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Issue 07 | The Giving Issue

The Essence of Living Locally

www.tellnewengland.com


- A MAGAZINE FOR NEW ENGLAND -


THE GIVING ISSUE EDITORIAL TEAM MANAGING EDITOR Mandi Tompkins FOUNDING PARTNERS Jenn Bakos & Ashley Herrin

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS, RECIPE CRAFTERS Cara Brostrom Shannon Kalahan Julieann Hartley Jennifer Hazard Katie Morris Briana Moore Lauren Wells Event Design + Styling Dean Russell Michelle Martin

A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO... Boston Food Forest Wolfe's Neck Farm Boston HandyWorks Shultz’s Guest House The Kitchen at Billings Forge

GET IN TOUCH SUBMISSIONS submit@tellnewengland.com GENERAL INQUIRIES info@tellnewengland.com MANDI Mandi@tellnewengland.com ASHLEY Ashley@tellnewengland.com JENN Jenn@tellnewengland.com


A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR

HERE we are again, about to jump head first into the holiday season. Holiday songs are (regrettably) already playing on the radio, and big box stores have had garlands and bows strung for weeks. Black Friday stampedes are ready to charge, and this year retailers will be opening their doors even earlier on our beloved Thanksgiving holiday. With all of this hysteria it can be near impossible to ignore. But this year we have a challenge for our community, to look beyond all the glitter and raucous to what truly matters and to what the holidays are really for. In this issue we celebrate the good in our community – those who selflessly give back, places built for good, food meant for sharing, and gifts that give back. We all have initiatives and movements that are near and dear to our hearts. These are just a few that are special to us, and they don’t even begin to skim the surface of ways to give back. New England is filled with people who have amazing stories to tell and opportunities to share – we just have to search for them and embrace them. So as we all begin our long or short journeys to see family this Thanksgiving, and as we enter the true holiday season, remember to reflect on the things that are important to you. Turn your frustrations into action, bring your community together, and celebrate the holidays the way they were meant to be – in the spirit of hope, love, happiness, remembrance, and togetherness. On behalf of the t.e.l.l. New England team,

Mandi Tompkins, Managing Editor


14

28

50

AN URBAN FOOD FOREST:

T.E.L.L. TRADITIONS:

ENDERS STATE FOREST:

THE GIFT OF HARVEST

PIELUCK

A GIFT OF LAND

Exploring the Boston

Our non-traditional take

Exploring one of CT's

Food Forest.

on a new Holiday tradition.

beautiful state forests.


THE GIVING ISSUE: TABLE OF CONTENTS

60

64

74

TRAIL FOOD:

MEET YOUR FARMER:

SHULTZ'S GUEST HOUSE

BACKCOUNTRY BITES

WOLFE'S NECK FARM

Visiting the sanctuary for

Fuel your body while out on

Exploring this 626-acre

homeless dogs.

the trail with these tasty and

organic farm located in Maine.

transportable bites.


THE GIVING ISSUE: TABLE OF CONTENTS

86

90

104

MULLED PEAR SANGRIA

5 TIPS FOR CREATIVE

INDULGE:

A winter take on this classic

GIFT WRAPPING

PUMPKIN GRANOLA

summer cocktail.

Be the presentation envy of all

Enjoy this easy-to-make treat

your friends this season.

filled with flavors of the season.


110

120

136

FORGING HOPE AT

MEET THE MAKER:

HAPPY BELLY PUMPKIN PIE

BILLINGS FORGE

BOSTON HANDYWORKS

A healthier take on this

A look at The Kitchen whose

A look at this Boston-based

holiday favorite.

training program provides

nonprofit dedicated to

hope for Connecticut.

rebuilding lives.


"What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead."


AN URBAN FOOD FOREST: THE GIFT OF HARVEST

STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY CARA BROSTROM


THERE IS A FOREST OF FOOD AND IT'S GROWING IN THIS CITY. This forest is made up of love, sweat, and time – as well as cucumbers, kale and butternut squash. It is a landscape of edibles, carefully planted and designed to follow the patterns of nature. Layers of edible vegetation support one another – an upper layer of fruit and nut trees, a mid-layer of vines and berry bushes, and a ground cover of herbs, edible perennials and annuals. But it is also a landscape of people. Gardeners, designers, urban planners, writers, educators, beekeepers, and many more lovers of land and food have come together on a given piece of land in the middle of the city with a common goal. They come here to get their hands dirty, to dig holes, to sheet mulch and plant crops. Many also come to share valuable knowledge. Together, they bring a food forest to the City of Boston. According to the Boston Food Forest Coalition (BFFC), “a food forest is a sustainable land management system that mimics a woodland ecosystem, focusing on food-producing trees and shrubs.” It offers something that parts of inner city Boston desperately need – an ecologically healthy, and useful way to meet our most urgent human needs for food, shelter, water harvesting, and medicine. The goal of the BFFC’s flagship project is to establish a public food forest network throughout the City of Boston with the help of both dedicated stewards and nearly 150 volunteers who will build, weed, share, and eat together. Through a partnership with the Boston Nature Center in Mattapan, the BFFC was given access to a piece of land to take their ideas from seed to sprout. With thoughtful planning according to the principles of permaculture, and a design process based on patterns found in nature, this food forest has produced an astounding harvest with minimal maintenance. »

- 16 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


Boston's Food Forest mission is 'to revive and conserve Boston’s established legacy orchards, as well as create new edible food forest sites.

- 17 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


The Boston Food Forest Coalition hopes to one day expand their initiative into entrepreneurial programs for youths, where nuts are turned into butters and berries into jams.


On a recent, cool October morning, I met with a small group of volunteers and organizers. The main task of the day was to plant several trees along a path which traveled between a beautiful herb spiral and a flourishing hugelkultur, or raised bed. The volunteers unloaded a pallet of donated trees from the back of a car, and wheeled them over to the planting site. The day progressed with an education in tree planting- how to dig a hole with pick-axe and shovel, prepare the hole for planting, and finally how to plant the tree. And as the sun rose in the sky and labors increased, sweaters and hoodies were quickly shed. In just a few hours time, a community had been built, all centered around the joint goal of bringing fresh, accessible food to the city. Steering committee member Dane Smith believes that building this type of community will ensure that the food forest reaches its full potential. This is our first year and we had a wonderful harvest,” said Dan Schenk, site manager and another cofounder of the BFFC. “We picked kale, pumpkins, cucumbers, potatoes, squash and shallots. It’s also very cool to know that we are planting fruit trees that could be producing food even a hundred years from now.” There is a lot of potential in a food forest; it is a network of education, food and community. The vision of the BFFC includes publicly accessible gardens, orchards, and food forests spread across the city and planned and maintained by the members of the communities who host these edible spaces. edible spaces. In a city where a wait list for a ten-by-ten foot plot in a community garden can take three years at best, the interest is there but the space is not. In these community-run food forests, the BFFC would work with neighbors to make sure each one is sustainable. Together they decide what foods they will grow, how they will maintain it and how they will share it. Executive Committee member Allison Meierding says the goal here is to create a space where people can get excited about learning to grow their own food. » - 19 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


The Boston Food Forest Coalition (BFFC) is a group of stewards who strive towards establishing a public food forest network throughout the City of Boston.


Volunteers work together to plant trees at the BFF. They come from various personal backgrounds, but have one common goal in mind: creating a forest of food.

- 22 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


"A food forest is a sustainable land management system that mimics a woodland ecosystem, focusing on food-producing trees and shrubs."

- 23 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


And the flagship site at the Boston Nature Center has had a very exciting year. Over 180 pounds of food were harvested throughout the year, and another untraceable amount was plucked by wildlife in between coalition visits. Among the harvest were cucumbers, cantaloupes, watermelon, tomatillos, kale, pumpkins, butternut and kuri squash, cabbage, potatoes, onions and shallots. The onsite herb spiral boasted rosemary, thyme, mint, oregano, dill, parsley, lemon balm, nasturtium, Johnny jump ups, borage and echinacea. All of this produce was then distributed. Cucumbers were sold by donation, day campers made kale chips, pumpkins were given to elementary school children, volunteers went home with shallots and tomatillos and squashes were made into potluck suppers. The demonstration site of the Boston Food Forest is about education combined with growing food. They hope to one day host harvest events focused on what is in season, to operate entrepreneurial programs where youth turn nuts into butters and berries into jams, and to share a portion of this locally grown food with local food pantries. In the meantime, the nature of the work is to continue education, and to share the food. Most importantly the Boston Food Forest has been placed in the hands of those who live here; they have been given the opportunity to learn, grow, give and receive. The BFFC is working to connect all of these into a network of perennial food, a forest in the city that is made up of community and homegrown abundance. ◊◊◊

Learn more about The Boston Food Forest at bostonfoodforest.org

- 24 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


TRADITIONS: PIE-LUCK AN EVENT STYLED BY T.E.L.L. NEW ENGLAND PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENN BAKOS & ASHLEY HERRIN

- 29 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


Our spiced mulled cider warms over hot flames while full plates have left bellies happy. Find recipes for all the pies served starting on pg. 40.

- 30 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


On Thursday my family and I will sit down for our Thanksgiving meal and give thanks. We will pass the mashed potatoes and the stuffing, and of course, the turkey and gravy. We will pause for a minute before digging into our plates piled a mile-high. We will bow our heads in silence, reflect and say grace. We will give thanks for our health, for the family and friends who are gathered with us around the dinner table – and of course for those who are not. We will give thanks for the roof over our head and the food on our plates and end with that goodness gracious, let’s eat attitude that was evoked by my favorite squash casserole steaming in front of me. That is how Thursday’s Thanksgiving meal will begin for my family and I, a continuation of a decades-long tradition. Traditions are an intrinsic part of any family’s history. As the family tree continues to grow, and buds blossom into even more branches, we find ourselves rooted to the traditions that help define our family heritage. At t.e.l.l., we are beginning to forge traditions of our own. Though we are not related by blood or marriage, our team has developed into a close-knit family that has been anchored by a love of the region.

PIELUCK: OUR NON-TRADITIONAL THANKSGIVING TRADITION Food. It unites us. It creates a common ground and a platform for discussion. Together, we’ve crafted countless recipes, sourced only the freshest, local ingredients, and taken hundreds of photographs to share with you, our readers, in hopes that you will one day trust us enough to go out, buy the ingredients, and try it for yourself.

»

- 31 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


FOOD, IN THE END, IN OUR OWN TRADITION, IS SOMETHING HOLY. IT'S NOT ABOUT NUTRIENTS AND CALORIES. IT'S ABOUT sharing. IT'S ABOUT honesty. IT'S ABOUT identity. This year, in hopes of combining our love of traditions and food, we gathered around the table with friends and family to indulge in some of our favorite Thanksgiving pies. These weren’t just “any” pies – these were pies passed down from relatives, and served at our own family tables in years past. These were the golden ones – our favorites that helped strengthen our own individual traditions. We indulged in hot mulled cider as we huddled around a campfire waiting for the last of the pies to come out of the oven. When it was time, the table was set and the food took center stage. We gathered around, passing plates in order to get a slice of each sweet and savory pie. Busy conversations soon turned to silence as forks full of pie were shoveled into our hungry mouths. Happy faces, smiles and laughter soon took over as we discussed which were our favorites, and what about them made them so unique. I sat at the table surrounded by new friends and old as we continued to dissect each pie’s ingredients. Cool air began to pull us closer to the fire once again. It may have been cold outside but warmth filled my body as I realized how thankful I was that a new tradition was born. ◊◊◊ - 34 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


Cooking mulled cider over open flames will spead up the recipe time when compared to cooking on stovetop. For both recipe versions, head to pg. 47.

- 35 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


- 36 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


- 37 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.


To find all the recipes cooked at our first "Pieluck," jump to page 40.


1 | CRAN-APPLE CRUMBLE Apple crisp has always been a favorite of ours no matter what time of year. We added cranberries to this pie to give a tart twist that

1

9-INCH PIE

also compliments this in-season fruit perfectly.

PEPARATION TIME 30 MINS.

COOK TIME 60 MINUTES

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

Filling:

Preheat oven to 425°. Line a 9-inch pie pan with pie

1 pie crust

crust and set aside.

2 tbsp. flour

In a large bowl, combine all filling ingredients: flour,

¾ cup sugar

sugar, cinnamon and salt. Add the sliced apples and

2 tsp. ground cinnamon

cranberries. Mix to coat. Add filling mixture to the pie pan and set aside. In a separate bowl, combine all

½ tsp. salt

the topping ingredients and mix. Sprinkle over the

6 cups red apples, sliced

filling.

1 cup fresh cranberries Topping: ½ cup oats ¼ cup packed brown sugar ¼ cup flour ¼ cup butter, softened

Bake for 15 minutes at 425°. Remove from oven and cover the crusts edge with tin foil to prevent burning. Place back in the oven and continue cooking for about 45 minutes or until golden brown.


2 | MAPLE PUMPKIN PIE This holiday staple includes one of our favorite local ingredients, maple syrup! Make this delicious pie at your next gathering and

1

9-INCH PIE

your guests will thank you. Serve with a scoop of local vanilla icea cream or with a dollop of homemade whipping cream. PEPARATION TIME 15 MINS.

COOK TIME 60 MINUTES

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

1 ½ cups mashed cooked pumpkin

Preheat oven to 350.

¼ cup sugar

Line a 9-inch pie pan with dough. In a separate bowl,

¾ cup evaporated skim milk

mixture into the pie pan.

combine all ingredients until well-combined. Pour

¼ maple syrup ¾ tsp. cinnamon ½ tsp. allspice ¼ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. ground ginger ¼ tsp. ground cloves 2 eggs 1 piecrust

Bake for 1 hour or until filling is cooked through. Gauge this by sticking a knife in the mixture - if it comes out clean, your pie is cooked. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream or top with homemade whipped cream. Enjoy!


3 | BUTTERNUT SQUASH PIE This delicious butternut squash pie is filled with the flavors of brown sugar and cinnamon, and ginger. Try this as an alterna-

1

9-INCH PIE

tive to pumpkin pies. Serve with vanilla ice cream of home made whipping cream. PEPARATION TIME 30 MINS.

COOK TIME 90 MINUTES

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

1 piecrust

Preheat oven to 400°. Roll out pie dough into a 9-inch pie

1 ½ cups butternut squash puree olive oil

pan. Trim or crimp the edges. Place in the freezer for 30 mins. while you prepare the filling. Once chilled, line the pie pan with aluminum foil and fill with dried beans or pie-weights. Bake for 10 mins., remove foil and weights,

2 large organic eggs plus 2 additional egg yolks

prick the bottom of the crust with a fork, and bake for

1 ½ tsp. vanilla extract

Once piecrust is removed from the oven, reduce to 350°.

½ cup dark brown sugar

For the filling: combine the eggs, yolks, vanilla, sugars,

¼ cup granulated sugar

salt, ginger, cinnamon, and nutmeg in a blender or food

¼ tsp. kosher salt 1 ½ tsp. ground ginger 1 ½ tsp. ground cinnamon ½ tsp. ground nutmeg 1 cup whole milk ¼ cup heavy cream

another 5 minutes. The crust should be just golden.

processor until smooth, about 10 seconds. Add 1 ½ cups of reserved squash and process until smooth, another 10 seconds. Scrape down the sides. In between pulses, add milk and heavy cream and process until combined. Pour filling into pre-baked pie shell (you may have a little extra filling). Bake until set and the center doesn’t jiggle, about 45-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool to room temperature. Serve with whipped cream or fresh vanilla ice cream.


4 | TURKEY POT PIE Have leftover turkey on your hands? This delicious and easyto-follow pie is the perfect way to use up those Thanksgiving

1

9-INCH PIE

leftovers. Fill with locally grown and fresh produce like onions, carrots, and peas for a hearty and comforting pot pie. PEPARATION TIME 45 MINS.

COOK TIME 30 MINUTES

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

1 pie crust (double or single crust)

In a medium sauce pan, bring water to a boil. Add

2-3 cups leftover turkey

about 10 minutes. Remove from heat, drain and set

3 medium carrots, peeled and diced

mushrooms and onions and cook for 5 minutes. Stir

diced carrots and potatoes to the water and boil for aside. Melt butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add in flour until combined. Next, add the chicken broth,

2 medium potatoes, peeled and cubed

thyme, salt and pepper. Stir until mixture is creamy

¼ cup butter

over medium heat for an additional 5 minutes or

¼ cup flour

and well-combined.

Continue cooking the sauce

until thickened.

½ cup peas

In a separate bowl, combine the carrots, potatoes,

1 cup fresh mushrooms

sauce, turkey and peas. Mix well. Spoon mixture into

½ cup chopped onion 2 cups chicken broth ½ teaspoon thyme salt and pepper to taste

a 9-inch pie plate and top with pie crust. If using two pie crusts, grease the bottom of the pie plan, and place one crust on the bottom, fill and top with the second. Cut slits in several places in the top crust. Bake at 375 for 25-30 minutes.


5 | MEAT PIE Traditional meat pies are filled with a meat of your choice and/ or other savory ingredients. They're best when seasoned to taste.

1

9-INCH PIE

Our variation of this classic pie is below. Serve piping hot!

PEPARATION TIME 30 MINS.

COOK TIME 1 HOUR

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

1 pie pastry (for a double crust)

Preheat your oven to 350째. Line a 9-inch pie pan

2 lbs. ground beef 2 cups mushrooms 2 tbsp. Worcestershire Sauce 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. ground pepper 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 lb. shredded Swiss cheese 2 eggs, beaten 1 tbsp. butter, melted

with a pie shell and set aside. In a large bowl, combine seasonings, Worcestershire sauce, beef and eggs. Mix well. Next, fold in the shredded cheese and mushrooms. Add the meat mixture to the pie pan, distributing more towards the middle. Top with the second pie shell, trimming the edges. Use fork to press down edges. Dust the top of the pie with melted butter and bake for 1 hour or until shell is golden brown.


6 | CHOCOLATE PORTER PECAN PIE Add this classic dessert to your Thanksgiving table this year and your friends and family will bow down to your culinary prowess.

1

9-INCH PIE

Want to make this traditional pie even better? Add a touch of Porter from Boston-based brewery, Trillium, for that extra kick. PEPARATION TIME 15 MINS.

COOK TIME 1 HOUR

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

1 piecrust (we recommend

First, preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Line your

Immaculate Baking Co.)

pie dish with piecrust, removing excess or creating

3 tbsp unsalted butter ½ cup dark chocolate chips or squares 3 large organic eggs 1 cup dark brown sugar

your favorite edge. Put the crust in the freezer while filling is prepped. Put butter and chocolate chips into the top of a double boiler and stir until melted. In a large bowl, whisk together eggs, brown sugar, flour, vanilla extract, corn syrup, and beer. Once combined, add the melted chocolate and continue to mix, finally stirring in your

3 tbsp. flour

pecans. Remove crust from the freezer and pour

1 tsp vanilla extract

filling into your dish. Bake at 350 for 45 to 50

¾ cup light corn syrup ¹/³ cup Trillium Porter 2 cups pecan halves

minutes or until the center of your pie is puffed a bit and pie is set.


SPICED MULLED CIDER 10 -12

Mulled cider is a classic New England drink that warms the heart and soul when those temperatures begin to drop. Adding spices to

SERVINGS

this hot beverage fills your home with the warm aromas of cinnamon, cloves and anise and compliments this drink perfectly. Top with your favorite local whiskey for extra warmth.

PEPARATION TIME 10 MINS.

COOK TIME 1-2 HOURS

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

1 gallon high-quality local

If cooking over open flames: Using indirect flames,

Apple Cider

warm up a dutch oven. Place all the spices in

4 cinnamon sticks 8 cloves, whole 6 star anise 1-2 whole apples, sliced

the oven and toast for a few minutes, stirring frequently, until fragrant. Add apple cider and apple slices. Cover. Let cider mull for about 1 hour prior to serving. Serve as-is or garnish with additional fruits such as a lemon or extra apple slice. Top with whiskey for additional warmth.

Whiskey of liking (if desired) If cooking in the kitchen: Heat a small skillet to medium-high and add spices. Toast, stirring frequently, until fragrances are awakened. Set aside. In a large pot, combine apple cider, apple slices and spices. Bring to medium heat, and cover. Allow cider to mull for approximately two hours or until spices are infused. Serve warm.


Adding your own spices to this hot beverage fills your home with the warm aromas of the holidays and compliments this drink perfectly. We added cinnamon sticks, anise and cloves but reccomend playing around with the spices to find a mix that you love.


ENDERS STATE FOREST: A GIFT OF LAND STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY SHANNON KALAHAN

Giving back to the community does not always mean giving something tangible. Some of the most valuable gifts to be bestowed upon New Englanders are not those that we can hold in our hands, but rather something the entire community can experience. Places where families build memories and continue New England traditions. Photographer Shannon Kalahan shares one such gift.


There is a soft rustling, crinkling sound as the wind twists it’s way through the branches of the trees that is unique to this time of year. Not the whisper of a spring or summer breeze. The leaves are drier. Louder. Brighter. More poetic. The wind stirs the golden grasses at my feet, and I can feel a hint of frost play at my skin. My nose begins to run. A hint of wood smoke tickles my senses. Amazing how one whiff of a wood stove can bring so many memories to life. I can almost feel the heat rise from the mug of mulled cider in my memories. I can taste the salty crunch of baked pumpkin seeds after a night of jack o’ lantern carving. And I can remember the feeling of a comfortable scarf around my neck and somewhat itchy wool socks on my feet keeping me warm at so many harvest fairs throughout my life, despite the chill of our Autumn evenings. All that and more from one little rustle through the leaves. Fall is, by far, my favorite time of year and photographing the autumn colors is my favorite activity. Obviously, as most of the inn, hotel and motel owners northeast of the New York border will tell you - I’m not alone. People from all over flock to New England every year to see the leaves turn. New England offers more foliage, stone walls, covered bridges, old red barns, rocky beaches, and quaint fishing villages than you can shake a proverbial stick at. From top to bottom, this region is a unique and never ending place to explore.

In particular, there is a spot in northern CT that I consider to be one of New England’s hidden gems. It is a patch of forest, swamp and fields maintained enough to be safe, but undisturbed enough to not feel manicured. » - 52 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


Since discovering it a few years ago, it has become one of my favorite day trips. In the quieter seasons, it’s a peaceful walk in the woods. During the summer, it’s bustling (though hardly “crowded”) with locals splashing in the pools beneath the park’s five waterfalls. Yes, you heard me - five. Oh, and did I mention? It’s awfully photogenic. This sanctuary is called the John Ostrom Enders and Harriet Whitmore Enders State Forest. Like all state parks, it was established for both land preservation, and for public use and enjoyment. Since 1970 when the state forest was established, Enders - as it is more well know - has expanded to cover approximately 2,000 acres in the towns of Granby and Barkhamsted. Some of the additional space was purchased, but by-and-large, the majority of the park was a parcel of land gifted to the State of Connecticut by the the Enders family. The state forest is a gift to the citizens of Connecticut, both as land held in trust for the people and as an actual donation to the state. According to the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection for the state of Connecticut, permitted activities include hiking, hunting, mountain biking and horseback riding. They also instituted a local “letterboxing” project, a statewide initiative to encourage public land use experiences. In the same generous spirit as its creation, Enders also participates in a resident curator program, which exchanges room and board for land management skills, helping to maintain the forest at no cost to taxpayers. Although it isn’t listed as an official activity, for me personally the state forest has been a huge source of photographic inspiration. I've hiked the area in every season. In the summer, I’ve risked a wade underneath the waterfalls and searched the shallow pools for a runaway lens cap.

»

- 53 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


Enders State Forest is a state forest located in the towns of Granby and Barkhamsted. The forest was gifted to the state of Connecticut in 1970.


(If you choose to go in the water, go safely. The edge of the waterfalls are slippery and dangerous!) I’ve also hiked along the waterfall gorge during the unpredictable winter and spring thaw/refreeze, and found that during those times of the year the park is challenging. Even with ice clips and hiking poles, I have still slipped down rocky hill sides, fallen through the ice on top of the brook at least twice and come home with a number of bruises. Thankfully, my camera has always survived my missteps. Autumn, however, is when Enders State Forest truly shines. Waterfalls are beautiful in any season, but waterfalls surrounded by the fiery colors of Connecticut’s deciduous trees, bathed in the glow of a late afternoon sun is magical. For that alone, I am eternally grateful to both the Enders family and the state for maintaining such an accessible park. I have spent many days wandering the trails of the state forest, listening to the wind through the branches, hearing the crunch of dry leaves underfoot, hypnotized by the sound of the babbling, plummeting waters. These quiet spaces, where you can lose and find yourself, while appreciating the surrounding beauty, are a rare and special treat in New England. Every memory I’ve made and every photograph I’ve taken at Enders, I cherish. This state forest is truly a gift to the community, tucked tightly in among all of the other beautiful places that New England has to offer. If you’re looking for a road trip, a family friendly park and extremely accessible waterfalls along a relatively short, easy side of moderate trail (as long as there is no snow on the ground), then Enders State Forest in Connecticut is the place for you. ◊◊◊

- 57 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


The core of the state forest is created by several waterfalls, also known as Enders Falls. In total, Enders State Forest comprises over 2,000 acres.


HEALTHY TRAIL EATS: BACKCOUNTRY BITES

RECIPE BY JULIEANN HARTLEY, NUTRITIONAL THERAPIST PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENN BAKOS


BACKCOUNTRY BITES These backcountry treats are great for hikers, skiers and snowshoers. They are a healthy nutrient-dense food that will keep you

10 -12

INDIVIDUAL BITES

energized while out all day in the snow and cold weather. Packed with protein, high quality fat and a variety of vitamins and minerals, these balls not only taste delicious, but will help you stay satisfied and moving. These treats are sweetened with dates and maca

PEPARATION TIME 10 MINS.

powder, a peruvian root known medicinally for it’s ability to help balance hormones, increase energy and provide a variety of minerals. Collagen is known for it’s high protein content and ability to help repair tissues, including joints and muscles. Coconut butter is high

COOK TIME 45 MINUTES

in medium chain fatty acids, which can be used immediately by the body for fast and long-lasting energy. Cocoa nibs are packed with minerals and a hint of caffeine for energy. Chia seeds provide fiber and a small amount of the anti-inflammatory omega 3 fatty acids. Ghee from a grass-fed cow, also provides an incredible amount of omega 3 fatty acids, as well as fat soluble vitamins, A, D, E and K. Ginger helps stimulate your stomach acid, so you will better digest these fantastic ingredients.

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

¼ cup ghee

Soften coconut butter on the stove or by placing

¼ cup coconut butter ¼ cup maca powder 1 tablespoons ginger ¼ cup cocoa nibs 1 tablespoon chia seeds ¼ cup collagen 4-6 dates

the jar in warm water. Combine all ingredients in a blender, food processor or immersion blender. Refrigerate mixture for 20-30 minutes, then make into balls. Keep cool to help them keep their shape. Eat and enjoy!


MEET YOUR FARMER

WOLFE’S NECK FARM: CONNECTING FOOD & COMMUNITY WORDS & PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENNIFER HAZARD

WOLFE'S Neck Farm in Freeport, Maine is near and dear to my family’s heart. The expansive, 626-acre organic farm is located off a long dirt road beside the Casco Bay. We had our first local camping experience here, which was nothing short of dreamy with ocean views, big fields to play in, and fresh eggs cooked on the campfire for breakfast. During grade school field trips, my children and I visited the main barn, where we muddied our Bean boots, and tended to chickens, sheep, pigs, and turkeys. In summer, we treated visiting friends to generous farmto-table dinners featuring local chefs, and danced to bluegrass music under the glow of twinkling lights. Wolfe’s Neck Farm is special to us, and many families in the community because the non-profit is so generous with its bucolic space. When asked what motivates the farm to give back the way they do, Executive Director Dave Herring says, “We have this amazing natural resource here. The farm was always intended to be shared with the community in ways that are meaningful and respectful.” The stunning, saltwater farm and its grounds were originally owned by the Smith family, who purchased the land in 1946. The Smith’s, who were from Philadelphia, planned to use the farmland as a vacation retreat, but soon realized the land had potential for much more. The family experimented with tree farming, raised cows, and in the 1950’s they built the Recompense Campsite, an oceanfront campground which still thrives today.

» - 64 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


Caroline Wild, a member of the Teen Ag crew, with a baby goat. Caroline joined the first Teen Ag crew in 2012.


A view of Wolfe's Neck Farm upon entering the property. The mission of Wolfe's Neck Farm is to "farm the land, educate our community, and offer a space for recreation."


THE FARM WAS ALWAYS INTENDED TO BE SHARED WITH THE COMMUNITY IN WAYS THAT ARE meaningful AND respectful.

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The Smith’s eventually began an organic beef operation in the late fifties, which would grow to over 600 head of cattle. The cattle used only feed from the farm and from leased fields nearby. In 1985, the farm was sold to The University of Southern Maine, but after a difficult tenure, The Wolfe’s Neck Farm foundation decided to refocus the farm’s goals. Today, Wolfe’s Neck is thriving in ways no one ever imagined. Their focus, according to Herring, is to connect people to food, and support sustainable farming practices statewide. In addition to its campgrounds, miles of open trails, school programs and farm-to-table events, Wolfe’s Neck Farm also offers an impressive Teen Ag Program, an outdoor curriculum for local teenagers that teaches basic farming practices. The crops the teens grow are donated to several nearby food pantries, sold at the farm stand, and offered to local residents in shares through community supported agriculture (CSA). Caroline Wild, who joined the first Teen Ag crew in 2012, and later became a Farming Program Assistant, says the experience taught her so much. “The farm has been the place where I grew up and learned what I wanted to do in life; I have made lifelong friends here and have been mentored by some truly amazing people.” Wolfe’s Neck Farm’s giving spirit thrives due in part to its hardworking and lean staff of nine, who focus on marketing, education, community outreach, and the daily needs of the farm itself. The staff works along with a board of 18 people as well as a host of dedicated community volunteers. This year, Herrings says, the board has stepped up to strategically guide the organization. » - 69 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


“We’re working on a 5-year plan that impacts how we do things. Our goals include engaging people of all ages and expanding our existing programs. We want to see our summer camp evolve, and continue partnerships with chefs, farmers and local food purveyors. Above all, we want to reinvest in the property to support future growth.” One of the ways the farm is working to grow is a new partnership with Stonyfield, who is known for their organic yogurt. Herring says a board member encouraged himself and the Director of Sustainable Agriculture at Stonyfield to get together to discuss a long-range vision. The meeting resulted in a plan to create a training program for organic dairy farmers throughout New England. Herring says the program dedicated Wolfe’s Neck Farm to a higher cause— training the next generation of dairy farmers. “We’re hoping the dairy training program will have great effects on the local economy, our community, and our health,” he says. The goal is to have four trainees and herds started by summer 2015. While Wolfe’s Neck Farm works to maintain its growth in the long term, the staff is currently preparing for another season of giving. The nonprofit donates their free-range turkeys to the chefs at Azure Café in Freeport for a Thanksgiving dinner that is held at the town’s community center. The free event is attended by hundreds of people. And in December, the farm celebrates the holidays with a Night Tree event that encourages families to explore the trails and leave behind decorated pinecones for the animals. These events highlight what Wolfe’s Neck Farm is really all about — bringing people together, sharing the farm’s bounty, and celebrating the beauty of Maine’s seasons with friends and neighbors. ◊◊◊

Learn more about Wolfe's Neck Farm at www.wolfesneckfarm.org - 70 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


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Wolfe’s Neck Farm is an oceanfront farm located just 4.5 miles from the center of Freeport, ME. The farm is comprised of 626 acres that are free and open to the public.


SHULTZ'S GUEST HOUSE: A SANCTUARY FOR HOMELESS DOGS WORDS BY MANDI TOMPKINS PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENN BAKOS


Kathy patiently waits to play with her brother Roger. On the right, the exterior of the shelter’s kennels, converted from former stables.

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TAKING HOMELESS PETS FROM SHELTER TO FOREVER HOME. The passing of a family pet can be tragic. They are not just warm and cuddly pals, they are truly a part of the family and their absence can be traumatic. When I was a child and my very first pet died, my parents eased my pain by describing a serene, heavenly farm in the sky. While this was a very difficult time, these images of Tarheel rolling around in fields, chasing squirrels, and eating to his hearts content eased my heartache a bit. About two weeks ago a very special dog passed away. Shultz, a rescued German shorthaired pointer, was the inspiration behind a very unique rescue shelter, one that truly embodies this vision of dog heaven. In honor of Shultz, this temporary place of solace for homeless dogs was named Shultz’s Guest House. And even though he is now gone, his legacy will live on and grow stronger than ever through the hundreds of homeless dogs that will stop over in his fields before moving on to their forever homes. Three months ago my husband and I visited Shultz’s Guest House, expecting a typical shelter. What we found instead was a true dog sanctuary. We had seen a perfect little puppy named Caramel on PetFinder™ and just had to meet her. As we drove through the wrought-iron gates and onto the grounds, we were transported from a suburban neighborhood to a quaint country estate. Located on 200-acres along the Charles River in Dedham, Massachusetts, the rescue is completely unexpected. The forest sprawled before us, and as we drove further up the hill, a stately white home revealed itself. My heart leapt with excitement and anxiety as we pulled in behind a beautiful barn and parked. We were warmly welcomed by Jill Greblick, and so began our journey to find our ideal pup. » - 77 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


Jim, the owner of this former horse farm, wanted to create a quiet, stress free setting where dogs could make their transition to a permanent home. What he created is nothing short of paradise. Before opening the shelter, dog pens were built, horse stables were converted to heated kennels, and a portion of the barn was taken over for administrative offices. Each dog that enters the guest house not only has a warm place to sleep and food to eat, they have their own large, grassy pen to romp around in. The day of our visit to the rescue we brought home a sweet puppy named Maizy and our lives were instantly changed forever. Maizy is a mixed breed rescue dog – one part Lab, one part Pitt Bull, and one part something that is still a mystery. She had a very rough start — abandoned on the side of the road in Tennessee, flea-ridden, half starved, and infested with worms. But this is a happy story because Maizy was found by loving people, nursed back to health, and brought north to find her forever home. We just happened to be the lucky ones who met her that morning. This type of beginning is unfortunately true for many of the dogs that come to Shultz’s Guest House. But with the help of a truly committed owner, loving staff, and volunteers, 115 dogs have found homes since August 2014. But despite the story these numbers tell, the journey from homeless to forever home is not a short and easy one. Many of the dogs come from the south, where the culture of dog ownership in some areas is much different than in New England. Many dogs live outside in the milder weather, and spaying and neutering dogs is not always the norm. This results in an excess of homeless dogs and overflowing shelters. »

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From top to bottom, left to right: Former horse stalls that have been converted into warm kennels for the dogs. The kennels are named and numbered to help keep careful track of the guests. Dog houses can be found in each outdoor pen.

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Jill Greblick’s dog loyally follows her around the grounds and watches after the “guests.”


Shultz’s Guest House finds the majority of their dogs in Tennessee through their rescue consultant Merry, who helps identify adoptable dogs at high kill shelters. She conducts a temperament test on each dog to make sure they are suitable for adoption and then coordinates transport to Shultz’s. Often times Jill and the other staff members make the long trip south to pick up the new pups and bring them back to find their new homes. On my second trip to the rescue I was given the opportunity to meet even more incredible dogs – some that may still be in need of a forever home. This new group of dogs hailed from Maryland, and since they were very skittish we were only able to meet a daring few. First, to get started we met the veteran of the rescue, Sally. This gorgeous elk hound mix with striking light amber eyes had been at the shelter for about a month. She was very lively, had a sweet disposition, and loved to play. We couldn’t figure out why she was still at the rescue. We then went into the barn where we were able to take a peak into the puppy room, and into a few other stalls where the dogs were partaking in their afternoon snooze. We met two more beautiful lab mixes — Kathy and Roger — before tearing ourselves away from the dogs. Adopting a dog at Shultz’s Guest House is a wonderful experience. The staff is welcoming, honest and accommodating, and they make what could be a daunting experience feel easy. And most importantly, all the staff and volunteers truly love the dogs. When we first went to the shelter we were lucky enough to meet. He was an old pup, but he was gentle and regal. He would wander the grounds with his brother Bronson, welcoming all the soon-to-be dog parents. He was a true representation of what the rescue has become — a loving place where dogs meet before their new lives begin. ◊◊◊

Learn more about Shultz's Guest House at www.sghrescue.org

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Sally, a rambunctious elk hound mix, had been at the shelter for over a month when we visited. To rescue Sally or a dog like her, fill out an application at sghrescue.org.


Two of the rescue dogs, Kathy and Roger, play in one of the shelter’s outdoor pens. The dogs have dozens of toys to choose from.


INDULGE: MULLED PEAR SANGRIA

RECIPE AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY KATIE MORRIS KATIE AT THE KITCHEN DOOR


MULLED PEAR SANGRIA Sangria is typically thought of as a hot-weather drink, but this mulled version will warm you up when the temperatures drop this

4

SERVINGS

winter. Cloves and cinnamon compliment fresh pears perfectly. Best enjoyed on chilly New England nights. PEPARATION TIME 10 MINS.

COOK TIME 30 MINUTES

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

2 ripe pears, plus extra slices for serving

Peel and core the pears and roughly chop into

š/³ c. sugar

namon stick, and cloves in a medium saucepan

1 c. water 1 whole cinnamon stick 5 whole cloves 4 oz. maple liqueur

cubes. Place the pear cubes, sugar, water, cinand bring to a simmer over medium heat. Simmer until the pears are soft, about 8-10 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to remove the cinnamon stick and cloves and discard. Puree the pear and syrup mixture until smooth, in a regular blender or using a hand blender.

1 bottle white wine Put the pear syrup back in a saucepan. Add the liqueur and wine and heat over low heat until just steaming. Remove from the heat and ladle into pre-warmed glasses (to prevent cracking). Garnish each glass with a few slices of pear andserve.


5 CREATIVE TIPS FOR HOLIDAY GIFT WRAPPING

TIPS BY LAUREN WELLS, LAUREN WELLS EVENT DESIGN + STYLING PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRIANA MOORE

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1. USE SIMPLE RECYCLED PAPERS LIKE kraft paper OR white kraft paper TO WRAP EACH GIFT. ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY AND COST EFFECTIVE! IF YOU PREFER PATTERNS TO PLAIN, YOU CAN PAINT OR DRAW ON THE PAPER TO MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNED WRAP.

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2. USE WASHI TAPE WHEN WRAPPING. IT WON'T MATTER IF YOUR CREASES ARE PERFECT, BECAUSE THE TAPE will be so cute.

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3. Tie the present WITH TWINE OR RIBBON - YOU CAN USE JUTE TWINE OR BAKERS TWINE, OR EVEN LEATHER CORDING OR MUSLIN RIBBON.

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4. GIFT TAGS! USE HANG TAGS, GOLD FOIL TAGS OR EVEN slices OF birch TO WRITE OUT WHO THE GIFT IS FOR.

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5. ADD A SPECIAL SOMETHING. WE USED FRESH GREENERY (WHICH ALSO SMELLS GREAT!) TO FINISH OFF EACH GIFT, BUT YOU COULD USE ANYTHING TO ADD THAT FINAL TOUCH; AN ornament, A pinecone, A candy cane.

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Olives & Grace, the South End shop, hosted a gift wrap bar with Lauren of Lauren Wells Event Design + Styling. Stop by the store today to pick up some locally made goodies for the holiday!


INDULGE: PUMPKIN GRANOLA

RECIPE BY JAMIE FAULHABER PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENN BAKOS


PUMPKIN GRANOLA Enjoy this easy-to-make crunchy treat filled with flavors of the season. Sprinkle over yogurt, ice cream, bring on a hike or fill up

5

SERVINGS

your cereal bowl and enjoy with milk in the morning!

PEPARATION TIME 10 MINS.

COOK TIME 40 MINUTES

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

5 cups oatmeal

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Line a baking sheet

Few dashes of salt ¼ tsp. nutmeg 1 tbsp. pumpkin pie spice 1 ½ tbsp. cinnamon (add more or less to taste)

with parchment paper, set aside. In a large bowl, combine the first five ingredients and set aside. Mix the next five ingredients together and pour into dry ingredients. Mix well, until the oatmeal mixture is nice and moist. Spread the granola on to baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from oven and stir the granola. Continue cooking

¾ cup pumpkin puree

for an additional 15-20 minutes. Remove from

3 tbsp. local honey

oven and add pepitas, dried cranberries and dried

½ cup brown sugar ½ cup applesauce 1 tsp. vanilla extract a few handfuls of pepitas, dried cranberries and dried chopped figs

chopped figs.


FORGING HOPE AT BILLINGS FORGE WORDS BY DEAN RUSSELL PHOTOGRAPHS BY MICHELLE MARTIN


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Tucked away in Downtown Hartford, Connecticut in a set of red brick industrial era buildings, The Kitchen at Billings Forge lives – a unique place for some of New England’s best locavore dining. To walk into the cafe and smell the shortbread, the red beets and freshly roasted butternut squash, it’s obvious that The Kitchen knows their food. But to look beyond the plate, into the frenzied room of ovens and dough and chopped greens, there is a story with roots much more penetrating. The Kitchen, founded in 2009, began with a mission to mix the gift of good food with the gift of opportunity. Located in one of Hartford’s poorest neighborhoods Frog Hollow, Billings Forge Community Works - the organization behind The Kitchen - not only serves locally-sourced cafe food, offers catering and fine dining, but runs a job training program aimed at arming city residents with the skills and education to break down socioeconomic barriers. “We do food, we run urban agriculture and we run a business,” says Mike Miller, director of special projects at Billings Forge. For him, breaking the poverty cycle is just simply part of the business model. “We take folks out of incarceration, the homeless, the unemployed,” says Miller, “all the folks that nobody wants and nobody will give a chance to, we get up and running in three-to-five months.” Connecticut, with a median household income of $69,000 a year, is the fifth wealthiest state in the country. Frog Hollow, where The Kitchen is located and gets many of their trainees, sees household income at merely $14,000. Its unemployment rate is 10% higher than the national average. » - 112 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


The Kitchen sources their food from Connecticut's farmers, the farmers market and The Garden, to create a unique cafĂŠ experience.

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Violence and a lack of education have plagued its streets for years, along with political promises to stimulate opportunity that just never came through. The Kitchen, however, offers a small window for change. Each trainee is selected and placed into a three-month program earning Connecticut’s minimum wage of $8.70 per hour. They work alongside The Kitchen’s chefs and are trained on everything from the basics to the Kitchen’s philosophy of rich, whole foods. The aim is to give these men and women a shot at real growth in the long term. “The last thing we want to do is to put people into poverty jobs,” Miller says. “We just got a couple of people jobs with $22 an hour and benefits and they feel like they’ve hit the jackpot.” Still, the effort is continuous and Billings Forge has to keep an eye on it’s own future as well as the trainees. “We could be a hell of a lot more profitable if we didn’t do the training,” jokes Mike Miller, director of special projects at Billings Forge. It’s likely true. But with a job placement rate averaging between 85 and 90 percent, Miller is notably proud of their successes. “By the time they leave us, they could work in a fine dining establishment,” he notes, adding, “we make everything from scratch so they are able to walk into any kitchen.” “From scratch” is no exaggeration. Along with their efforts to provide a stepping stone to those in need, they also run a community garden that supplies fresh produce for The Kitchen and their fine dining partner, the four-star Hartford restaurant Firebox. » - 114 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


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Not for nothing, they also host culinary classes open to the public and a weekly farmers’ market in Frog Hollow where local growers accept food stamps in an effort to broaden the community’s food landscape. Asked how it all stays together without any pieces falling through the cracks, Miller laughs. “Nothing is simple which is why it works.” This year marks The Kitchen’s fifth in operation. There have been some bumps along the way, but in Miller’s words, “we’ve gotten a lot better at this.” Back in The Kitchen, the chefs are talking with the trainees, hard at work. The steam from the oven fogs the windows. The smells are intoxicating. So are the dreams. Customers come in and, many of them have no idea what goes into it all. But that’s okay. Because in the end, everyone at Billings Forge - the trainees and chefs, alike - have one mission in mind: really good food. ◊◊◊

To learn more about the Kitchen at Billings Forge, visit www.billingsforgeworks.org.

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The Kitchen offers skills training and high-quality employment opportunities to the residents of Billings Forge and Frog Hollow.


MEET YOUR MAKER: BOSTON HANDYWORKS

STORY BY ASHLEY HERRIN PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENN BAKOS & ASHLEY HERRIN


REBUILDING LIVES. On Washington Street in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts sits a warehouse. From the outside it’s non-assuming. The brick façade gives little clues to what lies inside. However, inside those walls, something amazing is taking place. A chop saw is whirring busily in the corner as sawdust coats the cement floor. Hands are getting dirty as beautiful, handcrafted cutting boards are being made from maple and cherry. But the story isn’t about the cutting boards. Though gorgeous in every sense, the story actually begins with the hands that are crafting each and every piece that fill the product shelves in that warehouse. Each board is handcrafted by workers who have experienced homelessness; who’s home at one point or another was not under a secure roof, because that was a luxury they just did not have. Boston HandyWorks is a social enterprise of Pine Street Inn. They are a nonprofit organization whose mission it is to end homelessness through on-the-job training programs and a transitional work opportunity designed to get individuals off the streets and back into the workforce where a world of opportunity awaits. Back in October, we had the opportunity to visit Boston HandyWorks and sit down with the Director, Nick Pieri for a workshop tour and Q&A session. As we entered the warehouse and made our way to the woodshop in the back, the stacks of raw and finished material and the liveliness immediately wowed us as tools buzzed over fresh maple and people moved about. We had been exchanging emails with Nick for a over a month at this point, and were incredibly excited to finally meet the person who helps make this operation run. »

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Founded in 2009, Boston HandyWorks actually began as a services business mainly focusing on flooring and floor care. Nick had been working at Pine Street Inn at the time and was hired to oversee this new employee training initiative. Their goal quickly developed into finding better work experiences for homeless people and to help them improve their job skills, rebuild self-esteem, give them new skills and opportunities to put on their resume, and ultimately, give them the chance to get back into the workforce. By the end of 2009, Boston HandyWorks began seeking out more project-based learning opportunities as opposed to the classroom-based learning that they initially began with. This coincided with a need to come up with revenue. In order to keep offering these valuable training programs, they needed to become profitable, thus the birth of the Boston HandyWorks social enterprise. They started making products in late 2011. Their first batch of handmade goods was birdhouse centerpieces for Pine Street Inn’s annual fundraiser. The following year, for the same event, they crafted garden box centerpieces filled with herbs that was inspired by the chef’s recipes. The next year they introduced cutting boards to the fundraising tables. The feedback was overwhelmingly positive and selling of the boards soon followed. When describing the introduction of the cutting boards to the Boston HandyWorks offerings, Nick explained, “I had been really wanting to create a product since we started because it’s just really nice to have something to hold in your hands. I think that part is the best part of the tangible work experiences that we have, and with anything, is that you can see the results…there is a whole new level of satisfaction that comes with not only making something that’s beautiful but also seeing people appreciate it.” » - 125 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


One of the many bards produced by the Boston HandyWorks crew. To purchase a cutting board, visit their website at www.bostonhandyworks.com.


With every cutting board that is sold, 100% of the proceeds go towards funding the Boston HandyWorks training program, providing education, training and resources to help rebuild lives. An average of 35 employees are working at Boston HandyWorks at any given time. Their typical length of employment is about 6 months or less. Although it may seem that the workshop is an ideal long-term job opportunity for many, their mission is to get them out and help them find other work. The employees come from Pine Street Inn, from Pine Street’s group housing sites, from other shelters in the area, as well as from sober houses, pre-release centers, and halfway houses. Every 8 weeks Boston HandyWorks has a new intake of employees and orientation. In addition to learning the hand skills, they are also offered training on everything from sexual harassment in the workplace, diversity in the workplace, to professionalism and goal setting. Before taking the tour of the workshop, we asked Nick about the personal reward he has gotten out of working for such an initiative as Boston HandyWorks. “I completely love it, and I think the other people who work here (do too)…I think it’s safe to say we’re all hooked. It’s really cool just seeing people’s posture change, the way that they carry themselves after a week of meaningful employment. That’s why I keep doing it." Boston HandyWorks, located in the non-assuming warehouse in Jamaica Plain is working miracles just beyond that brick façade. Hard work and beautiful craftsmanship goes into each board that’s produced. And with each board that is sold, the consumer is returning the favor and giving hope to the craftsmen and women. Along with their logo, the Boston HandyWorks motto is also burned into each board…rebuilding lives…a powerful reminder of the men and women who have been given a second chance because of our purchases. ◊◊◊

To learn more about Boston HandyWorks or to make a purchase in time for the Holidays, visit www.bostonhandyworks.com - 128 t.e.l.l. NEW ENGL AND


I COMPLETELY love it, AND I THINK THE OTHER PEOPLE WHO WORK HERE (DO TOO)…I THINK IT’S SAFE TO SAY WE’RE ALL HOOKED. IT’S REALLY COOL JUST SEEING PEOPLE’S POSTURE CHANGE, THE WAY THAT THEY CARRY THEMSELVES AFTER A WEEK OF MEANINGFUL EMPLOYMENT. That’s why I keep doing it.

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Nick Pieri, the Director of Boston HandyWorks, has been with the program since it's inception in 2009.


Glue is applied to wood slats. Once dried, the boards will be further cut down, sanded and finished. All boards will receive the BHW mark.


Scenes from the Boston HandyWorks workshop located in Jamaica Plain, MA.

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Nick and some of the BHW employees. At any given time there are roughly 35 people going through the training and employment program which lasts about 6 weeks.


INDULGE: HAPPY BELLY PUMPKIN PIE

RECIPE BY JULIEANN HARTLEY, NUTRITIONAL THERAPIST PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENN BAKOS


The crust is a whole-food mix, using plantain as the base. Plantains are high in resistant starch, which helps feed your good gut bacteria.


HAPPY BELLY PUMPKIN PIE This alternative pumpkin pie is made of a whole-foods crust, that utilizes plantain as the base. In the crust also includes collagen,

1

PUMPKIN PIE

an important ingredient used to help heal tissues, including any intestines that may be showing signs of leaky gut! This recipe is designed to heal, strengthen and satisfy any belly after a heavy Thanksgiving meal!

PEPARATION TIME 20 MINS.

COOK TIME 1 HOUR

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

Crust:

For the crust: preheat oven to 400 degrees. Grease

• 1 Plantain (for a sweeter crust, use a ripe plantain and for a milder crust use green/yellow)

pie pan with butter, coconut oil or ghee. Puree all

• ¼ cup coconut butter • 4-6 dates • Pinch of himalayan sea salt

ingredients in a blender, then pour into pie pan. This is more of a batter than a typical pie dough, so you may have to manipulate the batter to the sides to make more of a crust. While baking,

• 2 tbsp. coconut oil

begin making pie filling (see pie filling recipe be-

• 2 tbsp. grass-fed beef collagen

low). Bake for 10 minutes, remove from the oven

• 1 tsp. ginger (optional)

and then pour pie filling into pie pan on top of

Pie Filling: • 1 (15 ounce) canned pumpkin puree (or 1½ cup homemade pumpkin puree) • 3 eggs • ½ cup coconut milk • 2 tbsp. to ½ cup honey

partially baked crust. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees and set crust aside. For the filling: With a food processor, blender or immersion blender, combine pumpkin puree, and eggs. Pulse in coconut milk, gelatin, honey, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt.

• 1 tbsp. ground cinnamon • 1 tsp. ginger

Pour filling into crust. Bake at 350° for 45 minutes

• 2 tbsp. of grass-fed beef gelatin

or until pie is set.

• 1 tsp. nutmeg •

1/8

tsp. celtic sea salt


"We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give."


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Issue 07 | Autumn 2014

t.e.l.l. volume 07 | The Giving Issue  
t.e.l.l. volume 07 | The Giving Issue  
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