Page 1

DESTINY CITY FILM FEST B1

-2 1987 01 8

because

tters ma

ART NEWS ROUNDUP B2

com

TWO FOR TACOMA A10

muni ty

Because Community Matters.

TACOMAWEEKLY NEWS FREE • FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2018

WWW.TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

Economic development boom continues for Tacoma in 2018

TACOMA URBAN LEAGUE CELEBRATES 50 YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY

T’wina Franklin, president and chief executive officer of the Urban League. By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

The $150 million Convention Center Hotel project, supported by Chinese investor Chun Yang, is under construction and Phase I will open in 2020. By Andrew Fickes

T

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

acoma is crane city. Cranes are up for Point Ruston, The Napoleon, a 135-unit apartment building at Tacoma Avenue South, and the Convention Center Hotel project. In second quarter 2018, the crane will go

up for the Town Center project. And what’s certain is that more will follow. Much of this development in 2018 across Tacoma got its start last year, described by city leaders as a banner year for economic development. “2017 was a phenomenal year,” said Elly Walkowiak, assistant director of community and economic development. “There was amazing growth in all different sectors. You

saw the rise of the multifamily sector and a balanced economy; it hit all the marks. There was the implementation of foreign investments in the city and that represents the largest projects in the downtown.” The rise of the multifamily sector was marked by 810 new units breaking ground in 2017. There are now future plans for more than 1,238 u See DEVELOPMENT / page A9

BOTH SCHOOL LEVIES PRIMED TO PASS By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma voters have seemingly approved both Tacoma School District levies that will fund school programs and enhancements. Proposition 1 is a four-year Replacement Educational Programs and Operations levy that will fund day-to-day operations that are not covered by state funding, add funds for special education, enhance arts, music and athletic programs, help maintain school buildings as well as provide more funding for antibullying programs. The $70 million levy replaces one that is expiring this year, and is passing with 62.91 percent of the vote, according to early returns. Proposition 2 is a six-year techu See LEVIES / page A9

PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMA SCHOOLS

Residents voted on two preplacement levies for operations not covered by state funds, technology and programs in Tacoma Public Schools.

Tacoma Urban League, known for its empowerment of African Americans and other disenfranchised groups in South Puget Sound via various social and economic advocacy programs and services, has had a rich history since its founding during the civil rights movement in 1968. That vivid history will be on full display on Tuesday, Feb. 20, the exact day of its founding, when the Urban League and all who believe in its mission will come together for a kickoff 50th anniversary open house. “We welcome people to come on home to the Urban League,” said T’wina Franklin, president and chief executive officer of the Urban League. “A lot of people are associated with the Urban League, but we also want to invite people who don’t know about the programs.” Starting at 3 p.m. and going until 7 p.m. at its offices, 2550 S. Yakima Ave., the open house will feature a pictorial history, along with text, spotlighting the contributions made by hundreds of Urban League workers and volunteers over the past 50 years. Those new to the Urban League will also have the opportunity to learn about how to volunteer and get involved in the many programs the organization has to offer. “A story lab will invite people to share their story (of how the Urban League has impacted them),” Franklin said. “A videographer will film their story and weave it all together into one video, which will be shown at the Signature Gala (on May 21). We expect the community to flow in and out and exchange stories or bring their curiosity.” Franklin is also proud to announce that the founder of the Urban League, Thomas Dixon, will be in attendance. That same evening, Franklin and Dixon will receive a proclamation from Tacoma City Council during the regular council meeting that will honor Dixon’s work. Dixon will visit with guests during the open house. The Urban League will celebrate its 50th anniversary throughout the year. Other celebratory events comprise the Living Library from 6:30-9 p.m. on April 13 at the University Place Library, where stories of the Tacoma-Pierce County civil rights movement will be told; the Signature Gala at 6 p.m. on May 21 at the Thea Foss Waterway; Urban League’s Family Reunion program at Cheney Stadium in July; and the seventh annual Holiday Luau on Dec. 7. Visit thetacomaurbanleague.org as program details are updated throughout the year.

TACOMA HOOPS

BLACK HISTORY MONTH EVENTS

TOMMY CASTRO AND THE PAINKILLERS

A12

B4

B5

GUEST EDITORIAL What does ending sexual harassment look like? And how does it happen? Stories and accountability are elements of it, but they alone do not shift the culture. PAGE A5

Pothole of the Week.....A2 Bulletin Board...............A2

Sports..........................A10 Hot Tickets..................A11

Look for daily updates online: tacomaweekly.com

CONNECT WITH US ON SOCIAL MEDIA! FACEBOOK: fb.com/tacomaweekly TWITTER: twitter.com/tacomaweekly INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/tacomaweekly

City Life....................... B1 Culture Corner............. B3

Calendar..................B6 Word Search............B6

Two Sections | 24 Pages


Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 16, 2018

Pothole of the Week

Deputies searching for Tacoma woman accused of repeatedly victimizing Olympia woman

MCKINLEY AND PUYALLUP AVE.

After appearing on the side of area milk cartons for months and months, we’ve come to the realization that our beloved Percival, the Pothole Pig, is not coming home to us. The celebrated swine has either found a new life somewhere else, or perhaps became a delicious and nutritious part of someone’s breakfast at some point. Whatever the case, we will miss him and be forever in his debt as his dedication to the City of Destiny led to so many nasty potholes being filled. This week, Carter the Crater Gator found another impressive road divot to stretch out in. To be honest, we’ve had a difficult time with this critter. He can’t get over the fact that he’ll always be second-fiddle when compared to Percival, and frankly, he’s been getting a little snarky. While we’ve let him know that his replacement could waddle through the front door of the Tacoma Weekly office at any moment, the toothy sourpuss has countered with his own threat of “pulling a Percival” and disappearing. With this in mind, we are still in the process of trying out new pothole seeking varmints. If you’ve got any ideas, please send them to jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

CASCADIA TAX PROFESSIONALS

Serving the South Sound area with 10 years of experience!

By David Rose

Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

Thurston County Sheriff’s detectives are asking for the public’s help to find a Tacoma woman wanted for second degree robbery, residential burglary DAVID ROSE and I.D. theft in the first degree. Deputies say 52-yearold Rita Salois has been traveling back and forth between Tacoma and Olympia to burglarize a woman’s home and stalk her. Investigators say she has broken into the victim’s house on six different occasions. “The victim in this case is in fear.

Nobody should have to live like she has for the last couple of years,” said Det. George Oplinger. Surveillance video shows Salois inside the victim’s home going through drawers and looking for items to steal. “On one occasion where she went in, the victim saw her from the outside coming in. She hid in the house because she's afraid of her. When Ms. Salois found the victim inside the house, she forced her to give her money,” said Oplinger. Salois is even accused of victimizing her own mother by depositing stolen checks into her account and then withdrawing the funds. “When the checks came back as no good because they were stolen, the bank is now going to the mother who owes the

bank $5,000,” said Oplinger. Deputies are hoping someone in the Tacoma area can tell them where Salois is staying or provide any information that will lead to her arrest. “There's information that we have that she’s on methamphetamines. She’s just out of control and she’s not making rational decisions.” If you know where deputies can find Rita Ann Salois, call Crime Stoppers at 1 (800) 222-TIPS. There is a cash reward of up to $1,000 for information that leads to her arrest. This is one of the cases being featured this weekend on “Washington’s Most Wanted” airing Friday at 11 p.m. on Q13 FOX and Saturday at 9:30 p.m. on JOEtv and 10:30 p.m. on Q13 FOX.

Two charged, 20 pounds of meth seized The Pierce County Prosecutor’s Office has charged Gilda Yamiless Licea Richardo, 21, and Fransisco Silva, 40, with unlawful possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver after they were found with more than 20 pounds of methamphetamine and a pound of heroin. “We’ve wiped out the local meth labs,” said Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. “Now we see it delivered up the I-5 corridor and this is one of the largest seizures I can recall.”  On Feb. 8 just before five in the morning, while conducting a search pursuant to a warrant on 43rd Street

in Tacoma, Lakewood Police arrested Silva and Licea Richardo. Silva admitted that he had methamphetamine in the house, but denied having heroin in the residence. Officers, assisted by a narcotics detection dog, found a one-pound package of suspected methamphetamine and a box containing nine one-kilo packages of suspected methamphetamine, a total of approximately 20 pounds. Officers also located approximately one pound of heroin and several pills that the officers identified as Oxycodone in the residence. In the bedrooms of both defendants officers found cash,

totaling nearly $60,000, including $35,540 found in a suitcase. Officers also found a Colt .38 caliber handgun and .38 caliber ammunition. In an interview with detectives, Silva said he had lived in the residence for approximately four months and that his role had been to watch the residence and hand out narcotics to buyers. Licea Richardo brought the narcotics to the residence. Bail for both Silva and Richardo was set at $500,000.  Charges are only allegations and a person is presumed innocent unless he or she is proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Bulletin Board SERVE A STINT ON CITY COUNCIL – APPLY NOW Tacoma City Council has directed the city manager to start the process to collect and review candidates to temporarily serve as the District 2 City Council member while Councilmember Robert Thoms serves a six-month tour of duty in Afghanistan as a U.S. Navy Reserve commander. Applications for the temporary appointment are available on the city’s website and at the clerk’s office. The deadline to turn in applications is Feb. 22, with interviews of potential appointees set for the March 6 study session, two days after Thoms leaves for deployment. “It’s going to be a short timeline, but we want to make sure we get someone appointed quickly,” Mayor Victoria Woodards said. The city had announced last week that Thoms would be leaving to serve in Kabul, Afghanistan as part of Operation Resolute Support and had originally mentioned that At-Large Councilmembers Lillian Hunter and Conor McCarthy would pay special attention to the needs of community members in Thoms’ district while he was deployed. The city’s District 2 spans Tacoma’s North End, downtown and the Tideflats. Further reflection and citizen comments, however, prompted a shift from that plan to one involving a temporary appointment to serve until Thoms returns to Tacoma to serve out the rest of his four-year term. Both Hunter and McCarthy later supported the idea of having a temporary appointment. For his part, Thoms pledged to keep in contact with his constituents and city staff as best he could during his deployment as well as advise the appointee on issues and concerns. “I want to make sure District 2 is well represented while I’m gone,” he said during a study session on the issue on Tuesday. The call for temporary appointees is not likely to draw the large numbers who submitted applications the last time the council sought to fill a vacancy because of the truncated timeline and the fact that applicants must reside within the district. The last appointment process to fill a council vacancy occurred last year, after then Councilmember Victoria Woodards stepped down to concentrate her efforts on running for mayor and to avoid triggering the city charter’s rules on term limits. Council members are not allowed to serve more than two full terms without a gap in service. Her council seat was an at-large position, which drew 55 applicants from around the city. The council ultimately selected former Councilmember Lauren Walker Lee to serve out the term because of her familiarity with the council and the city’s issues as well as her pledge not to run as the incumbent when the term ended. That position is now being served by Hunter, who was also on the short list to fill Woodards’ vacant seat.

REMINDER: HERITAGE GRANT APPLICATIONS NOW AVAILABLE The City of Tacoma’s Historic Preservation Office has announced that 2018 Heritage Project Grant applications are now available. Eligible applicants include nonprofits, organized community groups, public agencies and educational institutions. Applicants can apply for anywhere between $1,000 and $10,000 for their project. This is a matching grant with up to $40,000 in total awards being granted. “Our goal with the Heritage Project Grant Program is to support projects that increase public awareness and access to Tacoma’s history,” said Historic Preservation Officer Reuben McKnight. “We look forward to seeing innovative and informative proposals.”  Funding can be used for a number of projects including exhibitions, workshops, events or educational activities, development and production of interpretive materials, professional services required to research a historical publication or register nomination, documentation of an artifact or historical site, a historic site assessment, conservation materials and, in some limited cases, capacity building for organizations with heritage as their primary mission. Activities receiving heritage funding may be one-time events, a small number of closely related events, or an ongoing program or neighborhood public history project. Applications are due Feb. 28. To find out more about the grant or to download an application, go to cityoftacoma.org/HeritageGrant or e-mail lhoogkamer@cityoftacoma.org or call (253) 591-5254. CHAMBER RECOGNIZES WORKWELL DESIGNEES Chamber Luncheon, featuring the WorkWell Awards, is a Chamber awards program designed to recognize local employers who are committed to addressing workforce health issues. The Chamber celebrated strides Pierce County businesses are taking to make health and wellness a priority in the workplace. Congratulations to this year’s award designees: • Gold Designees: Received by an employer that implemented changes to all three categories of healthy eating, physical activity, and tobacco cessation – Better Business Bureau, CHI Franciscan Health, MultiCare Health Systems and Tacoma Public Schools.

• Silver Designees: Received by an employer that

implemented changes to two of the three categories of healthy eating, physical activity, and tobacco cessation: Tacoma Community House.

• Bronze Designee: Received by an employer that

implemented changes to one of the three categories of healthy eating, physical activity, and tobacco cessation: Generations Home Care. SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS ON PAGE A3


Friday, February 16, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

Bulletin Board CONTINUED FROM PAGE A2

• Active Transportation Advocate Designee:

Provides encouragement and incentives to their employees for using active transportation: MultiCare Health Systems.

• Happy Heart Designee: Demonstrate a broad and

long-term commitment to employee health and well-being: Better Business Bureau, CHI Franciscan Health, MultiCare Health Systems, Tacoma Community House and Tacoma Public Schools.

TIPS FOR PEOPLE WHO FEEL ILL DURING FLU SEASON The Washington State Department of Health has reported 10 deaths related to the flu in Pierce County, and 132 across the state. Flu season typically peaks in February and may continue through May.   Flu-like symptoms – fever, feverish chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches and tiredness – start suddenly, not gradually and a combination of these means you likely need to be seen by your primary care physician. If you are pregnant, diabetic, immunocompromised, or experience shortness of breath, such as chronic asthma or health failure, you should seek immediate medical care.

• Do still get your flu shot. The Centers for Disease

Control and Prevention (CDC) says it’s not too late. Primary care doctors, wellness/convenience clinics and most retail pharmacies can administer a flu shot.

• Don’t visit your local emergency room for a flu shot. Emergency departments should be reserved for medical emergencies – receiving a flu shot in the ER will come with longer wait times and higher out-of-pocket costs.

• Do seek medical care. If you are a typically healthy

person who’s had a flu shot but think you may be experiencing a common case of the flu, call your primary care physician, visit a convenience, retail or urgent care clinic and consider a virtual visit with a doctor from your mobile device or computer.

• Don’t infect others. If you are sick with the flu,

stay home to prevent spreading flu to others. Most healthy adults can infect others one day before symptoms develop and up to five to seven days after becoming sick, which means that you may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick

To find a flu vaccine provider near you, visit the CDC Flu Vaccine Finder at cdc.gov/flu and enter your zip code. (Courtesy of Dr. Eric Wall, market medical director, Pacific Northwest, United Healthcare) HUMANE SOCIETY PET FOOD DRIVE A RESOUNDING SUCCESS The “Fill the Little Red Wagon Pet Food Drive” kicked off Jan. 19 at Tacoma Subaru and culminated at Miranda Lambert’s Feb. 1 concert, benefitting the Humane Society for Tacoma and Pierce County’s animals and the pets they serve through the Pet Food Pantry.  Dog, cat, and rabbit food and treats poured in during the first portion of the drive held at Tacoma Subaru, 3838 South Tacoma Way. On Jan. 30, pet food donors’ names

were drawn, and the lucky winners received 50 pairs of tickets to Lambert’s concert. Bruce Titus Automotive Group then took it one step further and donated a brand new 2017 Ford Transit Connect, which Humane Society animals, volunteers, and staff will utilize for the Pet Food Pantry, Community Cat Program, spay/neuter services, and veterinary care in addition to transporting animals in from small or overcrowded shelters. Thank you Bruce Titus Automotive Group!  On Feb. 1, Lambert hosted four Humane Society adoptable dogs – two were transported in from Texas thanks to partner organization Project Freedom Ride – at the Tacoma Dome. A cuddle corner was set-up for Tacoma Dome staff and Livin’ Like Hippies band and crew to love on the animals and learn more about the programs and services available at the Society.  Later that evening, even more pet food and gift cards from local pet food suppliers came in during Miranda Lambert’s “Livin’ Like Hippies” concert. Lexie Olivier was the lucky winner who upgraded her tickets to the front row and got to meet Lambert herself. As Olivier summed up, “I’m shaking right now!” Thank you Miranda Lambert and Live Nation! Pet food donations help the Humane Society serve more than 8,000 animals at its facility each year and many more animals in the community through the Pet Food Pantry.  For more information, please visit www.thehumanesociety.org. URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE TEAM AVAILABLE Pierce County Executive Bruce Dammeier and The Adjutant General Bret Daugherty signed an interagency agreement between Pierce County and Washington State Emergency Management on Tuesday, Feb.13. The agreement will enable Washington State Task Force 1 (WA-TF1), one of 28 national Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) urban search and rescue teams, to respond to state and local emergencies in Washington. The signing was held in the WA-TF1 warehouse in Tacoma, Pierce County Emergency Management. The Washington Task Force 1 (WA-TF1) was established in 1991 and currently has 26 participating agencies from three primary jurisdictions - Seattle Fire, King County, and Pierce County. The Task Force comprises more than 210 team members, drawn from fire departments, hospitals, law enforcement and public works agencies. WA-TF1 recently deployed to assist with Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma. UWT AWARDS COLUMBIA BANK PHILANTHROPY Columbia Bank is the recipient of the 2018 Corporate Gold Star Award, presented by the University of Washington-Tacoma at the third annual Corporate Community Circle Breakfast. The breakfast, held on Feb. 8, brought together representatives from more than 60 Puget Sound-area organizations that support UW-Tacoma philanthropically. The Gold Star Award recognizes one organization whose support of the campus during the year and over time has had a significant impact on the institution and its students. Since the opening of the permanent campus in 1997, Columbia Bank has supported UW-Tacoma, contributing to excellence funds, scholarships and to the construction of William W. Philip Hall, a major gathering spot for campus and community. Columbia Bank was a founding SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS ON PAGE A9

TOP STORIES ON

tacomaweekly.com

 RUSTON ANNEXATION SPAT ENDS WITH PERMITTING DEAL  TACOMA BAPTIST HEATING UP  YEAR OF THE DOG  TMP BRINGS SINATRA TRIBUTE TO THE STAGE  CITY EDGES TOWARD FINAL DETENTION RULES  COUNCIL CALLS FOR PAUSE TO STUDY CITIZENS FORUM OPTIONS

Changes Coming to Paid Sick Leave cityoftacoma.org/employmentstandards

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN BEING A PART OF A FOSTER CARE COMMUNITY! We are now recruiting homes to be a part of a Mockingbird Family Model Constellation offering Therapeutic Foster Care!

Family Behavioral Health

Stop by our Foster Parent Informational Open House every Wednesday from 4:30-6:30!

We are located at 5219 N. Shirley St. Suite 3 in Ruston.

Join Family Behavioral Health as we build an intentional community of support around foster families. Interested in learning more?

Reach out to us at 253.348.0684 or email amyso@ccsww.org

THEFT & CREDIT CARD FRAUD

The University Place Police Department needs your help to identify the pictured woman, who is suspected of stealing an elderly woman’s wallet and fraudulently using the stolen credit cards to purchase thousands of dollars in electronics. Sometime between 9:30 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, January 31st, 2018, an elderly woman’s wallet was stolen from inside her purse while the victim was shopping at the Trader Joe’s grocery store on Bridgeport Way in the City of University Place. When the victim called her credit card company she was informed

Fridays at 10:30pm on

that her cards had just been used at 12:18 p.m. to make a $3,700 purchase at the Tacoma Mall Apple store and at 12:39 p.m. to make a $2,900 purchase at the Best Buy store in Tacoma. Surveillance video from the Apple store and the Best Buy store revealed that the victim’s stolen credits cards were used by an unidentified suspect who appears to be an Asian or Hispanic female in her 30’s. She has a slender build and long black hair, and was seen wearing blue athletic shoes, blue jeans, a dark blue hooded jacket, and a black Nike baseball hat.

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case.

Call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) www.TPCrimestoppers.com

All Callers will remain anonymous

6824 19th Street W, #139 • University Place WA 98466


Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 16, 2018

BE WELL

inside & out

FIRCREST’S COST LESS PHARMACY OPENS IN NEW LOCATION

At its new home just across the street from the Fircrest Golf Course entrance, neighbors are welcoming Cost Less back with open arms By Matt Nagle

matt@tacomaweekly.com

Those in the Fircrest community who have known and loved Cost Less Pharmacy & Wellness have reason to celebrate, as the family-owned business has reopened in a new location at 1375 Regents Blvd. Now just one block away from their former home of nearly 30 years, the friendly and personable owners and staff have been enjoying welcoming back their loyal customers and making new ones in these first few weeks of being open again. Cost Less Pharmacy is a true family owned and operated endeavor. Father and son team Dale and Nick Bisceglia own the business with partner Hien Tran and work the pharmacy side of the operation. The family matriarch, Dale’s wife/Nick’s mom Lynette Bisceglia, runs the gift shop side with Hien Tran’s wife Gwen Tran and employee Sokie Chhim. Together, this tightly knit group has built the business to become a pillar of the Fircrest community, which is reinforced even more so now that they own the former bank building they’ve reconverted into the new Cost Less Pharmacy. “It was a mistake to close and we had remorse right away,” said Tran, speaking of Dale’s retirement five years ago that led to the closing of the business. “We had been itching to come back but there was an agreement in place that we couldn’t open for five years. Nick and I decided we’d work together to re-open it five years later.” Dale came back too, having missed the joys of working in the neighborhood with his family. Born and raised just outside of Fircrest, he has been a local for more than 60 years. “We made a big investment in the community because we love it. It’s a nice place to be. That’s why we’re here,” he said. Son Nick agreed, having worked at the pharmacy starting when he was around 11 years old. “I grew up in the business and came to know a ton of our customers,” Nick said. “When we sold, it was like taking a part of life out of us – it was a bummer. This building came available three years ago so we were able to take the proceeds from the sale and reinvest so that we could do this and really invest in the community again. We’re going to be here for a long time. We’re very excited to be back.” The experience you’ll have at Cost Less Pharmacy & Wellness beats the big name pharmacies by a mile.

PHOTO BY MATT NAGLE

Cost Less owners (from left) Dale Bisceglia, Nick Bisceglia and Hien Tran are ready to serve you.

Not only is it a pleasure just stopping in to visit with those who work there, Cost Less offers low prescription prices, for pets too. As Nick put it, “We provide excellent customer service and low prescription prices. When you give people great service and a great price, they’re going to keep coming back.” “We know how to treat people,” Dale said. “Customer service was our priority then and still is. That’s what people want. They don’t want to be a number.” It’s a snap for new customers to transfer their pharmacy needs, too. “Just call or come in and we take care of the rest,” Nick explained. “There’s literally no work on the customers’ end. We just need an updated prescription list from the customer and we will contact the pharmacy or the doctor if necessary.” The pharmacy offers a wealth of services – from blood pressure and cholesterol checks to immunizations (no appointment necessary) including schoolrequired vaccines, flu shots and pneumonia/shingles vaccines (be sure and ask about the new shingles vaccine, which has nearly double the effectiveness). Also, Cost Less participates in the free and convenient mobile app RX2GO that allows users to submit refill requests and more. Equally enticing to customers as the pharmacy is the tasteful and beautifully designed gift shop side of

the business. As buyer, Lynette has keen a eye for quality merchandise that has to be seen to be fully appreciated. Handmade soaps and personal care items, candles, purses and totes, elegant scarves, sun catchers, wall art and home décor…the list seems endless. Going back to when Cost Less was at its former location, it came to be a go-to place for customers looking for something special they couldn’t find anywhere else. Lynette has started bringing in more local companies and artists’ work as well, such as Fox Island Trading Company – hand crafted, regionally sourced sustainable bath, body and skin care products made from spa grade organic Eco-cert natural ingredients and no animal testing. “We have fun building displays and chatting with people who come in looking for different ideas. That’s where we try to give our expertise,” Lynette said. “We’re evolving every day – meeting new people and bringing in new merchandise all the time.” And Lynette didn’t forget about moms and babies, either, with a line of products both fun and practical. Moms love the revolutionary NoseFrida brand nasal cleaner for babies, and little ones just can’t get enough of the plush toy Warmies on display – microwavable for warmth and lavender scented for comfort. A major attraction among the gifts is the wide selection of greeting cards by Designer Greetings – every one of them 50 percent off the marked price. In these days when a nice card can cost anywhere from $5 to $7 and up, half-off is an amazing deal. Cost Less in Fircrest is the only source in the area for Designer Greetings and includes gift bags, tissue papers and boxed note cards. Now that the Cost Less family owns their own building, options abound for adding amenities to the business. “We have a drive-thru window that we hope to implement,” Nick said. “It’s not a guarantee – we’ll see if our customers want to go that way or not. We also have additional spaces in the building to maybe team up with a nurse practitioner or doctor and they could have a satellite office here – all sorts of different services we’re considering.” Keep an eye out for a grand opening event as well in the coming months. Cost Less Pharmacy & Wellness (1375 Regents Blvd., Suite 101, Fircrest, WA 98466) is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., closed Sunday. Learn more at www. costlessfircrest.com or by calling (253) 564-1104.

FINE HAIR SPECIALIST

ADVERTISE WITH US!

253-922-5317

KATHRYN ELLIOTT

AT BEAUREGARDS SALON 4117 Bridgeport Way W. University Place, WA 98466

Dentures Complete Set

253-565-7787 Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday

649

$

TT Hair Salon & Supplies Theresa T., Cosmetologist

Relines $195 each

BUSINESS HOURS: Monday - Friday 8am - 8pm Saturday 9am - 7pm Sunday By Appointment ns Statio se! a le r fo

PT. DEFIANCE DENTURE & DENTAL CLINIC

5904 N. 45th St. • Tacoma 98407 • 253-238-1783

6409 6th Ave., #14, Tacoma, WA 98406

(253) 507-3795

tthairsalon72@gmail.com

Fife Dental Center 6106 20th St. East • Fife, WA 98424 Cost Less Pharmacy is back in Fircrest!

NEW L O C AT I O

N!

Low cash prescription prices and the same great customer service Drug Sildenafil 20mg (Revatio) #100 Celecoxib 200mg (celebrex) #100 Atorvastatin 40mg (Lipitor) #100 Tamsulosin 0.4mg (Flomax) #100 Metformin 500mg (Glucophage) #100 Finasteride 5mg (Proscar) #100 Losartan 50mg (Cozaar) #100 Call us Duloxetine 30mg (Cymbalta) #100 a r fo today Clopidogrel 75mg (Plavix) #100 price quote! Paroxetine 20mg (Paxil) #100

Our Price

Walgreens

$45.99 $30.99 $18.99 $18.99 $6.99 $15.99 $10.99 $27.99 $20.99 $18.99

$1,769.29 $699.99 $486.59 $309.89 $56.59 $249.89 $189.99 $749.89 $453. 29 $93.19

Transferring your medications to our pharmacy is easy, we will take care of everything ***prices effective 2/13/18 and may be subject to change*** IMMUNIZATIONS UNIQUE GIFTS DELIVERY

(shingles, flu, pneumonia, ect.) on site with no appointment necessary Our greeting cards (Designer Greetings) are 50% off all day every day Local delivery of medications to nursing homes, adult care homes and personal residences on case by case basis

1375 Regents Blvd #101, Fircrest, WA, 98466 | 253-564-1104 www.costlessfircrest.com

(253)926-3803

Thank you for voting us “Best Medical Professional 2014” in Fife, Milton, & Edgewood

NEW PATIENT SPECIAL $100 Target gift card

with NEW patient x-rays, exam and cleaning

Lisa L. Buttaro, DDS MAGD “Exceptional Care with Compassion”

www.fifedentalcenter.com


Friday, February 16, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

Guest Editorials

Congressman Adam Smith discusses concerns with authoritarianism

By Adam Smith

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Adam Smith released a video statement on Feb. 7 in reaction to President Trump’s actions attacking the freedom of press, the FBI, and the Department of Justice. The full video can be found at www. facebook.com/RepAdamSmith/videos/2037207609639073 and the transcript is below. Last year at a town meeting, I had a constituent ask me a very blunt and straightforward question. He asked me if I thought Donald Trump was a fascist. And at the time, I said no. I said look, I disagree with him on policy and just about everything he does and says, but we are a nation of laws, not of individuals. We have a Constitution, we have institutions around that. He was elected president, but no I don’t think he is a fascist. I feel to a certain degree that I owe that constituent an apology. Because while Donald Trump may not be a fascist, he certainly seems like he is aspiring to that level of authoritarianism.  I make this video to ask everybody to stand up for the institutions of our democracy however you feel about Donald Trump’s policies. I oppose just about every single one of them; I can’t think of a thing I agree with him on. Mostly I oppose the insulting and belittling way he talks about absolutely everybody. I think it’s not just beneath the office of the Presidency, but it also sends a horrific example for how we should conduct ourselves in public life. But even if you support him, even if you support the tax cut, or if you support some other aspect of his policy, please stand up for the institutions of our country and for the Constitution and don’t let him push us toward an authoritarian government. Now what am I talking about? It’s a whole bunch of different things. First of all, when he came out and said that Democrats that didn’t applaud him at the State of the Union were

un-American and even treasonous as if we’re all supposed to bow down in front of our king. That’s not the way this country works. We have free speech. Republicans didn’t clap, didn’t stand up when President Obama spoke. We have the right to express our own opinion, not to simply worship the person who happens to be our leader at the moment. And then there’s the fact that came to my attention as the ranking member of the Armed Services Committee that the president wants the military to essentially give him a parade – to have a parade of military might down Pennsylvania Avenue. This is wrong on so many levels that it’s hard to get through them all. To begin with, civilian control of the military is a bedrock principle of this county. We don’t want the military running the country. President George Washington, a military man himself, was very focused on the notion that the military far too often took over and ruined republics and democracies, going all the way back to Julius Caesar for that matter. We wanted to be a nation of civilian control and we love our military and the service that they provide for us, but one of the things that they fought and died for in all those wars is freedom and opportunity for all and for Donald Trump to want the military to march down and salute him is like North Korea or Russia. It’s what authoritarian regimes do. It’s not what liberal democracies do. And there are also his attacks on the media, the FBI and the Justice Department. He right now is systematically trying to completely trash two of our most important institutions, the FBI and the Justice Department, all because the FBI and the Justice Department are rightly looking into Russian interference into our election. That’s their job. But the president is trying to tear them down and demanding loyalty from members of the Justice Department and members of the FBI. They are supposed to be loyal to the law, not to a single person. The narcissistic egomania of President Trump is definitely bleeding over into a thought in his head that this is all about him. It’s not. It’s about the country. It’s about the Constitution. Again, we are a nation of laws, not of people. And then there are his constant attacks on the media,

constantly calling them fake news and attacking any media outlet that dares criticize him and going so far as to say that they’re not legitimate and that they’re fake news. As he travels and as his cabinet people travel, they’re banning the media from following what they do. Now look, I am a politician and I have been doing this for a while. There have been many critical things written about me in the media. I don’t like it when it happens, but I do like the fact that I live in a country where the media is free to do that. President Trump doesn’t seem to. He seems to want to banish the media. If you look around the world and you see how authoritarian regimes spread, that’s always their first step – silence the critics, silence the opposition, shut down the media. Putin does it in Russia, we’ve seen it happening in Turkey and in the Philippians, in countries in Eastern Europe right now. And certainly we’ve seen it in long ranging authoritarian regimes in other parts of the world. We don’t want to see it here. Again, I have disagreements with President Trump on policy, on immigration, on healthcare. I’ve said earlier that if you support his policies, I get that, but this is about more than that. Where healthcare is concerned, of course, he doesn’t actually have a policy. That’s one of my biggest concerns. But beyond all of that, regardless of how you feel about the policies, the Constitution, the institutions that make us a free and democratic society are what we should cherish the most. Donald Trump is president right now, I’m a Congressman right now. In years to follow, neither one of us will be here. There will be people that will follow us. That’s the way this country is set up – that we are a nation of laws, not of people. Donald Trump seems to want to make it all about him, and is creeping toward authoritarianism in America, no place in the democracy that was set up so long ago and that has worked so well for us. Again, now I understand if people support him on his policies, but please stand up for the institutions that make us a free society and don’t let President Trump make this all about him. Don’t let his ego drag us into an authoritarian government. We don’t need that; we need the freedom of the democracy that has served us so well for so long.

vape pens, and all the components that go into them such as batteries and e-liquids, like the ones I manufacture here in Washington. As a key part of this rule, all of these products will have to go through an extremely difficult, expensive and lengthy re-approval process if they were not on the market before 2007. For the majority of the small vape shops that opened after 2007 and operate in our state, this would kill their business. We need the Cole-Bishop Act now! Without Cole-Bishop, small vape retailers and manufacturers like me will have to pay approximately $1 million per product we produce. That would be fiscal prohibition. It would spawn an underground, unregulated black market and that would negatively impact our state’s economy because of the losses in tax revenue and jobs. Vapers would lose out on the regulated products they enjoy and rely on. Swift approval of the Cole-Bishop Act would clarify the FDA’s rules on vaping, and provide fair and effective regulations, without undermining the FDA’s regulatory authority over newly deemed products. The Cole-Bishop Act would also go the very important extra mile of creating common-sense regulations for vapor

products, which include:

Legislators need to support vape industry, too

By Marc Jarrett

While I am pleased that elected officials in Washington seized the opportunity to support the recreational marijuana industry by pushing back against U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ roll-back of the Justice Department’s legal marijuana policies, I wish they would defend the vaping industry with the same vigor by demonstrating their support for the Cole-Bishop Act. As the owner of a homegrown e-liquid manufacturer, as well as a recently opened brick and mortar vape shop in Lakewood, and through my many years of advocacy work as vice president of the Pink Lung Brigade, I know first-hand that the vaping community is in support of common-sense regulations, promoting safety, and keeping products available to shop owners and our customers. For example, the Pink Lung Brigade has spoken to the governor’s health panel on the importance of childresistant caps and proper labeling, and currently Pink Lung Brigade members and business owners had been self-regulating prior to any proposed legislation. However last year, the FDA finalized the “Deeming Rule” that extended their authority to include e-cigarettes,

• Require “keep out of reach of children” and

“underage sale prohibited” language on labeling

• Restrict advertising of vapor products only to

publications that meet FDA’s existing regulatory criteria of an adult only publications

• Prohibit self-service displays of vapor products; • Require nicotine content to be labeled on all vapor

products packaging;

• Require vapor retailers to register with the FDA

Please join me in urging elected officials at all levels – but especially Senators Maria Cantwell and Patty Murray – to support the vape industry as vigorously as recreational marijuana, by casting their support for the Cole-Bishop Act. Marc Jarrett is vice president of the Pink Lung Brigade (www.PinkLungBrigade.org) and owner of Banzai Vapors in Lakewood.

After #MeToo and #TimesUp

By Laura Finley, Ph.D.

I’m writing today about hashtags. In particular, I want to focus on what happens now that we’ve said #MeToo and #TimesUp. Like many women and girls, I said Me Too. And, like most, mine was not a one-time experience but rather a lifetime of inappropriate comments, catcalls, and unwanted sexual contact. As I’ve written before, I’m glad the Hollywood and USA gymnastics scandals have us talking about powerful men who abuse that power. But it isn’t just men in power who commit these same acts of sexual harassment, abuse, and assault. Men harass women and girls in the streets, at the stores, in schools. Everywhere. I am 45 years old. Not long ago, I experienced unwanted sexual conduct from someone half my age. The only power he has over me is that he’s a man who feels he’s entitled to say and do as he pleases to women. I have been catcalled by boys recently out of high school on the campus where I teach, a university with a commitment to social justice. A random guy at the gym thinks it’s okay to make a lewd comment about my weight, while another one at the market felt it was complimentary to mutter about my body to the poor female cashier, as if she wanted to hear his verbal diarrhea. As I drove to present a version of this piece at the Miami Women’s March second annual event, a man pulled up next to me so he could make a vulgar sexual gesture. So, yeah, MeToo. Speaking up matters. Shedding light on the scope of these problems to those who had inexplicably missed it, matters. Solidarity matters. And no, I do not believe this is fake feminism. But now what? Celebrities like Emma Watson, Reese Witherspoon and Shonda Rhimes have launched #TimesUp as perhaps a next step. With their attention, which wonderfully dominated the Golden Globes, they’ve also started a legal defense fund to help individuals come forward without fear of legal, career or financial retaliation. This is great,

and they’ve pledged to help create a cultural shift that will end sexual harassment. That’s where things get a bit more vague. What does that look like? And how does it happen? Stories and accountability are elements of it, but they alone do not shift the culture. Perhaps some other hashtag ideas can be helpful here. I have to admit, I’m not that big of a hashtagger, so forgive me if some of these may already be in circulation. But, how about #Iwilldisruptit? Someone saw or heard all of the instances I mentioned earlier, and in most cases of harassment, abuse and assault, that is true. What if in addition to being committed to speak up as persons who have been victimized, we also committed to speak up when we see or hear troublesome comments or behavior? Some of us do this, others need to start doing it. Or how about #teachkidsgenderequality? If we want to change our culture, we need to socialize both boys and girls differently. All kids need to know that no one is entitled to control your decisions and your bodies but you. I am guilty of being too nice, of too easily dismissing or forgiving. Many of us are. And yet I’m pissed off that I still have to live in this rape culture, and that my daughter does, too. As Barbara Kingsolver so importantly wrote, “Feminine instincts for sweetness and apology have no skin in this game.” As this last year has affirmed, when women channel their anger about gender inequality, amazing things happens.  I’m sure we can think of many more ideas – and they are that, not just hashtags – that will help transform our culture into one in which women don’t face these daily microaggressions. But in honor of the event I just spoke at, #powertothepolls. Let’s elect women, and the progressive men who support us, and make some political changes that will make male entitlement a thing of the past. Laura Finley, Ph.D., teaches in the Barry University Department of Sociology & Criminology and is syndicated by PeaceVoice.

Tacoma Weekly News® LLC 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma, WA 98421 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305 PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Dave Davison / dave@tacomaweekly.com Andrew Fickes / andrew@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chance Pittenger, Josiah Rutledge, Barb Rock COPY EDITING John Larson CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar, Lisa Lemmer WEB DEVELOPERS Ed Curran, Mike Vendetti PHOTOGRAPHERS Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard ADVERTISING Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com.


Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 16, 2018

METRO PARKS TACOMA BOARD HONORS AUTHOR FRANK HERBERT AND JUDGE JACK TANNER Parks along the waterfront will recall the legacy of two Tacoma natives

The process of naming a new public gathering space carved from the remnants of the former ASARCO smelting operation has sparked the parallel recognition of a pioneering African-American jurist, the late U.S. District Court Judge Jack Tanner. On Monday, Feb. 12, the Metro Parks Tacoma Board of Commissioners concluded a lengthy public process by naming the 11-acre waterfront site on the breakwater peninsula in honor of science fiction writer Frank Herbert’s 1965 novel “Dune” and its five sequels. The board approved the name Dune Peninsula at Point Defiance Park for the highly anticipated space that’s still under construction around the Tacoma Yacht Club boat basin. In addition, a winding, paved pedestrian loop also being built on the site has been named Frank Herbert Trail. Both are tentatively scheduled to open to the public later this year. During the same session, the board voted to rename what until then had been called Marine Park. The park, which occupies part of the Ruston Way shoreline area near Les Davis Pier, is now named Judge Jack Tanner Park. Tanner was a lifelong Tacoma resident who in 1978 became the first AfricanAmerican federal district JUDGE JACK TANNER PARK court judge in the Pacific Northwest. He passed away in 2006. The board chose to honor Tanner as part of its commitment to social equity, inclusion and diversity, key elements of the Strategic Master Plan formally adopted by the Metro Parks board in January. Metro Parks Commissioner Aaron Pointer, who is African-American and was a leading advocate to name a park after Tanner, called the decision a first step in correcting past inattention to the significance and contributions of residents of color. “Names mean a lot to people,” he said. “This kind of recognition will inspire a lot of people who might otherwise feel left out. Young kids who see the sign at the park may ask who Judge Tanner was. This may inspire them to learn where hard work and perseverance can lead.” The chosen names for the breakwater peninsula area were recommended by a Metro Parks committee of staff members who reviewed more than 500 recommendations submitted by the public last summer. Of those, about 300 were related to Herbert or “Dune.” Tanner’s name also was highly rated among the publicly submitted recommendations. Tanner was appointed to the federal bench by President Jimmy Carter. As a judge, he was known for his often controversial decisions on behalf of African-Americans

and others he believed had been the targets of inequitable treatment. In 1980, he ruled that inmates at the Washington State Penitentiary in Walla Walla had been the victims of cruel and unusual punishment, prohibited by the U.S. Constitution’s 8th Amendment. He’s also known for his 1983 “comparable worth” ruling that women should get equal pay for equal work. Although later overturned by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, the case remains a landmark in the history of women’s rights. Tanner was the son of a Tacoma longshoreman and union activist. After graduating from Stadium High School and serving in a segregated U.S. Army unit in World War II, the younger Tanner also worked as a longshoreman while earning degrees at what was then the College of Puget Sound and the University of Washington School of Law. Before his appointment to the bench, he was active in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and he marched for civil rights in Mississippi. As a lawyer, he regularly represented Puyallup, Nisqually and other Native American rights activists in disputes over fishing and treaty rights. “Dune,” one of the best-selling science fiction works of all time, was the first such novel with an environmental theme. And according to Herbert’s son, Brian, who

wrote a biography of his father, Frank Herbert’s devotion to the natural world evolved from his Tacoma childhood and his recollection of the foul smoke that spewed from the stack of the former ASARCO smelter. For about 100 years, the smelter complex dominated the waterfront adjacent to the breakwater, itself built from smelter slag, the waste residue of copper production. “Frank Herbert won the most prestigious awards in science fiction. Geographic features on Saturn’s moon Titan are named after words coined by him. And yet, not many people know he’s a native of Tacoma,” said Commissioner Erik Hanberg, an author who championed the cause. “His experiences in Tacoma shaped his appreciation for the delicate balance of nature, so it feels right to attach his name to a park that reclaims toxic land.” When Dune Peninsula at Point Defiance Park opens, it will feature panoramic views of Commencement Bay, Vashon Island, downtown Tacoma and Mount Rainier. A pedestrian-bicycle trail will connect it to the rest of Point Defiance Park, just west of the peninsula. The development is part of Metro Parks Tacoma’s Waterfront Phase 1, a huge restoration and redevelopment project that is central to Destination Point Defiance. This initiative, funded largely through a $198 million bond issue approved by Metro Parks voters in 2014, is designed to enhance the experiences of visitors to Point Defiance Park and honor its character.

STOP THE MADNESS™ ENTREPRENEUR 101™: 2 DAY LIVE SEMINARS

UNEMPLOYED? — YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE™ IMPROVE YOUR BUSINESS? — YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE™ FELON CAN’T GET WORK? — YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE™ RETIRED? — YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE™

tuesday february 27, 7:30pm

adv.tix $20 at bit.ly/wordsaction

START A BUSINESS

ENTREPRENEUR 101 INC PREPARED BY RETIRED JUDGE MICHAEL HECHT, MED, J.D.

MICHAELHECHT@YAHOO.COM

253-222-8001

at rialto theater / tacoma

An evening with Ijeoma Oluo Sonya Renee Taylor Jaclyn Friedman Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha


Friday, February 16, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

LEVERAGING OF ROADS DOLLARS LANDS CITY $21 MILLION IN GRANTS

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The City of Tacoma is well on track to top the campaign promise of turning the $175 million raised from the two streets packages voters approved in 2015 into $325 million worth of work. “Without that money, we couldn’t apply for these grants,” said Public Works Engineering Division Manager Chris E. Larson. The city, for example, just received $21 million in state and federal grants. Those six grants bring the running total to about $45 million toward the goal of $90 million, when the roads packages expire in 2025. “We are well ahead of where we thought we would be,” Public Works Director Kurtis D. Kingsolver said. “I feel really good about where we are at. I think we will exceed the $90 million, but I’d be hard pressed to guess what that will be.” The recent grants, from the Washington State Department of Transpor-

tation, Washington State Transportation Improvement Board and the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission, will fund projects that range from roadways and bridges to walking trails and pedestrian bridges. Specifically, $2.5 million will go to roadwork on South 19th Street, from Union Avenue to Mullen Street; $2.9 million will help fund the Yakima Avenue Bridge work; and $8.8 million will go toward re-doing Taylor Way between State Route 509 and East 11th Street. Another $50,000 will help improve the McCarver Street railroad crossing and $346,0000 will redo South 19th from Cedar Street to Bates Technical College. The most anticipated project funded by the slate of grants is a complete redo of East 64th Street from Pacific Avenue to McKinley Avenue. The $6,501,958 grant will help add curbs, storm drains, gutters, bike lanes and sidewalks to a new roadway along that well-traveled – and crumbling – strip after years of attempts. The city had been looking at ways to redo

the 64th Street roadway for the last 30 years, but the high price tag had put it out of reach until now. Future phases will extend the improvements along the full street, first to Portland Avenue and then to the city limits by about 2019. The total cost will be $9.5 million, with just $3 million coming from local dollars. “That’s a really big project,” Kingsolver said. “That is an example of what we want to do with street improvement dollars.” The two voter-approved road packages in 2015 levied a 1.5 percent utility tax and added a 20-cent per $1,000 tax on property as well as boosted sales taxes by .1 percent. Proposition 3 generates $130 million, increasing transportation funding from $118 million to $248 million over the 10-year term. Proposition A raises $4.5 million a year in sales taxes, more than doubling the Transportation Benefit District funding to $7 million.

That influx of cash for roadwork gets multiplied with grant dollars by either being used for design work or matching funds Tacoma’s street budget couldn’t afford. The $2.5 million grant the city recently received, for example, pays for the bulk of the 19th Street work, which only requires $850,000 from the city’s streets initiative fund. Outside of continuing to aggressively seek grants for future projects, one challenge now is coordinating with the utility companies about their need to dovetail street improvements onto their work schedules. “We don’t want to have to dig up a road twice,” Kingsolver said. “For the first time in my career, I’m the one driving the bus.” Public Works will provide its annual progress report of the work the street initiatives funded last year at the City Council study session on March 27.

A little help. A big difference. The assisted living services at Narrows Glen Senior Living Community are about the whole family and the whole YOU. Of course, we can help you with your daily needs. But did you know you will also have options for fitness, socializing, healthy fine dining, and more? And services are tailored to you, so you’ll get just the right amount of help you need, when you request it. But the best part? No matter if you need a little help or a lot, the difference you’ll feel will be amazing. Please call Narrows Glen to schedule your complimentary lunch and tour.

I n de p e n de n t & A s s i s t e d L i v i ng M e mor y C a r e

8201 6th Avenue • Tacoma • 253.256.1543 NarrowsGlenSeniorLiving.com LICENSE# 2385


Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 16, 2018

Lively discussion about Theater District revitalization set for Feb. 22 By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

Lighthouse Laundry Stay Warm this Winter!

HUG

E WA SHER

S!

Wash & dry your comforter in our HUGE 8 load washers! Open pm 8am - 9

26th & N. Pearl • Westgate S. Shopping Center Free Wi-Fi www.LightHouseLaundry.biz

Check us out at 2502 6th Avenue, Tacoma, WA 98406 Mon-Fri. 11am-7pm Sat. 10am-6pm Sun. 12pm-5pm Intuitive Readings available daily

more restaurants, to make it more lively. Part of the planning, Joy said, includes considerations in how to better utilize the Theater on the Square in the center of the district. In the summer, a major event there is the Farmers Market, but Joy said most of the time the park sits dormant. Theater on the Square is the hub to Pierce Transit’s bus turnaround there. Groups that organize events at the Square go through Pierce Transit to reserve the space. “We’re looking at how best that space can serve its purpose and who should best manage that and whether that is through a change in ownership, or lease, we’re not sure, but we’re exploring that during this process,” said Janine Robinson, project manager for Pierce Transit on TRANSFORM. Part of the planning around the Square also includes

improving transportation access into and out of the area. For more information about the project, call Dmitry Mikheyev at (253) 682-1725 or visit tacomatheaterdistrict.com.

IF YOU GO

A free and fun event inviting dialogue about the future transformation of the Theater District will be from 6-8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 in the Castle Hall (second floor) at Pythian Temple, 926 ½ Broadway. Light refreshments will be served.

TOP AUTO BODY

Tel: 253.922.8822 Fax: 253.922.8184 • Approved by all insurance companies • Imports & Domestics topautobodyfife @yahoo.com • Pick up & Delivery Service • Infinity certified Body Shop • Lifetime Warranty on Collision Repairs

5717 Pacific Hwy E. Fife, WA 98424

LOST PUPPY

HAPPY HOUR 3-7PM & 9-11:30PM

7 DAYS A WEEK! Sunday All Day Happy Hour!

GREAT BAR FOOD SPIRITS & ROTATING MICRO HANDLES

ALLIED ELECTRIC CORPORATION

Residential • Commercial • Auto Bonded • Licensed

253-756-5000 Emergency Service

Bob Corcoran, C.R.L. Fax: 253-756-0694

2519 N. Stevens Tacoma, WA 98407

Brown Female Terrier Mix

ie

d

el

e

ic tr

• Electrical Service • Commercial • Industrial • Residential • CCTV/Alarms WA 253-926-2000 5905 15th St. E

Corcoran’s Lock & Safe LLC

EXTENDED HAPPY HOUR DRINKS & APPETIZERS

c

www.crescentmoongifts.com

PHOTO BY KENYA SHAKOOR

Dozens gathered for the September 2017 Art Walk, organized by Spaceworks Tacoma, which gave community residents opportunity to see the Theater District up close and offer input on what revitalization of the neighborhood should look like.

Al l

Tacoma’s Theater District, home to numerous theaters, theater groups and complementary art-focused small businesses, is set for a transformation. City of Tacoma, Broadway Center for the Performing Arts and Pierce Transit are working in collaboration with community stakeholders to redesign the transportation and cultural hub bordered by 9th and 11th streets between Broadway and Pacific Avenue. The revitalization project called TRANSFORM was launched last spring when the project partners contracted with Seattle-based consulting firm Walker Macy to be the project’s planning consultant. Spaceworks Tacoma was also enlisted to begin community engagement efforts. Several community engagement efforts have transpired over the past year, including a September Art Walk presented by Spaceworks. Heather Joy, manager of Spaceworks Tacoma, said that during the Art Walk attendees got to experience the activity of the theater district and the possibilities of what changes were possible. Residents and transit riders were asked their opinion of what could work in the district. “We’ve had over 500 responses from the community already and we want to make sure that we are engaging the community along the way,” Joy said. On Thursday, Feb. 22, the project partners will check in with residents and community stakeholders and inform them of the progress of the project, while also receiving additional feedback via a non-traditional form: non-fiction, essays and poetry. Spaceworks partnered with Tacoma-based creative writing organization Creative Colloquy to solicit submissions from residents. The prompt asked: “What are your feelings on this project? Do you believe there is value in re-energizing our Theater District or not? How and why?” Many works were submitted and accepted, and five submissions have been selected to be read at the Feb. 22 event. The five submissions will be read by their respective creators, save for one who can’t make it. “We thought maybe this would offer a different platform to allow people to share their ideas,” Joy said. “We wanted to partner with (Creative Colloquy) to get some quality submissions. (The submissions represent) a broad spectrum of ideas, which is what we really wanted.” Joy said the next public event will be in April when the planning consultants present concrete revitalization projects that could take place. And then in July, Joy said, the project partners will present the final plan to the community. “From there Pierce Transit could use that plan in the redevelopment of the site, and we would want to encourage other developers to consider this plan when doing new projects,” Joy said. Joy said comments from the public have focused on the importance of discouraging new development from taking away from art and creativity in the downtown; sensible residential development that doesn’t lead to gentrification; preserving the historic architecture of the buildings; helping people walking at night in the district feel safer by adding more lighting, more amenities, and

co

rpo Ation r

Design and Construction of Electrical Systems TOLL FREE 1-877-272-6092 FAX: 253-926-2002

www.alliedmarinecorp.com FIFE, WA 98424

DR. JOSEPH M. MAZUKELLI DR. ANN HAUGEN DR. VICTORIA SANTIAGO

at 8th St. E. & Meridian on 2-10-18 Milton Area | $100 Reward

Please call us at (253) 348-0060 or (619) 780-1681

Follow us on Facebook!

Follow us on Twitter!

Follow us on Instagram!

facebook.com/tacomaweekly

twitter.com/tacomaweekly

instagram.com/tacomaweekly


Friday, February 16, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

t Development From page A1

multifamily transit-oriented development units. Now under construction are the 172-unit Stadium Apartments in Stadium District; The Napoleon; the 139-unit Grand on Broadway, which will include commercial space; the 35-unit Madison25 on Proctor Street; and the 104-unit KOZ, which are fully-furnished 250-400 square-foot apartments adjacent to the UW-Tacoma campus. In the planning phase is the 115-unit TRAX @ Tacoma Dome. A significant reason for commercial and multifamily housing growth downtown was attributed to a cascade of foreign investment. The $150 million Convention Center Hotel project that broke ground last summer, set to open in 2020, is backed by Chinese investor Chun Yang, CEO of Shanghai Mintong Real Estate Company. Town Center that broke ground late last year is a $125 million project that includes housing, retail and office space and is backed by Chinese investor Luo Xun Kun. Finally, The Hailey that broke ground in October 2017 is a $43 million mixed-use housing project located next to the Tacoma Public Library and is backed by Vietnamese investors the Hoang Quan Group. Although their ownership structure is local, The Napoleon and Point

t Levies From page A1

nology levy that will expand student access to technology and provide up-to-date tools for teaching for the careers of tomorrow. The levy would generate about $24 million a year. The levy is passing with 62.36 percent of the vote. The vote count will change as ballots are counted through next week, but statistically aren’t expected to alter the outcomes when they are certified on Feb. 23. Voter turn out was only 20.29 percent in the mail-only balloting, with only 25,098 ballots turned in so far from the 123,974 registered voters in the district, according to election figures. Combined, the levies will cost the average homeowner about $915 a year. Property owners currently pay $4.59 per $1,000 in property value, which breaks down to $4.11 for educational, athletic programs and teacher salaries and $0.48 for technology. The rise of new construction spreads the levy costs over more properties, meaning the new cost of local school funding programs from the levies will be $3.52 per $1,000 once both levies officially pass. For the owner of a median-priced home of $260,000, the actual tax payment will decrease by an average of $278 per year over the next four years. That’s compared to the $1,193

Bulletin Board CONTINUED FROM PAGE A3 donor to the Institute of Technology and is an ongoing supporter of the Milgard School of Business. Columbia Bank executives have been engaged with UW-Tacoma for more than 20 years. Currently, bank executives serve on four UW-Tacoma advisory boards. Columbia founder Bill Philip serves as honorary chair of UW-Tacoma’s current fundraising campaign. Executive Vice President Andy McDonald serves on the Chancellor’s Advisory Board and co-chairs the campaign’s corporate committee. UW-Tacoma is the recipient of the largest philanthropic investment Columbia Bank has ever made. The gift will help support the launch of the new Dressel Scholars Program, honoring Columbia’s widely respected late president and CEO, Melanie Jan LaPlant Dressel. Previous recipients of the Gold Star Award include MultiCare Health System and KeyBank. SALLY JEWELL TO GIVE COMMENCEMENT AT UPS Sally Jewell, U.S. secretary of the interior from 2013-17 and former president and CEO of outdoor retailer REI, will offer the Commencement address at University of Puget Sound’s 126th graduation ceremony on Sunday, May 13. She will be awarded the degree doctor of science, honoris causa. Jewell, an expert on energy and climate issues, led the federal office that manages about a fifth of the nation’s land, handling important decisions affecting natural resources, energy needs, public spaces, and tribal communities. Throughout her tenure, Jewell sought to balance the conservation of public spaces with the country’s need for economic progress, and prioritized policies to interest more young people in the great outdoors.  “It is with great pleasure and anticipation that we welcome Sally Jewell to address our graduating Class of 2018,” said Puget Sound President Isiaah Crawford. “As a professional and as an individual, Ms. Jewell has dedicated her life to making positive change, blending critical analysis, sound judgement, and intellectual curiosity

Ruston also are supported by significant shares in EB-5 investment, the federal immigrant investor program. Walkowiak said these foreign investments were procured through relationships forged many years ago. For example, former Mayor Marilyn Strickland’s travels to Vietnam ultimately cultivated investment from that country and led to the development of The Hailey. Meanwhile, much is to be said about the significant growth of industrial development in the Tideflats region of Tacoma. Three new multi-million dollar industrial centers will open over the next several years comprising Prologis Park, IPT Logistics Center and DCT Blair Logistics Center. Total build-out across all three centers is 3.9 million square feet. The centers will attract new employers providing 1,000-3,000 new high-paying jobs. Other industrial development includes: Tool Gauge expanding in Tacoma; Netherlands-based NewCold storage development under construction; and Bradken expanding in Tacoma with a total investment of $12.5 million. “In terms of job creation and unit construction, this will be a banner year,” Walkowiak said. Kim Bedier, interim director of economic and community development, said the City is prepared to take advantage of the compression factor it’s experiencing from Seattle, whether that’s in housing or business. “Tacoma is becoming newly discovered, offering new business opportunities,” Bedier said.

average homeowners pay now. Both levies were renewals of similar packages voters approved in 2014. Tacoma receives about 65 percent of its funding from the state and another 13 percent from federal and other sources. That leaves the district relying on voter-approved levies or bonds for about 22 percent of its budget. Those percentage are likely to get more locally focused in the coming years since the state’s formula for public education actually reduces funding for Tacoma Public Schools. Starting this year, Tacoma will receive less state money for students and teachers and will lose flexibility to pay for its teachers and programs. The district dipped into its reserve to fund $5 million rather than cut programs to cover the gap from the state. The replacement levies came at a time when Tacoma’s graduation rate has reached 86.1 percent – the highest since the state began officially tracking the statistic in 2003 and the seventh straight year of gains, according to data submitted to the state by Tacoma Public Schools. The gain in student achievement started in 2012, when the school district had a graduation rate of just 61.7 percent. The district set the goal of graduating at least 85 percent of its students by 2020, which was an aggressive goal considering it was labelled a “dropout factory” just years earlier when it had a 55 percent graduation rate. The district’s graduation rate now exceeds the statewide average graduation rate by a record 7 percent.

with a strong desire to serve her community. As a Pacific Northwesterner, she also shares our respect and love for this beautiful state and all it offers. Our graduates will benefit considerably from her experience and insights.” As secretary of the interior, Jewell sought to balance economic growth with conservation of public lands. She focused on investing in more sustainable water use and building trust with indigenous communities. An enthusiastic hiker and mountain climber – who scaled Mount Rainier seven times – Jewell made public access to federal lands a priority. She supported initiatives such as the Every Kid in a Park program, which gave all fourth-grade students and their families the right to a free, one-year pass to all U.S. national parks and public lands. She approved the first phase of the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan, which aimed to streamline approval for solar, wind, and geothermal projects, and to preserve more than 4 million acres of California desert land. She also traveled the country listening to scientists and raising the profile of federal government efforts to address climate change. Prior to her federal appointment, Jewell served as president and CEO of outdoor retailer REI. Earlier she worked in commercial banking for firms including Rainier Bank, Security Pacific Bank, West One Bank, and Washington Mutual. Born in London, England, and raised in Seattle, Jewell trained as an engineer at University of Washington and spent her early career as an engineer in the energy industry. Jewell has served with numerous nonprofits, including holding seats on the National Parks Conservation Association Board of Trustees and University of Washington Board of Regents. She helped found the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, which has protected and enhanced communities and public lands along the I-90 corridor from Puget Sound across the Cascades for more than 25 years. In 2012 she received the inaugural Land for People Award from The Trust for Public Land, and was awarded the Woodrow Wilson Award for Public Service.

We’re

HIRING Do you love to write? Do you love your city?

Join our team as a freelance writer!

Help us to expand coverage to the cities of Fife, Milton, Edgewood, Gig Harbor, Parkland, Lakewood, Spanaway and University Place!

Interested?

Send a letter of introduction and two writing samples to

matt@tacomaweekly.com. Please no phone calls or walk-ins.


Sports

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

TWO FOR TACOMA FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2018

SECTION A, PAGE 10

RESERVES TO PLAY FOR WISL TITLE, WHILE MASL STARS FIGHT ON

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

PHOTOS BY QUINN WIDTH / GOALWA.NET

(top) Lincoln head coach Jamila Jones notched his 100th career victory with a regular-season ending win over Lakes. The Lady Abes (21-1) have added two more to that tally in district play and have qualified for the state regional round. (middle) Lincoln senior Anthony Braggs Jr. throws down a two-hander. The Abes (22-0) are now the only undefeated team in the 3A state classification. (bottom) Emmitt Matthews Jr. is looking to extend Wilson's season into the regional round, but the Rams are going to need to get past Spanaway Lake in a loser-out game.

Tacoma teams flexing muscles at districts By Justin Gimse

PHOTOS BY KAYLA MEHRING

Tacoma Stars Reserves (7-2) vs. Bellingham United (8-1) Western Indoor Soccer League Championship Match Bellingham Sportsplex Saturday, Feb. 17 - 7:30 p.m. Tickets - Adults - $8, Kids - $5 Tacoma Stars vs. Ontario Fury Game 21 Accesso ShoWare Center Friday, Feb. 23 - 7:35 p.m. Tacoma Stars vs. Kansas City Comets Game 22 (season finale) Accesso ShoWare Center Friday, March 2 - 7:35 p.m.

F

By Justin Gimse

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

ans of Tacoma indoor soccer are living through the best of two worlds right now. Not only are the Tacoma Stars of the Major Arena Soccer League in a wild playoff race with rival Ontario, but on the smaller side, the Tacoma Stars Reserves will be playing for the Western Indoor Soccer League championship on Saturday, Feb. 17, in Bellingham. With just four games remaining in the regular season for the MASL Stars, the stakes in each game are ever-increasing. Following a 10-3 setback to perennial powerhouse (and Tacoma nemesis) San Diego on Fri-

day, Feb. 9, Tacoma finds themselves pretty much in a must-win state of affairs to close out the season. Tacoma (8-10) trails the Ontario Fury (9-10) by one game in the win column. The teams will face each other on Thursday, Feb. 15, in what is easily the biggest game of the season for both teams. A win by the Stars will put Tacoma in the driver’s seat; the boys from the Puget Sound have knocked-off their foes from the south in all three matches this season. A win would knot the teams’ records at 9-10, but with Tacoma gaining the advantage due to head-to-head competition. The Stars will have very little rest as they will then head back north to pay a visit to the Turlock Express (2-17). With nothing but pride on the line to play u See STARS / page A13

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

The district tournament fields have begun to shrink after a week of action, and several Tacoma-area basketball teams have either punched a ticket to the state regional round, or they are still fighting for their tournament lives. With several tournaments heading to their conclusion at gymnasiums in the Tacoma area, it’s the perfect time for basketball fans to catch some games that are definitely state-caliber, without incurring the extra Tacoma Dome costs. As of this issue of the Tacoma Weekly, there is but one undefeated boys team at the 3A state level. The Lincoln Abes have run their record to 22-0 after a 79-48 victory over Shelton to open 3A West Central District play on Thursday, Feb. 8, and a comeback 56-44 win over Capital on Saturday, Feb. 10. Lincoln is currently ranked third in the 3A RPI standings. The Abes will face their toughest foe of the season in the district semifinals. Ranked fifth in the RPI, Timberline (18-4) will put Lincoln to a true test on Thursday, Feb. 15. However, both teams have already qualified for the state regionals, so now the teams are chasing the best RPI number possible, as well as capturing the district championship. The RPI is a strange creature. The Garfield Bulldogs entered SeaKing District play as the top seed in the tournament and opened the tourney against eighth-seeded Seattle Prep. The underdogs ran out to a big lead early and held off the Bulldogs to win 58-55. The loss sends Garfield (21-1) into the consolation round, where they will need to win two straight loser-out contests to advance to the state regional round.

u See BASKETBALL / page A13


Friday, February 16, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

CAGESPORT CROWNS NEW CHAMP

FEBRUARY 15 – MARCH 3 THURSDAY, FEB. 15 - BASKETBALL Girls - Kentlake vs. Bellarmine Puyallup HS - 4A WCD Semis - 6 p.m. THURSDAY, FEB. 15 - BASKETBALL Boys - No. Thurston vs. Kelso Foss HS - 3A WCD Semis - 6 p.m. THURSDAY, FEB. 15 - BASKETBALL Boys - Span. Lake vs. Wilson Clover Park HS - 3A WCD Conso. - 6 p.m. THURSDAY, FEB. 15 - BASKETBALL Girls - Camas vs. Kentridge Puyallup HS - 4A WCD Semis - 7:45 p.m. THURSDAY, FEB. 15 - BASKETBALL Boys - Timberline vs. Lincoln Foss HS - 3A WCD Semis - 7:45 p.m. THURSDAY, FEB. 15 - BASKETBALL Boys - Fife vs. Foss Wilson HS - 2A WCD Semis - 7:45 p.m. FRIDAY, FEB. 16 - WRESTLING Washington State Mat Classic Tacoma Dome - 8:45 a.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 17, WRESTLING Washington State Mat Classic Tacoma Dome - 8:45 a.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Boys - 3A WCD District Title Game Puyallup HS - 12 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Girls - 3A WCD District Title Game Puyallup HS - 2 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Boys - 2A WCD District Title Game Wilson HS - 2 p.m.

PHOTOS BY ERNIE SAPIRO PHOTOGRAPHY

Cagesport 49 was another huge success at the Emerald Queen Casino on Saturday, Feb. 10. Daniel Swain captured the Cagesport featherweight championship with an arm-bar submission over Nathan Stolen. Terrance McKinney stopped Tyrone Henderson. Emmanual Carter defeated Quiton Wyland. Chase Hooper finished Wyatt Gonzalez. Eric McConico beat Dominique Smith. Chris San Jose stopped Anthony Zender. Fay Bursell outpointed Zach Conn. Jay Radick beat Darrio Mobley. Jacob Romero beat Cody Simpkins.

TACOMA AREA PREP SCORES

2B PACIFIC TOURNAMENT TOUTLE LAKE - 65, ILWACO - 61 NAPAVINE - 78, RAYMOND - 59 WINLOCK - 58, CHIEF LESCHI - 44 MORTON WP - 79, NO. BEACH - 44 THURSDAY, FEB. 8 3A WCD TOURNAMENT CAPITAL - 66, LAKES - 58 LINCOLN - 79, SHELTON - 48 TIMBERLINE - 77, STADIUM - 48 PRAIRIE - 53, BONNEY LAKE - 41 KELSO - 68, PENINSULA - 46 WILSON - 83, CENT. KITSAP - 57 SPAN. LAKE - 89, EVERGREEN - 68 NO. THURSTON - 96, HUDSON’S BAY - 63 2A WCD TOURNAMENT OLYMPIC - 59, STEILACOOM - 30 FRANKLIN PIERCE - 53, LINDBERGH - 52 FIFE - 66, SEQUIM - 45 PT. ANGELES - 52, HIGHLINE - 47 OT FRIDAY, FEB. 9 4A WCD TOURNAMENT ENUMCLAW - 60, KENTWOOD - 51 CURTIS - 51, KENNEDY - 48 UNION - 61, AUBURN - 43 FEDERAL WAY - 77, PUYALLUP - 51 OLYMPIA - 55, ROGERS - 53 (OUT) SKYVIEW - 60, AUBURN MV - 49 (OUT) BELLARMINE - 60, MT. RAINIER - 54 (OUT) KENTRIDGE - 89, DECATUR - 76 (OUT) SATURDAY, FEB. 10 3A WCD TOURNAMENT LINCOLN - 56, CAPITAL - 44 TIMBERLINE - 74, PRAIRIE - 63 KELSO - 65, WILSON - 54 NO. THURSTON - 67, SPAN. LAKE - 64 SHELTON - 76, LAKES - 74 (OUT) STADIUM - 51, BONNEY LAKE - 49 (OUT) PENINSULA - 59, CENT. KITSAP - 46 (OUT) HUD. BAY - 55, EVERGREEN - 50 (OUT) 2A WCD TOURNAMENT RENTON - 69, OLYMPIC - 49 NO. KITSAP - 70, F. PIERCE - 55 FIFE - 71, CLOVER PARK - 56 FOSS - 76, PT. ANGELES - 50 2B PACIFIC TOURNAMENT TOUTLE LAKE - 70, TOLEDO - 46 NAPAVINE - 57, WILLAPA - 56

SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Girls - 2A WCD District Title Game Wilson HS - 2 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Boys - 4A WCD District Title Game Puyallup HS - 6 p.m.

Sportswatch

BOYS BASKETBALL WEDNESDAY, FEB. 7 4A WCD TOURNAMENT ENUMCLAW - 58, ROGERS - 57 KENTWOOD - 69, OLYMPIA - 55 KENNEDY - 58, SKYVIEW - 54 CURTIS - 64, AUBURN MV - 49 AUBURN - 49, BELLARMINE - 45 UNION - 63, MT. RAINIER - 51 PUYALLUP - 63, KENTRIDGE - 51 FEDERAL WAY - 99, DECATUR - 51

SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Boys - 4A WCD District Title Game Puyallup HS - 4 p.m.

ADNA - 79, WINLOCK - 48 MORTON WP - 62, LIFE CHR. - 42 1B SEATAC TOURNAMENT TAC. BAPTIST - 66, GRACE ACAD. - 49 (OUT) MR LUTHERAN - 72, MV CHRIS. - 48 (OUT) MONDAY, FEB. 12 4A WCD TOURNAMENT OLYMPIA - 58, PUYALLUP - 54 (OUT) SKYVIEW - 63, AUBURN - 49 (OUT) BELLARMINE - 53, KENNEDY - 48 (OUT) KENTWOOD - 58, KENTRIDGE - 50 (OUT) 2B PACIFIC TOURNAMENT ILWACO - 69, WINLOCK - 66 (OUT) LIFE CHR. - 54, RAYMOND - 41 (OUT) TOLEDO - 74, CHIEF LESCHI - 52 (OUT) WILLAPA - 74, NO. BEACH - 51 (OUT) TUESDAY, FEB. 13 3A WCD TOURNAMENT SPAN. LAKE - 74, SHELTON - 54 (OUT) WILSON - 74, STADIUM - 49 (OUT) PRAIRIE - 65, PENINSULA - 59 (OUT) CAPITAL - 60, HUD. BAY - 44 (OUT) 1A WCD TOURNAMENT BELLEVUE CHRIS. - 57, PT. TOWNS. - 40 CASCADE CHRIS. - 42, VASHON - 32 2B PACIFIC TOURNAMENT LIFE CHRISTIAN - 63, ILWACO - 45 (OUT) TOLEDO - 50, WILLAPA - 45 (OUT) 1B SEATAC TOURNAMENT TACOMA BAPTIST - 68, NEAH BAY - 36 CEDAR PARK CH. - 53, MR LUTH. - 31 GIRLS BASKETBALL WEDNESDAY, FEB. 7 3A WCD TOURNAMENT LAKES - 33, PENINSULA - 50 LINCOLN - 71, YELM - 28 TIMBERLINE - 56, MT. TAHOMA - 37 PRAIRIE - 66, BONNEY LAKE - 19 KELSO - 68, SHELTON - 55 BETHEL - 73, NO. THURSTON - 31 WILSON - 65, HUDSON’S BAY - 47 GIG HARBOR - 73, EVERGREEN - 44 2A WCD TOURNAMENT NO. KITSAP - 67, FR. PIERCE - 31 FOSTER - 45, RIVER RIDGE - 42 EATONVILLE - 63, OLYMPIC - 58 KINGSTON - 42, STEILACOOM - 35 THURSDAY, FEB. 8 4A WCD TOURNAMENT KENTLAKE - 59, CURTIS - 36 BEAMER - 58, OLYMPIA - 41 UNION - 52, AUBURN MV - 47 BELLARMINE - 60, SKYVIEW - 20 ROGERS - 61, TAHOMA - 40 CAMAS - 45, HAZEN - 41 JEFFERSON - 64, SUMNER - 45 KENTRIDGE - 59, KENTWOOD - 10

2B PACIFIC TOURNAMENT WILLAPA - 56, MORTON WP - 52 TOLEDO - 35, RAYMOND - 30 OCOSTA - 50, ADNA - 40 MOSSYROCK - 51, SO. BEND - 37 FRIDAY, FEB. 9 3A WCD TOURNAMENT LINCOLN - 48, PENINSULA - 33 PRAIRIE - 70, TIMBERLINE - 18 BETHEL - 65, KELSO - 45 GIG HARBOR - 62, WILSON - 40 YELM - 51, LAKES - 43 (OUT) BONNEY LK. - 42, MT. TAHOMA - 38 (OUT) NO. THURSTON - 49, SHELTON - 46 (OUT) HUD. BAY - 55, EVERGREEN - 54 (OUT) 2A WCD TOURNAMENT NO. KITSAP - 51, RENTON - 48 PT. ANGELES - 55, FOSTER - 30 FIFE - 66, EATONVILLE - 22 WHITE RIVER - 64, KINGSTON - 50 SATURDAY, FEB. 10 4A WCD TOURNAMENT KENTLAKE - 54, BEAMER - 40 BELLARMINE - 57, UNION - 25 CAMAS - 56, ROGERS - 46 KENTRIDGE - 50, JEFFERSON - 24 OLYMPIA - 54, CURTIS - 51 (OUT) AUBURN MV - 61, SKYVIEW - 50 (OUT) TAHOMA - 37, HAZEN - 36 (OUT) KENTWOOD - 58, SUMNER - 54 (OUT) 1A WCD TOURNAMENT CASC. CHRIS. - 33, CH. WRIGHT - 21 (OUT) 2B PACIFIC TOURNAMENT NAPAVINE - 64, WILLAPA - 17 LIFE CHRISTIAN - 44, TOLEDO - 26 WAHKIAKUM - 56, OCOSTA - 32 ILWACO - 74, MOSSYROCK - 41 MONDAY, FEB. 12 3A WCD TOURNAMENT YELM - 78, WILSON- 64 (OUT) KELSO - 61, BONNEY LAKE - 30 (OUT) TIMBERLINE - 42, NO. THURSTON - 33 (OUT) PENINSULA - 70, HUD. BAY - 36 (OUT) TUESDAY, FEB. 13 4A WCD TOURNAMENT OLYMPIA - 44, JEFFERSON - 42 (OUT) ROGERS - 54, AUBURN MV - 33 (OUT) UNION - 56, TAHOMA - 45 (OUT) BEAMER - 50, KENTWOOD - 36 (OUT) 2A WCD TOURNAMENT EATONVILLE - 46, FR. PIERCE - 35 (OUT) KINGSTON - 45, R. RIDGE - 39 (OUT) RENTON - 43, OLYMPIC - 39 (OUT) FOSTER - 49, STEILACOOM - 34 (OUT)

FRIDAY, FEB. 23 - MASL SOCCER Ontario Fury vs. Tacoma Stars Accesso ShoWare Center - 7:35 p.m. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 28 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 9 a.m. - 11 p.m. THURSDAY, MAR. 1 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 9 a.m. - 11 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 9 a.m. - 11 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 3A Boys/4A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 3:45 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 3A Boys/4A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 5:30 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 4A Boys/3A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 7:15 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 4A Boys/3A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 9 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 8 a.m. - 11 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 4A Boys State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 3 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 4A Girls State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 5 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 3A Boys State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 3A Girls State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 9 p.m.


Section A • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 16, 2018

IN FOCUS: WCD DISTRICT PLAYOFFS

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

Lincoln High School has already qualified both the boys' and girls' teams for the state regional round of 16. The Wilson boys are still alive and in the hunt for a spot as well, while the Lady Rams were bumped from the district tournament and will not make the round of 16 for the first time in eight years. That was quite an impressive run. The Bellarmine Lady Lions have qualified for the 4A regionals, while the boys' team is still alive and kicking. Curtis will also be sending their boys' team to the 4A regionals. The defending 2A state champion Foss Falcons have yet to lose a game to a 2A foe since moving to the classification last year. The Falcons are currently ranked fourth in the state 2A RPI standings and have also qualified for the state regional round. The Life Christian girls have qualified for the 1B state regionals, while the boys' team has to win just one out of their next two games to get in for the fourth consecutive season. Fife has qualified both teams for the 2A regionals, while Franklin Pierce, Steilacoom and Clover Park are still fighting for one last berth. The Tacoma Baptist boys are peaking at the right time and have locked up a 1B regional spot.

C A L L IN G A L L C O M IC A R T IS T S !

ST LOOKING FOR CARTOONIATURING FE P RI FOR WEEKLY COMIC ST SUES! LOCAL PEOPLE/IS work Submit a sample of your om ly.c ek we ma aco @t to lisa


Friday, February 16, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

t Basketball From page A10

Despite the loss, Garfield remained the top-ranked team in the RPI standings, followed by O’Dea (21-3). The Wilson Rams have put themselves into a must-win situation as well following a surprising 65-54 loss to Kelso in the WCD quarterfinals. The Rams couldn’t buy a bucket near the basket for most of the game, while Kelso rained three-pointers for four quarters. The seventh-ranked Rams (19-4) would go on to upend Stadium 74-49 in a loser-out game on Tuesday, Feb. 13, and will now face a dangerous Spanaway Lake (17-6) on Thursday, Feb. 15, at Clover Park High School at 7:45 p.m. Tacoma is also represented by the Lincoln Lady Abes, who are currently ranked second in the state RPI. The Lady Abes will be facing an incredibly hot team from Prairie (20-2) in the 3A WCD semifinals a few hours after this issue goes to print. Lincoln has made short work of their first two district games, defeating Yelm by a score of 71-28 and Peninsula by a score of 48-33. On the flipside, Prairie has steamrolled their way to the semifinals, defeating Bonney Lake 66-19 and Timberline 70-18. Both teams have already qualified for the state regional round. After eight straight berths into the state round of 16, the Wilson Lady Rams’ (14-9) impressive run has finally come to an end. After a 65-47 tourney-opening round win over Hudson’s Bay, the Lady Rams fell to top-ranked Gig

t Stars

From page A10

for, Turlock is going to be a dangerous team in this match. They already have an advantage in every game due to the incredibly small playing surface they host games on. With the pressure fully on Tacoma, Turlock should be able to play free and easy. If Tacoma is going to cement themselves as a playoff-caliber club, they’re going to have to be able to come into these matches against lesser foes, and drop the hammer on them. Both games begin at 7:05 p.m. and can be watched live on the MASLtv Youtube channel. While the feed from Ontario is top-notch, you may grit your teeth watching the Turlock broadcast. We’re just going to leave it at that. Following their double-dip on the road, Tacoma will return home for their fourth (and final) match against Ontario on Friday, Feb. 23, at 7:35 p.m. It’s possible that a victory could sew-up a playoff berth for either team in this match, so it should be a high-energy, no sitting down affair at the Accesso ShoWare Center in Kent.

Harbor by a score of 62-40, and then fell to Yelm 78-64 in a loser-out contest. Don’t be surprised if Wilson begins a new state run next season. On the 4A side, the Bellarmine Prep Lady Lions have punched their ticket to the regional round following two convincing district wins. Bellarmine crushed Skyview 60-20 to open the tournament, and then defeated Union 57-25 to advance to the district semifinals. Sixth-ranked Bellarmine will face eighth-ranked Kentlake (18-5) on Thursday, Feb. 15, at Puyallup High School at 6 p.m. The boys’ 4A field has seen Curtis qualify for the state regionals after beating Auburn Mountain view 64-49 to open tournament play, followed by a 51-48 victory over Kennedy Catholic. The Vikings (17-5) will face eighthranked Enumclaw (18-5) in the WCD semifinals a few hours after this issue goes to print. The Bellarmine boys fell into the consolation bracket after an opening 49-45 loss to Auburn. Since then, the Lions (14-9) have rattled-off two victories, putting Bellarmine just one win away from regionals. Standing in their way is the defending state champion Kentwood Conquerers (18-6). The contest will go down shortly after this issue goes to print. It has been nothing but 2A wins for the Foss Falcons since moving down to the classification. The fourth-ranked Falcons (18-3) have only lost to 3A and 4A competition in that time, and it’s only been a few times. Foss has secured a ticket to the regionals and will face a Fife squad (19-4) in the 2A district semifinals that has pushed the Falcons to double overtime in their first match, before losing 66-48 in

On the WISL side, the Tacoma Stars Reserves have been hitting on all cylinders to close out the season and head into the playoffs. After beginning the season with a 2-2 record, the Reserves have put together a five-game winning streak that included a 6-4 victory over two-time defending champion Bellingham. Tacoma finished the season just a single game behind Bellingham and hosted their semifinal match against an Olympic Force squad that has turned into one the Reserves most fierce rivals. The Reserves beat Olympic 8-5 in Bremerton on Saturday, Feb. 3, to secure the second seed to the playoffs. The Force would be looking for payback when they visited the Tacoma Soccer Center on Saturday, Feb. 10, with a ticket to the WISL championship going to the victors. Olympic kept it tight against the Stars in the early going and even brought a 2-1 lead into the locker rooms at halftime. However, the floodgates opened up on them in the third quarter as the Reserves poured on four unanswered goals to take a 5-2 lead into the final stanza. There would be no slowing down for the Stars in the fourth, as they punched in another three goals to run away with an 8-3 victory. The defense was able to hold the regular season scoring champion Alex

WELCOME

TACOMA C H E N E Y S TA D I U M 2 0 1 8 WILL YOU BE THERE? SEASON TICKETS AND SCHEDULE AT

their rematch. The semifinal will be on Thursday, Feb. 15, at Wilson High School at 7:45 p.m. The district championship will be at Wilson on Saturday, Feb. 17, at 2 p.m. Franklin Pierce, Steilacoom and Clover Park are also still in the running for the 2A district’s final seed to regionals. The Fife girls (15-7) have qualified for regionals and will face a White River team (18-4) in the district semifinals that has had their number so far this season. Life Christian is trying their best to send two teams to regionals, but the boys’ district tournament field is probably the toughest at the 2B level in the state. Still, even though the boys (20-3) fell to a talented MortonWhite Pass (18-5) squad in their opener, the Eagles have rebounded with two straight wins to put them within striking distance of a regional berth. On the girls’ side, Life Christian (15-3) will face Napavine (20-1) in the 2B Southwest District semifinals. A victory would sew-up a regional spot for the Eagles, while a loss will put them in a position of needing one win over two remaining games. Head coach Mark Lovelady is coaching both the girls’ and boys’ squads and is now sitting just two wins away from 400 for his career. The Tacoma Baptist boys are one of the hottest teams around at the 1B level. While the Crusaders (21-3) have secured a regional berth, they will still have to face thirdranked Cedar Park Christian (24-0) in the 1B Tri-District semifinals, with a probable rematch with second-ranked Muckleshoot Tribal (22-2) in the district title game, should they advance.

Hernandez without a goal on the night. On the flipside, Tacoma’s Mark Lee scored two goals in the third quarter, and added two more in the fourth. The four-goal performance earned Lee the WISL Offensive Player of the Week Award. Tacoma also saw goals from veterans Nate Ford and Danny Minniti. Adrian Correa seemed to be everywhere on the field for the entire game, wreaking havoc on the Force’s game plan. He

was also rewarded with a goal. Tacoma’s JJ Schmeck sealed the deal with a lowburner that crossed the goal-line just before the final second ticked off of the scoreboard. Tacoma will be looking to regain the WISL trophy that they won in the WISL’s inaugural 2015 season. The Reserves will kick-off against Bellingham United at the Bellingham Sportsplex on Saturday, Feb. 17, at 7:30 p.m.

VILLAGE CONCEPTS OF MILTON

MILL RIDGE VILLAGE

Deficiency-Free State Survey 4th Year in a Row! (253) 925-9200 • 607 28th Ave, Milton • VillageConcepts.com

Three-generation family-owned & locally operated. Assisted Living Services Available.


Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 16, 2018

GIVE YOUR BUSINESS A FRESH LOOK!

TWadvertising DESIGN SERVICES FOR: • ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS • BRANDING • DESIGN CONSULTATION • COMPANY GRAPHICS • SOCIAL MEDIA • MARKETING

and gRAPHIC

SERVICES WE KNOW WHAT WORKS IN TACOMA! NOW OPEN!

AND MUCH MORE!

ENC E ESS EXP ERILS A WI LDE RN CK TAI WI TH BIG CO

TT Hair Salon & Su pplies Theresa T.,

EV ER Y DAY HA PP Y HO UR- 6p m 12 pm• • •

GERS $5 ANGUS BUR

ALL DAY $5 PIZ ZAS SUNDAYS: FRE E POO L • es on all TVs Hawks gam S • Showing DED HOT DOG LOA OFF 1/2 MONDAYS: GO w/host BIN TTY GRI TUESDAYS: Sin-dee - 7pm J No-Pants KARAOKE w/D FRIDAYS: large groups parties and *Available for

e of Featuring somessional rof the most unp art in wilderness a Tacom

(253) 507-37ma, WA 98406

tthairsalon72@g 95 mail.com

-THURS IDNIGHT SUN OPEN 12PM-M ON FRI & SAT • 21+ TILL 2AM

M AMPBAR.CO W W W . T H EPCB A R T A C O M A #CAM

E C N E I R E EXP ING

Cosmetologist

BUSINES Monday - Frida S HOURS: y 8am - 8pm Saturday 9am - 7pm Sunday By Appointment Stations 640 9 e! 6th Ave., #14, Taco for leas

PS, ACE, TIN CU FAKE FIRE PL D "THE LOG" SMORES AN DAY,

AV E S, 131 0 TA CO MA, WA TA CO MA

S R A E Y 30

EVERY DAY

JOHN WE PU B LI SH YMER ER

jweymer

C: 253.22

@tacom

aweekly.

com

P. O. BOX 9.1729 | O: 25 71 85 , TA CO M A, W3.922.5317 A 98 41 7

TIS IN ADVER ES! S E RV I C

CONTACT US FOR RATES & INFORMATION

253.922.5317

Tree Hugger’s Corner A guide for those who want to get out there and take action on behalf of the environment and social justice Saturday, Feb. 17, 10 a.m. RHONE-POULENC SALT MARSH MONTHLY WORK PARTY 1747 Port of Tacoma Road, Tacoma 350 Tacoma, together with the City of Tacoma and EarthCorps, will be working to clean up litter and debris in preparation for further restoration activities at this salt marsh and mud flat in the Port of Tacoma, nestled between U.S. Oil and Washington United Terminal on the Blair Waterway. 350 Tacoma would love your help! EarthCorps supplies gloves, tools, water and snack bars. They will teach you everything you need to know about tool use, safety, and the importance of the work you will be doing. No experience necessary, just come ready to learn something new. Bring: Clothing that can get dirty, long pants and long sleeves, sturdy shoes that can handle some mud, rain gear and warm layers or sun protection, Sack lunch and snacks, full water bottle (there will be a jug onsite for re-fills), travel mug for tea/coffee. Be sure to sign

in at registration when you arrive. Info: www.earthcorps.org/volunteer/event/a0E8000000P3y 0MEAR/ Wednesday, Feb. 21, 6:30 p.m. INDIVISIBLE TACOMA WHOLE WA ACTION MEETING Unitarian Universalist Church, 1115 S. 56th St., Tacoma 6:30-7:15 p.m.: Join Indivisible Tacoma to hear from Whole WA about why Washington needs single-payer healthcare and how we’re going to get it. Sign the petition, learn how to collect signatures, and leave with petitions so you can start collecting signatures ASAP. From 7:15-8 p.m. there will be a discussion of action on a national issue. Info: www.facebook.com/events/1505439576191504/

Wednesday, Feb. 21, 3 p.m. DAYS FOR GIRLS SEW DAY St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St., Tacoma Join the Tacoma Chapter of Days for Girls for their monthly meeting and sew day. Stop by for a few minutes or a few hours. They’ll be happy to share what they do, answer any questions and accept donations. Bring your sewing machine. Days for Girls has all skill level tasks available. Don’t sew? There are plenty of non-sewing tasks. Don’t have time to stay? Swing by and pick up stuff you can do at home, both sewing and non-sewing options are available. There is a need for sewing machines in working order. So, if you have one gathering dust that still works, it can be put to good use. Days for Girls empowers girls and women worldwide with more dignity, health and safety through access to quality sustainable menstrual health management and education. Info: www.daysforgirls.org or www.facebook.com/ dfgtacomawa/


City Life

TCC’s ‘Food in Art’ exhibit is a visual feast

YOUR TICKET to TACOMA

B3

TA C O M A W E E K LY. C O M

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2018

SECTION B, PAGE 1

THE FIFTH ANNUAL

DESTINY CITY FILM FESTIVAL BRINGING FILMS TO FEBRUARY

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DESTINY CITY FILM FEST

The cast of local filmmaker Michael Swingler’s short film “All the Marbles” looks like a motley crew that will take viewers on a wild and wooly ride. Swingler will be present at the Feb. 24 showing of the film. The Destiny City Film Festival begins at the Blue Mouse Feb. 23.

P

roctor’s historic Blue Mouse Theater will host the fifth annual Destiny City Film Festival from Feb. 23 to Feb. 25. This year’s program will feature 28 films from across the globe, alongside local films by directors in the Pacific Northwest. The three-day festival will highlight films across a variety of themes along with a screenwriting panel. This celebration of art and film is an opportunity to bring together local filmmakers, artists, families and friends from the Tacoma community and beyond. The festival will open Friday, Feb. 23 at 7 p.m. with “The Song of Sway Lake,” a fulllength drama directed by Ari Gold that follows the story of a jazz collector (Rory Culkin) who pursues a rare record from his grandmother’s collection. Following the film, guests are invited to the opening night party at the Blue Mouse for food, drinks and opportunities to connect with other attendees and filmmakers. Saturday will begin with an afternoon of free, family-friendly programming featuring playful short films that explore whimsical realities of animated rocket ships and adventurous bears. Local filmmaker Michael Swingler will be in attendance for his short film “All the Marbles.” The afternoon programming focuses on international narratives that explore ideas of finding strength, facing fear against the odds, what it means to find home and finding the courage to leave it. “Facing Mecca” by Jan-Eric Mack and “Bon Voyage” by Marc Raymond Wilkins are two Swiss films that explore the stories of refugees. “Iron Hands” by Johnson Cheng follows the journey of a 12-year-old girl who tries out for the Chinese youth Olympic weightlifting team. This program will also feature New Zealand filmmaker Zoe McIntosh’s short drama “The World in Your Window,” following the story of a young boy and his father liberated from their past through an unlikely friendship. Saturday will also feature a free screenwriting panel at the nearby Wheelock Library at 1 p.m. This year’s panel is moderated by local author and storyteller

Patric L. Rogers and will feature local writers Heather Hughes, David Margolis, Kevin Rexroat and Kristi Simkins, who will share their insights and experiences on the art of crafting an effective cinematic story. The Saturday afternoon programming features three diverse feature films including “Monkey Business: The Adventures of the Curious George Creators,” the Sundance Award-winning drama, “Gook” and the romantic comedy “Becks.” The evening will transition into “After Dark Shorts,” bringing together a combination of comedy, drama, sci-fi, and horror. “Prenatal,” directed by Bears Fonte, follows the surreal story of a young girl who becomes pregnant overnight. This program will also feature films from two Seattle filmmakers: “Mixtape Marauders,” a comedy short by Peter Edlund, and “Emiko,” a horror short by Justin Robert Vinall. These three filmmakers will be in attendance. The closing day, Sunday, Feb. 25, will begin with an afternoon program titled “The Stories We Tell,” featuring five films that delve into deeper dimensions of the treasured relationships in life. Among them are two Oscar-nominated shorts. “My Nephew Emmett,” a short drama by Kevin Wilson Jr., zeroes in on a man with a mission to protect his son Emmett from two killers motivated by racist intentions. This is followed by a documentary by Laura Checkoway titled “Edith+Eddie” surrounding the

A scene from “Coin Operated,” one of the many animated films that will be shown at the festival.

ONE REASONS FOR SMOKING

On Saturday, Feb. 17, 2 p.m. at King’s Books (218 St. Helens Ave, Tacoma,) Xandria Phillips, author of “Reasons for Smoking” — chosen by Claudia Rankine as the winner of the 2016 Seattle Review chapbook contest — will be reading from and signing her new chapbook. This is a free event. The poems in “Reasons for Smoking” articulate how living, touching, noticing, speaking and remembering are necessary and subversive acts. Phillips is a poet who hails from rural Ohio, where she was raised on corn and inherited her grandmother’s fear of open water. She is Winter Tangerine’s associate poetry editor, the poetry editor for Honeysuckle Press, and the curator of Love Letters to Spooks, a literary space for Black people. For more information visit www.xandriaphillips.com.

TWO MONTHLY BALLOON JAM

Come to one of the monthly balloon jams at

relationship between an elderly, interracial, newlywed couple caught in the turbulence of a family feud. The festival will close on Sunday evening with a documentary by Jack C. Newell titled “42 Grams,” which follows a chef through his rise to success and fame. The 2018 Storyteller Award winners will be announced prior to the film, and guests are invited to the closing night party at Peaks and Pints after the film to celebrate the festival’s final night. The Destiny City Film Festival will be a weekend that celebrates local and global film and the tradition of storytelling. Tickets purchased at the door are $10 for opening and closing night, $9 for general admission, $7 for military and seniors, and $6 for students. VIP all-access passes can be purchased online or at the box office for $60. Punch cards valid for four individual tickets can be purchased online or at the box office for $20. The Destiny City Film Festival is a homegrown, community-based festival built to showcase the best independent films from the Pacific Northwest and beyond. Its mission is to use the power of vibrant cinematic storytelling to curate an engaged community audience for independent film. DCFF is a 501(c)(3) not for-profit organization. Visit DestinyCityFilmFestival.com for more information and for scheduling details.

IHOP (7445 S. Hosmer St., Tacoma) where balloon sculptors join together to build each other up in their chosen passion, profession and hobby. Participants spend time teaching and learning, creating and giving constructive advice, networking and socializing, and even have fun doing it. This jam is focused on balloon twisting, but you will find jugglers, magicians, and face-painters joining in the fun as well. The core group is still less than 10 regular attendees, but organizers hope more will come and enjoy the time. The next balloon jam is Monday, Feb. 19 at 5:30 p.m. For information, visit www.facebook.com/ events/391756977916258.

THREE MIXED MEDIA TECHNIQUE

Pacific Gallery Artists February meeting and demo is Feb. 20, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Asia Pacific Cultural Center (4851 South Tacoma

Way). Kathy Collins, longtime watercolor artist who uses a mixed media technique for her dramatic, high-contrast paintings, will give a demo on how she incorporates pieces cut from her old and tired watercolors into her collage work to create dynamic new mixed media paintings. Her new work is intuitive and design focused. For information, visit www.pacificgalleryartists.org.

panelists include Kevin Rexroat, Heather Hughes, Kristi Simkins, and David Margolis. Patric Rogers moderates. For information, visit www.evensi.us/free-screenwriting-panelwheelock-library/242042084.

FIVE

FOUR

BRUNCH RIDE FREE SCREENWRITING PANEL

On Saturday, Feb. 24, 1 p.m. at Wheelock Library (3722 N. 26th St., Tacoma), the library presents its annual, free screenwriting panel. Writers of all backgrounds and level of experience are welcome. This panel discusses elements of storytelling through screenwriting, and what goes into crafting an impactful and effective cinematic story. This year’s

Join Ladies Night 253 and 2nd Cycle Tacoma’s Community Cycle Center Saturday, Feb. 24, for a social paced bike ride starting at 2nd Cycle (1205 M.L.K. Jr. Way, Tacoma). Meet at 10 a.m. and roll out no later than 10:30 a.m. This ride will be about eight miles total and will end at the Valley Tavern for brunch. Here is the route: www.mapmyride. com/routes/view/1908062300Info: crystalvoyage.com. This event is 21+. Ride at your own risk.


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 16, 2018

ART NEWS ROUNDUP A BIG WORLD OF BIG TOYS Play your way down Memory Lane at WSHM

What was your favorite childhood toy? A jump rope, a board game or Space Invaders? An Easy Bake Oven, Star Wars collectibles or a Slinky? You’re sure to find your favorites from the past and today in the nationally touring, blockbuster exhibition “Toytopia,” opening Feb. 16 at the Washington State History Museum and running through June 10. This exhibition is huge, and presents toys from miniature to giant-sized. Visitors can sit in a humanscale Monopoly car, walk through a doll house (complete with miniature dollhouses), and see the world’s largest Etch A Sketch, among other highlights. “Our goal was to capture the essence of childhood wonder; that dream of being in a world of toys,” explained Troy Carlson, owner of Stage Nine Entertainment Group who created “Toytopia.” Stage Nine exhibitions have travelled internationally and been exhibited at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute, Orlando Science Center and the Pacific National Exhibition in Vancouver, Canada. “Visiting ‘Toytopia’ will truly be a memorable, active experience for our community and visitors. Kids will love it, and so will adults. Seeing toys from the past rekindles the wonder and delight of childhood, no matter what your age,” said Mary Mikel Stump, the Historical Society’s director of audience engagement. “We have also connected Washington’s history, featuring toys and objects from our collection in two complementary exhibitions, ‘PlayDates’ and ‘Collections Selections,’” Stump added. In “PlayDates” visitors will see items like the Slinky Dog, invented in Washington, and learn about how toys and modes of play have changed over time. “Collections Selections” is an utterly charming rec-

reation of an early 1900s day-nursery, where visitors can see early manufactured toys within the context of the decorative arts of the time. This turn-of-thecentury environment, complete with reproduced historic Kate Greenaway wallpaper, artwork, and photos of Washington children on the walls, illustrates how the Industrial Revolution, child labor laws, and manufacturing impacted play in our culture. “Toytopia” is an exciting exhibition for private events, too. “We are offering a special birthday party package for kids of all ages. Families can enjoy cake and party games in one of several kid-friendly spaces, and then have a blast in the exhibition,” said Mark Sylvester, who manages the History Museum’s facility rental services. “For businesses, ‘Toytopia’ will add creative fun to a conference, seminar, brainstorming session, retreat or teambuilding day. It would also be fun for proms, weddings, class reunions, really any gathering.” The museum can accommodate groups of up to 250 for seated private events, and larger for standing or a mix of seated and standing activities. And if you’re looking for a date night, consider Press PLAY on Feb. 22, a History After Hours program for ages 21+. Admission to Press PLAY includes access to the exhibition, arcade games, board games, the chance to test your skill at (what else?) Oregon Trail on the big theater screen, plus craft beverages from Three Magnets Brewing Co. The Children’s Museum of Tacoma offers special child care on the same night,

just a short walk from the History Museum. “TOYTOPIA” HIGHLIGHTS: n Retro Arcade area with working games to play (game play is included in admission price) n World’s largest Etch A Sketch, close to eight feet tall n A life-size doll house filled with smaller dollhouses n A human-scale Monopoly car and game board; sit inside for a unique photo opportunity! n Memorable toys from the movie “Big” — the giant piano keyboard that star Tom Hanks played on, and Zoltar Speaks, the carnival arcade fortune teller machine n LEGO train layout n A signature Jack in The Box exploring the science of toys, from Furby to radiometers n Historic Schylling Tin Toys — see how toys are created out of simple sheets of tin n Interactive play areas with Keva Planks, Lincoln Logs, LEGO wall and Brain Teasers Find out about “Toytopia,” other History Museum exhibitions, hours and admission at www.washingtonhistory.org. For information about birthday party packages and other private events, contact mark.sylvester@ wshs.wa.gov.

GRAMMY AND EMMY-NOMINATED SONGWRITER, PIANIST AND VOCALIST MICHAEL FEINSTEIN PERFORMS ‘CELEBRATING THE CROONERS’ Broadway Center presents Michael Feinstein: “Celebrating the Crooners,” featuring material by Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Bing Crosby and others at Tacoma’s historic Pantages Theater on Friday, Feb. 23 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $39 and are on sale now. From recordings that have earned him five Grammy Award nominations, to his Emmynominated PBS-TV specials, his acclaimed NPR series, and concerts spanning the globe — not to mention his work as an educator and archivist — Feinstein’s career over the last three decades has revolved around bringing the music of the Great American songbook to the world. In 2007, Feinstein created the Great American Songbook Foundation, dedicated to celebrating the art form and preserving it

through educational programs, master classes and the annual High School Songbook Academy. The summer intensive is open to students from across the country and has produced graduates who have gone on to record acclaimed albums and appear on television programs such as NBC’s “America’s Got Talent.” Feinstein serves on the Library of Congress’ National Recording Preservation Board, an organization dedicated to ensuring the survival, conservation and increased public availability of America’s sound recording heritage. Feinstein was born and raised in Columbus, Ohio, where he started playing piano by ear as a 5-year-old. After graduating from high school, he moved to Los Angeles when he was 20. The widow of legendary concert pianist-actor Oscar Levant intro-

duced him to Ira Gershwin in July 1977. Feinstein became Gershwin’s assistant for six years, which earned him access to numerous unpublished Gershwin songs, many of which he has since performed and recorded. Gershwin’s influence provided a solid base upon which Feinstein evolved into a captivating performer, composer and arranger of his own original music. He also has become an unparalleled interpreter of music legends such as Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, Johnny Mercer, Duke Ellington and Harry Warren. Tickets to Michael Feinstein: “Celebrating the Crooners” — Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Bing Crosby, and others are on sale now for $39, $59, $79, and $95. To buy now, call the Broadway Center Box Office at (253) 591-5894, tollfree 1 (800) 291-7593, online at BroadwayCenter.org, or in person at 901 Broadway in Tacoma’s Theater District.

UP FOR ARTS 2018 SPRING ART AND CONCERT SERIES SCHEDULED Founded in 2000, UP for Arts is a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing public art to University Place. The group also hosts an Art and Concert Series, in which musicians present a concert in conjunction with a display of work by a featured artist. The Spring 2018 Art and Concert Series is soon to begin. Following is the schedule for these events, which are held at the University Place Civic Library Atrium, 3609 Market Square. All performances begin at 7 p.m. On Feb. 23, critically acclaimed Bay Area pianist, Robyn Carmichael, performs works by Scarlatti, Schubert, Tchaikovsky and Schuman. Audiences and critics have praised Carmichael for her “extraordinary poetry” and “lush, thrilling and intensely personal” performances. Carmichael’s distinctive style has defined her concerts in the U.S. and abroad. Her 2017-18 season includes West Coast concerts in Portland, San Diego, San Francisco, and Tacoma/Seattle area, and East Coast concerts in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey. She has been featured in a radio interview on Berkeley’s KPFA-FM “Piano” program, and made a CD release with music of Scarlatti, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Schumann, de Falla, Tchaikovsky, Bach-Alkan, and Rachmaninoff. New programs feature the virtuosic Tchaikovsky-Pletnev Nutcracker Suite, an all-Russian/Spanish program and educational concerts with commentary for libraries and grassroots organizations. A unique Chopin project and a program honoring the 200th anniversary of choreographer Marius Petipa are planned for 2018. Visit www.robyncarmichael.com for information on Carmichael. Art for the evening is raku pottery by artist Gina Kling. A friend talked Kling into taking pottery lessons 18 years ago at a community center. She immediately fell in love with pottery. Then one day she was in an art gallery in Gig Harbor and saw raku pottery for the first time. The artist was Christopher Mathis. He was teach-

Raku fish made by Gina King.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST

ing hand-built raku pottery. She immediately signed up for classes. She loved the unpredictability of raku. You never knew what the end product would look like. Would it have streaks of copper running through splashes of blues and green? Or, would it have more silver and reds? It was Mathis who encouraged her to begin selling her work. She has been teaching hand-built pottery herself on and off for the past seven years and has been with Proctor Art Gallery for the past three years. On March 23, Seattle opera star and Tacoma native, Ryan Bede — accompanied by pianist Elisabeth Ellis — will sing Songs Of The British Isles with selections by Vaughan Williams, Gurney, Quilter, Finzi and more. Visual artist Dan Suckow will show his nature photography. On April 27, multi-award winning pianist, violinist and composer Jennifer Thomas performs original songs, plus new music from her latest album. Visual artist Cindy Baij shows her watercolors. Admission is $15 for adults, $5 for students and UP for Arts members are free. Tickets available at the door. For more information, visit www.upforarts.org.

TACOMA ART MUSEUM HOSTS FREE COMMUNITY FESTIVAL Dust off your cowboy boots and mosey on down to Tacoma Art Museum’s Western Fest for an allages, fun-filled day inspired by the Haub Family Collection of Western American Art. Explore five new exhibitions, create western-themed art, hear authentic cowboy poetry, take in western music, food and more. The event takes place Saturday, Feb. 17 beginning at noon. SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES: Noon to 12:30 p.m. – Buffalo Soldiers presentation 1-2 p.m. – Music from The Cottonwood Cutups 2 p.m. – Cowboy poetry by Lynn Kopelke 2:30 p.m. – Native American storytelling by Roger Fernandes 3-4 p.m. – Music from The Cottonwood Cutups Ongoing from 12-4 p.m. Booth with artifacts from the Buffalo Soldiers of Seattle; Northwest animal sketching and touchable specimens with the Slater Museum of Natural History; clay animal sculpture artmaking in TAM Studio; Western-themed food in TAM Café. Western Fest is free and open to the public. This festival is made possible through the support of the Haub Family Endowment. The event is presented in partnership with Slater Museum of Natural History — Puget Sound Museum and The Buffalo Soldiers of Seattle (9th-10th Cavalry). Free community festivals are generously supported by the Tacoma Arts Commission (City of Tacoma government). Seasonal support is provided by ArtsFund. Tacoma Art Museum is located at 1701 Pacific Ave., Tacoma. For more information visit www.tacomaartmuseum.org.


Friday, February 16, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

TCC’S ‘FOOD IN ART’ Culture Corner EXHIBIT IS A VISUAL FEAST A GUIDE TO CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS OF TACOMA Coming theatrical attractions:

“Guys & Dolls”

Kemper Theater, at Annie Wright Upper School, 827 N. Tacoma Ave., Tacoma Friday, Feb. 16 and Saturday Feb. 17 at 7 p.m. This classic comedy tells the story of gamblers and the missionaries who try to save them in New York City. Characters include mobsters and Hotbox girls, and comedy ensues when a gangster falls in love with a missionary. The musical is based on a story and characters by Damon Runyon, with music and lyrics by Frank Loesser and book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows. Director Elizabeth Gettel’s concept is a non-traditional portrayal of the show, featuring a noir costume design by alumna Haley Parks and an opulent deco set by Scott Campbell. Theatre veterans and seniors Rachel Piatok and Clare Farley lead the large cast, with a special guest performance by Upper School science teacher Donald Sidman. The show is free. Learn more at bit.ly/2nEf3Cf. PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE GALLERY AT TCC

Barbara Petterson’s large paintings of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are prominently featured in “Food in Art” at the Gallery at TCC.

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

At the beginning of each year, The Gallery at Tacoma Community College holds a thematic exhibition, an art show in which a wide array of artists submit work that is somehow related to a given theme. This year, the theme is “food.” The result is what you might expect — a motley collection of work that has everything from still life paintings of fruits and vegetables to symbolic assemblage sculptures that visit the horrors of animal cruelty and factory farming. These big, free-for-all shows are generally hit and miss. Some of the work is recycled from previous shows. Regular visitors to The Gallery may recognize some of this repetition of previously seen material. Nevertheless, there are plenty of treasures to see in this feast of a show called “Food in Art.” Jeffree Stewart’s modest oil painting, “Palouse aka Breadbasket Grasslands,” for example, is a wonderful construction of undulating bands of lush yellow. Working with his grainy striations of color, Stewart gives an impression of fields of wheat in a way that hearkens back to some of the painters of the Northwest School like Guy Anderson, Morris Graves and Mark Tobey. At the other end of the spectrum, going from fields of wheat to sliced bread we find paintings like Barbara Petterson’s series of sandwiches, done big and up close. Her peanut butter and jelly sandwich paintings approach the photo realist realm. Similarly, TCC art teacher Marit Berg submitted a wonderful watercolor of a club sandwich. The tall, multi-layered construction is sliced in two as if to have a dialogue with itself before it is eaten. Also popular are Diane Fairbanks’s paintings of pastries and pancakes depicted as large objects plopped down into Pacific Northwest landscapes. Her “Budd Bay Bear Claw,” “Deception Pass Doughnut” and “Goldendale Griddlecakes” are funny, yet evocative of the drool response. Lynette Charters’s paintings on wood, in which the wood grain is left unpainted to become the skin of female figures, are as attractive as they are inventive. Charters visually quotes masters of the female nude like Paul Gauguin, Henri Lebasque and Julio Romero De Torres — here the nudes are associated with baskets and platters of fruits — in either a critique or homage to those painters. Jeanette Otis’s assemblage sculpture called “50 Billion Hamburgers” features toy cattle whose heads have been removed. They are turned onto their backs and chained to a cylinder to form a kind of unhappy merry-go-round that should seem macabre, but instead comes across as light-hearted like the toys you can get with a McDonald’s Happy Meal. Otis nevertheless brings home the point that a hamburger chain’s boast of its sales figures includes the pain and death of countless individual creatures. Diane Topolski’s charcoal drawing “Pizza Delivery” is masterfully ren-

“Avocados,” charcoal, by Barbara Ritter

dered. The large drawing is of a woman in a bathrobe sitting in a darkened room with a cell phone, the object used to summon the titular delivery of a pizza pie. The glow of the cell phone is picked up in the gleam of the glasses that the woman is wearing. Here, the food theme of the show becomes more weighty and mysterious. The show includes enough images of produce to fill many a bushel basket. Beets are a popular sub-theme of the exhibit. Patsy Surh O’Connell, Angela Gilmore and Kyle Dillehay (in a series of photos) all depict the wonderful red root vegetable. Christine Parent did several acrylic paintings that capture the marvelous marbling to be discovered when cutting into a head of red cabbage. Karin Williams has a beautifully austere portrait of onions as well. Barbara Ritter did a sequence of 12 charcoal drawings of a bowl of avocadoes. Each of the 12 drawings is done in its own style — an exploration of a musical variation on a theme. With “Food in Art,” The Gallery at TCC lays out a feast for the eye. There is yet plenty of time to get to the campus and view the show, since it runs through March 15. Between now and then, there are a number of events, talks and demonstrations associated with the show: On Feb. 21, Kyle Dillehay will demonstrate chocolate casting. On Feb. 27, TCC art chair Marit Berg will give a gallery talk. On Feb. 28, Ben Meeker will give a food performance. On March 9, TCC humanities professor Michael Huffman will deliver a gallery talk called “Pop Food.” For more information, visit www. tacomacc.edu/campuslife/thegallery.

DESTINY CITY FILM FEST

KRASNER MUSEUM

PANTAGES

JAPANESE AMERICANS

UP FOR ART

TOMMY CASTRO

GUYS AND DOLLS

THURGOOD

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

POETRY READING

BUFFALO SOLDIERS

WATERCOLOR DEMO

The Lakewood Playhouse Second Annual “Fun-Raiser” and 80th anniversary Season Reveal Preview Party

Lakewood Playhouse, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd. S.W., Lakewood Sunday, Feb. 18, 6 p.m. The Lakewood Playhouse is having a party to announce and preview its upcoming 80th season of shows. The doors open and a silent auction begins at 6 p.m. The preview party kicks into high gear at 6:30 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse will announce the six shows, and two bonus shows, of its 80th season. It will be an evening of fun, prizes and two songs from next season’s musicals performed by an all-star lineup of returning cast members from past musicals “Pirates of Penzance,” “Avenue Q,” “The Rocky Horror Show,” “Oliver” and “American Idiot.” This celebration will also serve as the second annual fundraiser for the playhouse. The gathering includes wine, phenomenal silent auction items and live auction items such as VIP tickets to the Rainiers with refreshments and a tour of the field; a private get-away at Cedarbrook Lodge; tickets to the Northwest premier of Disney’s “Hunchback of Notre Dame” at the 5th Avenue Theatre; a luxury stay at Snowater Resort at Mount Baker; a walk-on role in next season’s Lakewood Institute of Theater’s Spotlight Show and more. There will also be another 50/50 raffle. Last year’s winner won more than $700. Light appetizers will be provided by Carr’s Restaurant and Catering. All proceeds from ticket sales will go to benefit the Lakewood Playhouse’s “Friends Fund,” which goes to keep costs down at the theatre. The theme for this year’s “fun-raiser” is “This Old House” because the theater will be raising funds to help upgrade areas in this “old house” that Lakewood calls its home. This year, the theater is focusing on two areas: upgrading the bathrooms and new body microphones that the actors wear during musicals. Both areas are at the top of the “wish list” of Lakewood Playhouse patrons. Ticket prices are $25 (includes appetizers and apple cider), $50 (includes appetizers, apple cider and a glass of wine for adults), $75 (includes appetizers, apple cider and two glasses of wine for adults) and a limited number of VIP tables, which seat six each, and feature a special surprise, light appetizers and two bottles of wine. Tickets are available online at www.lakewoodplayhouse.org or can be purchased by calling the box office at (253) 588-0042. VIP tables can be purchased through contacting the box office only at (253) 588-0042 or while visiting during normal box office hours. The Lakewood Playhouse was founded in 1938 and has established itself with theatre that is both intimate and epic. The theatre is located within the Lakewood Towne Center. For further information about season 80 preview party, please contact the box office or make any e-mail queries to John Munn, managing artistic director, at jmunn.lakewoodplayhouse@gmail.com. For information visit: www.lakewoodplayhouse.org


Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 16, 2018

BLACK HISTORY MONTH CONTINUES IN TACOMA By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

Here we are, already right in the middle of Black History Month. Here are more upcoming events that will celebrate, educate, elucidate and meditate upon the lives and times of the African American odyssey in these United States, generally, and the Pacific Northwest, specifically: n BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION Friday, Feb. 16, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Tacoma Urban Performing Arts Center, 734 Pacific Ave., Tacoma

Join in and help celebrate Black History Month with healing and empowerment through West and Central Afri-

can dance and music. Sample tasty treats, meet new people, dance and most importantly, be yourself. No special attire needed except, perhaps, a nice pair of socks, as there are no street shoes allowed on the dance floor. Suggested donation is $10 (free for T.U.P.A.C. Board +1). Info: www.facebook.com/events/ 2364577856945858 n ‘HELD IN TRUST’ – THE STORY OF LT. HENRY O. FLIPPER, FIRST BLACK GRADUATE OF WEST POINT Saturday, Feb. 17, 1 p.m. The Buffalo Soldiers Museum, 1940 S. Wilkeson St., Tacoma

In honor of Black History Month, the Tacoma Buffalo Soldiers Museum proudly presents the film “Held in Trust,” the dramatic story of Lt. Henry Ossian Flipper, the first African American graduate of the U.S. Military Academy. Film will be shown free to the public. In the introduction of this hour-long film, General Colin Powell introduces the topic and Ozzie Davis narrates. The film features George Robert Snead as Flipper. Museum admission is free and open to the public. Donations are welcome. For more information, call (253) 272-4257. Info: www.buffalosoldierstacoma. org n BLACK HISTORY IN COMICS Saturday, Feb. 24, noon Stargazer Comics Toys & Games, A, 2610 6th Ave., Tacoma

Stargazer Comics invites you for a celebration of Black History in Comics on Feb. 24. During this final Saturday of Black History Month, Stargazer Comics will highlight characters, creators and stories that put the voices and experiences of black people at the forefront. Featured books will cover a broad range of genres — from clas-

Adonna Richardson at (253) 905-6633. This a black-tie event. In support of #METOO, women are asked to wear black. Info: www.allenchurch.org or www. facebook.com/events/754886758040619. sic and modern superhero tales and fantasy to historical biographies and memoirs. All of the featured books will be 20 percent off all day and the store will be raffling off some great graphic novels to a few lucky winners. Whether you’re looking for an inspiring or philosophically challenging perspective on an aspect of black history or simply want to find a great new hero tale, Stargazer will do its best to find the right book for you. The celebration will start at noon on Feb. 24 and run all day until closing at 8 p.m. Info: www.stargazercomics.com n BLACK HISTORY UNITY DINNER IV Saturday, Feb. 24, 5 p.m. Cheney Stadium Summit Club, 2502 S. Tyler St., Tacoma

Allen AME Church presents Black History Unity Dinner IV. Theme: “Black Women Making History.” Keynote speaker: Raven Goodwin, currently starring in the hit television show “Being Mary Jane.” She is also known for her work on BET, Nickelodeon and the Disney Channel. Goodwin has received several nominations for her roles including a Screen Actors Guild (SAG) award nominee for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture. Donation $75. For tickets and more information, contact

Puyallup’s Karshner Center hosts show and festival exploring human migration The Karshner Museum and Center for Culture & Arts presents an evening of art, music and theatre exploring the human journey. Migration, and the movement of human groups, immigration and refugees will be examined, stories told, and perspectives talked about. Along the way see a theatrical show, listen to an outstanding trio of musicians, and explore art by more than 40 artists from Tacoma to New York. The evening events are free to the public. The art show, “Migration Now” will be on display at the Karshner Museum and Center for Culture & Arts through March 1. “Migration Now” is a limited-edition portfolio of handmade prints addressing migrant issues from a collective of U.S. artists. University of Washington, Tacoma art students as well as others are also contributing to this show. On Feb. 23, the Karshner Museum hosts a free, family festival held in conjunction with “Migration Now.” The festival is called Art, Theatre and Music of the Human Journey. The evening begins at 5:30 p.m. with a performance by the Trio Guadalevin. Drawing on the Trio Guadalevin deep roots of music, Abel Rocha, August Denhard and Antonio Gómez will show how music migrates and how wonderful our heritages have blended in music and song. These musicians play in various groups

BRING IT TO BARB

Answering your questions on mental health, relationships and life issues

By Barb Rock DEAR BARB, I’ve struggled with my weight my whole life and I recently heard that exercise, more than diet, helps reduce the actual size of fat cells. Could this be true? I eat healthy but I hate exercise. Signed, Dreading Workouts DEAR DREADING WORKOUTS, Here are a few interesting facts: 1.) Fat cells are created when we gain

n GEORGE STEVENS JR.’S “THURGOOD” Friday, Feb. 23 at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24 at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 25 at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 1 at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 2 at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 3 at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Theater on the Square, 901 Broadway, Tacoma

Broadway Center is producing and presenting “Thurgood,” an award winning, one-man play written by George Stevens Jr., for eight public performances at Theater on the Square from Feb. 23 to March 3. The play is directed by Brett Carr and features Eric Clausell as both lead actor and co-director. Tickets start at $14 and are on sale now. “Thurgood” brings to life the true story of former Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. Told in the first person, the play revisits flashpoints in Marshall’s life: from his childhood in Baltimore, to law school, his rise to the Supreme Court, and his role in the civil rights movement. “Thurgood” premiered in 2006 with James Earl Jones in the title role, then opened on Broadway in 2008 with Laurence Fishburne. “Thurgood” was later adapted into an HBO special. Info: BroadwayCenter.org

The Pine and the Cherry: Japanese Americans in Washington

and venues, this time sponsored by the Early Music Education Foundation out of the University of Washington. Receiving a 4Culture Grant has made wonderful history of music performances possible.

COURTESY PHOTO

At 6:30 p.m., “Living Voices Island of Hope,” a multimedia theatrical production about immigration of early 1900s Ellis Island, will be performed. The production won the Governor’s Award for Art in Education Organization in 2017. At 7:15 p.m. there is a David Fenner Washington Humanities event with guest speaker David Fenner, whose lecture is called “The Long Haul: A Story of Human Migration.” From our beginnings in Africa to our frenetic journeys in the 21st century, examine the roots and the routes of human migration. Fenner’s presentation is supported by a Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau grant. Ongoing at the museum is “Children’s’ Stories of Immigration” and “Migration Read Aloud” and a slide show and video about Jacob Lawrence’s art series, “The Great Migration.” The Karshner Museum and Center for Culture & Arts is located at 309 4th St. N.E. in Puyallup. For information visit www.puyallup.k12.wa.us/ karshner_center

weight. 2.) Fat cells also shrink, but don’t die. Scientists once thought that we could only grow new fat cells during certain stages of our life; such as the first year of life and puberty and for women during menopause as well. It now has changed and we can create new fat cells as adults too! If you’ve gained a lot of weight as an adult, you may have added to your store of fat cells. That makes it harder to lose weight because, once they’ve taken up residence in your body, fat cells never go away. This is how it works. When a fat cell grows to about three times its normal size, it can divide and make new fat cells. How much fat a cell can handle before it divides varies from person to person. You can shrink the size of your fat cells but you can’t shrink the number. If you have more than your fair share of fat cells, it’s going to be more of an uphill battle for you to lose weight than for someone with fewer fat cells.

Mayumi Tsutakawa, daughter of the legendary builder of fountains, George Tsutakawa, will give a lecture on the WWII era internment of Japanese-Americans on Feb. 20 at University of Puget Sound.

On Tuesday, Feb. 20 at 6 p.m., the Associated Students of the University of Puget Sound Lectures presents, “The Pine and the Cherry: Japanese Americans in Washington,” a lecture by Mayumi Tsutakawa. Tsutakawa is an independent writer and curator who has focused on Asian/Pacific American history. This lecture was made possible by the Humanities Washington. The lecture will be held in the Tahoma Room at the University of Puget Sound. Admission is free and the lecture is open to the public. In the lead-up to World War II, Japantown in Seattle featured grocery stores, cafes, and native-language services, as well as labor and music clubs. Trading companies imported Japanese goods, and restaurants served the familiar sukiyaki, tofu and miso soup. In Eastern Washington, Japanese farmers prospered. Then came Executive Order 9066. Those born in Japan, as well as their American-citizen offspring, were sent to concentration camps in windswept deserts without due process. Throughout the West Coast, 120,000 Japanese Americans were forced from their homes. Most Seattle Japanese spent the war years at Camp Minidoka in Idaho, and when they returned, most had lost everything and could not find jobs. How did they face this injustice and rebuild their lives? How does a lively immigrant community face racist or religious hatred? The 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066 was in 2017, and Tsutakawa, whose father was renowned sculptor George Tsutakawa, will reveal her family’s 100-year history against the backdrop of this dramatic American story. For more information visit www.pugetsound.edu/news-and-events/ events-calendar/details/discussion-the-pine-and-the-cherry-japanese-americans-in-washington/2018-02-20 or www.facebook.com/ events/178095532954108.

To answer your question, there was a research study on the effects of diet and exercise on fat cell size at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C. They recently discovered that exercise, perhaps more than diet, can help reduce the size of fat cells that accumulate around the waist. Forty-five obese women were divided into three study groups. One group followed a calorie-restricted diet with no exercise; the second group followed a calorie-restricted diet and walked at a moderate pace three times a week. The third group followed the diet and walked at a more intense pace three times a week. They all lost weight, reduced their overall percentage of body fat, and reduced the size of fat cells in their hips. However, those who used diet alone did not shrink the fat cells located around their waist, while both exercise groups shrunk their waistline fat cells by 18 percent. Ditch the ugly, dreaded word “exer-

cise” and trade it for the word “busy.” Replace “I’m working out” with “I’m keeping busy.” Since it appears that physical activity is necessary in order to shrink the fat cells around the waist, just staying “busy” would be effective. This means that instead of folding your laundry while sitting down, you would stand. When you first attempt to do more standing and moving, you’ll notice that you’ll have a propensity to sit. When a song comes on the radio you like, get a little hip sway going and dance a little to the beat. By bending and stretching while gardening, washing windows, washing your car, or playing with your children or grandkids, it all counts! Keep moving so you don’t allow any of those fat cells to divide because it’s true: Exercise does indeed shrink fat cells. Barb Rock is a mental health counselor for the House of Matthew Homeward Bound program in Tacoma, and the published author of “Run Your Own Race: Happiness after 50.” Send any questions related to mental health, relationships or life issues to her at BarbRockrocks@yahoo.com.


Friday, February 16, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

TOMMY CASTRO AND THE PAINKILLERS CELEBRATE NEW RELEASE Tommy Castro and the Painkillers, currently celebrating the release of their new Alligator Records album, “Stompin’ Ground,” will perform at the Cultura Event Center in Tacoma on Saturday, Feb. 17. Over the course of his career, guitarist, vocalist and songwriter Tommy Castro – a six-time Blues Music Award-winner – has played thousands of shows to hundreds of thousands of ecstatic fans. Castro, along with his band, The Painkillers (bassist Randy McDonald, keyboardist Michael Emerson and drummer Bowen Brown) plays music that is guaranteed to fill the floor and raise the roof. Castro’s musical roots run deep. As he unleashes his high-energy music to fans all over the world, he is inspired by the sounds he absorbed while coming of age on the rough and tumble side of San Jose, Calif. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, this was Castro’s home turf. It was a place where the street-tough Mexican Americans and the counterculture hippies came together to drink, smoke, laugh, party and listen to tunes — the hippies with their blues and rock, the Mexicans with their soul music. Mixing the blues-rock he loved and the soul music he heard blasting out from the lowriders cruising the streets, along with the socially conscious message songs of the day, Castro’s own sound was born. He honed his guitar playing to a razor’s edge on the city’s competitive bar scene, where he learned how to capture an audience with his intensely passionate vocals, stellar musicianship and dynamic performances. Castro began playing in a variety of Bay Area blues and soul bands in his early 20s. He joined Warner Brothers’ artists The Dynatones in the late 1980s.

COURTESY PHOTO

Tommy Castro and his band the Painkillers will play the Cultura Event Center Feb. 17.

After forming the first Tommy Castro Band in 1991, Castro released a series of critically acclaimed CDs for Blind Pig, Telarc and 33rd Street Records, as well as one on his own Heart and Soul label. He signed with Alligator Records in 2009, releasing “Hard Believer” to massive acclaim. In 2012 Castro formed The Painkillers, creating a lean, mean four-piece lineup, capable of delivering soul-shaking, muscular music. Catch the show Saturday, Feb. 17, 8 p.m. at Cultura Event Center (5602 S. Washington St., Tacoma). Tickets range from $22.50 to $30. For information and tickets visit www.dannopresents.com.

Heart’s Ann Wilson beguiles EQC audience By Bill Bungard

Tacoma Weekly Man-on-the-Scene

The Northwest’s own, homegrown Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, singer/songwriter Ann Wilson of Heart, performed her solo rock show to a full audience at the Emerald Queen Casino Friday, Feb. 9. Wilson has been on hiatus from sister/music partner Nancy Wilson and Heart since October of 2016, doing “the Ann thing” while sister Nancy is busy with her new band, Roadcase Royale. Rock vocalist Ann Wilson performed a perfectly composed set list to showcase her familiar, dynamic soprano range while visiting a few Heart classics. A selection of cover songs, reflecting a diversity of musical styles, were peppered into the set. Wilson came out of the gates strong, with her four-piece band hammering out “The Real Me,” “Barracuda” and “Crazy On You,” before slowing it down with some stripped-down versions of “What About Love” and “Fool No More.” Wilson told a story of love and separation from a new relationship while being on the road in Australia. The result was the song “Anguish” (featured on the fantastic album “A Million Miles,”) which Wilson proceeded to sing. As a long time Heart and Ann Wilson fan, I was surprised and impressed with her performances of Yes’ “I’ve Seen all the Good People” and “She Talks to Angels” from the Black Crows. Wilson also did The Who’s “Won’t Get Fooled Again” and “Love Reign Over Me” before launching into one of her top hits “Alone,” which had the audience singing along. Wilson’s encore songs included her version of Buffalo Springfield’s “For What It’s Worth,” which features the well-known lyrics: “Stop, children,

COCO PET SEMATARY

2611 N. Proctor 253.752.9500

“REFUGEE NOCTURNE AND OTHER WORKS FOR ONE AND TWO GUITARS” at Antique Sandwich Company, 5102 N. Pearl St., Tacoma. Sunday, Feb. 18, 3-4:30 p.m. Classical guitarist Jeffry Steele performs a program of solos COURTESY PHOTO by himself (with electronic enhancements), Barrios, Rota, and traditional Irish and, in collaboration with Ken Jacobsen, duets by Bach, Sagreras, and Cardoso. The lengthiest piece is Steele’s “Refugee Nocturne,” prompting him to make the program a benefit for refugees. The remaining music relates a theme of longing for homeland, in this case Ireland, Italy, South America and Germany. Steele has a master’s degree in composition from Boston’s New England Conservatory and was described as “a splendid musician” by the Boston Globe. More recently he received a master’s in counseling from St. Martin’s University. His current work in the helping profession is raising his awareness of the plight endured by many immigrants. There is no admission charge but a freewill offering will be taken and be sent in full to the American Refugee Committee, which provides refugee assistance around the world. For information, visit www.facebook.com/events/176069766483598.

Friday, Feb. 16 THE SWISS: Rusty Cleavers, Cottonwood Cutups, Left Coast Country (bluegrass) 9 p.m., $10 CULTURA EVENT CENTER: Luis Panes, Empieza la rumba, Desde la Florida (Carnaval de Barranquilla) 8 p.m., $15-$20 EAGLES SOUTH TACOMA #2933: Dream Chasers (dance music) 7:30 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN BRIDGE NIGHTCLUB: Sin City (dance tunes) 9 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: 80 Proof Logic, Pagan County Rebels, Crossing Crusades (rock) 8 p.m. O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB: Downglow, Strawberry Rocket (rock) 9 p.m. PACIFIC BREWING: Stingy Brim Band (twang) 7 p.m. PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: C. Conway Jr. (vocal recital) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Guilty Smoke, Convergence, Skullsick Remedy, International Punk Kings (metal, punk) 7 p.m., $10 TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Lachlan Patterson (comedy) 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Gleewood (rock) 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: Fifteen Stitches, As of Right Now, Watch Rome (prog rock, psychedelic) 7 p.m.

Saturday, Feb. 17

THE VALLEY: The Mutineers, Wickt, Sharky Waters (Americana, country, rock) 7 p.m.

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

what’s that sound? Everybody look what’s going down.” There was a jazzy rendition of Aretha Franklin’s “Ain’t no Way,” Nina Simone’s “I Put a Spell on You” and Ray Charles’ “Danger Zone.” The latter was performed with just Wilson accompanied by her keyboardist. As a music photojournalist, I was prepared to photograph the allotted three songs and leave expecting a diluted Heart show, like the kind of shows we’ve seen from members of so many split-up bands. Instead I was enticed and tricked into staying for the whole show by the unexpected performances of Wilson’s Heart material and her wide range of cover tunes that touched on rock, jazz and blues. I believe I even heard some similarities to pop-country in the strippeddown versions of her music. Wilson’s voice deservingly belongs on the top of rock’s heap of most recognizable vocalists and maybe the top female rock vocalist. To view a slideshow of images from the concert, visit Tacomaweekly.com.

Stingy Brim Blue Project FRIDAY, FEB. 16 from 7-10 P.M.

Nightly @ 7:00 pm Sat. & Sun. Matinee at 4:00 pm FRIDAY NIGHT FRIGHTS 2/16 AT 10:00 P.M.

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

AIRPORT TAVERN: J.E.B. (Dilla hip hop and soul) 10 p.m., NC BOB’S JAVA JIVE: A Band of Bros, Tamys Hoffman Band (rock) 9 p.m. CULTURA EVENT CENTER: Tommy Castro and the Painkillers, Ethan Tucker (rock) 8 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN BRIDGE NIGHTCLUB: Sin City (dance tunes) 9 p.m. JAZZBONES: Nite Wave (80s dance music) 9 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Dead Rebel Saints, Ten Miles Wide, Late September Dogs (rock) 8 p.m., $10 NORMANNA HALL: The Rockin’ Aces Band (rock) 8 p.m. PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, STUDIO THEATRE: The Clay Crows (improv) 7 p.m. THE SPAR: The Whirlies (rock) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Firefighter Benefit (comedy) 4:30 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Lachlan Patterson (comedy) 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: 0 Dark 30 (rock) 8 p.m.

JOHNNY’S DOCK: Little Bill Trio (rock) 5 p.m. NEW FRONTIER: Electric Bluegrass, 4 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Country Music Jam (jam) 8:00 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: The Dope Show (comedy) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Final Notice with Bob Evans (country, rock, bluegrass) 7 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND, SCHNEEBECK HALL: Mini Maestros with Symphony Tacoma String Quintet (classical) 2:30 p.m., $10-$13 THE VALLEY: The 44’s (Americana) 8 p.m.

Monday, Feb. 19

ODD OTTER BREWING: Kurt Lindsay (singer/songwriter) 6 p.m. ALEGRE BAKERY AND GELATO: Open Mic Monday (open mic)

6:30 p.m. PACIFIC CHRISTIAN CENTER CHURCH: Marty and Misha Goetz (melodic) 7 p.m. THE SWISS: Open Mic Night (open mic) 7 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Bartlett on bass (jam) 7 p.m.

Tuesday, Feb. 20

DAWSON’S: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH: Tacoma TotemAires Barbershop Chorus (barber shop) 7 p.m. METRONOME: Open Mic (open mic) 7 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Bingo (it’s a game) 7 p.m. STONEGATE: Blues Jam with Roger Williamson (blues) 8 p.m. THE SWISS: Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz (trivia) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: The Comedy Voice (comedy) 8 p.m., 18+, NC UNCLE SAM’S: SOB Band (jam) 7 p.m., NC

Wednesday, Feb. 21

THE VALLEY: Crushed!? (Punk) 8 p.m. AIRPORT TAVERN: Tony Daniel, Amos Mac (comedy) 8 p.m., $5 DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Live It OutLoud All Ages Jam, 6 p.m. JOESEPPIS ITALIAN RISTORANTE: Robin Miller-Richardson (piano and vocals) 5:30 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 8:30 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC ROCK THE DOCK: Karaoke (hit & miss musicianship) 9 p.m. STONEGATE: The Blu Tonez (blues) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Open Mic (comedy) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Subvinyl Jukebox (jam) 7 p.m., NC

Thursday, Feb. 22

Sunday, Feb. 18

THE SPAR: Brian Lee and the Orbitors (blues) 8 p.m. ANTIQUE SANDWICH COMPANY: Jeffry Steele

(singer/songwriter) 3 p.m. DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND, PIANO ROOM: Corey Harper (singer/ songwriter) 7 p.m., NC THE AGAVES GRILL: Ed Taylor Band (jazz) 6 p.m. ANTHEM COFFEE CO: Kurt Lindsay (singer/songwriter) 6:30 p.m. DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC DIVERSIONS CAFE: Corey Harper (singer/songwriter) 7 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS IS SEEKING AN

EXPERIENCED ADVERTISING

SALES REPRESENTATIVE Tacoma Weekly News is seeking an extremely talented sales professional to join our team. The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated self-starter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers. REQUIREMENTS: 2 years of prior sales experience, preferably newspaper, online and special section experience. Must be self motivated, outgoing individual with the ability to work with the public and advertisers in a positive way. Attendance of community events, organizational skills, and attention to detail, negotiation and problem solving. Starting salary depends on qualifications.

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR RESUME TO: PUBLISHER@TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

Pacific Brewing & Malting Co. 610 Pacific Ave., tacoma


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 16, 2018

Coming Events TOP PICK: IS ISLAMOPHOBIA ERODING OUR CIVIL LIBERTIES? Wed., Feb. 21, 7 p.m. Fircrest United Methodist Church, 1018 Columbia Ave. (on S. 19th, just west of Pearl St.), Fircrest Miko Peled, Israeli-American author of “The General’s Son: Journey of an Israeli in Palestine” and a brand new book titled “Injustice: The Story of the Holy Land Foundation Five,”  will speak  in Fircrest. Born into an Israeli family that is solidly tied with the political and military elite in Israel, Peled speaks internationally about his journey to solidarity with the Palestinian movement for human rights and civil rights. His unique perspective and outspoken approach make for a thought-provoking evening. His most recent book exposes the travesty of justice in 2009 when five PalestinianAmericans were sentenced to 65 years (2), 20 years (1), and 15 years (2) for their extraordinary fundraising for Palestinians in need. An example of post-9/11 governmental over-reach, their good works were  characterized  in U.S. Federal Court  as material support to Hamas, whereas they intentionally did not give money to any groups on the State Department’s list.  Peled has done years of research and shows the absurdity of their conviction. One example: the United States’ Agency for International Development (USAID) was giving money to the same groups!  Chris Hedges, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and former Middle East bureau chief for The New York Times, writes of this new book: “Miko Peled shines a light on one of the most egregious cases of injustice committed to date against Muslim leaders in the United States. … An ominous and important warning about the degradation of the rule of law and civil liberties that increasingly characterizes American society.” Marjorie Cohn, professor emerita, Thomas Jefferson School of Law, writes: “Miko Peled tells the riveting story of a grave miscarriage of justice against the Holy Land Five. Capitalizing on post-9/11 Islamophobic hysteria, the U.S. government used secret evidence, conflating charity with terrorism, to convict five Palestinian men of providing material support for terrorism. Peled analyzes the case in the context of Israel’s brutal occupation of the Palestinian people and provides unique personal accounts of the defendants. A must-read for all who seek the truth about how the U.S. and Israel work handin-glove to oppress the Palestinians.” The talk is presented by Jewish Voice for Peace, Tacoma chapter. Info: www.facebook.com/Tacoma.JVP; www.jvp.org/TacomaDonate

‘THE GLASS MENAGERIE’ Feb 16 - March 11, Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Sundays, 2 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd., Lakewood Amanda Wingfield strives to give meaning and direction to her life and the lives of her children, though her methods are ineffective and irritating. Tom seeks escape in alcohol and the world of the movies and Laura, handicapped, has receded more and more into herself. This is a drama of great tenderness, charm and beauty, and one of the most famous plays of the modern theatre. It is a Lakewood Playhouse premier directed by South Sound theater veteran Michael O’Hara. Plays through March 11. Special showings at  8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22  (pay what you can night) and  8 p.m.  on Thursday, March 1 (pay what you can actors  benefit). Ages: Suitable for all ages, but parental guidance is suggested. Price: $26 general; $23 military and seniors; $20 students/educators. Info: www.lakewoodplayhouse.org; (253) 588-004 ‘MY WAY: A MUSICAL TRIBUTE TO FRANK SINATRA’ Through Feb. 25, Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 2 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 6th Ave., Tacoma The Voice. The Sultan of Swoon. The Chairman of the Board. Ol’ Blue Eyes. The Greatest Singer of the Popular Song. These are all nicknames for one of the greatest entertainers of the 20th century, a man whose career successes spanned more than 50 years, enjoying popularity with each successive generation. This is a musical tribute to the crooner, Grammy- and Academy-Award winner, the one-and-only Frank Sinatra! “My Way,” “Fly Me to the Moon,” “I’ve Got the World on a String” and “New York, New York” are some of his greatest hits that will have you singing along! Legendary singer, actor, and producer Frank Sinatra was one of the best-selling musical artists of all time. Songs like “The Way You Look Tonight,” “Fly Me to the Moon” and “Strangers in the Night” still resonate with a crowd today. “My Way: A  Musical  Tribute to Frank Sinatra” is a tribute to the  musical  legend contain-

ing 56 songs, both iconic and lesser-known, that are sung by a spectacular cast of four men and four women in a jazz club setting. Get ready to end the night singing, dancing and feeling grand after seeing “My Way!” tmp.org

ADULT PAINT NIGHT Fri., Feb. 16, 6-9 p.m. Throwing Mud Gallery, 2212 N. 30th St. Spend an evening with your sweetheart, or gather your friends for a “Gal-entines” get together. This is a chance to spend some creative time together with the special people in your life. Price: $15/person event fee reserves your seat. Just pay for the pottery you paint that evening. Info: (253) 2547961; facebook.com/events/ 2006662489613569 FNF PRESENTS: ‘PET SEMATARY’ Fri., Feb. 16, 10 p.m. to 12 a.m. Friday Night Frights, 2611 N. Proctor St. February is “Women in Horror Month” and Friday Night Frights is celebrating with director Mary Lambert’s “Pet Sematary,” often considered one of Stephen King’s finest novel to film adaptations, as well as one of his most hair-raising films. Price: $10. Info: (253) 7529500; facebook.com/events/ 2091370444430042 FRIDAY NIGHT MAGIC Fri., Feb. 16, 6-10 p.m. Comiks the Gathering, 15022 Pacific Ave. S. Join Comiks the Gathering for Friday Night Magic event. Rivals of Ixalan Draft will start at 6 p.m. Entry will be $15. Compete for this month’s promo and pack prize support. Price: $15. Info: (253) 240-1943; facebook.com/ events/790071501181770 PEARL WELLNESS CLINIC GRAND OPENING Fri., Feb. 16, 5-8 p.m. Pearl Chiropractic, 5702 N. 26th St., Suite B Come join us at our new location for appetizers/ drinks, meet the practitioners and staff, and discover all the services Pearl Wellness Clinic has to offer. Free 10-minute chair massage, prizes and more. Price: Free. Info: (253) 9705077; facebook.com/events/ 2046621622289993

WESTERN FEST FREE COMMUNITY FESTIVAL Sat., Feb. 17, 12-4 p.m. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave. Dust off your cowboy boots and mosey on down to Tacoma Art Museum’s Western Fest for an all-ages, fun-filled day inspired by the Haub Family Collection of Western American Art. Explore five new exhibitions, create westernthemed art, hear authentic cowboy poetry, take in western music, food, and more. Price: Free. Info: (253) 2724258; facebook.com/events/ 2059923617574628 MOVIES AND MARINE LIFE AT THE SEAPORT (FOR ADULTS) Sat., Feb. 17, 7-9 p.m. Foss Waterway Seaport, 705 Dock St. Looking for a unique night out? Come to Foss Waterway Seaport for an adults only (18+) evening of exploring the underwater life of Puget Sound. We’ll have short movies and snacks inside and investigate whatever underwater wild things we find in the Sound. Price: Pre-registration required, $25/person. Info: (253) 2722750; facebook.com/events/ 2096744010555512 MOON MOAN – FAMILY SATURDAY Sat., Feb. 17, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 950 Gallery, 950 Pacific Ave., Suite 205 (entrance on 11th St.) This event will be fun for children, and the last chance to see the exhibit “Moon Moan,” new work by Raven Juarez and Asia Tail. Price: Free. Info: 253) 627-2175; facebook.com/ events/206377969934828 GIVE BLOOD, GET BEER Sat., Feb. 17, 3-6 p.m. The Copper Door, 12 N. Tacoma Ave. Register to donate and receive a pre-paid voucher for a pint of beer at The Copper Door. In addition, you will also receive a Pint-4-Pint T-shirt along with the satisfaction that you just helped save a life. Price: Donation. Info: (253) 2123708; facebook.com/events/ 1424394781020611

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

event where Asia Pacific Cultural Center is partnering to bring you an event full of great performances. Price: Free. Info: facebook.com/ events/ 1990841764531480

events/143603956337682

ROCK TRADING STATION LAUNCH Mon., Feb. 19, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Freighthouse Art Gallery, 602 E. 25th St., Ste 60 Come join us as we launch our new rock trading station in the newly expanded Freighthouse Art Gallery. Bring in a painted rock to trade, or show up to hunt for rocks. Take some, leave some, enjoy them all. Price: No cover. Info: (253) 988-0068; facebook.com/ events/ 1545096842205667

BELLY DANCE REVUE Sun., Feb. 18, 6-8 p.m. The Antique Sandwich Company, 5102 N. Pearl St. Tacoma’s favorite belly dance show. Always free and always family friendly, the TBDR features different performers from all over the PNW. Come enjoy pie, sandwiches, beer, and wine all while watching a great dance show. Price: Free. Info: (253) 7524069; facebook.com/events/ 1754258454625230

COMMANDER LEAGUE Mon., Feb. 19, 6:30-9 p.m. Tacoma Games, 3013 6th Ave. Point System. Points are accumulated during each game and reset at the end of each month. Weekly and monthly prize support. See store for details. Price: $5. Info: (253) 301-2137; facebook.com/ events/ 1666199123437537

THE COMEDY SOCIAL Sun., Feb. 18. 8-11 p.m. North End Social Club, 3013 6th Ave. The winners will be chosen by a panel of three judges representing Mary Mart, the North End Social Club, and the show producers.The first place prize is $50 and the second place prize is a $25 bar tab. Contest will take place every first and third Sunday of the month. Price: No cover. Info: (253) 212-3913; facebook.com/ events/158460294802220

KABOOM! IMAGINATION PLAYGROUND Tues., Feb. 20, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Summit Library, 5107 112th St. E. Children can enjoy balanced and active play while building motor skills. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3321; piercecountylibrary.org/calendar

SALISHAN FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT Sun., Feb. 18, 5-7 p.m. Lister Elementary School, 2106 E. 44th St. Movie, popcorn, hot dogs, and nachos provided. Come bring the kids and enjoy a community movie night. Additional crafts and sport activities available during the movie for the wigglers among us. Price: Free. Info: (253) 571-2900; facebook.com/

T C D R H J I K O G B V P U G L M P Z O

T K Z J V M L G W T K T Z T T H F G I H L A A S W A T S W B V Q E X O E P X Z W

K K U V Y F U U U V C R T E R J S T G S

Q H X W E S Q U Q A W R M P R G Y S X J K H E I E R F M N T A P N F R Y U P E G

G Q U B T A Y O A R I D C L I A S R F A

P B M M V R M O N N S L O I J N I E O T

B I R X P P W D D J T O L F R E O A R N

MOVIE NIGHT Tues., Feb. 20, 6 p.m. Parkland/Spanaway Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S. Join us for a free screening of “Marshall,” starring Chadwick Boseman. Popcorn provided. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3304; piercecountylibrary.org/calendar

N A E B G F J X D G O S O Y C S R D A A

Z E N U J Y L K O M R O R T G E T I R P

D Y S V N I X V L G Y L D I M A S N T N

C X A E P X F Y L E M A E C P M A G V M

T W R S N G S A S S O F M Y E E C G W F

E L K N B I V P V X N F O N O R Y C P N

H N R Y K D S I V H T U Q I N I M I J T

Q F Y W Q O X A J O H B W T J C M E Y Y

R H N K I Z P C H M L A B S V A O J V M

Q V I I J I I V Y E E D E E E N T U O R

H W S W Y B L L B M H K J D V S A F F I

We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

YOGA MASTER How many words can you make out of this phrase?

LINCOLN DISTRICT LUNAR NEW YEAR Sun., Feb. 18, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lincoln District Tacoma, 3801 S. Yakima Ave. Join the Lincoln District in this year’s Lunar New Year

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.


Friday, February 16, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 7

Classifieds

CALL 253.922.5317

253.922.5317 www.tacomaweekly.com

Services Advertise your business for home, garden, pet, personal service needs and more right here! Call 253-922-5317 HANDYMAN

HANDYMAN

HANDYMAN REPAIRS Home Repairs Yardwork Roof Moss Treatment Gutter Cleaning

253-475-5220 ADVISOR

ADVISOR

SPIRITUAL READER AND ADVISOR PAST • PRESENT • FUTURE Ask for Miss Georgia $20 WITH THIS AD 253-263-2213 EXTERIORS

EXTERIORS

THE NORTHWEST’S PREMIER EXTERIOR CLEANING COMPANY

Services CASH FOR CARS

Cash for Cars or RVs $100 up to $5,000 Free Estimate Free Tow 253-341-9548 HAULING

360-440-6301

NOW SERVICING NORTH TACOMA AND UNIVERSITY PLACE Get scheduled for your free estimate at Johnnytsunami.com!

Sales $1.00

Clothing Sale EVERY MONDAY

HAULING

ALEX’S MAINTENANCE SERVICES Happy Holidays! Gutter Cleaning and Hauling

CLEANING

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you.

(253) 752-8105

CONTACT US Phone: 253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 Mail: 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma, WA 98421

FREE Hauling (253) 397-7013 for Metal LIMO

ROOFING

TriState Roofing Your Local Roof Experts “Repairs or Replacement” TriState Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

LIMO

1901 Center St., Tacoma, WA 98409 253-363-8280 www.tristate.pro

LIMO

LIMO

PATRIOT LIMOUSINE SERVICE

24 Hour Service

Weddings • Anniversaries • Birthdays • Proms • Graduations Funerals • Round Trip Airport Service • Corporate Holiday Parties • All Other Special Occasions

253-848-7378

www.patriotlimowa.com

253.473.7621 253.732.1419

HAULING

Licensed & Insured

ELECTRICAL

HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

Allied Electric Service

Father AND Son Hauling

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

Garage Clean Out Yard Clean Up

Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time.

253-926-2000

CELL

253-222-9181

www.alliedmarinecorp.com

Employment

OFFICE

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

ALLIEE1963CQ

Employment

Employment

PIERCE COUNTY COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER GROUP SEEKING AN

EXPERIENCED ADVERTISING

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

512 112th St. S. Parkland

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

ROOFING

 Storm Clean-up  Handyman

Squeaky Clean

Bargain World

WANTED:

LAWN CARE

Big John’s Lawn Care

CLEANING

Plus Daily Discounts

Wanted

LAWN CARE

Services

253-564-5743

ELECTRICAL

• ROOF CLEANING • GUTTER CLEANING • PRESSURE WASHING • WINDOW CLEANING

CASH FOR CARS

Services

PCCNG, Pierce County’s community news leader, is seeking an extremely talented sales professional to join our team. The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated selfstarter with a proven record for achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers.

DISCRIMINATION

Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator and City of Destiny Award Winner will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@fifetowing.com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E., Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

REQUIREMENTS: 2 years of prior sales experience, preferably newspaper, online and special section experience. Must be a self-motivated, outgoing individual with the ability to work with the public and advertisers in a positive way. Be willing to attend community events, have organizational skills and attention to detail with negotiation and problem solving. Starting salary depends on qualifications.

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR RESUME TO: PUBLISHER@TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: • Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com


Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 16, 2018

Notices

Notices NO. PUY-CS-CS-2017-0044 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON Shelia Pelt

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Northwest Towing, at 2025 S 341st Pl, Federal Way on 2/20/2018. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130. at 3:00 p.m. Viewing of cars from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Registered Tow Number 5695. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

v. Galen Yallup Jr.

Petitioner, Respondent,

The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court. In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing. If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition. This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act.

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 2/22/2018. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 10:00-11:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

TO: Steve Clark Case Name: In re the guardianship of C.S (DOB: 01/14/2016) Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2017-0039 Nature of Case: Guardianship of a Minor Child SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition has been filed asking the Court to appointed the abovenamed Petitioner(s) to be the guardian(s) for C.S (DOB: 01/14/2016), a minor child under PTC 7.12 (Guardianship of Minors Code). YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear at a guardianship hearing in this Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation at: DAY: MONDAY DATE: March 19th , 2018 TIME: 9:00 AM LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31st ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 The guardianship hearing is private and closed. Only those persons the Court finds to have a legitimate interest in the proceedings may attend. The Court will hear testimony to determine whether guardianship is in the best interest of the child and the Tribal community. The Court will consider all guardianship reports submitted for review. All parties shall be given the opportunity to contest the factual contents and conclusions of the guardianship reports. Any party may file recommendations regarding the guardianship with the Court at least 10 calendar days before the hearing. You also have the following rights before the Court: • The right to be present before the Court; • The right to present written and oral testimony; • The right to subpoena witnesses; • The right to submit relevant evidence to the Court for consideration; • The right to counsel at your own expense and effort; the Court has a list of attorneys who are admitted to practice before the Puyallup Tribe; and • The right to appeal a final decision in this matter. If you do not appear at the hearing or file a written response to the petition within 20 days from the date of this notice, the Court may enter an order in your absence. NOTICE PURSUANT TO PTC 4.08.250 – DEFAULT JUDGMENT WHEN A PARTY AGAINST WHOM A JUDGMENT IS SOUGHT FAILS TO APPEAR, PLEAD, OR OTHERWISE DEFEND WITHIN THE TIME ALLOWED, AND THAT IS SHOWN TO THE COURT BY A MOTION AND AFFIDAVIT OR TESTIMONY, THE COURT MAY ENTER AN ORDER OF DEFAULT AND, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO THE PARTY IN DEFAULT, ENTER A JUDGMENT GRANTING THE RELIEF SOUGHT IN THE COMPLAINT. Copies of the Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404. If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585. TO: Gerardo Ortiz Case Name: 01/24/2003)

In re the guardianship of L-B.E (DOB:

Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2017-0046 Nature of Case: Guardianship of a Minor Child SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition has been filed asking the Court to appointed the above-named Petitioner(s) to be the guardian(s) for L-B.E (DOB: 01/24/2003), a minor child under PTC 7.12 (Guardianship of Minors Code). YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear at a guardianship hearing in this Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation at: DAY: MONDAY DATE: March 19th, 2018 TIME: 11:00 AM LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31st ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 The guardianship hearing is private and closed. Only those persons the Court finds to have a legitimate interest in the proceedings may attend. The Court will hear testimony to determine whether guardianship is in the best interest of the child and the Tribal community. The Court will consider all guardianship reports submitted for review. All parties shall be given the opportunity to contest the factual contents and conclusions of the guardianship reports. Any party may file recommendations regarding the guardianship with the Court at least 10 calendar days before the hearing. You also have the following rights before the Court: • The right to be present before the Court; • The right to present written and oral testimony; • The right to subpoena witnesses; • The right to submit relevant evidence to the Court for consideration; • The right to counsel at your own expense and effort; the Court has a list of attorneys who are admitted to practice before the Puyallup Tribe; and • The right to appeal a final decision in this matter. If you do not appear at the hearing or file a written response to the petition within 20 days from the date of this notice, the Court may enter an order in your absence. NOTICE PURSUANT TO PTC 4.08.250 – DEFAULT JUDGMENT WHEN A PARTY AGAINST WHOM A JUDGMENT IS SOUGHT FAILS TO APPEAR, PLEAD, OR OTHERWISE DEFEND WITHIN THE TIME ALLOWED, AND THAT IS SHOWN TO THE COURT BY A MOTION AND AFFIDAVIT OR TESTIMONY, THE COURT MAY ENTER AN ORDER OF DEFAULT AND, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO THE PARTY IN DEFAULT, ENTER A JUDGMENT GRANTING THE RELIEF SOUGHT IN THE COMPLAINT. Copies of the Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404. If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585.

NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for April 4, 2018 at 9:45 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court. Dated January 24, 2018 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585 IN THE COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS WILLIAMS, DAVID, Petitioner, vs. WILLIAMS JR, DAVID, Respondent. NO. PUY-CV-PO-2017-0141 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS to: DAVID WILLIAMS JR. (Respondent) YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear on TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2018 at 2:30 p.m.., At the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, 1451 East 31st St, Tacoma, WA 98404 and respond to the petition filed against you pursuant to the provisions of the Domestic Violence Protection and Anti-Harassment Civil Code (PTC ch. 7.16). If you fail to respond, an order of protection will be issued against you for one (1) year from the date you are required to appear. A temporary order of protection has been issued against you, restraining you from the following: (contact the court for a complete copy of the Temporary Order) (1) You are restrained from causing petitioner or any of the minor children residing with petitioner any physical harm, bodily injury, assault including sexual assault, and from molesting, harassing, threatening, or stalking the same. (2) You are restrained from coming near or having any contact whatsoever with the parties, in person or through others, direct or indirectly. (3) You are further restrained from entering the petitioner’s residence, school or place of employment. A copy of the petition, notice of hearing, and ex parte order for protection has been filed with the clerk of this court. DATED February 1, 2018 Jamey LaPointe-McCloud, Court Clerk

IN THE COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS WILLIAMS, DAVID, Petitioner, vs. WILLIAMS, CHRISTINA GRACE, Respondent. NO. PUY-CV-PO-2017-0143 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS to: CHRISTINE GRACE WILLIAMS (Respondent) YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear on TUESDAY March 6, 2018 at 1:30 p.m., At the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, 1451 East 31st Tacoma, WA 98404 and respond to the petition filed against you pursuant to the provisions of the Domestic Violence Protection and AntiHarassment Civil Code (PTC ch. 7.16). If you fail to respond, an order of protection will be issued against you for one (1) year from the date you are required to appear. A temporary order of protection has been issued against you, restraining you from the following: (contact the court for a complete copy of the Temporary Order) (1) You are restrained from causing petitioner or any of the minor children residing with petitioner any physical harm, bodily injury, assault including sexual assault, and from molesting, harassing, threatening, or stalking the same. (2) You are restrained from coming near or having any contact whatsoever with the parties, in person or through others, direct or indirectly. (3) You are further restrained from entering the petitioner’s residence, school or place of employment. A copy of the petition, notice of hearing, and ex parte order for protection has been filed with the clerk of this court. DATED January 9, 2018 Jamey LaPointe-McCloud, Court Clerk

IN THE COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS WILLIAMS, RITA, Petitioner, vs. YOUNG, DONALD, Respondent. NO. PUY-CV-PO-2017-0142 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

Volunteers WANTED: PIANO PLAYER Tacoma Banjo club is looking for a piano player to play 20’s 30’s & 40’s Music. This is a very rewarding and fun activity for a person. The group performs at retirement centers, puyallup fair, private events, senior care centers. This is a volunteer position. We have about 20 Banjo players and two piano players that share performances. If you are interested to be apart of this great and fun group please contact Gary Hauenstein at 253 686 2413.

THE FIFE MILTON FOOD BANK WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE COMMUNITY FOR ITS SUPPORT IN 2017. LOCAL BUSINESSES, SCHOOLS, CHURCHES, AND INDIVIDUALS CONTRIBUTED A LARGE AMOUNT OF FOOD PLUS OVER $24,000 WHICH ALLOWED US TO PROVIDE FOOD TO MORE THAN 1,900 FAMILIES (7,300 CLIENTS) WITH OVER 129,000 POUNDS OF FOOD. WE HAVE 54 VOLUNTEERS WHO LOGGED MORE THAN 4,000 HOURS THIS YEAR. THE FOOD BANK IS SPONSORED BY ST. MARTIN OF TOURS CHURCH AND IS LOCATED BEHIND THE CHURCH (2303 54TH AVE. E., FIFE). Volunteer to help an Isolated Elder Make a difference in someone’s life! Senior Companions and Senior Friends are volunteers whose friendship helps seniors maintain their independence through regular visits and assistance with errands. Senior Companion volunteers must be 55+, low-income and serve 15 hrs/week to receive a tax free stipend. Senior Friend volunteers must be 18+ and serve 2 hrs/ month – no stipend. Eligible volunteers will pass a background check and attend training before being matched with an elder needing your help. Call Sarah (253-722-5686) or Linda (253-722-5691) at Lutheran Community Services for more information & an application VOLUNTEER ADVOCATES NEEDED FOR RESIDENTS IN LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES The Pierce County Long Term Care Ombudsman Program is looking for people who are empathetic, diplomatic, assertive, and skilled communicators to be volunteer ombudsman. As a LTC Ombudsman, you will visit an assisted living community or a skilled nursing community, working to ensure that resident rights are being protected and helping residents resolve problems they are unable to solve on their own. Volunteer ombudsman are trained and certified and dedicate 4 hours a week or 16 hours a month. Ongoing support, case staffing, team-meetings, and trainings are provided each month. For more information please call 253 798-3789 or Email Kgavron@co.pierce. wa.us. Or visit www. co.pierce.wa.us/index. aspx?NID=1302 Wanted: Volunteers for groceries.

The Empowerment Center currently has a limited number of openings for volunteers in our food bank. These positions will be filled on a first come, first served basis. Come vol-

unteer and receive free groceries! El Shaddai Christian Ministries/The Empowerment Center, 4340 Pacific Ave., Tacoma WA 98148. For more information contact us at 253-677-7740. City of Fife Needs You! We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www.cityoffife. org/getinvolved. NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto w w w. c h i f r a n c i s c a n . org and click “hospice and palliative care” in the “our services” tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253538-4649 #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www.projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks

Volunteers for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/ Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perishable snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE.

Help hard-working families

by volunteering with VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available (February to April 2017). Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Learn more and apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org.

Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver

Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driver’s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253-272-8433 Food Bank Eloise’s Cooking Pot Food Bank on the Eastside of Tacoma, WA is powered strictly by volunteers. We provide much needed food and other basic household items to people in need on a weekly basis. Being a volunteer driven organization we are always looking for good people who are interested in donating a few hours of their lives helping make the lives of someone else a little better. Donate as much or as little of your time you want for a wide variety of tasks, there is always plenty to do. If you are looking for a way to be part of something bigger and give a little much needed help to the local community then contact us and we’ll get you started. Please join us in helping to spread a little holiday cheer. Contact 253-212-2778. Help furnish hope to those in need!

NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. “NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.” Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at info@nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868.

South Sound Outreach

is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www. southsoundoutreach.org.

Make a difference in the life of a child!

The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma. org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks. com or 253.305.1025.

The Tacoma Maritime Institute

meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00. Call 253536-4494

Be a Big Brother!

Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several program options to fit your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 206.763.9060.

INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT “MEMORY COMMUNITY”

What It Is: We are Memory Community (a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation). The Memory Community Project is a creative service to seniors. Our Goals & Objectives: To create an accessible resource that: • helps our senior citizens tell their stories • connects the young and the old • increases our understanding of those before us who help us be who we are • honors the generations before us and show our appreciation by preserving their memories • All seniors are welcome to volunteer for filming their story! • At most two days of work during daytime – Day 1: pre-production meeting, and Release Form signing Day 2: filming, ideally wrapped within half a day What we’d like you to talk about in the film: Use 10 minutes or so to tell the most memorable story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/grandchildren. Compensation: a DVD in which you are the leading character, and a free upload to our website http://memorycommunity.org/ Contact: send your emails to deyung@ memorycommunity.org Or call Deyung at 360-850-9850 for scheduling a meeting. The filming is free, but donations are appreciated to help the project continue.

Knitters and Crocheters

Loving Hearts is a charitable knitting and crocheting group comprised of community volunteers. We make hats for chemo patients and the backpack program for children, baby items, blankets, wheelchair/walker bags and fingerless gloves for Veterans. We meet in Gig Harbor on the second Tuesday of each month from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. and again on third Wednesday from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Located at the WayPoint Church, 12719 134th Ave KPN, Gig Harbor, WA 98329. We also have a Fife meeting on the third Thursday of the month from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at Ardena Gale Mobile Park, 4821 70th Ave East, Fife. For more information please email Cynthia at lovingheartsonkp@aol. com or call Virginia at 253884-9619.

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to: Tacoma Weekly

304 Puyallup Ave.,#1 Tacoma WA 98421

Ad Copy Here:

The COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS to: DONALD A. YOUNG. (Respondent) YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear on TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 2018 at 1:30 p.m.., At the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, 1451 East 31st St, Tacoma, WA 98404 and respond to the petition filed against you pursuant to the provisions of the Domestic Violence Protection and Anti-Harassment Civil Code (PTC ch. 7.16). If you fail to respond, an order of protection will be issued against you for one (1) year from the date you are required to appear. A temporary order of protection has been issued against you, restraining you from the following: (contact the court for a complete copy of the Temporary Order) (1) You are restrained from causing petitioner or any of the minor children residing with petitioner any physical harm, bodily injury, assault including sexual assault, and from molesting, harassing, threatening, or stalking the same. (2) You are restrained from coming near or having any contact whatsoever with the parties, in person or through others, direct or indirectly. (3) You are further restrained from entering the petitioner’s residence, school or place of employment. A copy of the petition, notice of hearing, and ex parte order for protection has been filed with the clerk of this court. DATED January 9, 2018 Jamey LaPointe-McCloud, Court Clerk

Name: Address: Phone: Cash

$15.00 30 Words and Under: ______________ Extra words @ .05: _________________ Check

Visa/Mastercard Card #

Money Order Exp.

Sub Total: ________________________ x Number of Weeks = ______________

Total Amount: _______________

Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Mail or bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

w w w. t a c o m a w e e k l y. c o m


Friday, February 16, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 9

Classifieds

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

CALL 253.922.5317

REALTORS

REALTORS

SERGIO HERNANDEZ Serving the Community Since 1991 Better Properties University Place/Fircrest (253) 431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

FOR SALE 808 Alameda Ave, Fircrest, 98466

$429,900

5 beds, 1.75 baths, 2,492 sq. ft. Located in the heart of Fircrest, this gorgeous mid-century home awaits! From the curb this home shines. Fabulous layout with all the right features. The foyer leads to a wide open and updated kitchen/dining/living area, perfect for entertaining. A warm fireplace is the centerpiece of the main living room. Dining room access to 900’ azek deck and newly fenced backyard. Refin. hardwoods upstairs, heated bathroom floors, and new wool carpets downstairs. New windows and new Gaco 50yr roof material.

Your Go-To North Tacoma Experts and Neighbors

Toner Real Estate Solutions Joe Toner Real Estate Broker & Owner Specializing in RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL PRIVATE LOANS JOSEPH TONER

Sharon Benson • Sharonbenson.com Managing Broker CRS, GRI, ABR, SRES, CDPE, ONE 2016 Pierce County Realtor of the Year 253.381.7447 sharon@sharonbenson.com

Kelli Jo Hjalseth • Kellijo.net

Managing Broker CRS, IMS, RMS, CSHP 253.208.9066 Kellijo@windermere.com COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

DESIGNATED BROKER, PRINCIPAL TONER REAL ESTATE SOLUTIONS 1628 Mildred Street, Suite 202 Tacoma Washington 98465 Joe@JoeToner.com Local 253.441.5000 Direct 206.228.1372 COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS FOR SALE/LEASE UNDISCLOSED , WELL-ESTABLISHED LANDSCAPING BUSINESS in Gig Harbor for Sale.

$85,000 Cash. Seller will disclose the name & address when showing appointment is made with Prospective Qualified Buyer and after buyer signs a confidentiality agreement.

COLLISION CENTER, PORT ORCHARD, SIDNEY AVE. Longtime established, includes Real estate. Price reduced. $900,000. SBA Financing Possible. Price includes business, equipment, several outbuildings. Over 38,000 sq feet of land. Excellent road exposure. Seller Retiring. Call Ed: 253-224-7109

BAR & GRILL INCLUDES REAL ESTATE. Same

g n i d pen

location since 1934. Same Owner last 10 yars. Owner Retiring. Annual lGross income $500,000 Approx. Excellent Net. Abscentee Run Package Price $495,500. ($145,000 for the Business, $350,000 for the Real Estate). Seller prefers all cash. Currently owned free and clear. SBA financing possible. Excellent Condition Call Ed: 253-224-7109

NON-FRANCHISE COFFEE SHOP & DELI. Great Location. Business for Sale, $100,000. Owners’ Terms Available.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

CONDOS & HOMES APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

TACOMA TACOMA APARTMENT 322812710 S UNION A STAVE.

$625 $725

UNIV. PLACE NORTH TACOMA HOME

2208SGRANDVIEW DR.AVE W 821 AINSWORTH

$1450 $1350

3 BED 2 BATH 1742 SF. WEL1BED BATH 1 CLEAN, BED, 1 1BATH 500450 SF. SF. COZY 2 BED 2.5TOBATH COME THIS1896SF. 3 BED 2CHARMBATH COZY APART1BD APARTMENT IN THEWITH QUIET ING ROOMY RED BRICK U.P.AND HOME, W/HARDWOOD MENT IN TACOMA, WOODSHIRE RAMBLERONINTHE NORTH TACOMA FLOORS MAIN LEVEL. EASY ACCESSCOMPLEX TO WA-16.

UNIV. PL. APT. DUPONT 7514 41ST ST CT W 2205 BOBS HOLLOW LN

$1195 $1850

PUYALLUP TACOMA CONDO

9007 115THAVE ST.#310 E 1501 TACOMA

$1295 $1150

21BED BATH 11573RD SF.FLOOR REMOD32BED 2.5 BATH 2274800 SF. 2SF. STORY W/ BED, 1 BATH SPABED, 2.5 1 BATH 700SF. UNIT ELED TOWNHOUSE W/ 2 BEDS 3 SPACIOUS UPSTAIRS CIOUS 2ND BEDROOMS, FLOOR APARTMENT AT THEBATH. MARCATO CONDOS INCLUDES A & 1.5 NEWER FLOORING, OPENINLOFT, LANDINGSETTING AREA HOME THEAND WOODSY GOURMET KITCHEN WITH ALL APPLIANCES APPLIANCES, NEWER PAINT. PERFECT A WORK STATION. OF FIR FOR PARK COMPLEX.

TACOMA PUYALLUP DUPLEX

14406 AVE 9102PACIFIC 115TH ST ES

$695 $1050

SPANAWAY TACOMA TRIPLEX 5121 S 203RD ST.AVE CT. E 6021 MASON #2

$1425 $995

3 BED 2.5 BATH 1680 SF. BED,11 BATH BATH 575 2 1BED, 884SF. SF.GREAT YOUR 2 BED 1 BATH 875FANTASTIC SF. NEWLY 2RENMUST SEE!! VALUE IN THIS NICE 1 BEDNEW COZY HOMEUNIT IS LOCATED 2-BEDROOM APARTMENT STORY HOME, 3 BEDROOM ROOM UPPER AVAILABLEIN OVATED A QUIET DUPLEX COMMUNITY HOME HAS AN OPEN FLOORLOT. PLAN 2.5 BATH ON A CORNER IN THE PACIFIC OAKS APTS.

Park52.com ·· 253-473-5200 Park52.com 253-473-5200

Viewpictures, pictures, discounts discounts && more more properties properties online. View online.

Professional Services ProfessionalManagement Management Services


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 16, 2018

Lunar New Year

Blue Öyster Cult

Battle at the Boat 115

February 16, 8pm

March 10, 8pm

March 17, 7pm

I-5 Showroom No Charge

I-5 Showroom $25, $35, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom $30, $50, $75, $100

Sinbad

Keith Sweat

Robin Thicke

March 24, 8:30pm

April 7, 8:30pm

April 14, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $60, $65

I-5 Showroom $30, $45, $70, $75

I-5 Showroom $55, $85, $110, $120

featuring Bang Kieu

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 • EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424 You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.

Twa 02 16 18 p01  
Twa 02 16 18 p01  
Advertisement