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Volume 18 Issue 2 September 2019 What’s Inside Simmental Have A Good Fit From Pasture To Feedlot

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From The Gate Post — Beef Industry Challenges and Opportunities

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Breed Improvement — Contemporary Groups

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Vet’s Advice — Water Hemlock Poisoning

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What’s Happening

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Publication Mail Agreement # 40012794

Simmental Have A Good Fit From Pasture To Feedlot Jason McDonald believes in producing cattle that meet customer needs.

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Story By Lee Hart

hile he does finish about 250 head per year in his Carberry-area farm feedyard in southwest Manitoba, the majority of calves (1,700 to 1,800 head) are backgrounded to 900 to 950 pounds and trucked to a repeat-customer in Ontario. He’s travelled to Ontario in recent years to visit finishing feedlots and get a sense of what customers are looking for. A few days on the ground looking at Ontario feeding operations was a valuable experience. “It is a different system for finishing cattle in Ontario than we have in the west,” says McDonald, who is part of a four-generation family cattle and grain operation. “It is valuable to meet the feeder and get some direction from them on what we could be doing differently. We can put the weight on these calves in our farm feedyard, but it is really about finding that balance. We have to gear the feeding program to make sure they aren’t too green or too fleshy.” The McDonald cattle operation includes their own herd of about 720 cows and heifers, along with the long-running 2,200-head feedlot.They have annual cropland as well. Working with Jason is his wife Melanie and son Cole who is involved with the farm fulltime. His father Howard is still actively involved in the operation and youngest daughter Whitley is still in school, but helps out on the farm as she can. Their oldest daughter Samantha and her husband Tylor, live about an hour away from the home place. As they develop their own beef operation they are leasing about 120 cows from her dad, leaving about 600 head on the Carberry-area farm. The 2200-head capacity feedlot (expanded in 1999) has been part of the McDonald operation for many years. At one time they finished everything, but in the past five years have focused more on backgrounding steers and heifers. Aside from his own steers McDonald fills the lot with fall-purchased feeder cattle between October and December each year. They do finish cull cows from their own cowherd as well as any “tail enders” of the steers and heifers that don’t fit other marketing programs. The farm has largely been a commercial cow-calf operation, over the years, with a combination of British and continental breed genetics. “For many years my dad ran predominately Charolais cattle,” says McDonald. “So we had a very white-

Commercial Country

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#13, 4101 – 19th St. N.E., Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4

Phone: 403-250-7979 Fax: 403-250-5121

Website: www.simmental.com Email: cansim@simmental.com

CSA Executive President Garth Rancier Killam, AB P: (780) 385-2425 C: (780) 385-5313 rancierfarms@xplornet.ca First Vice-President Marlin LeBlanc Estevan, SK P: (306) 634-8031 C: (306) 421-2470 marlinleblanc@sasktel.net

Roger Deeg Strathmore, AB P: (403) 901-5305 rbdeeg@gmail.com

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Shane Williams East Garafraxa, ON P: 519-787-1323 C: 519-938-1220 jetslivestock@aol.com Frank Robblee Crapaud, PEI P: (902) 432-0596 frobblee@gmail.com

Second Vice-President Blair McRae Brandon, MB P: (204) 728-3058 C: (204) 729-5439 marmac@inetlink.ca

Byron Johnson Amisk, AB P: (780) 856-2175 C: (780) 806-3560 wjsimmentals@cciwireless.ca

CSA Directors

British Columbia President Lorne Webster Abbotsford, BC P: (778) 245-0175 lornewebster@hotmail.com

Lee McMillen Carievale, SK P: (306) 928-4820 C: (306) 483-8067 mrbulls@gmail.com

Provincial Associations

Secretary: Jan Wisse Francis Gagnon P: (604) 819-5511 Cheneville, QC P: (819) 428-3502 C: (514) 975-3722 francis_gagnon0407@hotmail.com

Ontario President Tina Hiddink Bloomfield, ON P: (613) 399-3239 tinahiddink@gmail.com

CSA Staff

General Manager Bruce Holmquist C: (639) 314-4613 bholmquist@simmental.com Office Manager Barb Judd Field Person Member Services Manager: P: (403) 250-7979 Whitney DeDecker Dwayne Martin Stettler, AB memberservices.osa@gmail.com bjudd@simmental.com Programs Coordinator P: (780) 940-3510 Quebec Sue Giles dmartin3510@gmail.com Secretaire: Sandra Berthiaume P: (403) 793-0409 Secretary: Katie Deeg Saint-Garmain, QC sgiles@simmental.com P: (403) 899-2291 P/F: (819) 395-4453 Simmental Country Sales Rep info@albertasimmental.com sandra.berthiaume@sympatico.ca Randy Bollum Saskatchewan Maritimes P: (403) 540-5949 President President rbollum@simmental.com Kirsten Fornwald Kerwin Delong Processing Department & Lampman, SK Kingston, NS Member Services P: (306) 487-2557 P: (902) 765-2645 Perry Welygan meadowacres@signaldirect.ca kdelong@bellaliant.net pwelygan@simmental.com Laurie Macdonald Secretary: Carolyn McCormack Secretary: Jennie Mutch lmacdonald@simmental.com P: (306) 697-2945 P: (902) 388-1613 sasksimmental@yourlink.ca jenniemutch@gmail.com Receptionist & Member Services Devra Leavitt Manitoba dleavitt@simmental.com President Administrative Assistant Andrea Bertholet Rae-Lee Erickson Cartwright, MB rerickson@simmental.com P: (204) 483-0319 YCSA Coordinator adbertholet@hotmail.com Kelsey Manske Secretary: Laurelly Beswitherick P: (306) 291-7086 P: (204) 637-2046 kmanske@simmental.com b2@inetlink.ca

Editorial Policy - Articles and information in this magazine represent the opinions of the writers and the information that, to the best of our knowledge, was accurate at the time of writing.

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Programs Coordinator Sue Giles 430-793-0409 sgiles@simmental.com Simmental Country Sales Representative Randy Bollum 403-540-5949 rbollum@simmental.com

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Mailing Dates - Each issue will be mailed on or about the first of the month. Commercial Country, mailed as second class, assumes no responsibility for actual receipt date. Advertising Content - The Commercial Country assumes no responsibility for the accuracy and truthfulness of submitted advertising copy or electronically supplied pictures and has the right to refuse any ad copy or photos. Advertisers shall indemnify and hold harmless the Country containing pedigrees or statements regarding performance must conform to records kept by the Canadian Simmental Association. Copy deviating from official records may be changed as necessary without advertiser consent. Š 2019 Simmental Country (1997) Ltd. All rights reserved. The contents of this publication may not be reproduced by any means, in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of the Canadian Simmental Association.

Published September 2019 For: Canadian Simmental Association #13 , 4101 - 19th Street N.E., Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4 Phone: 403-250-7979 Fax: 403-250-5121 Publication Mail Agreement #40012794

Box 2330, Warman, Saskatchewan S0K 4S0 Office: 306-933-4200 Fax: 306-934-0744 info@tbarc.com www.todayspublishing.com Editor: Bryan Kostiuk Marketing: Chris Poley Accounting: Treena Ballantyne & Carla Horatchka Circulation: Debbie Thiessen & Tanya Buziak Production: Janessa McKay, Breanne Anderson & Stephanie Lange Please Return Undeliverable Copies To: Canadian Simmental Association #13 , 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4 Phone: 403-250-7979 Fax: 403-250-5121


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continued from cover looking herd at one time. But also for about as long as I can remember we have also had Simmental cattle as well.” He remembers as a young 4-H member the first calf he showed winning the Grand Champion ribbon was a Simmental steer. The farm had been using Charolais, Simmental and Angus bulls in a cross breeding program. While the influence remains in part of the cowherd, 2019 is the first year that Charolais bulls have been dropped from the breeding program. McDonald says the bulk of the cowherd is red, white-faced cattle reflecting the Simmental/Red Angus cross. There is a smaller herd of black Simmental/Angus cross females and about 200 head of tan cows reflecting the Charolais influence. “Charolais are good cattle but sometimes colour is a factor in the marketplace,” says McDonald. “And with the Simmental you can get the colour, but you also get the performance. The duality of the breed also includes higher milk production to help put growth on those calves.” The mature cowherd on the McDonald farm averages between 1450 and 1650 pounds in size. Most of the herd is spring calving while, depending on the year, there are between 70 and 100 head in a fall calving herd. (The fall calving group was established after the BSE crisis in 2003. Rather than sell a cow for $150 he figured he might as well get her bred and produce a calf.) The fall herd continues and helps with cash flow as well. While the McDonald herd has solid red and black Simmental breeding bulls today, they earlier preferred the Fullblood Fleckvieh line which produced white-faced, white shouldered cattle in their cross breeding program. “And for a time we preferred to have horned cattle as well,” says McDonald. “I felt they performed better than polled. But the breeders have done an excellent job over the years of producing cattle more suitable for commercial beef production. For a time they were taller, lanky cattle whereas I prefer a bull that is thicker with a more moderate frame, rounded corners on the hip muscles, tidy and with good eye appeal. “I will still buy some Fullblood Simmental bulls today. While more people are interested in the solid colors, you can also find some excellent genetics in the full blood line often at a good price. While there are more polled genetics available today, some cattle are still horned. It really doesn’t matter to us. We use dehorning paste at calving so if any calf has horns it is dealt with then and really isn’t an issue.” The mature cow herd is bred to mostly Simmental bulls, while the 150 head of replacement heifers are bred to red and black Angus. Cattle are exposed to a 60-day breeding season, with spring calving

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beginning about March 10. It is a tight calving season with about 68 per cent of females calving within the first cycle. On average mature cows are delivering calves at about 105 pounds, while heifer birth weights are in the 85-pound range. “At one time we use to think bigger was better with many calves in the 120 pound range, but we’ve gone to the lower birth weights which is easier on the cow, the calves tend to be more lively and vigorous and we still get excellent gain over the summer grazing season,” he says. The herd is separated into colors as it heads out to summer pasture after calving, usually the third week of May to June 1. The black cattle are in one pasture, the red cattle are on different pastures and the tan cattle on yet other pastures. Pastures are predominately native grass, usually with some component of bush and shrubs for shelter. While it can vary, McDonald usually plans on a stocking rate of 25 cow-calf pairs per quarter section, although some better pastures can support 35 pairs per quarter with the calves receiving creep feed over the summer. The cowherd is brought home for weaning in mid-October, while he usually aims to wean the heifers about two weeks earlier to get those calves started on feed. On average the heifers are weaning calves in the 600 to 650 pound range while the mature cows have calves weaning an average of about 700 pounds. “And those are the averages,” says McDonald. “We have some heifers weaning nearly 800 pound calves and some cows with calves about 900 pounds but those are the outside ranges.” After weaning, all McDonald calves are moved into the feedyard. From about 250 to 275 head of heifers, he selects about 150 head to be kept as replacement heifers for his own herd, while the rest are usually sold as replacement heifers to neighbouring beef producers. His steers and any lower-end heifers continue onto the backgrounding program. Also in early October he starts buying feeder calves in 200, 300 or 400 head lots to fill up the feedlot by early December. Working with a livestock nutritionist, he formulates a balanced ration based on corn silage, corn grain, distiller’s grain and supplement that targets an average 2.5 pounds per day rate of gain. “When the calves first come in they may be a bit slower in gain and at some point they could also be putting on four pounds per day,” he says. “But we want the average to be about 2.5 pounds to have these calves in the 900 to 950 pound range when they are shipped to a finishing feedlot. On the feeding end they don’t want them too fleshy.”


Any steers or heifers that aren’t sold to a finishing lot, are fed to finish at home. “I might call them the misfits or cattle that aren’t exactly 4-H show cattle, if you know what I mean,” says McDonald. “But they still make excellent beef cattle. We finish them to about 1,450 pounds and they look good.” Depending on market prices the finished cattle are either shipped east to a packing plant in Guelph, Ontario or west to Cargill at High River, Alberta. While the calves head to the feedlot after weaning, the cows are back out on cropland cleaning up crop residue. Corn has been an important newer crop for McDonald. He produces about 750 acres of corn with about 420 acres cut for silage and 350 acres harvested for grain. Along with stubble and chaff from oats, wheat, barley and rye, cattle can also feed on grain corn crop residue, which usually carries them well into December. “I was hoping to keep cattle on that fall and early winter grazing until January 1,” says McDonald. “But this past winter we had to start feeding December 29, so we almost made it.” Any cull cows are put into the feedyard for finishing on a ration that includes corn silage and often cull potatoes. “We have quite a bit of potato production in this area and there are usually cull potatoes available that aren’t suitable for processing. “They have a high starch component and it may take a

cow two or three days to get used to them, but once they do they really like them and do well on potatoes,” says McDonald. He has even fed partially cooked frozen french fries with a high oil content which cattle really find appealing. From a moderate sized cross-bred cow out on pasture to a weaned calf in the backgrounding feedlot, McDonald says Simmental cattle deliver the genetics that work well in his commercial beef program. “There are colour options if that is important to a marketing program, but perhaps more importantly these females have the size and capacity to produce a good sized calf and produce the milk to keep it growing,” he says. “They are a moderate to slightly larger cow yet we have developed a herd that is easy doing and maintains good condition on mostly native grass pasture and crop residue in the fall. And with a properly balanced ration in the feedyard we can produce nice even batches of calves that work well for our finishing customers year after year.”

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w w w . v j v a u c t i o n . c o m T h e C a t t l e M a r k e t i n g C a p i t a l o f C a n a d a f o r o v e r 5 0 Ye a r s 9


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From the Gate Post

Bruce Holmquist General Manager - Canadian Simmental Association

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Beef Industry Challenges and Opportunities

he Canadian Simmental Association was one of the many sponsors of the Canadian Beef Industry Conference (CBIC) which was held August 12-16 in Calgary, Alberta. After having the conference in London, Ontario last year, CBIC moved back to its roots in 2019 bringing together the Canadian beef industry to discuss and learn more about industry issues; as well as to provide a venue to network and engage with a cross-section of people who are involved in all of the segments of the beef value chain. The week of events included tours, industry committee and organization meetings, as well as presenters on a wide range of topics that focused on many of the opportunities, as well as challenges that are facing the beef industry. Anyone who has been involved in a previous CBIC knows that it is a very full schedule with several of the meetings being held concurrently. That makes it impossible to attend them all so conference attendees must choose which meetings are of most interest to them. The CBIC also serves as the location of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association Semi-Annual Meetings, Canadian Beef Check-off Annual General Meeting, Young Cattlemen’s Council Annual General Meeting, Canadian Beef Breeds Council Technical Genetic Improvement Forum, Beef Cattle Research Council General Session and National Cattle Feeders meetings. The theme for 2019 CBIC was “Securing Our Future” and throughout the sessions the messaging was one of opportunity as well as recognizing the challenges we face as primary food producers. The pressures facing cattle producers have never been greater and how we choose to deal with them is always our choice. This can often be a frustrating and complex process with a lot of emotion attached as was recently seen though the interaction between cattle producers and the public through various types of social media. Food purchasing decisions are based on many factors and one of them is emotion and food production also often becomes emotionally charged when producers who work hard and invest heavily in doing it are constantly being challenged by misinformation. Recently, Facebook pages were flowing with comments and posts about a video produced by The Weather Network that promoted the reduction of beef consumption in

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order to curb beef production with the misguided notion of saving the environment. This was around the same time as the push back that occurred towards Tim Horton’s and the launching of their Beyond Meat products when we also saw producers react with strong emotions and criticism towards them as well. Unfortunately, we have also had similar messaging from our Federal Government with the release of the new Canada Food Guide earlier this year and through comments from the Federal Environment Minister who referenced it while issuing a call to “eat more plants and less meat in order to combat global warming.” So how do we deal with all of this? The beef industry is very different now than when many of us first became involved. It has tremendous opportunities and at the same time it is also being challenged from many directions and on many fronts and unfortunately that will continue. With each generation, consumers want to know more about the food they buy and there will always be an abundance of misinformation for them to have to sift through. As an industry we have a great story to tell and as producers we all know that we are part of the solution and are not the problem. How we message that needs to happen in many ways and needs to be done by many people. There will be communication mistakes made along the way by all of us including individual producers, industry organizations and beef chain partners but it is important to recognize that we are all on the same team and that the overall image of beef production and of the people who do it is very important. While accurate messaging and education of the science is important, doing it in a positive manner is just as important as that also influences the image of all who are involved. This applies in communication not only from each of us to consumers of our product, but also between our industry organizations and the producers who fund them. Like our industry organizations, beef producers are responsible to be informed and educated on industry issues and to also be messengers of the positive attributes and value to society of cattle and beef production. Canadian Beef Conference 2019 was a good reminder to me of that and that we can all do a better and more complete job of spreading the positive message of sustainable beef production.


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David Haywood-Farmer CCA President

I am pleased to provide you with an update of the activities underway at the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). It’s been a busy summer for CCA as we are focused on important matters impacting the beef industry. The need for predictable rules-based trade in the international trading environment, climate as it relates to sustainable beef production and business risk management topped the list of discussions at CCA’s Semi-Annual Meeting held in August in conjunction with the 2019 Canadian Beef Industry Conference (CBIC) in Calgary, AB. Also, with the federal election slated for October 21, the CCA is actively urging producers to review its federal election priorities document. Available online, this document outlines the issues and policies of importance to the Canadian beef sector including trade, labour, research, regulatory burden and business risk management. The fourth annual CBIC provided plenty of opportunity for attendees to partake in workshops, presentations, information sessions from CCA committees and operating divisions, keynote addresses and formal meetings of industry partners and stakeholders. Canfax presented a market outlook that was well received. Cattlemen’s Young Leaders (CYL) and Young Cattlemen’s Council (YCC) had another strong presence at the CBIC. Public and Stakeholder Engagement provided an activity update and showcased resources to help tell the Canadian beef story. Attendees at the Beef Cattle Research Council General Session took in the latest on antimicrobial use and resistance, the monitoring of animal health and productivity in cow-calf herds across the country, among other topics. Separately, CCA leadership and staff participated in a bilateral meeting with their U.S. counterparts from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and a trilateral meeting with leadership from NCBA and the Mexican producer organization, the Confederación Nacional de Organizaciones Ganaderas (CNOG). Trade, animal health and other issues of common interest were among the topics discussed. Among the formal discussions at the CCA committee meetings was how to manage trade disruptions such as the current suspension of access for Canadian beef to China. China of course stopped accepting imports of Canadian pork and beef in late June and earlier halted exports of Canadian canola seed and soybeans. To manage such events, CCA has made proposals to further diversify and secure market access and has formally asked the government to support an export diversification funding request to assist in further market development. Export diversification is an essential tool for industry to manage closures when unexpected trade issues arise. CCA has also requested the establishment of a meat market access group (like what was formed for canola) and for the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program (WLPIP) to be permanent and expanded beyond the western provinces.

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Market diversification can help Canada’s beef industry navigate its way through the temporary market interruption with China in a reasonable manner. Demand for high quality Canadian beef in the global marketplace is strong and continues to grow; weekly Canadian slaughter volumes in July 2019 reached the highest level since July 2010, which is a good indicator that we are working our way through this. The CCA will work closely with the Government of Canada to resume stable trade with China as quickly as possible. Shipments of Canadian beef to China represented 2.6 per cent of Canada’s total beef exports last year. The timeline to ratification of the Canada-United StatesMexico Agreement (CUSMA) was also discussed. The U.S. House of Representatives recessed without moving forward on their domestic ratification process for the new North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Thus U.S. ratification of the U.S-MexicoCanada Agreement (USMCA) before the start of the Canadian federal election is unlikely. A delay in implementing the new agreement is not a significant concern for the beef sector provided the existing NAFTA remains in effect. In June, Mexico became the first of the three nations to ratify the new NAFTA. In May, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tabled Bill C-100 or the enabling legislation to implement CUSMA. The Bill did not pass prior to Parliament adjourning for the summer. The Prime Minister has committed to moving in sync with the U.S. on ratification. Other significant trade topics on the discussion table include the creation of additional protocols for certifying eligibility of cattle for the European Union, post-BREXIT access to the UK, expansion of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership and work to gain recognition for Canada as a BSE negligible-risk country. Canada’s beef industry is the most sustainable in the world and one of the many ways we continue to prove that is through showcasing the Environmental Stewardship Award. The CCA applauds all provincial nominees and congratulates 2019 recipient BC’s Clifton Ranch, owned and operated by Wade and Sandra Clifton and family. Canadian beef cattle help to preserve one of the world’s most endangered ecosystems on this planet. Grazing cattle is also a recognized practice to help mitigate the risk of wildfires and is currently used as such in BC. Finally, an updated National Beef Strategy covering the period 2020-2024 will be publicly released in October. In it the CCA will continue to advocate for a competitive regulatory environment, a resilient marketplace and collaborative beef industry.


the

solid foundation of our bulls

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Breed Improvement

By Sean McGrath Breed Improvement Coordinator for the Canadian Simmental Association

Contemporary Groups

A

fter 20+ years working in breed improvement, one of the most common concerns I still hear with EPD is that “my cattle are compared or competing against my neighbour’s with higher levels of management.” Every animal we observe is a function of Genetics interacting with Environment. If the Environment is the same, then the differences we observe between animals are largely due to Genetics. While EPD allow us to compare cattle across herds and management programs, the calculation of EPD does not use direct comparisons of cattle from different management. The contemporary group is one of the main ways we separate cattle for evaluation and is a key part of how EPD are calculated and why they work to compare cattle across herds and environments. A contemporary group is defined as cattle of a similar age and the same sex raised in the same environment. Let’s use the following simplified example to show how it works. Let’s consider two herds, each with 5 calves. For this example, we will assume that all the calves are out of mature cows and the weaning weights shown are 205 day adjusted weaning weights. Herd 1 Mgt Grpt

Sire

Cont grp

Dev

Calf

DOB

Sex

WWT

A

Jan 1

M

850

1

Z

1

+50

Heavy

Y

B C D E

Jan 15 Jan 15 Jan 30 Apr 15

M F F F

750 700 650 450

1 1 1 1

Y Z Y Z

1 2 2 3

-50 +25 -25 0

Heavier

Z

Heaviest

X

Herd 2 Calf

Sex

WWT

F

DOB Apr 1

M

500

Mgt Grpt 1

Sire Z

Cont grp 4

Dev -50

G H I J

Apr 15 Apr 30 Apr 1 Apr 15

M M F F

650 600 500 450

1 2 1 1

X X X Z

4 5 6 6

+50 0 +25 -25

If we look at the example, we can see from the birthdates that Herd 1 is a winter calving herd and Herd 2 calves in the spring. We can also see that there is likely very different management as the weaning weights from Herd 1 are much higher on average than those from Herd 2. If we look at the Management Groups (Mgt Grp) we can see that the breeder in Herd 1 reported all calves as being managed in the same way. If we look at Contemporary Group (Cont Grp) we can see that the cattle are split into three different groups. Contemporary Group 1 is made of male calves, about the same age, raised in the same environment. Contemporary Group 2 is heifers calves, also roughly the same age and raised in the same environment. The third group is a single, late born female. Even though she is a heifer and was raised with the other calves, she is separated out of the heifer group because her age difference with the other heifers is too great to account for in the evaluation. Herd 2 reported three male calves and two females; however they reported one of the males as Management Group 2. Maybe this calf was sick and treated separately, or the mother was in a different pasture or

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some other reason. When the contemporary groups are formed calf ‘H’ is placed in his own group and is not compared to the other males from Herd 2 because he was managed in a different environment. Calves are only compared within their own contemporary groups, so not only are calves NOT directly compared between herds, they are not even directly compared with calves from the same herd that differ in sex, age or management. The Deviation (Dev) column shows how much the calf’s weaning weight differs from the group average of their contemporaries. You will notice that the average the calf is compared to is only those calves in their contemporary group. For example, in Herd 1, Calf ‘A’ is only being compared to Calf ‘B’. The basic idea behind EPD is that animals are the product of their environment interacting with their genetics to produce a phenotype. If the environment is the same, then a lot of the differences we see between calves in a contemporary group must be due to genetic influences. If we then look at how progeny from various sires perform relative to their group, we can see in Herd 1 that calves from Sire Z are heavier than calves from Sire Y. In Herd 2, Sire Z has lighter calves than Sire X. This means that if we were to sort these bulls for Weaning Weight genetics, the result would look something like the following… Weaning Weight Sire

This is an extremely simplified example. In our IGS evaluation the calculation of EPD relies on additional information such as Heritability (how much of the difference we see in a contemporary group is due to genetics), relationships between traits, the influence of the dam on calf performance, millions more pedigree and performance records from thousands more herds and multiple years of data, sophisticated adjustments for factors such as age of dam and age of calf and direct DNA SNP marker information to name a few, however the basic concept of a contemporary group is really the driving force behind genetic evaluation and EPD. Going into the fall weaning season, it is extremely important to correctly identify management differences between groups of cattle by identifying them on your weaning reports using the management group code. Cattle that are managed differently from each other should be grouped in different groups. The computer can sort out the sex and age differences, but only you as a breeder can identify differences in your management between cattle. Hopefully, this example helped to explain the importance of contemporary groups and further explain just what cattle have their actual performance compared with each other.


Heifer Calves, Bred Heifers & MORE On Offer!

Consignors

SSC Shell Shocked

Dunc’s Cattle co, FAR-L FARMS, FOLEY SIMMENTALS, Johnathan McNeil, MILLER LIVESTOCK, PINCH HILL CATTLE CO., RICK-SHA FARMS, RIDGEVIEW CATTLE CO., WISER HEIGHTS STOCK FARM, Xcel Livestock

Go Go Girl 214G MAF KING COBRA 3C X STF DOMINANCE T171

Gretchen 217G W/C Loaded Up 1119Y X HOOKS SHEAR FORCE

These full sisters sell!

Frilly 217F

Mr hoc broker x whf slugger

Bred to Geoff County O

Fancy 218F

Mr hoc broker x whf slugger

Bred to WHL Gold Key 1619D

RIVER POINT Cattle Co.

Reed, Jane, Shelby + Josie Crawford REED 519.857.7333 JANE 519.317.5263 HOME 519.287.5286 - RIVERPOINT@HOTMAIL.COM RIVERPOINTCATTLECOMPANY.COm

Sales management:

Glossy 219G

HOOK’S BROADWAY 11B X LFE BS LEWIS 322U

GliOKSttSHerEAR21FO6G RCE

44B X HO

Fired Up 239F

W/C Loaded Up 1119Y X MRL Red Gambler Bred to WHL Gold Key 1619D

Felicity 244F

Harvie Boondock 12Z x WHF Slugger

Bred to WHL Gold Key 1619D

Fine Wine 254F

W/c bullseye 770d x double bar d true grit Bred to Geoff County O

SIMMENTAL, ANGUS & SIMANGUS GENETICS SELL! 17


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Best Of Both Worlds...

Commercial Or Purebred Simmental Cattle

g n i r u t a e F

Skor Simmentals Complete Female Dispersal Thursday, December 19, 2019 Selling 400 Females

Regular Wednesday Sales Year Round • Offering one owner weigh ups • Presort sales on Mondays ~ Sept. - Nov. • Special offering - Warren Severtson’s 150 Simmental Cross Steers • Bred Cow & Heifer Sales ~ Friday - Nov. - Dec.

Selling At The Innisfail Auction Market Scott Anderson Ranch Friday, December 6, 2019 275 Reputation Bred Heifers

Daines Cattle Bull Sale Thursday, April 9, 2020 Selling 100 Breeding Bulls

Red/ Red Blaze - Tan/ Tan White Face both sets are bred to Severtson Red Angus bulls.

Simmental, Black Angus, Maine and Charolais 150 Black/BBF replacement breeding heifers

Black/Black Blaze - Bred to Daines Black Angus bulls. 60 day calving period, starting Feb. 1 Full herd health. Check out the video on our website.

Grant 403.350.1519 | Mark 403.350.0200 Micheal 403.350.1569

Thank You Transcon Livestock Corp & Bohrson Marketing Services

Innisfail Auction Market would like to thank Jay Good and Scott Bohrson, along with their teams for another great year of Simmental sales. We have enjoyed being your host market sn look forward to these 2019/2020 sales! Sim Power Simmental Female Sale, December 6, 2019 | Western Harvest Female Sale - December 10, 2019 Ultra / CzechMate Bull Sale February 2020 | Bull Spectrum Sale -March 9, 2020

For more information on these sales, please contact

Innisfail Auction Market

DANNY DAINES 403.391.0580

MARK DAINES 403.350.0200

www.innisfailauctionmarket.com | 403.227.3166

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DUANE DAINES 403.358.4971


bred to blue chip

bred to blue chip

lcs 114e

bred to dkf razor

bred to dkf razor

lcs 9z

bred to blue chip

lcf 8e

rrar 25y

bred to blue chip

lcs 68c

lw 109c

sales management: bohrson marketing | www.bohrson.com

The Verstegen Family Jon-William 306-631-8749

Michael & Alyssa 306-631-8763

Greg & helen 306-513-8059 21


Vet’s Advice

By Roy Lewis, DVM

W

Water Hemlock Poisoning

ith the wetter spring and summer sightings of Western water hemlock have increased. Prior to 2006 I personally had only seen one occurrence of this highly toxic plant in 25 years of practice. This year in a short time frame several findings with multiple plants in our practice area, a great distance apart, have been identified. This is one of the most potent poisonous plants known to cattle. One root bulb can kill a mature cow very quickly. It is important for us to be on the lookout for this toxic plant and inform your neighbours if it has been sited in the area. I see more of it in southern Alberta for sure growing around sloughs and around water ways. With the suspicion of any toxic plant identification is critical. Water hemlock has narrow leaves with sharp tooth like margins. The flowers are small, white and in umbrella like clusters. The roots are very bulbous and this distinguishes it from look alike plants. It is commonly confused with water parsnip, which also has narrow leaves, but they do not have the tooth like margins and the roots are not bulbous. Cow parsnip is also very common in our area but it is generally a larger plant and has very large fan like leaves. In dryer condition cattle and other livestock can graze cow parsnip and it actually has pretty good feed value. It is very common in our cool wooded areas. Poisonings to water hemlock will generally occur in the early spring on the young shoots before much else is growing or in the fall as pastures run low. Hemlock likes wetter conditions so is often found around dugouts or along streams and other water sources. It generally does not like a lot of shade so is often in the open. The late fall is the other critical time when other vegetation is sparse where poisonings occur from eating the bulbous roots. The plant in its entirety can be pulled out easily if the ground is wet which is why livestock especially cattle gain access to the roots. If you have problems identifying this or other potentially toxic or noxious weeds, there are several sources for advice. The local agricultural fieldman or crop specialist are well versed in identification. It is important these ag-fieldman also know this plant is present in your geographic area. The sprayer operators are also excellent reference sources as that is their job to identify weeds in order to select appropriate sprays. Veterinarians are well trained in the treatment of the poisonings and could reference pictures of the toxic plants. Water hemlock control involves manual removal as plant numbers are generally low, close to a water source and there can be a fair distance between plants. The poison is toxic to humans so use gloves when picking and do not cut into the bulbous roots.

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Protective eye wear would also be a wise precautionary measure. The plant is a perennial so try and pull the entire root out. This is generally easy, especially on the bigger plants, by grasping right at the base of the plant. Any small leaf shoots should also be removed. Dispose by incinerating, desiccating or composting. As with all poisonings, it is far better to be preventative than treat the disease. Be vigilant in subsequent years in case regrowth from a root bulb can occur and check pastures before livestock are turned in. The seeds are not considered toxic but removing before plants go to seed goes without saying. Rarely would you find livestock from hemlock poisoning alive as death can occur within fifteen minutes. Most are reported as sudden deaths around water sources. Here veterinarians must rule out other causes of sudden death such as blue-green algae poisoning, anthrax, blackleg or bloat. Many of these toxins appear to be increasing in frequency. Convulsions and other nervous signs such as frothing and clamping of the jaws are observed if the animals are found alive. Treatment by the veterinarian would consist of trying to control the convulsions. No specific antidote exists but depending on the amount consumed low level poisonings can recover with no long-term effects. All species of animals could be susceptible but cattle, sheep, goats and bison because of their grazing patterns are most susceptible. They are all less fussy grazers and in conditions of low forage availability will go after these less desirable plants. Cattle especially because of the pulling action of their grazing are most susceptible. Deaths in horses and swine have also been documented. Fortunately poisonings are very, very rare because conditions must be right between stage of plant growth and the lack of other available pasture. Rotational grazing systems where large numbers of animals are forced onto a small area could actually increase likelihood of exposure to hemlock if it was present. When walking out onto pastures be ever vigilant of what species of grasses, forbs and weeds are present. This gives us clues as to the health of the pasture, where production can be improved, where overgrazing has occurred and if we can prevent poisonings by removing some toxic plants in the process so much the better. Fortunately, death from water hemlock is very rare but it should be considered when there is a sudden death with very little postmortem findings. With all this moisture this year our pastures are lush and it could be pulled out easily.


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15th Annual Fleckvieh Bull & Female Sale Saturday, 4:00 pm

December 7, 2019 at Wolfe Farms, Valleyview, AB

55 Fleckvieh Simmental 18 month old bulls 18 bred heifers

6 Open Full Fleckvieh heifers

Thank you to last year’s buyers (*multiple purchases)

WOLFE ENOCH FF 818E sold to Lone Stone Farms

WOLFE ENRICH FF 802E sold to Eddy Klassen

Alix Farming Co. Ltd. Blazin J Inc.* Wallace & Daina Calder* Bradley & Deborah Chapman Cody Chapman Diamond Anchor Ranch Chelsie Dillabough* DMD Simmentals* Rob & Kendra Elzinga* Peter D. Froland Gerig Farms Ltd.* Harper Creek Farms Louie Haukeness HBCR Valley Farming Co.* Ted & Joyce Henderson David Hiebert Hollingworth Farms Ltd.* Jassman Farm Ltd.* Travis Jassman

Klassen Ranching Eddy Klassen Lone Stone Farms Brad McLaughlin* Garth Meehan* North Point Angus* Peace View Colony* Jim Peel* Landen Poyser John Prinse* Todd Sawchuck Schamber Ranch* Simonette Livestock Ventures South Peace Colony* Gaylen J. Spencer Brian & Deanne Stratuliak* Turner Farms/Condon Farms* Willcooke Simmentals*

All bulls can stay on the farm through the winter and be fed free of charge. For bull purchases, at least 50% down is required sale day and the remainder can be paid in the spring when the bulls are delivered.

For catalogues or further information contact:

Wolfe Farms Tony Wolfe

Box 2074, Valleyview, AB T0H 3N0 780-524-9322 email: wolfefarms8@gmail.com website: www.wolfefarms.ca

Directions to Farm

From Valleyview go S on Hwy 43 to Twp 681 (Warren Rd), W to Rge Rd 232, S to Twp 674 and W to farm. From Little Smoky go N on Hwy 43 to Twp 673A (Anderson Rd), W to Rge Rd 225, N to Twp 674, and W to farm.

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Regular Sales every Thursday at 8:30 AM Presort Yearling Sales Sept. 23 and 30 at 8:30 AM Presort Calf Sales Sept. 12, Sept. 26, Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7, Nov. 28, Dec. 5, Dec. 12, Dec. 19 at 12:30 PM All Breeds Presort Calf Sales Oct. 21, Nov. 11, Nov. 18, Nov. 25 at 8:30 am

SPECIAL PRESORT SALES Monday, Oct. 28, 8:30 AM - Simm X Char X Monday, Nov. 4, 8:30 AM - Black & Red Angus Thursday, Nov. 14, 12:30 PM - Angus Influence Thursday, Nov. 21, 12:30 PM - Speckle Park Influence & Hereford Influence

BRED COW & HEIFER SALES 1:00 PM Saturday, Nov. 30 - Open Consignment Monday, Dec. 2 (2:00 PM) - Westman Farms Annual Bred Heifer Sale on the farm, Vermilion, AB 450 Simm Influence Heifers Tuesday, Dec. 3 - Bred Cow & Heifer Sale Featuring Tingley Farms and Holtby Farms Saturday, Dec. 7 - Select Bred Cow & Heifer Sale Consignment from Little Willow Creek (Harlans) | MC Quantock | Doug Marjoram | Bar Crossroads Ranch and others Majority of these consignments are home raised Monday, Dec. 9 - Y Coulee Land & Cattle “You Be The Judge” Sale 60 Red Angus Bulls | 600 Angus and Simm Influence Bred Heifers Saturday, Dec. 14 - Dusty Rose Ranch 450 Simm Influence Bred Heifers Monday, Dec. 16 - Open Consignment Tuesday, Dec. 17 - Gus Garnier Angus Complete Dispersal of 300 Purebred Black Angus Saturday, Dec. 21 - Open Consignment Wayne Woodman 306-821-6310

Kyle Soderberg 306-883-7374

Jim Pulyk 780-787-0646

Brent Brooks 306-240-5340

Brian Romanowicz 780-207-0290 (Bonnyville Area)

Bob Foxwell 780-842-0410 (Wainwright)

Brody Brooks Yard Foreman 306-240-6504

Ryan Noble 306-839-7949

Kody Smith 306-821-6720

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December 11, 2019

Evening Sale At Spring Creek Ranch Near Moosomin, SK 25 cows born in 2013 • 55 Simmental & Angus Bred Heifers

MBJ 2A Erixon Power Play 102Y X Springcreek Amanda 156W

MBJ 82A Erixon Power Play 102Y X Springcreek Polly 24W

MBJ 32A Springcreek BLK Tank 99T X Springcreek Linne 91R

BSCC 6A Harvie JDF Wallbanger111X X Blacksand BLK Pearl 901W

MBJ 36A TNT Gunner N208 X Springcreek Arrow 168X

MBJ 44A Springcreek Liner 56U X Springcreek B Gold 18X

BSCC 21A Erixon Power Play 102Y X Blacksand Linnette 942W

MBJ 7Z Springcreek Liner 56U X Springcreek Red Tara 90S

MBJ 95A Springcreek Align 100X X Springcreek Polly 109X

MBJ 103A Springcreek Liner 104S X Springcreek BK Stormy 21T

Please contact us for catalogues...

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Du Poste de Porte

Par Bruce Holmquist Directeur général - Association Simmental du Canada

L

Défis et opportunités de l’industrie bovine

’Association Simmental du Canada a été l’un des nombreux commanditaires de la dernière Conférence Canadienne sur l’industrie bovine (“CBIC”), laquelle s’est tenue du 12 au 16 août à Calgary, en Alberta. Ayant tenu cette conférence à London en Ontario l’année dernière, elle était de retour en 2019 à ses racines originales, avec l’objectif de rassembler les Intervenants de l’industrie bovine canadienne pour discuter et acquérir de nouvelles connaissances entourant l’industrie bovine. De même, cette rencontre constituait une bonne occasion pour favoriser le réseautage et la discussion avec un important groupe d’intervenants actifs dans tous les segments de la chaine de valeur du bœuf. Cette semaine d’activités incluait des visites, des rencontres de certains comités et d’instances de l’industrie, de même que des présentations sur un large éventail de sujets, couvrant un ensemble d’opportunités et de défis au sein de notre industrie bovine. Quiconque a déjà participé à une conférence précédente du “CBIC” est bien conscient que l’agenda était très chargé, avec plusieurs des rencontres qui se déroulaient simultanément. Il y était donc impossible d’assister à toutes les activités, de telle sorte que les participants devaient choisir les rencontres ayant le plus d’intérêt pour eux. La conférence annuelle du “CIBC” est également l’occasion pour la tenue de plusieurs autres rencontres, notamment; les réunions semi-annuelles de l’Association Canadienne des producteurs de bovins (“CCA-Canadian Cattlemen’s Association”), l’Assemblée Générale Annuelle sur les prélevés du secteur bovin, l’Assemblée Générale Annuelledu Conseil des jeunes producteurs de bovins canadiens, le forum technique sur l’amélioration génétique du Conseil Canadien des races de boucherie (« CBBC »), une rencontre générale du Conseil de recherche sur les bovins de boucherie (« CBRC ») et des rencontres de l’Association Nationale des engraisseurs de bovins. Le thème de la conférence en 2019 était “Assurons notre avenir” et, tout au long du programme d’activités, les messages touchaient autant les diverses opportunités que la reconnaissance des défis auxquels les producteurs sont confrontés en tant que producteurs d’aliments au début de la chaine de valeur. Les producteurs bovins n’ont jamais été confrontés à des défis aussi grands et la manière d’y faire face demeure toujours notre responsabilité. Tout cela peut parfois être une démarche complexe et frustrante, où l’émotivité est très élevée, comme on a pu le constater dernièrement lors de multiples échanges sur les divers médiaux sociaux entre les producteurs de bovins et le grand public. Les décisions d’achat de nos aliments sont basées sur de nombreux facteurs, notamment l’émotion, et la production des aliments revêt souvent un caractère très émotif, en particulier lorsque les producteurs qui travaillent fort et investissent massivement dans leur production doivent constamment faire face à des défis alimentés par une mauvaise compréhension. Dernièrement, les pages Facebook étaient inondées de commentaires et d’écrits concernant un reportage vidéo produit par

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“The Weather Network”, lequel faisait la promotion de la réduction de la consommation de viande de bœuf, cela afin de ralentir la production bovine, mais avec un énoncé de fausses raisons de sauver notre environnement. Autour de la même période, on était témoin d’une forte opposition envers la chaine de restaurants Tim Hortons qui venait d’introduire ses produits de “viande végétale-Beyond Meat”, alors que des producteurs ont réagi avec beaucoup d’émotion et de critique envers eux. Bien malheureusement, nous avons reçu un message semblable précédemment cette année de la part de notre Gouvernement Fédéral, lors du lancement plus tôt en 2019 du nouveau Guide alimentaire canadien. De plus, des commentaires prononcés par notre Ministre Fédéral de l’environnement faisaient clairement référence à un message nous invitant à “manger davantage de plantes et moins de viande en vue de combattre le réchauffement climatique”. Comment doit-on ainsi faire face à tout cela ? L’industrie bovine est très différente de ce qu’elle était lorsque plusieurs d’entre nous ont commencé à y être impliqué. Tandis que d’immenses opportunités existent, il y a également de nombreux défis touchant plusieurs facettes et, bien malheureusement, cela va continuer. Au niveau de chacune des générations, les consommateurs veulent en savoir davantage au sujet des aliments qu’ils achètent et ceux-ci devront toujours demeurer vigilants et critiques face à cette abondance de fausse information. En tant qu’industrie nous avons une belle histoire à présenter, et à titre de producteurs, nous savons tous que nous faisons partie de la solution et non du problème. Nos messages doivent être diffusés de différentes manières et par de nombreuses personnes. Au fil du temps, il y aura des erreurs de communication de la part des producteurs eux-mêmes, d’organisations de l’industrie et de partenaires de la chaine de valeur, toutefois on doit reconnaître qu’on fait tous partie de la même équipe, et qu’il est primordial de préserver l’image globale de la production bovine et des gens qui la font. Alors qu’il est important que le message soit précis et repose sur la science, il est tout aussi important de le faire de manière positive, car cela viendra aussi influencer l’image de quiconque est impliqué. Cela s’applique à la fois pour la communication entre les producteurs et les consommateurs de notre produit qu’aux échanges entre les diverses organisations de l’industrie et les producteurs qui les supportent financièrement. Tout comme nos organisations de l’industrie, les producteurs bovins doivent demeurer informés et éduqués par rapport aux enjeux de l’industrie, et ils doivent être des messagers des attributs positifs et de la valeur pour la société des bovins et de la production bovine. La Conférence 2019 de l’industrie bovine Canadienne a constitué un très bon rappel pour moi, et aussi du fait que nous pouvons tous faire un meilleur travail en diffusant un message positif relié à une production bovine durable.


Don’t forget our Bonchuk farms BUll Sale

Tuesday, March 10, 2020 • Virden, MB 29


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Amelioration de la Race

Par Sean McGrath Coordonnateur des programmes d’amélioration de la race, Association Simmental du Canada

Les groupes contemporains

J

e travaille dans le domaine de l’amélioration génétique depuis plus de vingt ans et l’un des commentaires le plus fréquent que j’entends au sujet des ÉPD est: “mes bovins sont comparés et doivent compétitionner avec ceux de mes voisins qui ont une meilleure régie que moi”. Chaque animal qu’on observe est le résultat d’un bagage génétique qui est soumis à un environnement donné. Si l’environnement est le même, les différences observées entre les animaux proviendront alors de la génétique. Bien qu’on puisse comparer des animaux entre divers troupeaux et sous différents systèmes de régie avec les ÉPD, leur calcul n’est pas effectué à partir de comparaisons directes entre des bovins élevés selon des pratiques de régie différentes. La répartition des animaux dans des groupes contemporains représente la principale façon de séparer les animaux pour les évaluations génétiques, et cela constitue l’élément-clé du calcul des ÉPD, lesquels nous permettent de faire des comparaisons de bovins de différents troupeaux et élevés selon diverses conditions d’environnement. On définit un groupe contemporain par un groupe de bovins du même âge et du même sexe élevé dans les mêmes conditions environnementales. Examinons comment le tout fonctionne à partir de l’exemple simplifié suivant. Prenons par exemple deux troupeaux, avec cinq sujets chacun. Dans ce cas-ci, on prend pour acquis que tous les veaux sont issus de vaches adultes, et que les poids au sevrage indiqués sont des poids ajustés à 205 jours d’âge. Troupeau 1 Veau Date de naissance Sexe

Poids au sevrage

Groupe de régiet Père

Groupe contemporain

Déviation

A

1 jan

M

850

1

Z

1

+50

B C D E

15 jan 15 jan 30 jan 15 avr

M F F F

750 700 650 450

1 1 1 1

Y Z Y Z

1 2 2 3

-50 +25 -25 0

Troupeau 2 Veau Date de naissance Sexe

Poids au sevrage

Groupe de régiet Père

Groupe contemporain

Déviation

F

1 avr

M

500

1

Z

4

-50

G H I J

15 avr 30 avr 1 avr 15 avr

M M F F

650 600 500 450

1 2 1 1

X X X Z

4 5 6 6

+50 0 +25 -25

Si on examine les dates de naissance des veaux pour cet exemple, on peut ainsi voir que les vêlages se déroulent en hiver pour le Troupeau 1, alors qu’ils surviennent au printemps pour le Troupeau 2. On peut également voir qu’il y a fort probablement de grandes différences de régie, car les poids au sevrage des veaux du Troupeau 1 sont beaucoup plus élevés que ceux du Troupeau 2. En regardant les données des groupes de régie, on peut constater que l’éleveur du Troupeau 1 a déclaré que tous les veaux avaient été gérés de la même manière. Lorsqu’on regarde les groupes contemporains, on peut voir que les bovins sont divisés selon trois groupes différents. Le groupe contemporain 1 est composé de veaux mâles, environ du même âge et qui sont élevés dans le même environnement. Le groupe contemporain 2 est composé de génisses, élevées dans le même environnement et qui sont relativement du même âge. Le 3e groupe est formé d’un seul veau, soit unefemelle née plus tard. Bien qu’il s’agisse d’une génisse élevée avec les autres veaux, elle ne fait pas partie du groupe contemporain de génisses, car la différence d’âge qu’elle a avec les autres génisses est trop importante pour les fins de l’évaluation génétique. L’éleveur du Troupeau 2 a déclaré trois veaux mâles et deux veaux

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femelles, toutefois un des veaux mâles a été placé dans le groupe de régie 2.Ce veau était possiblement malade et traité séparément, ou bien la mère était dans un pâturage différent, ou encore cela était pour une autre raison. Au moment de former les groupes contemporains, le veau “H” a été placé dans son propre groupe, et il n’est pas comparé aux autres mâles car il est élevé dans un environnement différent. Les veaux sont comparés uniquement à l’intérieur de leur propre groupe contemporain, ainsi en plus de NE PAS être directement comparés entre les troupeaux, ils ne sont même pas comparés directement avec les autres veaux du même troupeau ayant des différences de sexe, d’âge et d’environnement. La déviation apparaissant dans la colonne de droite nous indique le niveau de différence du poids au sevrage du veau, par rapport au poids au sevrage moyen de ses contemporains. Vous remarquerez que chaque veau n’est comparé qu’à la moyenne des veaux inclus dans son groupe contemporain. Par exemple, dans le Troupeau 1, le veau “A” est comparé uniquement au veau « B ». L’idée de base derrière les ÉPD est que les animaux sont le produit de leur environnement, intéragissant avec leur bagage génétique, pour obtenir un phénotype donné. Si l’environnement est le même, les différences qu’on voit entre les veaux dans le même groupe contemporain sont alors dues aux différences génétiques. Lorsqu’on analyse de quelle manière la descendance de chaque taureau performe relativement au sein de leur groupe, on peut voir que dans le Troupeau 1, les veaux du père “Z” sont plus lourds que ceux du père “Y”. Dans le troupeau 2, les veaux du père “Z” sont plus légers que ceux du père “X”. Cela veut dire que si on était pour classer ces trois pères selon leur génétique pour le poids au sevrage, le résultat pourrait ressembler au suivant… Poids au sevrage Père Lourd Y Plus lourd Z Le plus lourd X Voici donc un exemple extrêmement simplifié. Pour notre évaluation produite par IGS, le calcul des ÉPD repose également sur des informations supplémentaires telles que l’héritabilité (la portion de différences qu’on voit dans un groupe contemporain et qui est du à la génétique), les relations entre les caractères, l’influence de la mère sur les performances de son veau, les millions de données de performance et sur les généalogies provenant de milliers de troupeaux et cela sur une foule d’années, d’ajustements sophistiqués pour des facteurs tels que l’âge de la mère et l’âge du veau, et des informations provenant des marqueurs génomique sur l’ADN (SNP), pour n’en nommer que quelques-uns. Toutefois, le concept de base des groupes contemporains est vraiment le moteur derrière l’évaluation génétique et le calcul des ÉPD. Avec la saison des sevrages de l’automne qui approche, rappelezvous qu’il est extrêmement important d’identifier correctement les différences de régie entre vos différents groupes de bovins, en utilisant les codes appropriés pour chaque groupe de régie sur vos formulaires de déclaration des poids au sevrage. Les bovins qui sont gérés différemment des autres bovins doivent être placées dans des groupes différents. L’ordinateur pourra répartir les veaux selon leurs différences de sexe et d’âge, mais vous seuls en tant qu’éleveurs pouvez identifier les différences de régie entre les bovins. Avec cet exemple, j’espère que cela vous permettra de mieux comprendre l’importance des groupes contemporains, et que vous comprendrez également davantage comment les données de chaque bovin sont comparées entre elles.


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34


Our family has a for agriculture and the cattle business.

Meadow Acres Simmentals

rnwald Fo t rit B + na ren B , ten irs K Dustin, Blair + Laurel Fornwald

Dustin :: 306-487-7510 | Kirsten :: 306-487-7514 www.meadowacressimmentals.com Find us on Facebook or come and see us in Lampman, Saskatchewan 35


Established to promote & recognize the top registered Bulls & Females in the Simmental breed that are exhibited at shows each year!

2019 Qualifying Shows British Columbia

Ontario

IPE - Armstrong, BC Aug. 28 - Sept. 1

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Toronto, ON Nov. 3

Alberta

Glencoe Fall Fair - Glencoe, ON Sept. 21

Olds Fall Classic - Olds, AB Oct. 4 - 6

Ironhill Simmentals

2018 Show Bull & Female of the Year Boss Lake Genetics

Quebec

Farmfair International, Edmonton, AB Nov. 6 - 10

Brome Fair - Brome, QC Aug. 30 Shawville Fair - Shawville, QC Aug. 31

Saskatchewan

Stockade Roundup Lloydminster, SK Oct. 30 - Nov. 3

Expo Boeuf - Victoriaville, QC Oct. 10 -13

Canadian Western Agribition Maritimes Regina, SK Heritage Beef Classic Nov. 25 - 30 Windsor, NS Sept. 20

Manitoba

MSA Summer Show - Treherne, MB Jun. 30 Manitoba AG EX - Brandon, MB Oct. 23 - 26

36

Points Table

Class A Show (100+ head)

Class B Show (80-99 head)

Class C Show (60-79 head)

Class D Show (40-59 head)

Class E Show (20-39 head)

Placing

Points

Points

Points

Points

Points

1

15

14

13

12

10

2

14

13

12

11

9

3

13

12

11

10

8

4

12

11

10

9

7

5

11

10

9

8

6

6

10

9

8

7

5

7

9

8

7

6

4

8

8

7

6

5

3

9

7

6

5

4

2

10

6

5

4

3

1

Divison Champion

14

12

10

8

6

Reserve Division Champion

13

11

9

7

5

Grand Champion

14

12

10

8

6

Reserve Grand Champion

13

11

9

7

5

Visit www.simmental.com for a complete list of rules and regulations


Upcoming Alberta Sales

OCTOBER Oct. 11 Oct. 24

Anchor D “Pasture Treasure” Female Sale Rimbey, AB 2019 Edition Mader Ranches Ladies Night Carstairs, AB

November

Nov. 6 – 10 Nov. 21 Nov. 23 Nov. 29

Farmfair International Edmonton, AB Canadian Classic Simmental Sale Lacombe, AB South Holden Simmentals Dispersal Sale Viking, AB Lone Stone Farms Invitational Female Sale Westlock, AB

Dec. 18 Westgold Farms Female Production Sale Lloydminster, SK Dec. 19 Skor Simmentals Complete December Female Dispersal Sale Dec. 3 Transcon’s Western Harvest Innisfail, AB 6th Annual Simmental Dec. 20 Friday Night Lights 8th Bred Heifer Sale Annual Simmental Sale Innisfail, AB Olds, AB Dec. 4 Camrose Country Classic Sale 21 Transcon’s National Trust Dec. Camrose, AB on Ice Semen & Embryo Sale Dec. 6 SimPower Bred Female Sale Chapter XII Innisfail, AB Red Deer, AB Dec. 7 Wolfe Farms 15th Annual Dec. 21 Checkers Simmental Sale Fleckvieh Bull & Female Sale Ponoka, AB Valleyview, AB Dec. 21 Profit / Smarty Pants Event Dec. 9 Y Coulee “You Be The Judge” Ponoka, AB Fall Bull & Heifer Sale Dec. 22 Transcon’s Fleckvieh Lloydminster, SK Equation Fullblood Dec. 9 The Source of Elite Genetics Sale Simmental Sale Lloydminster, SK Red Deer, AB Dec. 16 Border City 2nd Annual Transcon’s Ultimate Dec. 22 Simmental Sale Red & Black XXII Lloydminster, SK Red Deer, AB Dec. 17 Southern Alberta Simmental Dec. 31 New Years Resolution Frozen Round Up 26th Annual Genetics Sale, Volume VIII Bull & Female Sale Lloydminster, SK Stavely, AB

37


SweepStake$ SSA Simmental

Nov. 27, 2019 Agribition, 6 pm John Deere Sales Arena

$30,000

Over in prize money and prizes! :: Silver Memberships only $100! For a chance to win... ::

- $15, 000 in Sale Credits to Agribition Sale

- Secondary prizes drawn throughout the event! - Silver memberships can be purchased in advance sasksimmental@yourlink.ca or at the show

$2000

2019 SSA Bull Promo Winner Congratulations to Bar Crossroads Ranch of Edam, SK winner of the 2019 Bull Promo. They purchased a bull from Red Willow Ranch, Cutknife, SK and will recieve a $2000 Sale Credit, sponsored by the Sask. Simmental Association, to be used to purchase a bull or female at public auction or by private treaty from a current SSA member.

Saskatchewan Simmental Association

Fall Show & Sales Simmental Influenced Cattle will be in attendnce at the following Fall Shows & Sales!

Check w ith you Edam Fall Fair Mart fo r local Auctio October 25-26 r Simm n Pre-sor ental contact John Grant 306-441-7984 t sales near yo Lloydminster Stockade Roundup u! Oct. 30 - Nov. 2 Yorkton Harvest Show Down Nov. 8-9 Canadian Western Agribition Nov. 27 - Simmental Show 9 AM Simmental Sweepstakes 6 PM Simmental Sale 7 PM Nov. 29 - Commercial Show 10 AM Bull Pen Alley People’s Choice 5 PM Nov. 30 - Bull Pen Alley 10 AM Commercial Sale 12 PM

President: Kirsten Fornwald (306) 487-7514 Secretary: Carolyn McCormack Box 591 Grenfell, SK S0G 2B0 (306) 697-2945 fax (306) 697-2942 email: sasksimmental@yourlink.ca

www.sasksimmental.com 38


2020 CSA AGM & YCSA Show

July 23-26

Portage La Prairie, mb - watch msa website for more information -

‘Tag E

Simm

m Al

l

ental

’

Manitoba Fall Sales

Now posted on the manitoba simmental website Thank you to everyone that attended 2019 MSA Summer Show - June 30th, 2019 in Treherne, Mantioba find a breeder in your area at

www.mbsimmental.com Box 274, Austin, MB R0H 0C0 President: Tracy Wilcox 204-713-0029 Secretary: Laurelly Beswitherick 204-637-2046 b2@inetlink.ca 39


Maritime Simmental Association BOARD OF DIRECTORS

President: Kerwin Delong, NS Vice President: Trevor Pauley, NB Secretary: Jennie Mutch, PE Treasurer: Marlene Gaunce, NB Directors: Laura Parsons, NS Lacey Fisher, NS Geraline VanAgten, NB Wade Loane, PE Brent Matheson, PE CSA Director: Frank Robblee, PE

www.maritimesimmentalassociation.com

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Dates to Remember AOE Simmental Show Heritage Beef Classic Windsor, NS September 20, 2019

MYCSA Salt Water Classic Windsor, NS September 21-22, 2019

Salt Water Simmental Sale Nappan, NS October 19, 2019

If you have any questions regarding the 2019 Salt Water Simmental Sale, please contact one of the committee members. Kerwin Delong - (902) 824-2720 Connor Morse - (902) 844-0286 Patrick Milner - (902) 694-3121 Trevor Pauley - (506) 874-2706


Sue Giles

Program Coordinator - Canadian Simmental Association

Ph: (403) 793-0409 sgiles@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

Keep ahead

of your competition!

GARTH CUTLER

Advertise in ANNUAL BULL SALE 3rd Saturday in February

PO Box 5177 Lacombe, AB T4L 1W9 Ph: (403) 304 - 0896 email: circleg@telus.net

Randy Bollum

Industry and Member Services Representative

Ph: (403) 540-5949 rbollum@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

41


Don’t ma ke for your c it hard ustom to find yo ers u!

Advertise in

Sue Giles

Program Coordinator - Canadian Simmental Association

Ph: (403) 793-0409 sgiles@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

42


Randy Bollum

Industry and Member Services Representative

Ph: (403) 540-5949 rbollum@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

43


ADVERTISE IN THIS SPOT! Contact Randy Bollum or Sue Giles today!

Ryan Gylander Box 809 Wildwood, AB T0E 2M0

ryan_gylander@hotmail.com

1.780.621.2737

Keep ahead

Sue Giles

Program Coordinator - Canadian Simmental Association

Ph: (403) 793-0409 sgiles@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

44

Simmeron Ranch Martin Skaret 1-56021 RGE. RD. 261 Sturgeon County Alberta, T8R 0V9 Ph: 780-939-3248 Cell: 780 913 7963 mskaret@xplornet.com www.simmeronranch.ca

of your competition!

Advertise in


Shane & Shannon Wolfe and family Site 11, Box 47, RR 1 SUNDRE, AB T0M 1X0 PHONE & FAX (403) 556-8584 e-mail: wolfepack@airenet.com www.wolfesfleckvieh.ca

Red and Black Simmental Kelly & Jenna Waltz Vermilion, AB 780-853-3834

Where only 2 year old bulls sell

Randy Bollum

Industry and Member Services Representative

Ph: (403) 540-5949 rbollum@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

45


BARRY & BRENDA LABATTE Box 72 Gladmar, Sask. S0C 1A0 www.labattesimmentals.com Ph: (306)969-4820 labatte.simm@sasktel.net Cell: (306) 815-7900

Don’t ma ke for your c it hard ustom to find yo ers u!

Advertise in

Dave & Krista Erixon Box 156 Clavet, SK S0K 0Y0

306-270-2893

Red & Black Simmentals

www.erixonsimmentals.com

Randy Bollum

Industry and Member Services Representative

Ph: (403) 540-5949 rbollum@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

Jim (306) 928-4636 Dave (306) 483-8660

Lee (306) 928-4820 Fax (306) 928-2143 The Stamp Of Quality Simmental Genetics For Over 40 Years

46


Solsgirth, MB DAVE WAYNE h: 204-842-3706 h: 204-842-3859 c: 204-773-0467 c: 204-796-0004 Raising Quality Simmental Seedstock

www.bonchukfarms.com

Randy Bollum

Industry and Member Services Representative

Ph: (403) 540-5949 rbollum@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

This card spot costs LESS than a coffee a day! Advertise with us!

Sue Giles

Program Coordinator - Canadian Simmental Association

Ph: (403) 793-0409 sgiles@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

47


Tyler, Jen, Emma, Margaret Brooks 142 Clarke Rd. • Paris, ON N3L 3E1 • 519.770.9664

K

BAN R E RIV ARMS F

Ray Comier PO Box 141 LaSalle, Manitoba R0G 1B0 Ph: (204) 736 - 2608 Cell: (204) 782 -1191 Fax: (204) 736 - 4654 Email: r.r.comier@xplornet.com Website: www.riverbankfarms.com Red & Black with Fleckvieh Influence

BOOMER

CREEK LIVESTOCK

Owen Martin 4550 Ament Line Wallenstein Ont. N0B 2S0 C. 519-501-2207 E. owenmartin4550@gmail.com

Purebred Red & Black Simmentals

48


Randy Bollum

Industry and Member Services Representative

Ph: (403) 540-5949 rbollum@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

Sue Giles

Program Coordinator - Canadian Simmental Association

Ph: (403) 793-0409 sgiles@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

23401 Big Bend Rd. Newbury, ON N0L 1Z0 Ron & Linda 519.695.6124 Mike & Melissa 226.268.0520

www.simmental.com

49


Randy Bollum

Industry and Member Services Representative

Ph: (403) 540-5949 rbollum@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

Sue Giles

Program Coordinator - Canadian Simmental Association

Ph: (403) 793-0409 sgiles@simmental.com Canadian Simmental Association #13, 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 7C4

www.simmental.com

Rouge et Noir / Red and Black

Pur-sang / Purebred

85 Golf road, Waterloo, QuĂŠbec Kirk Stoddard Join us on Alexis Stoddard 450 521-8561 Facebook! 450 531-5920

757 Bedford Hwy, Bedford NS

Herdsman, Jay Hiltz (Cell) 902-277-1102 jayhiltz@live.com 50


Industry Events

Insurance

Auctioneer/Ringman

Photographers

51


Trucking

Semen/Embryos

firstclass_cardadSC.indd 1

2019-07-13 8:20:49 PM

Marketing 403.940.3334 C: 403.869.5599 bohrsondesign@gmail.com RR4 Site 7 Box 28 Olds, AB CANADA T4H 1T8

www.BOHRSON.com BLIService Bussiness Card 2015_Layout 1 2015-07 Trusted Unparalleled QualityDouble FULL SERVICE SALES MANAGEMENT

Box 1409 Crossfield, AB T0M 0S0 Office: 403.946.4999 Brian Bouchard: 403.813.7999 Chad Lorenz: 403.896.9585 Doug Domolewski: 403.635.1840 Email: info@bouchardlivestock.com

e Full Servic ting ke r a M Livestock

Semen/Embryos

Brian

Chad

Bova-Tech Ltd.

- Consulting - Order Buying - International Export Approved Semen & Embryo Storage Facility

WWW.BOUCHARDLIVESTOCK.COM

Cow Sense & Science

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888.354.4622 // www.genexcanada.ca

SERVICES

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In-Clinic & On Farm Services Embryo Collection, Freezing & Transplants Donor Care Facility Recipient Programs

P.O. Box 80142 Airdrie, Alberta T4B 2V8 Canada Tel: (403) 332-1567 E-mail: info@bova-tech.com

Export Certified International Marketing

Alberta - Saskatchewan - Manitoba

52

OFFERING AN E XC E P T I O N A L C O M B I N AT I O N O F

© 2019 Genex Cooperative, Inc. All rights reserved.

A-21288-19


Advertiser’s Index

ABC Cattle Co. .....................................45 Adair Ranch...........................................41 Alameda Agencies Ltd. .........................51 Alliance Simmental Farms.....................48 Alta Genetics.........................................52 Anchor D Ranch Simmentals..........13, 41 Applecross Cattle Co. ...........................41 Artisan Farms........................................51 Ashworth Farm & Ranch Ltd. ...............45 Aumack Simmentals..............................45 Bar 5 Farms...........................................48 Bar CL Livestock...................................41 Beechinor Bros. Simmentals.................41 Big Rock Simmentals............................41 Black River Farms.................................48 Black Sand Cattle Company..................47 Blue Mountains Farm............................48 Blushrose Simmental Farm...................45 Bohrson Marketing Services...6, 7, 11, 17, 52 Bonchuk Farms...............................29, 47 Boomer Creek Livestock.......................48 Bouchard Livestock International......5, 52 Boundary Ranch....................................45 Bova-Tech Ltd. ......................................52 Bow Valley Genetics..............................52 Brooksland Farms.................................48 Brown, Grady.........................................51 Canadian Bull Congress........................51 Canadian Cattlemen..............................52 Carey, Brent...........................................51 Car-Laur Simmentals.............................48 Cattle Cures...........................................51 Circle G Simmentals & Angus...............41 City View Simmentals............................45 Clearwater Simmentals.........................41 Crimson Tide Fleckvieh.........................48 Crossroad Farms...................................45 Czech-Mate Livestock...........................41 Davis-Rairdan Embryo Transplants Ltd....52 Deeg Simmental....................................41 Destiny Simmentals...............................48 Diamond T Simmentals.........................42 DJ Farms...............................................48 Don Heggie Simmentals........................42 Donovandale Farms..............................48 Dora Lee Genetics.................................49

Dorran Marketing Inc. ...........................51 Dorran, Steve........................................51 Double Bar D Farms............................ IFC Double G Simmentals............................45 Downey Farms......................................47 Dunc’s Cattle Co. ..................................49 Dwayann Simmentals............................49 Eagle-Ridge Simmentals.......................42 East Poplar Simmentals........................46 Edge, Dean............................................51 EDN Simmentals...................................46 Elm Tree Farms.....................................49 Erixon Simmentals.................................46 Fallen Timber Farms.............................41 Ferme Gagnon Farm.............................50 First Class Cattle Marketing..................52 Foley Simmentals..................................49 Genex Cooperative, Inc. .......................52 GJR Simmentals....................................46 Grant Rolston Photography Ltd. ...........51 Granvandale Simmentals......................49 Grinalta Farms.......................................42 H.S. Knill Company Ltd. .......................52 Hairy Hill Cattle Co. ..............................42 Hannah Simmentals..............................42 Harvie Ranching....................................42 High Bluff Stock Farm............................47 High Country Cattle Services................42 Hi-Tech Farms.......................................49 Hoegl Livestock.....................................46 Indian River Cattle Company........... 11, 49 Innisfail Auction Market..........................20 Janzen Brogan Embryo Services Ltd....52 Janzen Ranches....................................42 Jetstream Livestock...............................49 JNR Farms............................................42 Keato Meadow Simmentals...................42 Kin Kin Cattle Co. .................................42 Kuntz Simmental Farm..........................46 LaBatte Simmentals..............................46 Lazy Bar-B Simmentals.........................46 Lazy Creek Farms.................................21 Lazy S Ranch Inc. ................................42 Lewis Farms...................................... OBC Little Willow Creek Ranch......................46 Lloydminster Livestock Sales................26

Lobster Point Farms..............................50 Lone Stone Farms.................................42 Luv-N-It Cattle Company.......................42 M&J Farms............................................48 M&R Cattle Co. .....................................43 MacKenzie Cattle Company..................43 Mader Ranches.........................18, 19, 43 Mar Mac Farms.....................................48 Masterfeeds...........................................51 Maxwell Simmentals..............................43 McCormack Family Ranch....................46 MCG Simmentals..................................43 McIntosh Livestock................................46 McManus Simmentals...........................48 McMillen Ranching Ltd. ........................46 Meadow Acres Simmentals.............35, 46 MI Simmentals.......................................43 Mitchell Cattle Co. ................................41 New Holland Agriculture..........................3 Nolara Farms.........................................43 Norfolk Cattle.........................................49 North Creek Simmentals.......................46 North Hill Simmentals............................43 O Double E Simmentals........................43 Oberg, Don............................................51 O’Brien Farms.......................................49 Okotoks Fleckvieh Embryo Group.........43 Oslanski Simmental Farms....................43 Parkhill Ranches....................................43 Pearson Farms......................................43 Pheasantdale Simmentals.....................46 Phillips Farms Simmentals....................50 Pine Creek Simmentals.........................43 Porter Ranches......................................43 Rancier Farms.................................15, 44 RDG Simmentals...................................44 Rehorst Farms Ltd. ...............................49 Rendezvous Farms...............................48 River Point Cattle Company............17, 49 Riverbank Farms...................................48 Robb Farms...........................................47 Robson Acres........................................49 Rosebud Simmentals............................44 Rust Mountain View Ranch...................50 SAJ Simmentals....................................47 Seven-M Livestock................................44

SilverSmith Farms.................................44 Simmeron Fleckvieh Simmentals..........44 Skeels, Dan...........................................51 Skor Simmentals.......................30, 31, 44 South Holden Simmental.......................23 Southpaw Cattle Company....................44 Spring Creek Simmentals................27, 47 Spring Lake Simmentals........................44 Starwest Farms...............................33, 44 Steen Agencies......................................51 Stewart Simmentals...............................49 Stock, Mark............................................51 Stone Simmentals.................................44 Storebo Farm ........................................47 Sullivan Simmentals..............................50 Sully’s Farm...........................................49 Sun Rise Simmentals............................47 Sunny Valley Simmentals......................47 Swan Lake Farms..................................47 Swantewitt Simmentals.........................44 T Bar C Cattle Co. Ltd. ...................29, 52 The Register..........................................50 Timberlind Auctions...............................51 Todd Simmentals...................................50 Transcon Livestock Corp. ...23, 31, 52, 55 Trevor’s Cowpix.....................................51 Triple Rose Simmentals........................50 Tryon Simmentals..................................50 TSN Livestock.......................................48 Tymarc Livestock...................................44 Verleysen Farms....................................44 Virginia Ranch.......................................45 VJV Livestock Marketing Group..............9 W2 Farms..............................................47 W2 Land & Cattle..................................45 Weldehaven Farms...............................50 Wells’ Crossing Cattle Company...........45 Westway Farms Ltd. .............................45 Windy Knoll Farm..................................50 WJ Simmentals......................................45 Wolfe Farms....................................25, 45 Wolfe’s Fleckvieh...................................45 Wright’s Pro Rich Seeds........................48 XRC Simmentals...................................47

Beth Rankin Retiring August 29, 2019 Beth has been an integral part of the Canadian Simmental Association office staff for over 26 years. Her contributions and dedication to the CSA will always be valued and remembered. Beth, from everyone at the Canadian Simmental Association, thank you for all your hard work and service over the past 26 years. We wish you all the best in your retirement. Enjoy and relax!

53


What’s Happening

Nov. 14 Harvest Hoedown 25th Annual Simmental Heifer Sale Neepawa, MB Pembina Triangle Simmental Association 39th Annual Sale Nov. 15 Cypress River, MB Nov. 16 Lazy Creek Farms – Simmental & Red Angus Dispersal SEPTEMBER Moose Jaw, SK Sep. 14 17th Annual Ontario Autumn Classic Canadian Classic Simmental Sale Nov. 21 Hanover, ON Lacombe, AB Sep. 16 - 22 III Simmental – Simbrah Congress of the Americas Nov. 23 Futures One Online Sale: Edition 10 Guapiles, Costa Rica www.DLMS.ca Sep. 20 - 22 Maritime YCSA Classic Nov. 23 South Holden Simmental Complete Herd Dispersal Sale Windsor, NS Viking, AB Heritage Beef Classic Sep. 20 Canadian Western Agribition Nov. 25 30 Windsor, NS Regina, SK Sep. 21 Glencoe Fall Fair 27 Agribition Simmental 49th Annual Sale Nov. Glencoe, ON Regina, SK Sep. 21 - 22 Salt Water Classic Lone Stone Farms Invitational Female Sale Nov. 29 Windsor, NS Westlock, AB Sep. 26 Double Bar D Farms Online Heifer Sale Online Sep. 28 Ferme Gagnon Female Sale Cheneville, QC 5th Annual Eastern Harvest Simmental Heifer Sale Sep. 28 Cheneville, QC

December

Dec. 3 Transcon’s Western Harvest 6th Annual Simmental Bred Heifer Sale Innisfail, AB Camrose Country Classic 8th Annual Sale Dec. 4 Camrose, AB Dec. 5 Ashworth Farm & Ranch Female Production Sale October Oungre, SK Oct. 1 Anchor D Influenced Simmental Calf Sale SimPower Bred Female Sale Dec. 6 VJV Rimbey, AB Innisfail, AB Oct. 2 Anchor D Influenced Simmental Calf Sale Wolfe Farms 15th Annual Fleckvieh Bull & Female Sale Dec. 7 VJV Ponoka, AB Valleyview, AB Oct. 4 Anchor D Influenced Simmental Calf Sale Dec. 9 The Source Of Elite Simmental Genetics Sale VJV Dawson Creek, BC Lloydminster, SK Oct. 4 - 6 Olds Fall Classic Y Coulee “You Be The Judge” Fall Bull and Heifer Sale Dec. 9 Olds, AB Lloydminster, SK Oct. 5 Ontario Simmental Solution Sale Keystone Konnection 41st Annual Simmental Sale Dec. 10 Listowel, ON Brandon, MB Oct. 6 IRCC “Quality Control” Female Sale Double Bar D “Sharing the Herd” Production Sale Dec. 11 Indian River, ON Grenfell, SK Oct. 10 - 13 Expo Boeuf Dec. 11 Spring Creek “The Golden Opportunity VI” Female Sale Victoriaville, Quebec Moosomin, SK Oct. 11 Anchor D “Pasture Treasure” Female Sale Dec. 12 Transcon’s Simmsational 42nd Annual Simmental Sale Rimbey, AB Moose Jaw, SK Oct. 12 Shades of Autumn Production & Prospect Sale McMillen Ranching Ltd. “Herdbuilder 2019” Female Sale Dec. 13 Houston, BC Carievale, SK Oct. 19 Ottawa Valley Simmental Sale WLB Livestock Top Cut Female Sale Dec. 14 Metcalfe, ON Douglas, MB Oct. 19 Salt Water Simmental Sale Bonchuk Farms Female Production Sale Dec. 15 Nappan, NS Virden, MB Stars of the Valley Simmental Sale Oct. 19 Dec. 16 Border City 2nd Annual Simmental Sale Metcalfe, ON Lloydminster, SK Oct. 20 River Point Cattle Company & Guests “Fall Gala” Production Sale Dec. 16 Shades Of The Prairies Simmental Production Sale Glencoe, ON Brandon, MB Oct. 23 - 26 Manitoba Ag Ex Southern Alberta Simmental Round Up 26th Annual Dec. 17 Brandon, MB Bull & Female Sale Oct. 24 2019 Edition Mader Ranches Ladies Night Bred Female Sale Stavely, AB Carstairs, AB Westgold Farms Female Production Sale Dec. 18 Oct. 26 Partners for Progress Sale IX Lloydminster, SK Shefford, QC Skor Simmentals Complete Female Dispersal Sale Dec. 19 Oct. 28 Rust Mountain View “Queens of the Pasture” Production Sale Innisfail, AB Mercer, ND Friday Night Lights 8th Annual Simmental Sale Dec. 20 Oct. 30 - Nov. 3 Lloydminster Stockade Round-Up Olds, AB Lloydminster, SK Transcon’s National Trust On Ice Semen & Embryo Sale Chapter XII Dec. 21 November Red Deer, AB Nov. 1 - 10 Royal Agriculture Winter Fair Checkers Simmental Sale Dec. 21 Toronto, ON Ponoka, AB Nov. 2 Royal Elite All Breed Sale Profit / Smarty Pants Event Dec. 21 Toronto, ON Ponoka, AB Nov. 3 Canadian National Simmental Show Transcon’s Fleckvieh Equation Fullblood Simmental Sale Dec. 22 Toronto, ON Red Deer, AB Nov. 6 - 10 Farmfair International Transcon’s Ultimate Red & Black XXII Dec. 22 Edmonton, AB Red Deer, AB Nov. 13 Maple Lake Stock Farm Production Sale Premier & Guests Falls View Production Sale Dec. 28 Hartney, MB Niagara, ON Nov. 13 Chittick Farms Production Sale New Year’s Resolution Frozen Genetics Sale Volume VIII Dec. 31 Mayerthorpe, AB Lloydminster, SK

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35th Annual Bull Sale - Saturday February 29, 2020 300 Simmental & Angus Bulls Exciting Offspring from these and many more Herd Sires...

MAF Stunner 95E LFE Hoover 847D

LFE Beast Mode LFE Amber Jack 385E

Breaking Curfew

LFE Cash 386D

Private Treaty Females For Sale! Boss Lake Bonafide 722E Website: www.lewisfarms.ca Office Ph.: 780-962-5050 Kyle Lewis: 780-220-9188 kyle@lewisfarms.ca Ken Lewis: 780-818-3829 corrie@lewisfarms.ca Fullblood Division: Mark Land & Cattle, Lenny Mark 780-842-7207

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