or their clients, which are the homeless, unemployed, working poor, elderly, children and military. EFN maintains an eight-acre farm in the Orting Valley and has just started farming it year round. In 2014, EFN distributed 15.3 million pounds of food and accommodated 1,421,417 client visits, with 6,626 of these visits made by Native Americans. EFN was able to distribute 17 percent more food in 2014 than in 2011, keeping pace with the 11-percent increase in need in the community during that same time period. “It was like Chanukkah and Christmas all rolled into one,” said EFN Executive Director Helen McGovern-Pilant, noting that this donation is the highest EFN has ever received since it began in 1982. “It was totally unexpected, an amazing, generous gift and another way the Tribe reaches out to take care of their neighbors in need.” TOYS FOR TOTS Again this year, the Puyallup Tribe helped Toys for Tots with its blessed mission to deliver, through a new toy at Christmas, a message of hope to about 50,000 less fortunate youngsters that will assist them in becoming responsible, productive, patriotic citizens. At Christmastime 2015, the Tribe gifted $50,000 to the Tacoma/Pierce County Toys for Tots effort so that area children would not be disappointed during this most joyful season of the year. Toys for Tots also includes older teenagers who desire more grown-up type gifts but are overlooked by donors focused on young children. “Without the generous donation from the Puyallup Tribe, many kids in specific age groups would not have received gifts this year Christmas morning,” said Pierce County Sheriff’s Detective Ed Troyer, the local Toys for Tots coordinator. With the Tribe’s donation added to the support Toys for Tots receives from across Pierce County, the local Toys for Tots mission will continue to collect new, unwrapped toys during October, November and December each year, and distribute those toys as Christmas gifts to needy children in the community.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


Friday, April 21, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

Small, shy and senior off-leash dog area coming to Chambers Creek Park An expanded off-leash area including a separate area for small, shy and senior dogs is coming soon to Pierce County’s Chambers Creek Regional Park in University Place. Since its inception in 2007, the nonprofit SUNDogs group has lobbied for a larger off-leash area for dogs and their owners. Although the group obtained approval to open a small site near Central Meadow in 2009, it has taken several years to convince Pierce County to allow a site expansion. “We are so appreciative of our new County Executive Bruce Dammeier, who met with us and understood the need for an expansion of the off leash area,” said SUNDogs President Bill Long. “Although the new site still isn’t as large as we wished, it is certainly a step in the right direction.” Right now, SUNDogs maintains a less than one-acre site near the Central Meadow area. The group paid for all the fencing

and gates as well as needed items. “Our members indicated they wanted a larger area to exercise and socialize their dogs along with a separate area for small, shy and senior dogs,” Long said. SUNDogs will purchase gates and fencing for the Small, Shy and Senior Dog area that will be located between the Central Meadow bathrooms and the existing off leash area. The group also plans to “push out” the existing fence to expand the current dog park. “This site is ideal because it is near parking, water and restrooms,” Long said. It will cost approximately $16,000 to purchase and install the additional fencing and gates. Donations can be done online at www.up-dogpark.org using PayPal or mailed to SUNDogs at P.O. Box 65352, University Place, WA 98464-1352. SUNDogs is a nonprofit 501c3 organization.

PHOTO BY LAYLA AND ME PHOTOGRAPHY

CELEBRATE! These dog owners are celebrating the upcoming dog park expan-

sion. (Left to right): Daisy, Kathy Makenas, Mica, Bill Long, Daisy, Dee Ulseth, Annie, Layla and Kimmo with their friends can’t wait to use the expanded off leash area at Chambers Bay, which will include a separate area for small, shy and senior dogs. Donations welcome at www.up-dogpark.org.

GETTING TO THE BOTTOM OF COLONOSCOPIES:

FIVE MYTHS DEBUNKED By MultiCare Health System

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women in the United States and the second leading cause in men; but it doesn’t need to be. In fact, it's one of the few cancers that can be prevented by appropriate screening. “Colonoscopies are life-saving, preventive tests,” said Kevin Leung, a gastroenterologist with Digestive Health Specialists who performs colonoscopies at MultiCare Covington Medical Center. A colonoscopy can reduce the risk of death from colorectal cancer by more than 50 percent, yet only one-third of adults are getting screened. Because colorectal cancer typically doesn't have any symptoms, a colonoscopy is the only way to find the disease while it’s still treatable. “Colorectal cancer discovered early in its course is completely curable, and the only way to do that is to get screened,” said Eric Johnson, colon and rectal surgeon with MultiCare Colon and Rectal Surgery. Starting at age 50, both men and women should get a colonoscopy every 10 years, unless they’re at high risk for colorectal cancer or have a condition that needs to be monitored. Is the procedure really as bad as its reputation would suggest? In a nutshell, no. Yet fears and misconceptions persist. Here are the top five. TOP 5 MYTHS AND FEARS 1. Colonoscopies aren’t safe — and they might hurt. One of the most common concerns people have is that something will go wrong during a colonoscopy. “It's one of the safest procedures that we do,” said Johnson. “Colonoscopies aren’t painful, just inconvenient,” says Leung. “With current medications, people are quite comfortable.” A colonoscopy is a benign procedure performed in an outpatient setting, and only takes about 20-30 minutes. Most patients are mildly sedated and don't feel

the colonoscopy. This approach is much easier on patients. 5. I’ll have to take a lot of time off work. Most people only need to miss one day of work for a colonoscopy. “The prep time is not usually time you can be productive,” said Leung. But, he points out, you can usually wait until the evening to take the first dose of prep solution, so missing work the day before is not usually necessary. The day of the colonoscopy is spent at the clinic and recovering from sedation at home, but there are typically no ill effects from the procedure. Most people return to work the next day. BOTTOM LINE: DON’T SKIP OUT ON SCREENING According to the American Cancer Society, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is about 5 percent for men and 4.5 percent for women. “That doesn’t sound like much,” said Leung, “But that’s a 1 in 20 chance.”

any pain. 2. I’m afraid to get a colonoscopy in case I get diagnosed with cancer. “A colonoscopy in no way increases your chances of being diagnosed with cancer,” said Leung. “But it can prevent cancer by finding polyps.” Although one of the aims of colonoscopy is to detect colorectal cancer, the primary purpose is to detect polyps — small growths on the surface of the colon — that could become cancerous. These polyps occur in about 30 percent of the population. During a colonoscopy, a long, flexible tube is inserted into the anus to examine the entire rectum and colon with a viewing scope. If polyps are detected, they are easily removed while the procedure is taking place to prevent cancer from occurring. 3. It’s too embarrassing. Physicians and nurses understand

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that a colonoscopy is a potentially embarrassing experience for patients, and do all they can to make them comfortable — from providing a curtain for undressing, a private room, blankets to stay warm and covered and the ability to select a male or female physician. It can also help to remember that physicians perform thousands of colonoscopies each year and consider the colon the same way they would any other organ.

GET SCREENED TODAY MultiCare, in partnership with the American Cancer Society, is committed to increasing the screening rate for colon cancer. Getting screened is your best option for early detection, when treatment is most likely to be successful. Together, we’re working toward the shared goal of getting 80 percent of adults (50 and older) screened for colorectal cancer by 2018.

4. I won’t be able to drink the prep solution. The purpose of prep solution is to cleanse the colon so that even the smallest of polyps can be identified and removed during the colonoscopy. Once upon a time, patients were required to drink a gallon of prep solution the day before the procedure. Today, most patients drink small-volume preps in split doses: one taken the night before and one the morning of

MORE INFORMATION Visit multicare.org/cancer-colorectal for more information about colorectal cancer, prevention, detection and treatments. MultiCare Health System is a not-forprofit health care organization with more than 11,000 employees and a comprehensive network of services throughout Pierce, South King, Thurston and Kitsap counties.

Tacoma

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By Adam Peters Tacoma - If you’re like most renters, you feel trapped within the walls of a house or apartment that doesn’t feel like yours. How could it when you’re not even permitted to bang in a nail or two without a hassle. You feel like you’re stuck in the renter’s rut with no way of rising up out of it and owning your own home. Well don’t feel trapped any more! A new FREE Special Report entitled “How to Stop Paying Rent and Own Your Own Home” has already helped dozens of local renters get out from under their landlord’s finger, and move into a wonderful home they can truly call their own. You can make this move too by discovering the important steps detailed in this FREE Special Report. It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been renting, or how insurmountable your financial situation may seem. With the help of this report, it will become suddenly clear to you how you really can save for the down payment and stop wasting thousands of dollars on rent. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1-800-5301015 and enter 9001. You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Get your free special report and stop wasting thousands of dollars on rent NOW. This report is courtesy of RE*USA NW. Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently under contract. Copyright © 2017. PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 21, 2017

Our View

UNHEARD VOICES CAN STILL BRING THUNDER It was a year ago that Northwest Innovation Works officially called off its plans to build what would have been the largest natural gas to methanol plant in the world at Tacoma’s Tideflats during a time when any and all public meetings even remotely connected to the plant were flooded with angry protesters and sign wavers. Port and city officials then promised more openness and transparency in future development plans, particularly involving large projects located on Tacoma’s waterways. They even took some baby steps, but trust was already lost. Those limited changes didn’t calm the storm of frustration and criticism. They fed them, particular as focus shifted away from methanol to liquefied natural gas (LNG) and the less-than-transparent marketing blitz by Puget Sound Energy about the glories of all things natural gas. Lawsuits, countersuits, signature drives and more lawsuits came and went. Storm clouds of discontent continued to build. Like-minded neighbors began organizing. Those groups then formed movements. Those movements then formed coalitions. They are now preparing for a revolution, targeting City Council and Port of Tacoma Commission seats so their worries and voices get heard. Sure, they are unlikely to topple the seats of power locally, but there are three seats up for grabs at the Port of Tacoma and five open seats on the ninemember Tacoma City Council, including the mayor’s chair. Just one seat on either dais could change the conversation about the role of Tacoma’s waterfront when it comes to job creation and environmental stewardship. Even if the coalition of environmentally minded groups fails to seat a single candidate on the council or the port commission, it seems that both governments are finally starting to take them seriously. The city and the port are working on the details of a review of the land-use documents that ultimately determine what developments and activities will be allowed on the waterfront. While news of that process seems promising, people should be reminded that the process to revise those rules could take as long as two years. That’s plenty of time for projects to move forward under the current zoning rules. Certainly the city and port could shorten that process or at least announce a moratorium on potential fossil fuel or coal exporting projects while the subarea plan process chugs through the review process.

CORRECTION The photos in the April 14 story “PLU MediaLab holds free screening of environmental film� were incorrectly credited. They were taken by Kelly Lavelle. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for the error.

TACOMAWEEKLY Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma, WA 98421 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305 PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Larry LaRue / larry@tacomaweekly.com Duncan Rolfson / duncan@tacomaweekly.com ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dave Davison, Chance Pittenger, Matt Kite, Josh Reisberg, Randy Rutledge COPY EDITING John Larson CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar WEB DEVELOPER Ed Curran, Miguel Douglas PHOTOGRAPHERS Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard, David Turnipseed ADVERTISING Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Marlene Carrillo-Yeam / marlene@tacomaweekly.com Andrea Jay / andrea@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. For questions or concerns about delivery, please call Josh at (253) 228-1709.

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Guest Editorial

WHAT PUGET SOUND ENERGY IS NOT TELLING US ABOUT LNG PLANT SAFETY OR

LIAR, LIAR, PORT ON FIRE? By Steven Storms

For many months there has been a conflict about the dangers the liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant might create. Puget Sound Energy keeps claiming that any potential hazard will be contained within the 550-foot property line. They claim that they have run computer models to prove it. Their results are contrary to nearly every legitimate industry or safety standard published in the world. Dr. Jerry Havens, a world-renowned expert in LNG safety and author of many of the modeling programs, describes it better than anyone. His recommendation for a smaller 3 million gallon spill (the LNG storage tank in Tacoma is 8 million gallons) is, “It must be emphasized that the three-mile distance recommended here is based primarily on the assumption that approximately 3,000,000 gallons of LNG is spilled onto water, as it appears there is little doubt that either pool fire radiation, thermal fluxes or flammable vapor clouds from such a spill could put the public in harm’s way out to that distance. However, it is a minimum specification, because it does not address the possibility of more serious events which could occur.� Havens also says that there is a cozy relationship that allows the models to show whatever is needed to fit the plant site. "We believe that we have already reached the condition in LNG safety regulation where the determination of the design spill is effectively inseparable from the determination of the amount of land that the facility operator can purchase to ensure that the public cannot intrude on. And, most importantly, the methodology for determining the ‘maximum’ design spills that must be planned for appear to have evolved based on far-less than-scientific reasoning processes.� Even in their own documents, PSE knows that their claim of a 550-foot hazard zone is not totally honest. Extracts from their “Fire Protection Evaluation� report show they actually know that there is a much larger danger. Section 2.1 “Liquefied Natural Gas Hazards� states: “Explosion, fire and thermal radiation hazards will exist due to this flammable air-gas mixture. Gas at concentrations within the upper and lower flammable limits can travel for long distances.� Section 5. “Fire Scenarios With Firefighting Equipment� states: “It should be remembered that although methane or natural gas has a relatively high ignition temperature (above 1,000 F or 538 C), it requires very little energy to ignite a combustible natural gas mixture. For example, the sparks from static electrical charge on clothing, from a nail in a shoe, or from the switch in a non-hazard flashlight, are all potential ignition sources.� Section 8.4 in their report describes “Responding to an Uncontrollable Liquefied Natural Gas Spill.� This section says, “In the unlikely event of a major liquefied natural gas spill from the liquefied natural gas tank, the facility should be evacuated. The wind speed and the spill volume will affect the distance that the vapor cloud will travel. With higher wind speed the vapor cloud will disperse in a shorter distance than with a low wind speed. However, if the wind speed is low, the lower explosive limit may be attained and if an ignition source exists, the vapor will ignite.� These are the exact results that were obtained when an independent computer model was run using the same model that the Tacoma Fire Department uses. The model showed that a four-inch hole in the LNG storage tank using the weather

conditions on the day the model was run (Aug. 29, 2016) would create an explosive vapor cloud that would extend 3.5 miles from the plant site. PSE knows that there is a much greater safety hazard than they publicize. They describe it in their own internal reports, but deny it to the public. They just cannot afford to let the public know. Descriptions of 3,000° F fires that will melt steel and cause instant death within a 2,000-foot radius would not be helpful to their public approval. Releasing information, that within a 7,000-foot radius, it will give humans second-degree burns within 30 seconds and catch houses on fire would not win supporters. These are actual numbers from the Sandia Report commissioned by the U.S. government to study the effects of a LNG fire. It is also supported by the safety report done by the attorney general of Rhode Island when they were threatened with an LNG plant within their port in Providence. The proposed LNG plant could not have found a worse site. Not only is the general public threatened by the close proximity, the whole industrial port area is put at risk. To make matters worse, it is located adjacent to the TARGA Sound Terminal, which is a tank farm that holds more than 40 million gallons of fossil fuels. This is right at the 3,000-degree hazard zone that will melt steel. (The melting point of steel is closer to 2,500° F and it will begin to soften at about 1,000° F) Any catastrophe that would combine the two plants is almost inconceivable. In fact the total fuel sources located in the port almost ensure that if one large plant is engulfed in fires or explosions, the cascading effect would spread throughout the port. The proposed reopening of the fire station next to the LNG plant would be of little help, because it also is within the 3,000-degree zone and would be one of the first to be incinerated. Even if it survived, a LNG fire cannot be controlled with water. Only dry chemicals can be used and there are not enough dry chemicals in the city or the state to fight a large LNG fire. Firefighters would not be able to get close enough, due to the high temperatures, to do anything except to help evacuate. While this sounds apocalyptic, it is the scenario described in the Providence, RI safety study. We need for PSE to be truthful. We need to know what the consequences are from an “uncontrollable liquefied natural spill� as described in their “Fire Protection Evaluation.� PSE claimed that their LNG plant could be a terrorist target and I take them at their word. The worst-case scenario might include an attack on the 8 million gallon storage tank. I am sure that PSE would never willingly release any results from a worst-case scenario because the results would be too damaging. If the City or the Fire Department is not willing to require the information for the public to judge the risk, it is time to look elsewhere. It might take our attorney general to step in, much like in Rhode Island. Maybe a lawsuit is the only way to find the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Steven Storms has a bachelors degree in chemical engineering and was a licensed Professional Engineer. He had nearly 40 years of experience working in heavy industry with a good portion of that in the energy and environmental fields. He retired as the project director of process evaluation. He is also past Chairman of the Puget Sound chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers He is a resident of Northeast Tacoma.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, (Re: “Obamacare: What happens now?� by Katie Ladenburg, Tacoma Weekly, April 14) Katie Ladenburg raises excellent questions about health care and what will happen if the Affordable Care Act is repealed without a replacement, or even with a replacement. It depends on us using our voices as shown by the defeat of the first Trumpcare plan that would have caused 24 million Americans to lose their health care. What comes next? How about we ask for affordable health

care for all Americans, not one that includes tax breaks for the rich and cuts millions from their health care insurance. In a recent study by the Congressional Management Foundation, it was shown that when constituents speak to their elected representatives in person, on the phone, or by writing a letter, it has the most powerful effect on their decision making. So let’s write those letters, make those calls, go to those town halls, and get health care for all Americans! Willie Dickerson Snohomish, WA

E-MAIL US YOUR OPINIONS! Tacoma Weekly welcomes your opinions, viewpoints and letters to the editor. You can e-mail us at news@ tacomaweekly.com. Please include your name, address and phone number when submitting your letter.


Friday, April 21, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

Camp scholarships available for young eco�adventurers For the past five years, Pierce County Parks and Recreation in partnership with Pierce County Planning and Public Works Department have organized the Eco Explorers Adventure Camp for kids at Chambers Creek Regional Park. Through exploration, adventure and creative play, each day offers exciting new experiences that will challenge participants’ abilities and help build their skills in sensory awareness, earth stewardship, wilderness survival, emergency response, science investigation and much more. With support from UP Cares, this outdoor adventure camp has received funding that will provide local youth ages 5 to 14 the opportunity to experience the great outdoors in this fun-filled setting. All you need to do is: 1. Pick the week you are interested in attending: Week 1 – Young explorers ages 5-8, June 26-30, University Place, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., fee: $95 Week 3 – Junior Explorers ages 10-14, July 24-28, University Place, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., fee $120 2. Send in your scholarship application 3. Get approved for the fun!

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Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 21, 2017

Home & Garden

WILLOW TREE GARDENS AND INTERIORS By Duncan Rolfson

duncan@tacomaweekly.com

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ocated at 7216 27th St. W. in University Place, this full-service nursery is truly a one-stop shop. Everything in house has been optimized for our Pacific Northwest weather, and the horticultural techniques critical for maintaining them. Just flag anyone on staff for any questions, no matter how specific they may be, and the staff will gladly assist in finding the answer for you. From perennials, to annuals, shrubs and succulents, the lengthy vine of options at Willow Tree Gardens is seemingly endless. The actual lot for Willow Tree is quite large, enough space for an open area holding large potted trees and shrubs, and two very large greenhouses containing the plethora of colorful flower options. Jenn Zimmerman, owner and horticultural expert, says, “We offer a wide variety of plants from the everyday options on up to rare and unusual plants.� A quick tour around the facility delivers that message eloquently, with conifer shrubs and bonsai-style flowers rubbing shoulder to shoulder. Though our

weather is tricky, the experts at Willow Tree have your back when it comes to properly establishing and maintaining a healthy garden in your own lawn. “Here at Willow Tree Gardens you will find every item necessary for getting a healthy, vigorous garden up and running, from tools and soil on up to amendments, pesticides, animal repellants and so much more,� Zimmerman said. Not only do they offer some amazingly varied garden fare, but there is also a wonderful little gift shop where one may score a sweet lamp, jewelry or even lotions and other topicals infused

with thyme. “We offer an array of items in our gift shop, including our amazing handmade wreaths made by our one and only Marilyn,� she said. Willow Tree truly has a gifted staff, among an amazing array of beautiful flowers, vegetable and fruit starts, and unique ornamentals by the wheel-barrel full, ready to assist in any garden related arena. You can even pick your plants, pots and soil for them to plant for you. So get the family together, strap your boots on, and come explore Willow Tree and take a leap of faith when it comes to your next garden additions.

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Friday, April 21, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

Home & Garden

ENGAGE KIDS’ LOVE OF NATURE THROUGH BIRD FEEDING

DITCH THEIR DEVICES AND GET THEM OUTDOORS and observe results. Kids will see plenty more birds visiting and less waste under the feeder. The experiment can help teach kids that not everything low priced is a good deal.

Is it difficult to pry your kids away from their electronic devices to get them outdoors? From tots to teens, today’s kids love their electronics. After all, where could you find anything to compete with the bright sights and sounds of their favorite video game? The answer may be no farther than your backyard and the brightly colored songbirds visiting during warm weather. Interacting with nature helps kids in many ways, from helping them understand science concepts and care for the environment, to lifelong physical and mental health benefits. One of the easiest, most enjoyable ways for children to interact with nature is to feed wild birds right in their backyard. “Feeding birds, planting gardens, anything you do with children that’s nature-oriented helps them understand their connection to the natural world,” says Elaine Cole, president of Cole’s Wild Bird Products. Cole learned her own love of wild birds by feeding them with her father, company founder and birding expert, Richard Cole. Cole’s offers some tips to help engage kids’ love of nature through bird feeding:

Ultimately, feeding wild birds should be fun for families. Here are some types of bird feed that should appeal to children’s interests:

• Suet - While today’s high-energy

suet comes in different, convenient forms, like Cole’s Nutberry Suet, and Suet Kibbles, kids will love the idea of serving up a big hunk of fat in the form of a Suet cake. Kids can stick it directly on tree bark and branches, which they’ll find fun!

• Seeds - Many songbirds prefer

seeds. Serving high-quality seed, like black oil sunflower, can help attract songbirds. Learn more about seed mixes and birds who love them.

• Dried mealworms - The early

bird may get the worm, but birds, such as bluebirds, flickers and nuthatches, prefer a tasty treat like dried mealworms. Kids will get a kick out of filling up feeders with something yucky-looking for their feathered friends.

• Get kids off the couch, ditch their

devices and introduce them to their backyard! Tell children what type of location is best for a birdfeeder, then let them hunt for the spot. Choose a location where a feeder can be seen from indoors (so they can enjoy watching their feathered friends), yet is safe from predators. Let math and critical thinking skills come into play by measuring the distance from the door to the feeder and from the feeder to the nearest shrubs where predators could hide and trees where birds can shelter.

• Take the opportunity to teach the importance of good nutrition - for the child and the bird! Explain how good nutrition helps living creatures stay healthy and energized. Help them understand the nutritional value of food they eat by explaining what birds like to eat and how birds need a healthy diet of nutritious food options like Cole’s Wild Bird Feed to support their health and well-being.

• Help kids understand wild birds have

food preferences just as they do. Talk about how some birds like to eat

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRANDPOINT

GET OUTDOORS. Kids of all ages will get a kick out of providing food for our feathered friends by engaging some simple home projects.

bugs, grubs and worms, while others prefer berries and some like seed.

• The feeder you choose will influ-

ence the kind of birds that visit. Many types of birds will visit a bowl feeder, and its open shape makes it quick and easy for kids to fill with any type of feed and clean. Giving children the task of filling and cleaning feeders can teach them responsibility and basic life skills, plus they’ll take ownership of the feeder and nurturing backyard birds.

• You can also use bird feeding to help kids understand concepts of finance, including spending their money wisely. Try an

experiment with them; buy a bag of cheap birdseed, fill the feeder and watch what happens. Fewer birds will visit and a mound of waste - the filler in cheap feed - will pile up under the feeder. Then replace the cheap feed with a Cole’s seed mix

“My dad got me hooked on bird feeding by challenging me to identify as many birds at the feeder as possible,” Cole says. “I did the same thing with my kids. My dad recently gave my 10-yearold daughter a birding journal. She loves to identify all the birds she knows and anything interesting about them. “Kids taking part in attracting birds to their backyard is great fun; they’ll love getting out of the house, taking charge of their new feathered friends and they’ll learn a lot of good lessons through the process.”


Section A • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 21, 2017

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Friday, April 21, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

t Awards From page A1

Clinic for Veterans aims to lessen these burdens by providing assistance with legal issues affecting common and basic human needs. Volunteer attorneys and support staff from the office, with the Tacoma Pierce County Bar Association’s Volunteer Legal Services, staff the free monthly clinic. “The need for legal assistance will continue as more service members return to civilian life,” said Lindquist. “Those who have given so much to our country deserve our support.” In addition to assisting in the clinic for veterans, prosecutor’s office staff volunteer in their communities in a variety of ways, including serving on non-profit boards, volunteer fire departments, and local government councils. “Community service is not a 9 to 5

job, and it’s not about money,” said award presenter Sylvia Eichman reading from the nomination letter. “Many in our office generously donate their time and volunteer in the community to help those who need help. It’s more than just a way of doing business, it’s an office-wide culture that is widely embraced.” The second award is Boss of the Year, 2017, presented to Lindquist. The award is presented to one outstanding boss who “exemplifies professionalism and leadership at its finest.” “It seems easy for Mark to make people believe. His attitude, dedication, drive, and initiative are infectious, but he does so almost effortlessly,” said award presenter Tiffany Johnston reading from the nomination letter. “He goes about his day, shoulders the weight and responsibility of the office, and invites others to look on and see the way a real public servant conducts himself.” “Our office is blessed with many servant leaders,” said Lindquist. “We are committed to being life-long learners who make our community stronger and safer.”

t Protests From page A1

have to be.” The deadline for candidates to file campaign documents is May 19, which could come with many candidates filing at the last minute after they size up the candidates who have already filed. Petitions and candidate cultivation hasn’t taken the place of good, old fashioned protests and rallies. Those continue on a regular basis. A protest at the site of Puget Sound Energy’s LNG construction site last week included members of RedLine Tacoma, Save Tacoma Water and the Green Party Tahoma that was cosponsored by Direct Action Tacoma, an umbrella group that organizes nonviolent direct action such as protests and forums on environmental, social, economic and racial justice issues.

t Dining From page A1

largest outreach and fundraising efforts of the year with all proceeds directly benefiting their programs and services available in the South Sound. PCAF Development Coordinator Hannah Febach said of their mission, “PCAF, through education and service, prevents HIV infection, assists persons affected by HIV and AIDS, addresses related health problems, and combats associated stigma and discrimination by providing these services. The services are provided at one of our two locations, an office in Tacoma and an office in Olympia, through which we serve people affected by HIV in Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Lewis counties.” The PCAF website clarifies more so, stating: “We’re dedicated to assisting persons living with HIV to meet their needs for food, housing, healthcare, and personal support. We also provide extensive outreach, education and prevention programs including free HIV testing to help stop the spread of HIV and work to combat HIV related stigma.” Dining Out for Life isn’t just a Pierce County phenomenon. The event occurs nationwide on the final Thursday in April annually in more than 60 cities. Participating establishments can donate anywhere from 25 to 100 per-

t Comics From page A1

thought about buying a gym and running it together,” said Matt, now 36. “But I”m not sure he planned on leaving the Seals. He loved them, loved being one.” A few years ago, Matt began thinking of a new line of work – opening a comic book store. Mike had been a collector, an artist, and had spent time teaching Matt about the hobby. “He knew what comics to buy and put away,” Matt said. “He understood all that way before I did.” Matt began buying collections, selling comics on Facebook or from the trunk of his car, keeping the best ones for a shop that didn’t yet exist. A good friend, 30-year-old Jesse Ruano, was into comics, too. His passion, however, was in a game, Magic: The Gathering. “I was working for Microsoft and Uber, driving around the country taking photos of roads and streets,” Ruano said. “Once we started talking about a comics store, I’d stop in to check them out wherever I’d been sent.” They made a list of things they saw and liked in stores, and things they didn't like. “Most of them were kind of dark and cramped,” Matt said. “And older comics all had a cardboard backing and a plastic wrapper to protect them. None of the newest comics did. “That meant if you wanted a brand new comic to put away, you had to go through all of them looking for the best one because they’d all been pawed through.” The two found a huge storefront in Spanaway at 15022 Pacific Ave. S., in the Goodwill Plaza. Diane Tatham had watched them do the preliminary work, and helped them with a loan. “They worked for more than two years, and I was really proud of them,” she said.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PCAF

In Olympia on April 27? Eat at Ramblin Jacks.

“They’re perfect partners. They trust each other and aren’t afraid of hard work.” Putting the shop together, Matt unveiled the name and logo. “CoMiks: The Gathering,” it was called. And in between the ‘k’ and ‘s’ was a tiny ‘e.’ Though you couldn’t see the letter ‘e’ at a glance, it made the name official. “Every comic we sell, everything that goes out the front door, will have my brother Mike’s name on it,” Matt said. Inside, the store is huge, well lit and a bit quirky. “We wanted to make it a family experience, so we put a Lego bin in the back for the littlest customers,” Matt said. “They see it, they don’t want to leave.” There are also four long tables near the back. For games and gamers, and though Saturday and Sunday are official game days – show up, join in, learn and compete – Ruano plays whenever someone asks and he has time. Magic is the preferred game, and cards are for sale, but no one needs to buy anything to play. There are bins of old comics, some of them just 50 cents a copy, and brand new comics and graphic novels, T-shirts, action figures and statues. “Every comic book you buy here is ‘bagged and boarded,’” Matt said, laughing. “That way you have a good chance of starting with this week's comic in near-mint condition.” The two men agreed upon one other addition to the shop – Buster. “I found him five years ago in a puddle,” Matt said of his dog. “He sleeps about 18 hours a day in his own bed. “He’s a dog who loves everyone, but especially little kids. They’re his size, and he’ll walk up and lick their nose. I’ve seen little girls steal a toy from him mouth.” Matt and Ruano had a “soft opening” for the shop on March 15, and neither has had a day off since. “We knew what we wanted, what we

“It doesn’t seem like our elected officials are protecting us,” organizer Sarah Morken said. “And that’s not right.” While the protest was held outside of the LNG site, the overall protest was against fracked gas in general and the promotion of fossil fuels over more renewable energy sources. Among the protesters were members of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, which has been in a drawn out legal battle over environmental safety concerns and questions about construction activities at the former Superfund site leading to contamination leeching into the waterway. “It’s our responsibility to stop this,” Morken said, noting that the protests could take on elements of the Standing Rock protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline through the Sioux Reservation’s primary drinking water source, the Missouri River. “We would rather not have to do something like that.”

cent of proceeds to benefit the cause, though all money raised locally stays local. This year marks the 23rd year that PCAF has hosted the event in the South Sound. The list of participating establishments is diverse and includes more than 40 options in this region. Olympians can stay local with places like Dillinger’s Cocktails and Kitchen and Traditions Café. Early bird Tacomans can begin bright-eyed and bushy-tailed with breakfast staples like Old Milwaukee Café or Marcia’s Silver Spoon. Adventurous diners can go international with places like East West Café and Gateway to India. Indulge during your lunch break with pick-me-ups like the Red Hot or Happy Belly. Or even make a date night or ladies night out of it and dine with Primo Grill, sip ice cold brews at 7 Seas Brewing or enjoy a wee dram with Heritage Distilling Company. If you can’t make it out to dine out with friends during festivities, you can still contribute to the cause by making a donation. Febach says, “We will have volunteers stationed at restaurants talking to diners about the event and giving them the opportunity to donate. If, for any reason, a diner doesn’t connect with a volunteer while dining out, they can still donate online.” For more details about the Pierce County AIDS Foundation or to make a donation or view the full list of participating restaurants visit www.diningoutforlife.com/ southsound.

needed to learn was what the community wanted,” Ruano said. “The only downside to working 30 days in a row is your laundry starts to pile up.” The shop is open daily, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. on Sundays. They have averaged 30-40 customers per day, and their grand opening is April 29. They’ll give away as many as 400 comics, as many as 180 graphic novels. Buster will be there. Diane will be there,

too, for both her sons and Ruano. “She doesn’t know much about comics, but she comes in every few days and talks to us, to customers,” Matt said. “She’s the only person that gets Buster excited.” Matt fields a question, mulls it a moment. “I don’t know that Mike ever would have wanted to own a shop like this, but he’d have loved coming in,” Matt said. “The shop honors him. In a way, it started with him back when we were kids.”

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SI DE TH E

Sports

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 2017

RAINIERS GO BOOM HOME STAND JUST WHAT TACOMA NEEDED

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 12

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

HOME AGAIN. (top-left) Starting pitcher Chase De Jong put in five innings of stellar work against Albuquerque on Monday, April 17. The 23-year old right hander scattered just five hits, gave up a single earned run and struck out five Isotope batters. (top-right) De Jong and catcher Steve Baron get their pitch signs in order. (bottom-left) First baseman D.J. Peterson charges a grounder. (bottom-right) Shortstop Tyler Smith kicks in the afterburners on his way to third base. See more photos on page A15. By Josiah Rutledge Tacoma Weekly Correspondent

A

trip home to Cheney Stadium proved to be just what the doctor ordered for the Tacoma Rainiers, as their opening road trip was marred by rain and early-season struggles as they fell three games to one to the Sacramento RiverCats in their opening series of the season. Though it wasn’t quite the fast start the defending Pacific Coast League Northern Division champs had hoped for, they were able to turn it around upon arriving in Tacoma, taking three out of four from the El Paso Chihuahuas in their first home series of the season. The home opener saw top prospect Tyler O’Neill smash the first of what will likely be many home runs at Cheney for the 21-year old outfield phenom (provided the Mariners don’t require his services too soon) en route to a 7-2 victory. The next day was scheduled to be the return of outfielder Boog Powell from his 80-game suspension that had begun in June of 2016. However, that day’s game was rained out, forcing a doubleheader of two, seven-inning games on Thursday, April, 13, the Rainiers’ second such doubleheader of the season. Though righthander Sam Gaviglio pitched admirably in the first game, tossing seven innings of one-run ball, Tacoma was unable to scratch across even a single run against El Paso right-handers Matt Magill and Phil Maton, who combined for a shutout, saddling Gaviglio with a complete game loss in his season debut. Like the first game of the day, the second also featured a dominant, complete game effort from the Rainiers starter, as Chris Heston spun seven scoreless innings with six strikeouts to silence the Chihuahua bats. Unlike earlier in the day, however, the Rainier offense was able to get it going for a

four-run, fifth inning highlighted by RBI doubles from Gordon Beckham, Daniel Vogelbach and DJ Peterson, the last of which drove in both Vogelbach and O’Neill to give Tacoma a 4-0 lead. They were able to scratch across an additional run in the sixth inning behind a walk by Powell and singles by Beckham and Vogelbach, extending the lead to 5-0 and giving Heston enough support to earn him the victory in his Rainier debut and push the club’s record to 3-4. The finale of the four-game set against El Paso proved to be a thriller. A sacrifice fly by O’Neill in the bottom of the first gave the Rainiers a quick 1-0 lead, but El Paso’s Rafael Ortega quickly matched it with an RBI double to score teammate Collin Cowgill, evening the score at 1-1, where it remained as Tacoma’s Dylan Unsworth, Emilio Pagan, Nick Hagadone (a graduate of Sumner High School), Casey Fien, Dean Kiekhefer and Mark Lowe traded zeroes with Dinelson Lamet, Logan Bawcom and Andre Rienzo until the ninth inning. Entering to pitch the bottom of the ninth, El Paso southpaw Keith Hessler struck out third baseman Zach Shank, but then allowed walks to catcher Tuffy Gosewisch, Powell and Vogelbach sandwiched around a flyout by Beckham. This set up a bases loaded, two-out situation for O’Neill. On a 1-2 pitch from Hessler, O’Neill hit a high pop-up into the middle of the diamond right in front of the pitcher’s mound. Thanks to some miscommunication between Hessler, catcher Rocky Gale and third baseman Cory Spangenberg, along with some fortuitous aid from the winds at Cheney, the ball dropped two feet away from Hessler, allowing Gosewisch, who had been going from the moment bat hit ball with two outs, to score the winning run, giving the Rainiers a walk-off victory. The next day the Rainiers began their three-game series against the Albuquerque Isotopes, as Ryan Weber

toed the mound for Tacoma against German Marquez, the No. 69 prospect in baseball and No. 4 in the Colorado Rockies organization, according to MLB.com. Marquez stymied the Rainier offense almost completely, racking up seven strikeouts and allowing just two baserunners. Fortunately, however, his outing was short-lived, as he was replaced after just 3.1 innings by Sam Moll. On the other side of the ledger, Weber didn’t have the flashy strikeout total of his counterpart, fanning just three, but he was just as effective, tossing five scoreless innings. In the sixth inning, Weber was relieved by Dillon Overton (who began his season with the parent club in Seattle before being optioned to Tacoma in order to clear roster space for Tony Zych’s activation from the 10-day disabled list). Overton continued the trend of dominant Rainier pitching, tossing scoreless frames in the sixth, seventh and eighth innings. The Rainiers got on the board for Overton in the sixth inning with an RBI single by Vogelbach that scored Powell, and they were able to tack on a second run later in the inning when Ben Gamel’s sacrifice fly scored Beckham. Carrying that 2-0 lead into the ninth inning, manager Pat Listach handed the ball over to veteran closer Jean Machi, who got the job done despite allowing singles to Pat Valaika and Noel Cuevas, giving Overton the win in his Rainier debut. With a chance to clinch their second straight series win, the Rainiers turned to right-hander Chase De Jong, a righthander who was thrown into the fire in a 13th inning save situation in his Major League debut for the Mariners earlier this season in place of Overton (who was on paternity leave) and eventually allowed a walk-off three-run homer to the Astros’ George Springer. Making his second start for the Rainiers, De Jong was up to the task, striking out six

u See RAINIERS / page A14

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

MUFASSA. (top) Bellarmine senior Kyle

Casey wound up this blast from the left angle and bent it just inside the right post for one of his incredible five goals in the match against Olympia. Casey had a hat trick with 10 minutes to spare in the first half. (second-down) Senior Tyler Vu battles for control of the ball in the muck. (third-down) The mud flies when players take to the air for a header. (bottom) Senior Max Hilger with a beautiful slide tackle.

CASEY’S FIVE GOALS PUSH LIONS NEAR TOP By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

It has been a difficult spring so far for many high school sports around Tacoma. If a student-athlete happens to play a sport that includes a mitt or a racquet around these parts, he or she has spent quite a bit of time cooling their heels back at home following another rainout. One thing the young folks around here haven’t quite figured out yet is that March and April are often a black hole for baseball, softball and tennis. Given time, they’ll learn this tough fact. That being stated, sports such as track and field, lacrosse, water polo and soccer see no issues with inclement weather. If it’s nasty out, you can still bet that those youngsters will be out there giving it their all, even if it’s in the face of 25-mile per hour winds, with some driving rain as a side dish. Of course, throw in a lightning storm or a tornado, and these events are going to be postponed. On Tuesday, April 17, it looked as though something wicked had just blown into town and the soccer games for the day and evening were going to be cancelled. It was 45 minutes before match time and as this reporter made his way to Bellarmine Prep, the skies began dumping a fierce hailstorm that was accompanied by the crackle and boom

u See SOCCER / page A14


Friday, April 21, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

Sportswatch SOUNDERS U23 TO FACE OSA IN US OPEN CUP OPENER IN MAY

The Sounders U23 team will face the Olympic Soccer Academy (OSA) in the first round of the 2017 Lamar Hunt US Open Cup on May 10 at Seattle Memorial Stadium. Kick off for the game will be 7:30 p.m. Winner of the first round matchup hosts Reno 1868 FC of the USL in the second round on May 17. For the third time since inception in 2012, the Sounders U23 will compete in the Lamar Hunt US Open Cup. In 2013, the defending PDL Western Conference champions fell to the Charlotte Eagles of the USL in Charlotte, N.C. after advancing to play professional competition. The 2015 run in the cup stopped at Kitsap SC after dispatching Outbreak FC from the USASA ranks in California. OSA is a NPSL team playing primarily out of French Field in Kent after playing games in Pierce County during the 2015 NPSL season. The 2016 NPSL NW Conference champions will look to build on a successful 2016 season with the addition of former PDL club and Kitsap SC joining the NPSL along with FCM Portland, PDX FC, Pierce County FC, and the Spokane Shadow. OSA is coached by Paul Aur and Giuseppe Pezzano is the owner of the team. “The Open Cup is always an honor to be a part of and we will look to create an entertaining game against OSA as our college players make their way here in May,” said Darren Sawatzky, Sounders U23 head coach and general manager, “OSA has done well in the NPSL and we look forward to the competition.” To find the PDL schedule and purchase tickets to the Sounders U23 regular season, go to www.soundersu23. com.

RAINIERS UNVEIL 2017 TACOMA PUBLIC SCHOOLS JERSEY

The Tacoma Rainiers announced the winner of the 2017 Tacoma Public Schools Jersey Design Contest winner as Franklin Elementary School fifth grader, Isayas Hampton. Isayas’ winning jersey design, featuring silhouettes of numerous iconic Tacoma landmarks, will be worn on-field by Tacoma Rainiers players and coaching staff on Friday, May 26 as part of the festivities for Tacoma Public Schools Night at Cheney Stadium. Prior to the game, Isayas will be presented with a personalized jersey emblazoned with his design, take a VIP tour of Cheney Stadium, and be given the opportunity to throw out the ceremonial first pitch. The specialty jerseys will be made available for purchase through a silent auction held on the night of the game, with proceeds benefiting Palmer Scholars. “Our annual jersey design contest is a favorite of mine and our entire staff,” Rainiers Team President Aaron Artman said. “It’s a great way to engage with our youth and provide a fun opportunity for students. Tacoma Public Schools has done, and continues to do, great work in our community. We’re very proud to play a part in that.” Join the Tacoma Rainiers and support Tacoma Public Schools with the purchase of group tickets to the Friday, May 26 contest by calling group event coordinator Lauren Hall at (253) 722-1047. Single-game tickets, season ticket options, group outings, and suite packages for the club’s 2017 season are available now and can be purchased by calling the Tacoma Rainiers front office at (253) 752-7707, online at www.tacomarainiers.com, or in person at the Cheney Stadium Box Office. The most up-to-date news and notes about the Rainiers leading up to and throughout the 2017 season can be found by following the Rainiers on Twitter (@RainiersLand) and liking the team on Facebook.

PLU WOMEN’S CREW REMAIN NEAR THE TOP NATIONALLY

The Pacific Lutheran University women’s rowing team’s varsity eight remains static at seventh in the nation in the fourth installment of the Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association/US Rowing Coaches Poll, presented by Pocock Racing Shells. The Lutes secured 86 votes in the poll, remaining the top West Coast squad in the rankings and remaining seventh for the third consecutive week. Northwest Conference rival Lewis & Clark College is tied for 15th (10 points) while the University of Puget Sound sits just outside the Top 15 in the other receiving votes section. Bates College sits atop the poll with 148 points and nine of the 10 first place votes. Wesleyan University (134 points) and Williams College (123 points) remain second and third with Tufts University (116 points) in fourth. Ithaca College rounds out the top five, securing 114 points and the remaining first place vote. The Lutes are back on the water on Sunday, April 23, hosting the NWC Championships on American Lake.

MILLER EARNS THIRD NWC WEEKLY NOD OF THE SEASON FOR LUTES

For the third time this season, Pacific Lutheran University softball student-athlete Marissa Miller is the Northwest Conference Pitcher of the Week, securing the accolade on Monday after a dominant weekend inside the circle against crosstown rival University of Puget Sound. The Edgewood native concluded the weekend series with a 0.54 earned run average, striking out eight while collecting two complete game victories. Miller allowed

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just one earned run and struck out five in a 7-1 victory over the Loggers on Friday afternoon before capping off the weekend on Saturday by allowing no earned runs and fanning three in a 12-2 victory. Miller’s efforts helped the Lutes (20-14, 16-12 NWC) return to the NWC Tournament for the first time since 2013. Miller previously won NWC Pitcher of the Week on Feb. 6 and Mar. 6 while fellow pitcher Elli Rassbach claimed the award on Feb. 27 after tossing a no-hitter against Pacific University. The Lutes open postseason play on Friday, April 21, facing Linfield College at 2:30 p.m. in the doubleelimination NWC Tournament held in Spokane.

PLU’S HATTON EARNS SECOND NWC WEEKLY NOD BEFORE FINALS

The Northwest Conference released its weekly track and field award winners on Monday, April 17, with Pacific Lutheran University student-athlete Lucas Hatton securing NWC Field Athlete of the Week for the second time this season. The senior thrower secures the honor after winning two events on Saturday at the Lewis & Clark Invitational in Portland. The Eatonville native won the shot put with a season-best toss of 51 feet, one inch, while winning the hammer throw with a personal record heave of 169’ 7”. Hatton additionally placed fourth in the discus throw (134’ 5”). His performance helped the Lutes place second overall at the six-team meet, finishing four points shy of meet champion George Fox University. Hatton, who was the NWC Field Athlete of the Week on March 13, currently owns the best throw in the NWC in the hammer and ranks second in the conference and 25th nationally in the shot put. This marks the fifth time this season the Lutes have earned an NWC track and field weekly award. Brad Hodkinson won Track Athlete of the Week on April 10 and March 20, while Richard Johnson secured the honor on March 13. PLU returns to action on Friday, April 21, competing at day one of the 2017 NWC Championships in Spokane.

HASELWOOD AND JESSEN REPRESENT PLU AT NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Pacific Lutheran University women’s golf studentathletes Anna Jessen and Desirae Haselwood have had a lot on their plate recently. Two weeks ago, both Jessen and Haselwood had the opportunity to present their capstone research at the National Center for Undergraduate Research in Memphis, Tenn. The trip to Memphis was sandwiched around two weekend golf tournaments for the two seniors. Both Jessen and Haselwood submitted their abstracts last December and out of 4,000 applicants, were both picked to display their research. Jessen’s capstone focused on the viability of mass public transportation in the Puget Sound region, which was influenced by her experiences riding the bus to Seattle for internship last summer. Haselwood’s focused on golf and the attributes or skills that are most important for a PGA golfer’s ranking. “We were surrounded by so many smart and successful students who had done some brilliant research and it was really fun,” Haselwood said. “It was special because I really enjoyed my capstone project and was excited about the work I put into it so being able to present it at a national conference was really rewarding.” “There were students from all across the country and they were presenting in any discipline you could think of,” Jessen said. “I was very fortunate to be able to go with three other fellow economics majors.” The weekend prior to the research conference, both Jessen and Haselwood were hitting their stride on the golf course. Jessen shot a 158 (77-81) to finish third while Haselwood was two strokes back in sixth place (77-83), helping the Lutes to a third place showing at the Whitman Invitational in Walla Walla. However, unforeseen circumstances kept the two Lutes sidelined the following weekend for the Northwest Conference Spring Classic after getting stranded halfway across the country. As a result of a delayed flight due to weather, Jessen and Haselwood didn’t make it back in time for their tee time for day one of the Spring Classic. They watched their teammates from the sidelines as the Lutes placed fifth. Despite their absence, there was no disappointment from their coach, Sara Griffin, or their teammates. “They understand the hectic life of a college golfer and a graduating senior,” Griffin said. “I applaud them for all they do and I’m grateful that they are representing PLU.” Not too often do athletes miss competition due to extracurriculars, it usually is the other way around. However, Haselwood and Jessen as well as their teammates and coach understand that being accepted into this conference was an opportunity that they couldn’t pass up. That support was evident by the work Griffin did attempting to get them back in time, calling the airlines trying to work with them to get her players back home in time for the tournament. Although it didn’t work out, Haselwood and Jessen enjoyed supporting their teammates from the sidelines during the Sunday final round at the NWC Spring Classic. “I’ve really just tried to take things one day at a time because there is so much going on – golf, school, looking for jobs for post-graduation,” Haselwood said. “The beauty of Division III is the chance to be able to focus on school and athletics at the same time,” Jessen added. Jessen and Haselwood and the rest of the Lutes are back in action on Saturday, April 22 and Sunday, April 23, hosting the 2017 Northwest Conference Championships at the Tacoma Country and Golf Club. – By Dylan Foreman, PLU Sports

TACOMA’S HOT TICKETS APRIL 20 – 30 THURSDAY, APRIL 20 – FASTPITCH Wilson vs. Lincoln SERA Complex – 4 p.m. THURSDAY, APRIL 20 – SOCCER Mt. Tahoma vs. Wilson Stadium Bowl – 7:15 p.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 22 – BASEBALL Central Kitsap vs. Bellarmine Cheney Stadium – 12 p.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 22 – SOCCER Curtis vs. Bellarmine Bellarmine HS – 4 p.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 22 – MMA CageSport 45 Emerald Queen Casino – 7 p.m. MONDAY, APRIL 24 – BASEBALL Wilson vs. Stadium Heidelberg Field – 4 p.m. TUESDAY, APRIL 25 – SOCCER South Kitsap vs. Bellarmine Bellarmine HS – 4 p.m. TUESDAY, APRIL 25 – SOCCER Spanaway Lake vs. Lincoln Lincoln Bowl – 7 p.m. TUESDAY, APRIL 25 – SOCCER Bonney Lake vs. Stadium Stadium Bowl – 7:15 p.m. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26 – BASEBALL Spanaway Lake vs. Lincoln Heidelberg Field – 4 p.m. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26 – BASEBALL Bethel vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma HS – 4 p.m. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26 – BASEBALL Stadium vs. Wilson Wilson HS – 4 p.m. THURSDAY, APRIL 27 – FASTPITCH Lincoln vs. Stadium Peck Fields – 3:30 p.m. THURSDAY, APRIL 27 – SOCCER Stadium vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 6:30 p.m. THURSDAY, APRIL 27 – BASEBALL Sacramento vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. THURSDAY, APRIL 27 – SOCCER Bethel vs. Wilson Stadium Bowl – 7:15 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 28 – BASEBALL Stadium vs. Lincoln Heidelberg Field – 4 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 28 – FASTPITCH Franklin Pierce vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma HS – 4 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 28 – SOCCER Sumner vs. Bellarmine Bellarmine HS – 4 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 28 – BASEBALL Sacramento vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 28 – SOCCER Emerald Ridge vs. Curtis Curtis Viking Stadium – 7:30 p.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 29 – FASTPITCH Lincoln vs. Foss UW Softball Stadium – 5 p.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 29 – BASEBALL Sacramento vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 5:05 p.m. SUNDAY, APRIL 30 – BASEBALL Sacramento vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 1:35 p.m.


Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 21, 2017

t Soccer From page A12

of lightning. After a relatively pleasant start to the day, Mother Nature decided to throw everyone a curve ball, and then seemingly spun on her heels and changed her mind, scattering the clouds and ushering in blue skies and sunshine to the brave and hopeful on the field and in the stands at Bellarmine’s Memorial Field. The wind, hail and rain may have disappeared for the entirety of the soccer match between the Bellarmine Lions and the Olympia Bears, but it did nothing for the soaked field that soon became a bit of a mud bowl. While some folks may look at muddy conditions as being a bit of an equalizer for the two teams, it was clear that it was going to be no big deal for the home side Lions as they inched closer to the top of the 4A South Puget Sound League standings with a 7-1 thumping of the Bears. Bellarmine wasted no time showing their dominance in the match. Within the first 10 minutes, Bellarmine senior Kyle Casey had punched in a solo goal and followed it up with another off an assist by senior Max Hilger. The Lions looked like a team that was there to take care of business and not mess around. On the other side of the ball, the Olympia Bears looked like a team that was on the edge of getting overwhelmed. It took another 12 minutes for the Lions to score again, and they came in bunches. Sophomore Noah Comfort took a feed from Hilger in front of the goal and slammed a left-footed blast low and just inside the

t Rainiers From page A12

over five innings while allowing nothing but a solo home run to Albuquerque's Mike Tauchman. Possessing a 2-1 lead behind Steve Baron’s 2-RBI single, the Rainiers turned it over to the quartet of Ryne Harper, Nick Hagadone, Mark Lowe and Dean Kiekhefer to close out the victory, while adding a third run in the form of a Beckham solo home run in the eighth. Now at 6-4 for the season and having secured their second consecutive series win, the Rainiers went into Monday morning’s game looking to complete the three-game sweep over the Isotopes. To do so, they gave the ball to veteran right-hander Christian Bergman. Though his start was actually the worst in terms of ERA among a string of strong outings by Rainier hurlers, he was able to post

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

MOVING UP. Bellarmine senior Noah Welch gets after

it for control of the soccer ball. The Lions will host the Curtis Vikings on Saturday, April 22 at Bellarmine's Memorial Field at 4 p.m. The game should have huge playoff implications for both teams, as Bellarmine makes a run at the 4A SPSL title and Curtis tries to work up toward a higher seed into the playoffs.

the first quality start of the season for the club, allowing three runs over 6.2 innings. With Bergman keeping the Rainiers in the game, it was up to the Tacoma offense to win it for them. They were up to the task, scoring four runs, all via the home run, with solo shots from Baron and Gamel in the third and sixth innings, respectively, and a two-run shot by DJ Peterson in the sixth. With a one-run lead going into the ninth, Listach turned once again to closer Jean Machi, who locked down his third save of the season, facing the minimum of three batters. Compared to the opening road-trip, the Rainiers improved both offensively (from scoring 2.3 runs per game to 3.3) and defensively (from allowing 4.0 runs per game to a minuscule 1.1) on their first home stand of the season, during which they posted a 6-1 record to boost their season record to 7-4. Immediately following the sweep of Albuquerque, the Rainiers were back on the road, heading to El Paso to take on the

left post for Bellarmine’s third goal. Five minutes later, Comfort would strike again. After taking a long pass up the middle from senior Ryan Sanches, Comfort got by his defender and then paused, freezing senior Olympia goalkeeper Matteo Delguidice in his tracks. Comfort then chipped the ball to the left side of the goal, giving Bellarmine a 4-0 advantage with 13 minutes remaining in the first half. Casey found gold again just three minutes later on a superb pass into the box from junior Reece Zurfluh. With the ball at the waist-level, Casey leapt into the air and punched the ball past a startled Delguidice with his right foot. Hat tricks are a pretty rare occurrence. However, a hat trick within the first half of play is downright ridiculous. Olympia would sneak a goal through with five minutes left in the first half on a fine move by Khalil Bredeson. It would be the lone gold star on the day for the Bears. The second half was a bit slower, with the Lions working more on their passing and defensive game. Finally, after 27 minutes of play, Casey would strike for his fourth goal of the game off a feed from Comfort. Less than a minute later, Casey would bend a 15-yard shot inside the far post for his fifth goal of the day and Bellarmine would cruise the rest of the way for an impressive 7-1 victory. Bellarmine (7-1-2) sits just one point behind Puyallup (8-2-0) for the 4A SPSL lead. On Friday, April 7, the Lions knocked off Puyallup 2-1 in their first meeting of the season. The two teams will meet again at Sparks Stadium on Thursday, May 4, for what may very well be all the league marbles. Bellarmine hosts Curtis on Saturday, April 22 at 4 p.m.

same Chihuahua team against whom they began their home stand. Gaviglio, facing El Paso’s Magill for the second time in as many starts, looked to build upon his strong outing the last time around, but was unable to do so, allowing four runs over 6.1 innings. While the Rainier offense left the yard twice, with Peterson and Beckham each hitting solo shots (their second and third of the season, respectively), they were able to muster only three runs against the Chihuahuas’ combination of Magill, Kevin Quackenbush, Carter Capps (the Padres hurler on a rehab assignment as he works his way back from Tommy John surgery), Bawcom and Maton, falling to El Paso 4-3 and snapping a five-game winning streak. Through the first 12 games of the season, the Rainiers pitching staff has been phenomenal, posting a PCL-best 2.44 ERA, with three rotation members (Heston, Bergman and De Jong) holding ERAs below 3.00. On the other side of the ball, the offense has yet to really get it going, posting league-worst marks in batting average, on-base plus slugging, and runs. The Rainiers will continue their fourgame series in El Paso through Friday, April 21, after which they will head to Albuquerque to take on the Isotopes once again, this time in a four-game set. The next game at Cheney Stadium for the Rainiers will be next Thursday, April 27, as they play host to the Sacramento RiverCats for a four-game tilt. Up with the big club: Infielder Mike Freeman, who began the season in Tacoma before being called up to help fill in for an injured Jean Segura, has received just six plate appearances for the Mariners, but he’s been productive in them,

with a single, two walks, zero strikeouts, and a home run (which came in his first and only start of the season). However, due to the hot hitting of utility man Taylor Motter (slashing .321/.387/.786 on the season with three home runs), Freeman will likely be back to Tacoma upon Segura’s return to the lineup (which is tentatively scheduled for this Friday). On the pitching side, Mariner left-hander James Paxton took home American League Player of the Week honors for the week of April 10 with his 2-0 record and 17 strikeouts over 15 scoreless innings during the week. Using his dominant mix of fastball, cutter, and curveball, Paxton has spun 21 scoreless innings to begin the season, the longest such streak to begin the season in Mariner history. After a rough 2-8 start, the Mariners hit their stride with a four-game winning streak before it was snapped by the Miami Marlins’ 8.1 innings of no-hit ball on Tuesday, April 18. Elsewhere on the farm: Mariner righthanded reliever Steve Cishek, recovering from hip surgery, began his rehab assignment with the Double-A Arkansas Travelers. On Tuesday, April 18, he was reassigned to Tacoma to continue his rehab. After a rough start, the Travelers are in the midst of a three-game winning streak that has brought their record to 6-6. They’ve been led by the extraordinary pitching of Andrew Moore and Max Povse, who have combined to allow just two runs over 37.2 innings, good for a 0.48 ERA. Infielder Chris Mariscal has torn the cover off the ball for the Advanced-A Modesto Nuts, to the tune of a .389 batting average over his 36 at-bats. Nick Neidert has been excellent on the mound for the Nuts, holding a 2.87 ERA over 15.2 innings.

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Friday, April 21, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 15

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

BLOWING UP. (top-left) Dan Vogelbach takes a cut in the batter's box. The slugger has a knack for finding his way on base, whether it is drawing walks, or spraying hits all over the field. (top-middle) Gordon Beckham is new on the scene and already making it happen for Tacoma. The infielder already has three home runs on the season. (right and bottom-left) Ben Gamel should shine in his time in Tacoma after skipping ahead to the Mariners late last season.

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Section A • Page 16 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 21, 2017

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KEEP TACOMA BEAUTIFUL Once upon a time, Tacoma had an ugly reputation for being a dirty city – even giving off its own smell that became notorious as “the aroma of Tacoma.” Adding to this, tourist traffic was low, crime was high, and it seemed that Tacoma didn’t matter because Seattle was just a short drive away. This all changed in recent years, as Tacoma has made a stunning comeback and is now one of the most beautiful and livable cities on the West Coast. Tacoma is back on the map and no one wants to return to those dark and dreary days.

PUYALLUP TRIBE: “NO LNG!” The extinction of salmon throughout Puget Sound is upon us.

Among the more ardent Tacoma boosters is the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, which has been a forward thinking and financially generous leader in keeping Tacoma beautiful. The Tribe’s active protection of this area’s pristine waters, the salmon and all natural resources has benefitted the entire region. The Tribe vigorously opposes the prospect of an LNG plant being sited in the metropolitan Tacoma area. Not only would the plant be placed right on the Tribe’s reservation, it would mar Tacoma’s great scenic beauty, put natural resources at risk and endanger the lives of everyone who lives and works here in the event of a catastrophic LNG accident.

A PLANT WITHOUT A CUSTOMER Pristine waterways next to an industrial complex such as LNG could cause an environmental disaster in the Puget Sound from which we may never recover.

Puget Sound Energy is in the final permitting stages of the proposed LNG plant even though at this point PSE lacks any customers for LNG. The proposal started after the private utility company landed a contract with Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE) to provide ships with cleaner-burning LNG rather than diesel, but TOTE has since put those plans on hold, announcing in a news release that the company does not have an exact date for when it will retrofit its ships to use LNG. In other words, PSE wants to build a plant without a customer.

LNG PUTS AREA RESIDENTS IN JEOPARDY Also among its plans, PSE wants to form a for-profit subsidiary to handle the commercial sales of LNG to TOTE and other yet-to-be-determined customers while also storing the LNG for its utility customers to use during extreme weather conditions. Transporting LNG for local ratepayers presents the threat, and the inherent risks, of tanker trucks on our roadways and the potential for gas truck accidents in our neighborhoods or at the plant. Moreover, we would face potential risks to our health, the environment and our wallets for something PSE has yet to prove utility customers need. Thousands of oil train cars enter and leave the Port of Tacoma daily. A train derailment in the river would be catastrophic.

THE HISTORIC DANGERS OF LNG The construction of an LNG plant would require a large capacity natural gas pipeline to be constructed through the heart of the city of Fife, another booming city that lies right on the Interstate 5 corridor through Pierce County. This should deeply concern local residents considering historic on-site accidents that have occurred involving or related to LNG: r On Oct. 20, 1944 in Cleveland, 128 people died when an East Ohio Natural Gas Company’s LNG tank ruptured and exploded. LNG spilled into the city’s sewer system, vaporized and turned into a gas, which exploded and burned.

The I-5 corridor is well known for traffic congestion, which greatly increases the risk of toxic accidents on the highway.

A catastrophic LNG explosion could ignite the entire Port of Tacoma.

r On Oct. 6, 1979 in Lusby, MD a pump seal failed at the Cove Point LNG facility, which released natural gas vapors that settled into an electrical conduit. The gas vapors ignited when a worker switched off a circuit breaker, causing an explosion that killed one worker and severely injured another. r On Jan. 19, 2004 an explosion at Sonatrach LNG facility in Skikda, Algeria killed 27 people and injured 56. Three LNG trains were also destroyed. The massive hydrocarbon gas explosion was ignited when a steam boiler that was part of an LNG liquefaction train exploded near a propane and ethane refrigeration storage site. A report from a U.S. government inspection team cited that a leak of hydrocarbons from the liquefaction process initiated the domino effect of explosions. r On April 7, 2014 a “processing vessel” at a Williams Co. Inc. facility near the small town of Plymouth, Wash., exploded, spraying chunks of shrapnel as heavy as 250 pounds as far as 300 yards. The flying debris pierced the double walls of a 134-foot LNG tank on site, causing leaks. Five workers were injured, and local responders warned that vapors from the leaks could trigger a more devastating, second explosion. A county fire department spokesman said authorities were concerned a second blast could level a 0.75 mile “lethal zone” around the plant.


City Life

‘Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead’ at Lakewood Playhouse

B3

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 2017

SECTION B, PAGE 1

POPULAR UPS BIKE SWAP EVENT KICKS OFF BIKE MONTH

PHOTO BY KRIS CREWS

SWAP MEET. Cycling fans will be able to buy and sell used bikes and related gear on April 29 on the campus of the University of Puget Sound. By Matt Kite

I

mattkite@tacomaweekly.com

f you’ve thought lately about buying, selling or fixing a bicycle, you’re in luck. The City of Tacoma has dedicated the entire month of May to cycling, and the fun actually kicks off a few days early – on Saturday, April 29 – with the ninth-annual Bike Swap at the University of Puget Sound. Vendors, mechanics, experts and enthusiasts alike will gather from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Thompson Hall parking lot, between Union Avenue and North 14th Street, to exchange ideas and, of course, bicycles and anything bike-related. “We will be there rain or shine, though we always hope for shine,” said Meredith Soniat, an active transportation coordinator with the City of Tacoma’s Public Works Department. “As this event becomes a staple in the South Sound bicycling community, we expect to have a combination of both new and repeat participants, likely reaching around a thousand attendees again this year. The number of vendors continues to grow annually, as well, with nearly 30 vendors and community partners registered for this year’s swap.” At the heart of the event is the “bike corral” where citizens can buy, sell or trade bicycles, parts and accessories. Mechanics will be on hand to offer minor repairs, and users can even practice putting their bicycles on Pierce Transit bus bike racks. Kids will get a chance to

ONE SQUEAK & SQUAWK FUNDRAISER Organizers of the forthcoming Squeak & Squawk Festival will host a fundraising concert at Lift Bridge Coffee – located at 1102 A St. - at 6 p.m. Friday, April 21. The lineup includes local indierock and power-pop favorites Pig Snout, Trees and Timber (shown), Coma Figura and Scorn Dog. For updates, visit Facebook and pull up the event “SQSQ Fundraiser #2.”

explore their fledgling riding skills in the “bike rodeo,” and a food truck will be serving tasty meals to those who work up an appetite. “If participants have one to two bikes or bike parts to sell,” Soniat explains, “they can do so at the bike corral, a dedicated area for individual-to-individual transactions. Individual sellers can register bikes and bike accessories and lock the items up while they are at the event. Anyone interested in an item calls the cell phone number listed on the bike corral tag, and the sellers and buyers work out a place and time to meet up for test rides and to negotiate pricing and payment details. Sellers must fill out a waiver form upon registering items.” The Bike Swap in particular and Bike Month in general play a significant role in putting the city’s philosophy into action. Indeed, perhaps more than any other activity, biking has the potential to address multiple community problems. The City of Tacoma’s Transportation Master Plan, which was released in December of 2015, notes the following: “With growing public health concerns about obesity and air quality, increasing bicycle activity is one of the most cost effective ways to reduce health costs, preserve infrastructure, and improve air quality.” In other words, it’s not just your health that benefits from cycling; the streets, the air and even your wallet receive a much-needed boost as well. “With the goal of increasing the number of people

ally explores the limits of what a human brain and body can endure, and the strange beauty that can be found in even the most extreme forms of reunciation,” according to Entertainment Weekly. The Vegan Book Club meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at King’s, which is located at 218 St. Helens Ave. The event is free and open to the general public. Visit www.kingsbookstore.com for further details.

Matt Kite is an avid hiker and masters runner in Tacoma. Check out “3 Minute Hikes,” his hiking channel on YouTube.

FIND A ROUNDUP OF OTHER LOCAL BIKE MONTH ACTIVITIES ON B4.

which will be held at TAM from 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 22. Conservator Lisa Duncan will cover topics ranging from stabilizing fragile papers to removing stains and discoloration. The event is free. TAM is located at 1701 Pacific Ave.; www.tacomaartmuseum.org.

prices ranging from $30 to $65; www. americascarmuseum.org.

FIVE PARK APPRECIATION

FOUR THE COOL CAR BLUES

THREE ART PRESERVATION

TWO VEGGIE POWER The Vegan Book Club – coordinated by the South Sound Vegan Meetup Group – will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, at King’s Bookstore to discuss this month’s selection, “The Vegetarian” by Han Kang (Hogarth Press, $14.19.) “Kang viscer-

who bike everywhere – to work, school, dinner, etc. – we look at the swap as an opportunity to introduce a new group of people to bicycling as a mode of transportation, not simply recreation,” Soniat said. “At the swap, we will have a Map Masters booth where attendees can get their own copy of the Pierce County Bike Map, and volunteers from the bike community serve as resources to provide recommended routes based on the attendees’ desired destinations.” For my part, I’ve got two bicycles collecting dust in the garage. One needs a new rear derailleur. The other needs a new inner tube. I don’t need two bikes, just one that works. I’ll be taking at least one of them to the Bike Swap, where I hope to transform said dust collector into a well-oiled machine – or unite it with someone who can put it to good use.

Art lovers can learn how Tacoma Art Museum cares for and conserves prints, drawings and photographs during the event “Behind the Scenes: Art Conservation”

On Friday, April 21, LeMay America’s Car Museum – located at 2702 E. D St. - will host “Drive the Blues Away,” a night of live music, gourmet bites and tastings from regional distilleries, wineries and breweries. The event also serves as the kickoff to “Summer Drive Series: Convertibles in Route 66.” Tickets are on sale now with

Metro Parks Tacoma is celebrating Earth Day (Saturday, April 22) with its annual Park Appreciation Day. From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., community volunteers will be out in force picking up litter and otherwise helping beautify their neighborhood parks. Those interested should bring comfortable, weather-appropriate clothing; tools such as pruners, rakes and shovels. To register and find a list of parks in need of volunteers, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/parksappreciation-day-chip-in.


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 21, 2017

WEEKLY REWIND

Photos by Bill Bungard (Top row) Peelander-Z – featuring Kengo Hioki (Peelander Yellow), Yumiko Kanazaki (Pink) and Akiteru Ito (Purple) – rocked Real Art Tacoma with fan favorites “Mad Tiger,� “So Many Mike� and a little “human bowling,� on April 5. (Middle row) Big Wheel Stunt Show – featuring Tacoma Weekly sports editor Justin Gimse on drums – (left) opened for Randy Hansen’s Jimi Hendrix tribute show (right) on April 1 at Cultura Event Center. (Bottom row) Tacoma boy Jeff Angell returned to Jazzbones with his newest band, Staticland, on March 31; and local favorite Vicci Martinez, an alumnus of NBC-TV’s“The Voice,� headlined Cultura on April 15.

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Friday, April 21, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

LAKEWOOD PLAYHOUSE Culture Corner PRESENTS CLASSIC, A GUIDE TO CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS OF TACOMA Goings on this week in Tacoma: ABSURDIST SPOOF April 23, 1-5 p.m. ‘Hilltop Artists Day’ to Celebrate Tacoma’s Art and Community Museum of Glass, 1801 Dock St., Tacoma, WA 98402

PHOTO BY TIM JOHNSTON

DISORIENTED. (l to r) Frank Roberts plays Rosencrantz and Paul Richter plays Guildenstern in Tom Stoppard’s “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead,” which is showing at Lakewood Playhouse through May 7. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

Deep into its 78th season of main stage shows, Lakewood Playhouse has opened a production of Tom Stoppard’s 1966 absurdist comedy, “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead.” The play takes two minor characters from William Shakespeare’s masterpiece “Hamlet” and features them as anti-heroes in a convoluted series of dialogues that deal with various facets of the existentialist conundrum. Having found themselves in a peculiar, limbo-like place, the two seem perplexed as to where they are, who they are and why they are. Via a series of scenarios, colored by humor (ranging from slapstick to highly refined wit), Rosencrantz and Guildenstern exemplify the absurd situation in which modern humanity finds itself: stripped of metaphysical explanations for the existence of the universe, we seem to come out of nothing and return to nothing. In between we grapple with the problem of finding meaning, direction and purpose in our lives. The play can be seen as a very elaborate exploration of Hamlet’s classic proposition that “to be, or not to be” is our main question. Between intersecting with moments from Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” and dealing with a wandering troupe of tragedians (led by a mysterious character called “the Player”) the two characters become a means to highlight the way in which art (drama) serves to give our lives a sense of meaning, structure and expectation that is often illusory and misleading. As the old mythologies increasingly lose their potency, our culture seems more and more consumed with various forms of narrative (cinema, television, and other forms of mass media). Stoppard suggests that drama, in increasingly degraded form, is becoming the source for the expectations that we have for our lives. The Lakewood Playhouse production of this complex play is directed by Beau M.K. Prichard and features a stellar cast that includes local talent like Theresa Byrd, Silva Goetz, Shelby Isham, Breann Nicholas and Dayna Childs (as Queen Gertrude.) Dylan Twiner does a

swashbuckling version of prince Hamlet while Gabi Marler is beguilingly funny as Ophelia. Ben Stahl and Jennifer Davy will both be familiar to the Lakewood Playhouse audience. Noah Goucher is particularly goofy as the ghost of Hamlet’s father and W. Scott Pinkston plays a rubbery version of Polonius. Many of the above double as members of the group of tragedians. The play is anchored by the talented duo of Frank Roberts (as the tall and jocular Rosencrantz) and Paul Richter (as the intellectual Guildenstern). The two function almost like two halves of a single character. Indeed, within the play, they exhibit confusion as to who is who even between themselves. The show stealer is Nathan Rice who stars as “The Player,” the wry, brilliant and amoral leader of a ragtag troupe of actors that seem doomed to traipse through the limbo world and seek out audiences for their ever more bloody and pornographic performances. The Player is the only character that seems to possess any knowledge of what is going on within the multilevel framework of the play. Note must be made of Blake R. York’s rustic set design and of Rochelle-Ann Graham’s lush costumes. The rust-colored, velvet tunic sported by the Player makes him seem like a piratical pumpkin. Aaron Mohs-Hale’s job of lighting the stage is brilliant. The lighting creates a variety of magical moments, like when the Player presides over a scene of carnage and the whole stage is flooded with blood-red illumination. The evening begins with a lively and comedic rendition of “The Fifteen Minute Hamlet,” which serves to get the audience into a mood for humor and is a quick review of the contours of “Hamlet.” Stoppard’s stage plays are so rich and multilayered that they can withstand multiple viewings. This is a play that is sure to breed new insight upon every reading and viewing. Lakewood Playhouse does justice to the piece with a well-conceived show that is flawlessly performed. “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” runs through May 7. For further information visit www.lakewoodplayhouse.org.

PHOTO BY TIM JOHNSTON

ADRIFT. (L to R) Paul Richter (Guildenstern), Frank Roberts (Rosencrantz) and Nathan Rice (The Player) from the Lakewood Playhouse production of “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead.”

Hilltop Artists is pleased to announce Hilltop Artists Day at Museum of Glass on Sunday, April 23, from 1 to 5 p.m. Thanks to the generosity of Dale and Leslie Chihuly, the event is free for all youth ages 18 and under. Proceeds from adult admissions will be donated directly to Hilltop Artists. Dale Chihuly coPHOTO COURTESY OF LISA MONET PHOTOGRAPHY founded Hilltop Artists in 1994 and has remained a steadfast supporter ever since. Hilltop Artists’ tuitionfree programs provide youth, ages 12-20, with glass art instruction and adult mentors focused on increasing students’ academic and interpersonal success. The ongoing partnership among Hilltop Artists, Chihuly Studio, and the Museum of Glass serves to strengthen the glass community and exemplifies a remarkable collaboration in the arts on behalf of our youth. With the theme “A Color Beyond Imagination,” the event commemorates the incredible past 10 years of Hilltop Artists, along with launching the organization into its next chapter. The event also features family-friendly activities, local entertainment, Hot Shop demonstrations by students and alumni, and much more. Info: museumofglass.org PHOTO COURTESY OF HILLTOP ARTISTS

April 21 – May 7, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m. “Exit Laughing” Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St., Tacoma, WA 98403 When the biggest highlight in your life for the past 30 years has been your weekly bridge night out with the “girls,” what do you do when one of your foursome inconveniently dies? If you’re Connie, Leona and Millie, three southern ladies from Birmingham, you do the most daring thing you’ve ever done. You “borrow” the ashes from the funeral home for one last card game, and the wildest, most exciting night of your lives involves a police raid, a stripper and a whole new way of looking at all the fun you can have when you’re truly living. Info: www.tacomalittletheatre.com


Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 21, 2017

CITY OF TACOMA ‘BIKE MONTH’ SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

PHOTOS BY KRIS CREWS

PEDAL POWER. City of Tacoma and other groups will celebrate National Bike Month in May. Municipal Building (747 Market St.), first floor Council Chambers, 5 p.m.

after work at the Harmon downtown (1938 Pacific Ave.) from 4:30-6:30 p.m.

May 14: Tour de Donuts. For $23, you can tour Tacoma on bicycle at a leisurely 10-12 miles per hour and visit the best donut joints in town. All told, you’ll ride 25 miles. Oh, and you don’t have to eat any donuts (ride-only is $15). Info and registration here: twbc.org/event-2493577

May 21: Hills in Heels Ride. Menstrual Cycle and Velofemmes are partnering to bring you this all-ages, all-inclusive ride. The only requirement is that you don your best pair of heels. Meet at 2nd Cycle (1205 MLK Jr. Way) at 2 p.m. More info here: www.exit133.com/events/details/hills-in-heels-ride

Month of May: Bike everywhere challenge. Ditch your car and use your bike to commute to work, the park, the grocery store, the library, or anywhere else. Log your trips to be entered to win one of several prizes. Visit www.PierceTrips. com to learn more and sign up as a team member or captain.

May 17: Trails and Ales. If you prefer to drink your carbohydrates, drop by the Hub’s Event Space for an evening of beer and bicycles. Hosted by ForeverGreen Trails. 203 Tacoma Ave., 6-7:30 p.m.

May 24: Bike to a Better Tacoma. Learn about what bike-related projects are underway in Tacoma. The Hub, 5-7 p.m.

May 2: Bike Month proclamation with City Council. Join Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland and the Tacoma City Council for the reading of the Bike Month Proclamation, designating May 2017 as the 10th annual Bike Month. Tacoma

May 19: Bike to Work Day. Downtown On the Go is encouraging everyone to bike to work on Friday, May 19. Be sure to stop by Manifesto Coffee (1003 S. 11th St.) from 7:30-9:30 a.m. on your way to work. Participants will gather

By Matt Kite mattkite@tacomaweekly.com

Designated “Bike Month” by the City of Tacoma, in conjunction with National Bike Month, the month of May will be packed with bike-related events and activities. Below are just a handful of the many events planned throughout the month:

May 26: Cycles on the Foss. Take a family-friendly ride through the environmental history of Tacoma’s waterfront. Meet at the Foss Waterway Seaport Museum (705 Dock St.). Maritime-themed costumes are encouraged. Social gathering to follow at the Social Bar and Grill (1715 Dock St.). 5:15-7 p.m.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: GORILLAZ The world’s most popular virtual band, Gorillaz, has announced new tour dates which include a Sept. 30 stop at Seattle’s KeyArena. The cartoon version of band – the brainchild of Blur’s Damon Albarn and “Tank Girl” cartoonist Jamie Hewlett – consists of Murdoc Niccals, 2D, Noodle and Russel Hobbs. The real collective has featured a round robin of dozens of performers since its selftitled debut album surfaced in 2001. The new tour is in support of the forthcoming “Humanz” album, which features contributions from Danny Brown, De La Soul, Anthony Hamilton, Grace Jones and Jehnny Beth of Savages, among others. Tickets for the Seattle show will go on sale to the general public at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 21. Prices weren’t available as of press time; www.ticketmaster. com for further details on that and these upcoming shows except for where otherwise indicated.

• Dub Fest featuring The Burgeoning, the Rej3ctz and more: 5:30 p.m. May 12, Gillenwater Plaza at University of Washington-Tacoma, $5 to $8; www. uwttickets.com.

• Northwest Sinfonietta presents Mozart’s “Requiem”: 7:30 p.m. May 20, Rialto Theater, $20 to $50; www.broadwaycenter.org. • Life in Color with RL Grime, 3LAU and What So Not: 8 p.m. May 20, Tacoma Dome, $54 to $89. • Randy Bachman: 8:30 p.m. May 20, Emerald Queen Casino, $30 to $85.

• Soul 2 Soul Tour with Tim McGraw and Faith Hill: 7:30 p.m. May 27, Tacoma Dome, $66.50 to $116.50.

IMAGE COURTESY OF GORILLAZ

• Brad Paisley with Dustin Lynch, Chase Bryant and Lindsay Ell: 7 p.m. June 3, White River Ampitheatre, Auburn, $33 to $44.75. • Joan Osbourne “The Songs of Bob Dylan”: 7:30 p.m. June 3, Rialto Theater, $39 to $59; www. broadwaycenter.org.

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Friday, April 21, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

GUITAR FEST COMES TO TACOMA DOME APRIL 29-30 TW PICK OF THE WEEK: VETERAN BREMERTON PUNK BAND

NEUTRALBOY RETURNS TO JAZZBONES ON TUESDAY, APRIL 25. ADDING SUPPORT WILL BE THE PLOT THICKENS AND STOP DON’T STOP WITH MUSIC STARTING AT 9 P.M. THIS IS A FREE SHOW; WWW.JAZZBONES. COM.

FRIDAY, APRIL 21

SUNDAY, APRIL 23

REAL ART TACOMA: Cheap Sweat, Stamps, Sprism, Mop (alternative) 8 p.m., $7, AA

PHOTOS COURTESY OF GUITAR FEST

GEAR. Guitars galore will be on display next weekend at the Tacoma Dome By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Whether you’re looking for a rare Epiphone guitar or you want to offload a few instruments that have been gathering dust in the attic, the Tacoma Guitar Festival is the place to be next weekend. Its third, annual run is expected to draw 1,500 guitar aficionados to the Tacoma Dome on April 29 and 30. The event is the brainchild of local entrepreneur Bruce Adolph, who launched it in 2015 after several years of manning a booth at the more established Seattle-Tacoma Guitar Show in Kent. The event has quickly grown into the largest guitar festival in the region; and Adolph’s dream is to build the West Coast equivalent of the Dallas International Guitar Festival which, in its 40th year, is billed as the oldest and largest guitar festival in the world. “I go to some of the other guitar shows, and they don’t have as many exhibitors, and our crowds are really growing,� Adolph said. “Each year, we really try to up the guitar personalities. We take some of that budget and pour it into more wellknown guitarists each year.� A full roster of critically acclaimed performers will be on hand to perform or lead workshops on various guitar techniques. Among those going on stage this year are Olympia’s Ethan Tucker, a recent alumnus of NBC-TV’s “The Voice�; Andy Timmons of Danger Danger fame, who is also known for touring with the likes of Alice Cooper; Grand Funk Railroad’s Bruce Kulick, who also supported Kiss from

1984 to 1996; and singer-songwriter Kaki King, who made Rolling Stone’s list of “New Guitar Gods� in 2006. This year’s Tacoma Guitar Fest will also feature more than 150 vendors with the likes of Ted Brown Music, Guitar Maniacs and Vashon Guitar Company peddling their wares; and attendees are encouraged to bring their own gear to sell or trade. The only restriction is that they are limited to what they can carry into the event. “The older the instruments the better,� Adolph said. “ A lot of our vendors, if they buy more than they sell they’re happy. There’s a lot of great commerce that goes on, everything from some of the big stores that you’re familiar with in the area to vintage guitar stores to effects pedals and amps. So it’s really a fun vibe. It’s a neat atmosphere. Some people sell records and other things and a lot of small guitar parts. If you’re looking for hardto-find things, it could be a place for you.� Hours for the Tacoma Guitar Festival are 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 29 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 30. Tickets are $15 per day, $25 for a two-day pass. Admission is free for children ages 12 and under with an accompanying adult. The first 125 people in line each day

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REAL ART TACOMA: Lobsana, Wells, Horse Grenades, Animal Backwards (indie-rock, synthpop) 7:30 p.m., $7, AA

Andy Timmons (1:55 p.m.) Fender Guitar/JHS Pedals demonstration Bryan Ewald/PRS (3:55 p.m.) Sunday, April 30 Larry Mitchell (10:30 p.m.) Adrian Galysh (11:20 a.m.) Bruce Kulick (12:15 p.m.) Ethan Tucker (1:45 p.m.) Carl Tosten (3 p.m.) TOMMY’S HONOUR (117 MIN, PG) Fri 4/21-Sun 4/23: 1:15, 3:50, 6:30, 9:05, Mon 4/24: 1:15, 3:50, 9:05 Tue 4/25-Thu 4/27: 1:15, 3:50, 6:30, 9:05 T2 TRAINSPOTTING (117 MIN, R) Fri 4/21-Mon 4/24: 1:00, 3:35, 6:15, 8:50, Tue 4/25-Wed 4/26: 3:35, 8:50 Thu 4/27: 1:00, 3:35, 6:15, 8:50 GIFTED (101 MIN, PG-13) Fri 4/21: 11:45 AM, 2:05, 4:25, 6:50 Sat 4/22: 11:45 AM, 2:05, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10, Sun 4/23: 11:45 AM, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10, Mon 4/24: 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 Tue 4/25-Thu 4/27: 2:05, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE (124 MIN, PG-13) Fri 4/21-Sun 4/23: 12:00, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15, Mon 4/24-Thu 4/27: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 TRAINSPOTTING (94 MIN, R) Fri 4/21: 9:10 THE VOID (90 MIN, NR) Sat 4/22: 11:00 SONITA (90 MIN, NR) Sun 4/23: 2:00 AYANDA (105 MIN, NR) Mon 4/24: 1:30, 6:30

DINING OUT FOR LIFE

B SHARP COFFEE: “Something to Tell� (story telling open mic) 7 p.m., NC, AA G. DONNALSON’S: Bill & Denny’s Little Big Band (jazz, blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Sonic Funk (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Champagne Sunday and Kim Archer (pop, folk, blues, soul) 9 p.m., $10 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LIFT BRIDGE COFFEE: Squeak & Squawk fundraiser with Pig Snout, Trees and Timber, Coma Figura, Scorn Dog (indie-rock, power pop) 6 p.m., $7, AA LOUIE G’S: Midnight Rambler, Body Electric (Rolling Stones, Rush tribute) 8 p.m., $10, AA MARKEE (OLD TOWN): The Unassuming Beekeepers (acoustic, bluegrass, country, rockabilly) 7 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Quickie (pop-punk, power-pop) 8 p.m. in loft; The True Romans (rock covers) 9 p.m. in main showroom, NC THE SWISS: The Covers (rock covers) 9 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: Kyle Kinane (comedy) 7:30, 10:30 p.m., $22-$29, 18+ early show UNCLE SAM’S: Cloneapalooza tryouts (rock) 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: Super Dub Family Jam, Stay Grounded (reggae, rock) 9 p.m., $5

TANNA (100 MIN, NR) Tue 4/25: 1:00, 6:30 THE FITS (72 MIN, NR) Wed 4/26: 2:00, 6:30

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B SHARP COFFEE: T-Town Blues Revue with John Hodgkin (blues) 8 p.m., $7, AA G. DONNALSON’S: Bill & Denny’s Little Big Band (jazz, blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Sonic Funk (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Spawnbreezie (reggae, pop) 9:30 p.m., $15-$20 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Hookerfist, Lithium (Tool, Nirvana tribute) 8 p.m., $10, AA METRONOME: Russell James Pyle (singer-songwriter) 7 p.m., NC, AA PACIFIC BREWING: Angie Lynn (acoustic, singer-songwriter) 7 p.m., NC, AA THE SPAR: Twang Junkies (country) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rikkha, Prize Fighters, White City Graves, Crown Villains (rock) 8 p.m. in loft, $8; S.O.B., Sandra Lopez (classic rock) 9 p.m. in main showroom, NC THE SWISS: Strangely Alright, Limberlost, The Revolving Bullets (alternative, power-pop) 9 p.m., $8 TACOMA COMEDY: Kyle Kinane (comedy) 7:30, 10:30 p.m., $22-$29, 18+ early show UNCLE SAM’S: Benefit show, 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: Deathbed Confessions, Redeem the Exile, Sweater for an Astronaut (metal) 9 p.m., $5

JAZZBONES: Captain Morgan Loco Nut launch party with DJ Indica Jones (DJ) 9 p.m.

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Jazz and blues open mic, 5 p.m., NC, AA NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass jam, 4 p.m., NC REAL ART TACOMA: One Tribe Movement (folk), 7 p.m. THE SPAR: New Rhymatics (blues, soul, R&B, vintage country) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kareem Kandi Band (jazz) 5 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: The Dope Show (comedy) 8 p.m., $14.20$24.20

MONDAY, APRIL 24

G. DONNALSON’S: Jazz and blues open mic, 5 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Michael Langdon (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Graduation Show (comedy) 7:30 p.m., $10-$16, 18+

TUESDAY, APRIL 25

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Billy Stoops (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Neutralboy, The Plot Thickens, Stop Don’t Stop (punk, alternative) 9 p.m., NC METRONOME: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., NC, AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lefferty (open mic) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: New Talent Tuesday (comedy) 8 p.m., NC, 18+

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26

JAZZBONES: Jake “The Snake� Roberts, Susan Jones (comedy) 8 p.m., $15-$20 DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Leify Green (open mic) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, APRIL 27

B SHARP COFFEE: Elliot Turner and the Ground Up Trio (jazz jam) 8 p.m, NC, AA DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Rod Cook (blues) 7 p.m., AA JAZZBONES: Ladies Night with DJ Indica Jones (DJ) 8 p.m., NC women, $5 men KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Roni Lee with Jerry Battista, The Davanos, Wasted on the Way (rock) 7:30 p.m., $10, AA REAL ART TACOMA: The Madd Hammers, Bad Idea, One More (rock) 8 p.m., $7, AA TACOMA COMEDY: Steve Trevino (comedy) 8 p.m., $10-$16, 18+

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Seeking Freelance Writer Pierce County Community Newspaper Group (PCCNG) is the premier producer of community newspapers in the Tacoma and Pierce County area. Along with our flagship publication, the Tacoma Weekly, we publish the University Place Press, Fife Free Press, Milton-Edgewood Signal and Puyallup Tribal News. PCCNG is seeking experienced, dependable, community-minded writers. All areas are needed – news, sports and entertainment. Must be a self-starter capable of following up on assignments and also developing in-depth stories independently in a deadline-driven environment. Photography skills are a big plus, as are copyediting/ proofreading skills (AP style). Will include some evening work and occasional weekend hours. Send cover letter, resume and at least three examples of published work to matt@tacomaweekly.com or via regular mail to PCCNG, 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma WA 98421. Please, no phone calls or walk-ins.


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 21, 2017

Coming Events TW PICK: ‘PINOCCHIO: THE BALLET’ Fri., April 28, 7 p.m. – OPENING NIGHT Sat., April 29, 2 p.m. Sun., April 30, 2 p.m. Jan Collum Ballroom Theater in The Merlino Art Center, 508 6th Ave., Tacoma Tacoma City Ballet presents “Pinocchio The Ballet,” a new original ballet and classical tale that promises to delight audiences of every age. Lasting only one hour and 15 minutes, Tacoma City Ballet has created yet another fabulous performance the whole family will enjoy, accentuated with beautiful sets and costumes. Ages: All ages. Price: $10 with festival seating. Info/tickets: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2881620 ‘ROSENCRANTZ & GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD’ Fri., April 21, 8 p.m. Sat., April 22, 8 p.m. Sun., April 23, 2 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse, Lakewood Towne Center, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd SW, Lakewood Acclaimed as a modern comedic masterpiece, “Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead” is the fabulously inventive tale of “Hamlet” as told from the worm’seye view of the bewildered Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, two minor characters in Shakespeare’s play. In Tom Stoppard’s best-known work, this Shakespearean Laurel and Hardy finally get a chance to take the lead role, but do so in a world where echoes of “Waiting for Godot” resound, where reality and illusion intermix, and where fate leads our two heroes to a tragic but inevitable end. Presented with “The 15-Minute Hamlet” – the author continues his association with “Hamlet” by taking the most famous and best loved lines from Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” and condensing them into a hilarious 13-minute version. This miraculous feat is followed by an encore – a twominute version! Both shows are Lakewood Playhouse premieres, running through May 7. Ages: All ages. Info: www.LakewoodPlayhouse. org; (253) 588-0042 DARK PLAY OR STORIES FOR BOYS BY CARLOS MURILLO Fri., April 21, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University, Studio Theatre, 12180 Park Ave S. Nick invents false personas online to “catfish” people. When he invents Rachel and uses that persona to respond to Adam, Nick must create more and more elaborate deceptions that ultimately lead to dark and horrifying consequences. Price: $5. Info: (253) 535-7150; www.eventbrite.com/e/darkplay-or-stories-for-boys-tickets-26648848423 DRIVE THE BLUES AWAY Fri., April 21, 8-11 p.m. LeMay – America’s Car Museum, 2702 E. D St. Enjoy live music entertainment, gourmet light bites from Pacific Grill, and samples from local breweries and distilleries - a perfect way to chase away the wet weather blues. Ages: 21+ Price: $30$65. Info: (253) 779-8490; www.americascarmuseum. org GALLERY - DUENDE Fri., April 21, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University, 12180 Park Ave. S. Please join the Department of Art and Design as we celebrate the accomplishments of our graduating artists in the culmination of their degree

program. Price: Free. Info: (253) 535-7150; www.plu. edu MEANINGFUL MOVIES TACOMA SCREENS “RACING EXTINCTION” Fri., April 21, 7-9 p.m. Center for Spiritual Living, 206 N. J St. In celebration of Earth Day, join us for a free public screening of “Racing Extinction” a 90-minute film that depicts the massive die off of species photographed by NatGeo photographer Joel Sartore. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (206) 948-8309; www.meaningfulmovies.com EXIT LAUGHING Fri., April 21, 7:30 p.m. Sat., April 22, 7:30 p.m. Sun., April 23, 2 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St. When the biggest highlight in your life for the past 30 years has been your weekly bridge night out with the “girls,” what do you do when one of your foursome inconveniently dies? Ages: All ages. Price: $24; $22 students, seniors & military; $20 12 and under. Info: (253) 272-2281; www. tacomalittletheatre.com EARTH DAY WETLAND RESTORATION WITH CHB Sat., April 22, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Gog le hi te Wetlands, 1402 Lincoln Ave. The Gog le hi te Wetland is a critical piece of habitat connected to the Puyallup River. It is home to an incredible variety of birds, coyote, river otter and of course our native salmon. Price: Free. Info: (253) 383-2429 FANCY NANCY THE MUSICAL Sat., April 22, 11 a.m to 12 p.m.; 2-3 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 Sixth Ave. Dress up in your most glamorous attire, pour a spot of tea and join us for the most elegant musical ever – Fancy Nancy. Nancy and her pals Wanda, Rhonda, Bree and Lionel are thrilled to be dancing in their very first show, “Deep Sea Dances.” Ages: Recommended for all ages. Price: Adult ($15): Senior ($13): Student ($13): Military($13): Child 12 & under ($12) Groups of 10 or more ($10) Info: (253) 565-6867; tmp.org/index.php/8543-2 FIRST CREEK NEIGHBORS PORTLAND AVE CLEANUP Sat., April 22, 9 a.m. Portland Avenue Community Center, 3513 E. Portland Ave. It’s Earth Day and our Community Clean up Day. Get to know your Eastside neighbors as we clean up Portland Avenue. All ages are welcome. Parent supervision required. Price: Free. Info: (253) 5915391; www.facebook.com/ events/408620456156365

ARGENTINE TANGO ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS CLASS Sun., April 23, 12-1 p.m. Backstreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St. The studio was built with the sole purpose of teaching only authentic social Argentine tango. You will learn the basic elements for this wonderful dance by certified professional instructors. Ages: 16 with guardian and up. Price: $10 per class, 8 classes for $40, 10 classes for $70. Info: (253) 304-8296; backstreettango.com ARLO GUTHRIE Sun., April 23, 7:30 p.m. Pantages Theater, 901 Broadway Son of famous folk singer, and a folk music icon in his own right, Arlo Guthrie returns to Tacoma. He’ll share timeless stories and unforgettable classic songs as he carries the torch of the Guthrie family legacy. Price: $29-$85. Info: (253) 591-5894; www. broadwaycenter.org RAINIER LEAGUE OF ARTS, MARCH INTO ART Sun., April 23, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Catholic Community Services, 1323 S Yakima Ave This is a mixed art show of photography, watercolor, oil, blown glass and even a Native American hand painted drum. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 502-2617; www. rainierleagueofarts.com NEW SPANISH WORSHIP SERVICE Sun., April 23, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 101 E. 38th St. We are offering a new Spanish worship service for the community. All are welcome to this new outreach, which will use the same format as our English service. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 474-0525; www.blctacoma. org BIBLE DISCUSSION THE BOOK OF REVELATION Mon., April 24, 1-2 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. All are welcome for a discussion of the Book of Revelation, led by Pastor Martin Yabroff of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church. No background required. Open discussion and practical applications. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402; www.saintandrewstacoma.org HOW TO TRANSFORM YOUR LIFE THROUGH MEDITATION Mon., April 24, 7-8:30 p.m. Tushita Kadampa Buddhist Center, 1501 Pacific Ave S. Based on Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso’s newly revised text, this course will explore many meaningful topics that will help us improve our life. Ages: All ages. Price: $10. Info: (360) 754-7787; www. meditateinolympia.org/tacoma POTTERY CLASSES AT THROWING MUD GALLERY Mon., April 24, 6-8:30 p.m. Throwing Mud Gallery, 2210-2212 N. 30th St. Learn the art of creating pottery on the potters wheel, hand building techniques and decorative and functional pottery in our clean and spacious studio. Ages: 18+ Price: $210 + tool kit. Info: (253) 254-7961; www. throwingmudgallery.com TAHOMA FUCHSIA SOCIETY MEETING Mon., April 24, 7-9 p.m. Lakewood Presbyterian Church, 8601 104th St. SW, Lakewood This is a fun loving group of individuals who enjoy all things fuchsia. There is an annual fuchsia sale in April.

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317. ARGENTINE TANGO LESSONS Wed., April 26, 7-9:30 p.m. Cultura Event Center, 5602 S. Washington St. Beginning class at 7 p.m., intermediate at 8 p.m., with two hours of classes and practice for all levels concentrating on good social tango, not tricks or “patterns.” Ages: 18+ Price: $10; $15 couple. Info: (253) 222-0105; tangointacoma.com

Price: Free. Info: (253) 5881214; www.facebook.com/ tahomafuchsiasociety LINE DANCING Tues., April 25, 6-8 p.m. Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way Beginners and intermediates can get on the dance floor for fun and exercise in this seven-week program. Beginners meet on Tuesdays, intermediates on Thursdays. Price: $45 for 7-week session. Info: (253) 383-3900; funtimelinedancing.com

SENIOR TO SENIOR Wed., April 26, 6-8 p.m. Portland Ave. Community Center, 3513 E. Portland Ave. Metro Parks Tacoma’s Fifty and Better (FAB) program invites high school seniors in transition to adulthood to get tips from experienced seniors on topics such as banking, setting financial goals and paying for college and cars. Ages: High school seniors invited. Price: Free. Info: (253) 278-1475; www.metroparkstacoma.org

NEUTRALBOY Tues., April 25, 9 p.m. Jazzbones, 2803 Sixth Ave. Neutralboy is a hardcore punk band from Bremerton. Price: Free. Info: (253) 3969169; www.jazzbones.com STUDENT SPRING ART SALE Tues., April 25, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University, 12180 Park Ave. S. Be a part of the first student art sale on Pacific Lutheran University’s campus. All the works are made by students or alumni. Pieces range from ceramic bowls and mugs to student designed stickers, with 80 percent of the proceeds returning to the artists. Price: $1-$20. Info: (503) 267-5354; www.plu. edu

BOOST YOUR BODY IMAGE: CONFIDENCE AT ANY SIZE CLASS Wed., April 26, 7:15-8 p.m. Lean Body Lifestyles, 711 St. Helens Ave, Suite 201 Re-boot and repair your relationship with your body. It is possible to love your body, independent of how much you weigh, or what number appears on the labels of your clothing. Ages: 18 and older. Price: $295; for 6-class sessions, workbook and private Facebook group. Info: (253) 678-5403; www.leanbodylifestyles.com/events.html

AMERICAN POLITICS READING GROUP Wed., April 26, 7:30-9 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University, 12180 Park Ave. S. Join us at Pacific Lutheran University (Xavier 201) for a discussion of Nancy Isenberg’s “White Trash.” This is a book about race and class and has a lot to tell us about the role of these issues on the 2016 election. Ages: All. Price: Free. Info: (253) 535-7662; www.plu. edu

U S T F H A E B B K N P S N K R V O F H

H R R H X E B S E W N F C S R K N L A H

G E H O H I I F S U Y I K J A R H X X O

G R O X D S R R Q J R X L L P J H A W J

I U D Q Y K T A B Q E B C N G S D J M P

X T S E E X P C X Y P G D P O M I T Z V

T N V R F D U K Y X C K U A D U N Q T B

Z E F A U K L E R J K L G P H H I I U O

W V O C D I L D H C S D O D S A N K O P

SACRAMENTO RIVER CATS AT TACOMA RAINIERS Thurs. April 27, 7:05 p.m. Cheney Stadium, 502 S. Tyler St. The Rainiers host the Sacramento River Cats in this four-game series. Price: $7.50-$11.50, not including Ticketmaster fees. Info: (253) 752-7707; www.tacomarainiers.com

G D A I I K A G L I E H U D A M G G N R

J A G T Q A Y A R C N M T H E J O W I O

V F L L Y P U S U D O V X F L F U E A T

F R P U Q S P A X W B M D F F U T W R E

H A L M Y V S K S P Z R F Q F H F Z T S

C I Z A J F H Z V A Z Z T Y O N O Y F T

H H N Z N I E R W P X S M V C E S M A Y X X E R K W E H N I D X H Z E D C X N K A J X B C D OW Y X Y M H K N U S B Z K H C F J R L I F I T C W N A W K L Q U P

B S P U Q P K O C J U G I Q G C E U G U

We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

DINING OUT FOR LIFE How many words can you make out of this phrase?


Friday, April 21, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

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Find the right business for your home, garden, pet, Allied Electric Service offers electric service of compersonal service needs mercial, industrial, residential, and more right here! & marine construction. DESIGN

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Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time.

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PATRIOT LIMOUSINE SERVICE

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EMPLOYMENT

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CLASSY CUTS HIRING HAIR STYLIST. FULL AND PART TIME. AT TWO LOCATIONS. 810 E. 72ND STREET, TACOMA: AND 20817 E. STATE ROUTE 410, BONNEY LAKE: APPLY IN PERSON

Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@fifetowing. com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E., Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator and City of Destiny Award Winner will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

JT GENERAL CONTRACTOR ROOFING

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3ECTION"s0AGEsTACOMAWEEKLYCOMsFriday, April 21, 2017

NOTICES

NOTICES

IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA WASHINGTON Case No: PUY-CV-PR-2016-0101 IN RE ESTATE OF: FAYE ALICE WRIGHT, Decedent. PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the administrator named below has been appointed Administrator of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable stature of limitations, present the claim in writing , with proper vouchers, in the manner as provided in Puyallup Tribal Code, Ch. 8.04, Subchapter 9, by serving on or mailing to the Administrator or the attorney for the Administrator at he address stated below, a copy of the claim, and the filing the original of the claim with the Court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within ninety (90) days after the date of first posting of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this timeframe, the claim is not barred until the Final Account is filed. Name of Decedent: Fay Alice Wright Date of Death: December 6, 2015 Decedent’s Resident Address: 2805 East Holm Road, Fife, WA 98424 Date of First Posting: March 13,2017 Administrator: Donald George, Jr. Attorney for the Personal Representative: Charles R. Hostnik Address for Mailing or Service: Anderson Hostnik PLLC, 6915 Lakewood Drive West, Suite A-1, Tacoma, WA 98467-3299 Court of Probate Proceedings: Puyallup Tribal Court Case Number: PUY-CV-PR-2016-0101 DATED this 13th day of March, 2017 ANDERSON HOSTNIK PLLC Charles R Hostnik, WSBA #10834 Attorney for Donald George, Jr., Administrator Of the Estate of Faye Alice Wright

Case Style: CIVIL Case Number: PUY-CV-CUST-2017-0054 Nature of Case: CUSTODY YOU ARE HEREBY summoned to appear and respond to the Civil Complaint/Petition filed by the above named Petitioner in the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, located at 1451 E 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. A(n) INITIAL Hearing is scheduled at the abovenamed Court on June 13 , 2017, at 2:30 p.m. You must respond in writing to the civil complaint/ petition within twenty (20) days after the date of the first publication of this summons. You must serve a copy of your written answer on the Petitioner and file with this Court an affidavit of service. Failure to file a written response may result in a default judgment entered against you. The parties have the right to legal representation at their own expense and effort. This Court has a list of attorneys and spokespersons who are admitted to practice in this Court. Copies of the Civil Complaint/Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404. If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585.

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE CASE NUMBER: 16-2-11183-7 SUMMONS CIT BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, Vs. EVELYN NETTLETON, an individual; THE LINKS AT NORTHSHORE CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, an association; and all other persons or parties unknown claiming any legal or equitable right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described in the complaint herein, adverse to Plaintiff’s title, or any cloud on Plaintiff’s title to the Property, collectively designated as DOES 1 through 50, inclusive. Defendants.

NO. PUY-CS-CS-2016-0059 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON Jennifer Taylor Petitioner, v. Giana Abbott Respondent,

TO: EVELYN NETTLETON

The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court. In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing. If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition. This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act. NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for June 14th, 2017at 9:45 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court. Dated April 12, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585

A lawsuit has been started against you in the aboveentitled court by plaintiff. Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons. In order to defend against this lawsuit, you must respond to the Complaint by stating your defense in writing, and serve a copy upon the understanding attorney for the Plaintiff within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, excluding the day of service , if served in the in the State of Washington, or within sixty (60) days after the service of this summons, excluding the day of service, if served outside the State of Washington, or if you are a United States government defendant, or a default judgment may be entered against you without notice. A default judgment is one where plaintiff is entitled to what is asks for because you have not responded. If you serve a notice of appearance on the undersigned attorney, you are entitled to notice before a default judgment may be entered.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition has been filed asking the Court to appointed the above named Petitioner(s) to be guardian(s) for C., M, a minor child under PTC 7.12 (Guardianship of Minors Code). YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear at a guardianship hearing in this Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation at: DAY: MONDAY DATE: May 22nd , 2017 TIME: 10:30 AM LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31ST ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 The guardianship hearing is private and closed. Only those persons the Court finds to have a legitimate interest in the proceedings may attend. The Court will hear testimony to determine whether guardianship is in the best interest of the child and the Tribal community. The Court will consider all guardianship reports submitted for review. All parties shall be given the opportunity to contest the factual contents and conclusions of the guardianship reports. Any party may file recommendations regarding the guardianship with the Court at least 10 calendar days before the hearing. You also have the following rights before the court: 1. The right to be present before the court; 2. The right to present written and oral testimony; 3. The right to subpoena witnesses; 4. The right to submit relevant evidence to the Court for consideration; 5. The right to counsel at your own expense and effort; the court has a list of attorneys who are to practice before the Puyallup Tribe; and 6. The right to appeal a final decision in this matter. If you do not appear at the hearing or file a written response to the petition within 20 days from the date if this notice, the Court may enter an order in your absence. PTC

4.08.250—

WHEN A PARTY AGAINST WHOM A JUDGMENT IS SOUGHT FAILS TO APPEAR, PLEAD, OR OTHERWISE DEFEND WITHIN THE TIME ALLOWED, AND THAT IS SHOWN TO THE COURT BY A MOTION AND AFFIDAVIT OR TESTMONY, THE COURT MAY ENTER AN ORDER OF DEFAULT AND, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO THE PARTY IN DEGFAULT, ENTER A JUDGMENT GRANTING THE RELIEF SOUGHT IN THE COMPLAINT. Copies of the Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St, Tacoma, WA 98404 If you have any questions, Please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585

IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON WSFC Petitioner,

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE

v. JB Jamal Island Respondent, The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court. In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing. If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition. This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act. NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for June 14, 2017 at 9:15am at the Puyallup Tribal Court. Dated April 12, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585

Milton Senior Center Rummage Sale Friday April 28th 10-4 Saturday April 29th 9-3 Lots of great Antiques, plants and clothing! 1000 Laurel Street 253 987-5669 Farmers Market Coming Soon in Spanaway. 192nd St. E. and B Street. Local Farmers Welcome. 253-219-6523

DATED: 9/16, 2016 MALCOM * CISNEROS, A Law Corporation

Chambers Creek Foundation 10 Year Anniversary Gala and Auction Saturday, June 24 at 5 PM - 11 PM Chambers Bay Pavilion 6320 Grandview Drive W. University Place, WA

Nathan F. Smith, WSBA #431960 Attorney for Plaintiff MALCOLM * CISNEROS, A Law Corporation2112 Business Center Drive Irvine, California 92612 Phone: (949 ) 252-9400 Fax: (949) 252-1032 Email: Nathan@mclaw.org

Come Celebrate Chambers Creek Foundation accomplishments in the last 10 years since the opening of Chambers Bay Golf and the future plans of trails and bridges at the Properties. chambersckfoundation.org

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY OF PEIRCE

Auction Notice

THIS SUMMONS is issued pursuant to Rule 4 of the Superior Court Civil Rules of the State of Washington.

CASE NUMBER: B31809-1 SUMMONS ONEWEST BANK N.A., Plaintiff, Vs. RICHARD W. SWITZER, an heir; RHONDA J. SWITZER, an heir; BRYAB C. SWITZER, An heir; ALFRED L. SWITZER, an heir; ESTATE OF SANDRA J. SWITZER, an Estate; UNKNOWN HEIRS OF SANDRA J. SWITZER, individuals; and all others persons Or parties unknown claiming any legal or equitable right , title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described in the complaint herein, adverse to Plaintiff’s title, or any cloud on Plaintiff’s title to Property, collectively designed as DOES 1 through 50, inclusive. Defendants. To: RICAHRD W. SWITZER A lawsuit has been started against you in the above –entitled court by plaintiff. Plaintiff’s claim is stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons. In order to defend against this lawsuit, you must respond to the Complaint by stating your defense in writing, and serve a copy upon this person signing this Summons within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons if served in the State of Washington, or within sixty (60) days if served outside the State of Washington or if you are a United States government defendant, excluding the day of service, or a default judgment may be entered against you without notice. A default judgment is one where plaintiff is entitled to what it asks for because you have not responded. If you serve a notice of appearance on the undersigned person, you are entitled to notice before a judgment may be entered. You may demand that the plaintiff file this lawsuit with the court. If you do so, the demand must be in writing and must be served upon the person signing this summons. Within 14 days after you served the demand, the plaintiff must file this lawsuit with in the court, or the service on you of this Summons and Complaint will be void. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any may be served on time. THIS SUMMONS is issued pursuant to Rule 4 of the Superior Court Civil Rules of the State of Washington. Dated 31,2017 Respectfully Submitted, MALCOLM*CISNEROS, A Law Corporation Nathan F Smith , WSBA #43160 Stephen M Lewis, WSB #47173 Attorneys for Plaintiff MALCOLM*CISNEROS, A Law Corporation2112 Business Center Drive Irvine, California 92612 Phone: (949) 252-9400 Fax: (949) 252-1032

NOTICES

NO. PUY-CS-FC-2017-0012 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing

You may demand that the Plaintiff file this lawsuit with the court. If you do so, the demand must be in writing and must be served upon the person signing this Summons. Within 14 days after you served the demand, the Plaintiff must file this lawsuit with the court, or the service on you of this Summons and Complaint will be void. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be served on time.

TO: Melody Brown Case Name: C.,M Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2017-0001 Nature of Case: guardianship of a Minor Child

NOTICE PURSUANT TO DEFAULT JUDGMENT

TO: Haedr Al-Shabani

NOTICES

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 04272017 Date 04/27/2017 View @ 1 pm Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

WANTED

Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 4/25/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 9:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 08:00-09:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

VOLUNTEERS Wanted: Volunteers for groceries. The Empowerment Center currently has a limited number of openings for volunteers in our food bank. These positions will be filled on a first come, first served basis. Come volunteer and receive free groceries! El Shaddai Christian Ministries/The Empowerment Center, 4340 Pacific Ave., Tacoma WA 98148. For more information contact us at 253-677-7740. City of Fife Needs You! We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www.cityoffife.org/getinvolved NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto w w w. c h i f r a n c i s c a n . org and click “hospice and palliative care� in the “our services� tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253538-4649 #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www. projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are

some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perishable snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE. Help hard-working families by volunteering with VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available (February to April 2017). Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Learn more and apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org. Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driver’s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253-2728433 Great Volunteer Opportunity Make friends, have fun and help seniors with simple tasks. You’ll make a big difference by helping people maintain their independence. This is volunteering, not caregiving. Volunteers must be 55 or older, low income, serve 15 hrs/wk and live in Pierce or Kitsap Counties. Drivers are especially needed. Benefits include hourly tax-free stipend and mileage reimbursement. For information call Julie at Lutheran Community Services, Senior Companion Volunteer Program, (253)722-5686.

PETS Pet of the Week

WANTED: Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

  

WINIFRED Our Featured Pet Winifred came to us all the way from Memphis. It’s taken a bit for the brown tabby to adjust from the long plane ride, but she’s definitely coming out of her shell. Pro tip: slowly approach her cage and coo “Winifred,� and the gorgeous girl will timidly make her way towards you. Before you know it she’s head-butting her way into your heart. After about five minutes of petting, the three-year-old relaxes and even reaches out for more, purring up a storm. Got a quieter home and a heart of gold Our Southern belle would love to make your acquaintance — #A515834

www.thehumanesociety.org


Friday, April 21, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

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3 BED 1.75 BATH 1457 SF. TAKE 3 BD 1 BA 1360SF. NORTH AN OLD HOME AND MAKE IT END UPGRADED RAMBLER WITH LARGE KITCHEN AND DINING MODERN - THAT’S WHAT THE ROOM WITH BREAKFAST BAR. OWNER DID HERE.

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1 BED, 1 BATH 490 SF. CHARMING 1 2 BD 1.5 BA 1238SF. LOVE THE QUIET IN BEDROOM FOURPLEX. UTILITY CHARGE THIS RELAXED COUNTRY SETTING FOR OF $45/MONTH FOR GARBAGE. THIS UPGRADED REMODELED TOWNHOUSE

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www.familytree253.com Jay Brock

Any Tree Service

Johnny Marth

Not valid with other offers or specials. Expires 4-21-17.

$500 job minimum

Certified Arborist PN-7500A

LIC. FAMILTRC874M6

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Certified Arborist PN-7495A

LAND FOR SALE 5th Avenue Court NE, Milton

$330,000

2.2 acres undeveloped raw land situated in an industrial area of Tacoma annex by the City of Milton. Close to tide flats off Pacific highway. Some value in the timber can be logged, graded and paved for storage and commercial parking. 2 parcel each is 1.10 acres. slopping lot. There is a non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress. Property has been Incorporated into Milton. All building and land use fall under the Milton Municipal Code Chapter 17.14 Table of Use.

COMMERCIAL

FOR SALE!! 4008 S. Pine, Tacoma

LAND FOR SALE 13117 E. 94th Ave., Puyallup

$595,000

$880,000 Level 3.93 acres, zoned “Urban Center,� Senior and Nursing housing, Daycare centers, Educational services. High traffic count. Some easement restrictions from Bonneville Trans lines. Property abuts to Future site of Puyallup Retirement Residence. 2 parcels totaling just under 4 acres of development land. There is a 2300 sf residence on one parcel.

COMMERCIAL

Good Investment Property, FULLY LEASED , completely remodeled commercial office building, 3350 sq ft, .25 acre commercial lot, owner occupied, 10 offices, 3 bathrooms, Spacious conference room, 2 full Kitchen reception area, 2 parking lots front and rear. Centrally located to all services. 7.5 Cap Rate.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS FOR SALE/LEASE

UNIVERSITY PLACE-COMMERCIAL temporary offFormer the CPA market ZONED, 27th & Bridgeport Way, Office Real Estate Included, $225,000, Now Vacant. EATING ESTABLISHMENT WITH BEER & WINE - Same Owners last 9 years, great location, Business price $285,000, terms avail.

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OFFICE BUILDING WITH 6 SUITES, Close to Wright’s Park, ideal for Attorneys or Professional use. Asking Price $519,000, Terms. Suites are also available for Lease. price reduction

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LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $149,000 $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. for $4,000 Month. SAME OWNER: BARTENDING ACADEMY OF TACOMA, Since 1959, Very profitable, Training provided. SUCCESSFUL, LONGTIME ESTABLISHMENT. Manufacturer of Award Ribbons and Rosettes with large wholesale customer base. (Local and out of state business) Business is for sale. $60,000 Plus inventory.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to:

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Tacoma Weekly 304 Puyallup Ave., #1 Tacoma WA 98421

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Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 304 Puyallup Ave. Tacoma. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

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