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STRONGER THAN EVER BUILDING A BETTER UNION

MAGAZINE OF
2023 THE OFFICIAL
SOUTHWEST MOUNTAIN STATES CARPENTERS
SOUTHWEST MOUNTAIN STATES REGIONAL COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS SWMSCARPENTERS.ORG

LETTER FROM THE EST

Carpenters,

We experienced a lot of changes at the Council in 2022. Out of the gate, we came in with a new administration. Fast forward a couple of months and we negotiated the best agreement for Southern California. Fast forward a couple of more months and this Regional Council grows to 10 states strong by picking up Eastern Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. We’re now border to border, with more than 64,000 members, and now we are the Southwest Mountain States Regional Council of Carpenters.

Our membership worked over 58 million-man hours and volunteered 140,000 CUPP hours. Every hour was aimed at creating more membership opportunities to gain more Union Jobs, Union Wages, and Union Benefits.

A proud moment for this Council was coming together with our Brothers and Sisters from Northern California to pass AB 2011 (The Affordable Housing High Road Jobs Act). This bill will put many Union Carpenters to work in the housing market. The passing of AB 2011 also showed the power of what can be done when the two Councils of California come together - two Councils, one Brotherhood!

In 2023, we will continue to build better; we will continue to work, and more importantly, we will do everything we can, together, to build a better Union. 2023 is about me; it’s about you; it’s about us. Stronger Together and Stronger Than Ever.

To do this we need to do a few things: recruit every person that wants to wear a set of Carpenter’s bags, retain the membership we have, and train them to be the best Carpenter they can be. We will rely on you, our members, to be a mentor and active participant in the process because you are the best example of what this Brotherhood can be.

I am proud of our Union. We have remained United, Unidos, as one Brotherhood; making sure our Union represents everybody in all our 10 states: African Americans, Asian Americans, Caucasians, Hispanics, Native Americans, and women. The language we speak is common and needs no translation. We do what we do to feed our families and live our parents’ American dream with the hopes that one day our children will be living ours.

I will continue to stand shoulder to shoulder with you, working to secure Union jobs with good Union wages and strong Union benefits for all our members across our Council.

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7,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 MEMBERSHIP BY LOCAL 2,000 & below 2,000-3,000 3,000-4,000 4,000-5,000 5,000-6,000 6,000-7,000 2022 HEALTH & WELFARE TRUST HOURS: 58,497,775 MEMBERSHIP STATS LOCAL 1319 971 801 743 82 635 808 1136 59 323 555 1,899 1,457 1,447 1,372 1,302 1,051 936 510 475 223 206 57,712 2020 58,134 2021 MEMBER GROWTH Total New Joins: 2,276 Total Journeyed Out: 1,592 63,468 2022

FONTAINEBLEAU RESORT LAS VEGAS Dispatches: 899

INTEL EAGLE PROJECT Dispatches: 748

TAIWAN SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING PLANT Dispatches: 595

INTEL OCOTILLO CAMPUS

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN SPHERE

MEMBERSHIP DEMOGRAPHICS

Latino
Black (2.2) Native American
Asian (1.0) White (24.0) Unknown (5.5)
(66.0)
(1.3)
Dispatches: 578
Dispatches:
805 1607 562 721 1912 714 951 1977 213 909 619 6,299 5,710 5,812 5,525 5,103 4,909 4,339 3,962 3,439 3,235 2,271 1,986 661 2.2% BLACK 5.5% UNKNOWN 1.3% NATIVE AMERICAN 1.0% ASIAN 66.0% LATINO 24.0% WHITES
325 PROJECTS

MERGER NEWS

SOUTHWEST CARPENTERS EXPANDS NORTH

In the past, our Council focused heavily on letting the public know that we build better. Now we can say we build bigger. Southwest Carpenters added Eastern Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming to our Council. Expanding in the Mountain States regions of the U.S. made it apparent that we were no longer just the Brotherhood of the Southwest. Therefore, we updated our Council name to reflect our growth. The Southwest Mountain States Regional Council of Carpenters was introduced in October 2022. Now the SWMSRCC is 10 states total - from the Canadian to the Mexican border.

Due to the expansion, five new Locals were added to Southwest Carpenters Brotherhood: Local 59 in Spokane, WA; Local 1136 in Kettle Falls, WA; Local 635 in Meridian, ID; Local 808 in Idaho Falls, ID; and Local 82 in Great Falls, MT. Five new Training Centers have been added to the Southwest Mountain States.

SWMSRCC Leadership had a busy summer, meeting with members at Local halls to introduce them to the new and enhanced benefits, training, and revitalized Locals. Leadership has also been conducting ongoing meetings with new and established contractors letting them know that there’s a new team in town ready to do business.

During the last 20 years, our Council has always acted with our members’ best interests in mind. This expansion continues this tradition. There’s strength in numbers. We’re excited to see our influence in the Mountain States grow to better negotiate the industry’s best wages, healthcare, and retirement benefits.

We welcome our newest Brothers and Sisters to the Southwest Mountain States. Regardless of where we are located, we continue to be one Brotherhood, one Union – 10 states strong, from border to border.

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SCAN THE QR CODE TO WATCH THE ANNOUNCEMENT VIDEO FROM LEADERSHIP IDAHO LOCAL 635
WASHINGTON LOCAL 59 MONTANA LOCAL 82

TRAINING FUND

The Southwest Mountain States Carpenters Training Fund offers a bonafide apprenticeship program at the state and local level. Classes are taught – in a large selection of crafts – at our world-class training centers across the Southwest Mountain States. Apprentices are offered compliance-driven classes that give hands-on experience and solid training with safety always at the forefront. And apprentices earn while they learn. Weekend enhancement classes are also offered to Journeymen.

36,980

3,503

1,592

TOTAL APPRENTICES BY PERIOD IN 2022:

Apprentices Attended Classes

Classes Offered in 2022

Members Journeyed Out

Total - 8,434

1st
3rd
984 4th
1,180 5th
1,102 6th
951 7th
997 8th - 959 9th - 48 10th - 76
- 1,240 2nd - 897
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GOTV

Each year, one of the mainstays of SWMSRCC activism is Getting Out the Vote or GOTV. Every political cycle, members put boots on the ground to support candidates and ballot measures that in turn, support us. In 2022, our members fought hard for the representatives and legislation that will keep our members working and ensure the highest quality of life for our families.

POLITICAL

AB 2011

After much hard work on the political front, including several rallies at the state capitol and successful lobbying of state elected officials, the SWMSRCC – in solidarity with NorCal Carpenters – was able to celebrate the passage of AB 2011. This past September, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed the Assembly bill into law which is expected to create millions of new affordable housing units while also ensuring the creation of over 100,000 good union jobs on those construction projects. Executive Secretary-Treasurer Rodriguez applauded the passage of the bill. “The best part is that the workforce that builds the homes will be able to afford to live in the homes thanks to these labor standards.”

SWMSRCC stands with Governor Newsom in bringing about the necessary change to tackle California’s housing crisis head-on. AB 2011 will build middle-and-low-income homes, and will put our members to work and keep them working into the future! STRONGER THAN

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EVER

MAJOR VICTORIES

CALIFORNIA: The Southwest Mountain States Council launched a major campaign to help elect Karen Bass, Mayor of Los Angeles. Carpenters put in thousands of man-hours making calls, knocking on doors, and launched one of the largest independent expenditure campaigns in the city’s history. Mayor Bass’ first action was an executive order mandating that all affordable housing projects that use union labor will get approved by the city in 60 days or less.

ARIZONA: SWMSRCC was the first union in the state to support Katie Hobbs, who was elected governor by just 17,000 votes. Local 1912 President Fabian Sandez has been appointed to Governor Hobbs’ transition team and is working with the administration to craft Arizona’s first ever wage theft task force. Mark Kelly was elected senator by a majority of votes that the Arizona Carpenters helped to secure.

NEVADA: Carpenters were engaged in campaigns across the Silver State and helped re-elect Senator Catherine Cortez Masto. This was a critical victory that ensured pro-Carpenter candidates kept their majority in the U.S. Senate.

COLORADO: Local 555 invested heavily in campaigning down ballot for state legislative candidates. Pro-labor candidates exceeded expectations and expanded their majorities in both Houses. The Carpenters are working with members of the State Senate to pass statewide wage theft legislation which builds on legislation passed through the Denver City Council.

NEW MEXICO: Local 1319 Carpenters were actively engaged throughout Governor Grisham’s re-election campaign. It was only fitting that the governor held her final campaign rally at our Albuquerque Training Center. Governor Grisham was successfully re-elected, and her staff is now working with Carpenters Local 1319 to craft a statewide project labor agreement.

BUILDING HISTORY & BREAKING BARRIERS

THE LONG-AWAITED 6TH STREET BRIDGE WAS OFFICIALLY UNVEILED AT THE GRAND OPENING EVENT IN THE SUMMER OF 2022

More than 400 Carpenters worked on the Sixth Street Bridge over the six years of construction, including the most women on any public works project to date. That statistic alone helped catapult our Sisters into the spotlight, turning them into overnight sensations and role models for many young girls and women that watched them on the news. Various local media outlets and major newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times, covered the progress of this project and highlighted the stories of many of the Carpenters that were instrumental in reconstructing the iconic LA landmark.

The celebration of the completion of this project was unlike any other witnessed by Angelenos in recent years. Union Carpenters, including our Sisters in the Brotherhood, were a part of those honored at the ceremony. Chanel Waits was one of the guest speakers of the night emphasizing what working on the bridge meant for her and other women in the trade.

After many years, the 6th Street Bridge has reopened for business – reconnecting communities and deepening the sense of pride that many of our Carpenters have for the city they call home.

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MEMBER SPOTLIGHT DONALD ROWE

On March 20, 2018, I was involved in a motorcycle accident that resulted in substantial injuries including road rash, a shattered femur, and severe damage to my right leg. While on the ground, I called my dad, who was just a few miles ahead of me. He rushed back quickly and was there right next to me the whole time helping me. If it wasn’t for a good Samaritan who ran over right away and took my belt off and wrapped it tightly around my leg for a tourniquet, then I probably would have bled out and wouldn’t be here right now. After two hospitals and eight surgeries, I decided the only best option was amputation.

Once the doors opened and that air finally hit my face after having spent 21 days in the hospital, giant tears of gratefulness, appreciation, and respect for life ran from my eyes. My new life as an amputee had begun.

I had been out of work for about a year and a half and my disability had run out. I knew there were other options, but I ended up picking up a warehouse job. I was so fed up with the job that I called my old apprenticeship instructor, Michael “Tiny” Gaunt. I was having a hard time and needed to talk to somebody. Once we got off the phone, I went straight to the HR office and gave them my two weeks’ notice. I knew I had to get back into the Union despite my fear of failing and not knowing if I could handle it. I was jumping off a giant cliff into the deepest, darkest waters, but something inside of me pushed me and told me that there will be light and guidance for me.

Shortly after, I got picked up by a company where my brothers and dad worked for. It wasn’t my plan to work with family, but now that I look back, I’m grateful. They were not easy on me and didn’t treat me any differently because I had one leg. That job went on for about a year and soon after I ended up getting on a job doing heavy highway construction on the 10 freeway in Southern California for Lane Security Paving.

Since I’ve been back, I’ve been able to gain more knowledge, and more experience in pile driving, carpenter work, torching and welding, bridge work, walls and footings, abutments, barrier rail, drill work, confined space training, some heavy machine operating, and many other skills both physical and mental. I truly couldn’t have done this without everyone’s support – that’s been there for me and everybody I’ve crossed paths with since.

When I laid there in that hospital bed, I never thought I’d be where I’m at today, still a part of the Union with an amazing career, a loving supporting family, and a beautiful, healthy 10-month-old son. I do this for my son, for my family, for my God, for my Union, and for me.

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SCAN THE QR TO WATCH DONALD’S VIDEO

CONTRACT NEGOTIATIONS

2022 saw continued notable contract updates. Across the Southwest Mountain States, Union Carpenters saw increases in wage allocations in many crafts, including a new Master Labor Agreement for Southern California. These increases are just a sampling of the negotiations being worked on across the SWMSRCC. Negotiating better wages and benefits for our members is a priority for our Council. Here are some of the 2022 notable contract updates:

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA:

• Carpenters and Drywall MLAs - Negotiated increase of $13 over the next four years.

• San Diego Drywall - Negotiated $15 over the next four years plus a $1.50 increase in 2026 & 2027 for an additional $3.00 increase.

• San Diego Building - Negotiated a $15 increase over the next four years.

• Engineering - Negotiated a single rate for engineering work throughout Southern California based on the 8-County scale.

• Scaffold (Heavy Commercial) - Negotiated a $14.50 increase over the next four years.

• Roof Structures - Negotiated a $16 increase over the next four years.

• Tilt-up Concrete - Negotiated a $17 increase over the next four years.

SOUTHERN NEVADA:

• Negotiated five-year agreements with $7.90 in increases, Veterans Day added as a holiday, Foreman Pay +$2.50 for the Aria, Bellagio, Mandalay Bay, Mirage, New York-New York, and Park MGM properties.

• Negotiated a five-year agreement with $8.14 in increases, Veterans Day added as a holiday, Foreman Pay +$2.50 for the Excalibur property.

• Negotiated a five-year agreement with $8.04 in increases, Veterans Day added as a holiday, Foreman Pay +$2.50 for the Luxor property.

• Negotiated a four-year Primary and Secondary Trade Show Floor Agreements with $13.26 in increases.

ARIZONA:

• Negotiated a four-year Commercial Agreement with $6.70 in increases plus a wage opener and added Veterans Day as a holiday (in lieu of Presidents’ Day).

• Negotiated a four-year Heavy and Highway Agreement with $6.70 in increases plus an opener regarding wages, Veterans Day, breaks, and Sunday overtime.

UTAH:

• Negotiated a three-year Scaffold Building Agreement with $6.12 in increases.

• Negotiated a three-year Fetzers’ Mill-Cabinet Shop Agreement with $4.49 in increases.

COLORADO:

• Negotiated a three-year Building Construction Agreement with $6.05 in increases and the day after Thanksgiving added as a holiday.

• Negotiated a three-year Heavy and Highway Engineering and Utility Agreement with $6.99 in increases and the day after Thanksgiving was added as a holiday.

NEW MEXICO:

• Negotiated a five-year LANL Agreement with Newport News Nuclear BWXT Los Alamos/N3B Los Alamos. Created a blended Construction/Maintenance wage package. Added a dime to Vacation. Year 1 increase of $3.12. Year 2 increase will receive an additional 3% market adjustment on top of the 2%-4% Blended Economic Index increase. Years 3-5 receive the 2%-4% Blended Economic Index increase. Removed C/CCC from employee to employer burden. Swing and Graveyard Shifts increased to 20%. Foreman increased to 15%, General Foreman increased to 25% and, Area General Foreman classification was added at a 30% premium.

IDAHO:

• Exterior Interior Systems Agreement MOU negotiated. Reallocation of benefits and a $1.62 increase to Health & Welfare effective January 2023.

MILLWRIGHT:

•10-State Regional Agreement was negotiated creating regional consistency and overtime payment on vacation for all hours worked throughout the Southwest Mountain States.

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AT THE LOCAL LOCAL 555 LOCAL 661 LOCAL 714 LOCAL 82 LOCAL 59 LOCAL 743 LOCAL 721 LOCAL 619 LOCAL 1136 LOCAL 562 LOCAL 213
LOCAL 951 LOCAL 909 LOCAL 1977 LOCAL 1319 LOCAL 808 LOCAL 801 LOCAL 1607 LOCAL 805 LOCAL 1912 LOCAL 635 LOCAL 971 LOCAL 323

CARPENTERS IN THE NEWS

Number of Stories:

Total Advertising Value:

TOP STORIES:

156 $6,388,868

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Jared Allen Home for Wounded Warriors - CBS 2 Los Angeles
EST
on Primer Impacto
Urban Awnings Prototype Tour - Spectrum Los Angeles
Rodriguez
STRONGER THAN EVER 19 Facebook 13,684 Followers Instagram 14,973 Followers YouTube 2,373 Subscribers Twitter 2,056 Followers TikTok 2,518 Followers SCAN THE QR FOR SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS #SOUTHWESTMOUNTAINSTATESCARPENTERS WE’RE STRONGER TOGETHER! Are you on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok or Twitter? Are you following your Union? Let’s get connected! Follow, Like, Comment WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU.

SOLIDARITY DAYS EVENTS

STANDING SHOULDER TO SHOULDER IN SOLIDARITY

Relaxed COVID-19 restrictions gave Locals the opportunity to resume in-person events. Wasting no time, our Union pulled up their bootstraps and got to work planning two of the largest events our Council has seen. The Southern California and New Mexico Solidarity Day events drew thousands of Carpenters and their families to the home of labor.

In Ontario, more than 2,000 members and their families were welcomed to partake in great food, carnival games, and an interactive Build Better installation. Southwest Mountain States Carpenters enjoyed a warm afternoon enjoying great music, winning great raffle prizes, and being together after a long pandemic break.

Legendary labor leader Dolores Huerta and Governor Michelle Lujan-Grisham joined the celebrations in support of working families at the New Mexico Union Solidarity Day. Union electricians, pipefitters, painters, firefighters, and other service workers were also among those in attendance.

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA - SOLIDARITY DAY NEW MEXICO - SOLIDARITY DAY

JOURNEYMEN GRADUATIONS

CELEBRATING OUR GRADUATES

In 2022, the SWMSRCC honored Journeymen graduates at a level never seen before in Council history. After navigating more than two years of practicing social distancing and restricted gatherings, the Council was ready to come together for a celebration.

We spared no punches in recognizing our new graduates at Locals across Southern California. The celebrations welcomed friends and relatives into the SWMSRCC family to honor our graduates. EST Rodriguez attended alongside dignitaries as each graduate received his or her certificate. Horns rang, bells were rung, and pencils were symbolically thrown into the air ringing in the ascension of the Southwest Mountain States’ newest stars!

LOCAL 213/714/721/1607 LOCAL 562 LOCAL 661 LOCAL 743 LOCAL 805 LOCAL 909 LOCAL 619 LOCAL 951

CARPENTER COMBINE DAYS EVENTS

COMBINE DAYS

With an unprecedented volume of work coming to Southern California due to the new infrastructure funding and the 2028 Olympics being around the corner, Southwest Mountain States Carpenters held its first post-pandemic Carpenter Combine Day in Los Angeles and San Diego.

The events were modeled after Combine Day in the NFL where college football players perform physical and mental tests in front of NFL coaches and scouts. The SWMSRCC Carpenter Combine Day gives ready-to-work Journeymen Carpenters, apprentices, and those who have never picked up a hammer, a chance to showcase their skills in front of more than 150 hiring contractors.

The contractors evaluated attendees in an eight-station skills camp, including 4x4 carrying, scaffold assembly, drywall etching, tape measure, screw off, hammering, plywood carry, and corbel mounting.

More than 1,000 people participated in Los Angeles and 500 in San Diego. Hundreds came away with jobs by the day’s end, and many more left information with contractors to be contacted when a job becomes available.

“Carpenter Combine Day is a great opportunity for people looking to start or restart a career with good jobs, solid wages, and strong benefits,” said EST Pete Rodriguez. “And it’s a great opportunity to bring the Union to the community.”

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SCAN THE QR WATCH COMBINE DAY LA RECAP HERE

HEAVY HITTERS MEETINGS EVENTS

Heavy Hitters Meetings are one of the key critical gatherings that are back in rotation in the Southwest Mountain States. Apprentices, Journeymen, Stewards, and Foremen meet to address pressing topics and consider options to further strengthen our Union.

Members were most interested in expanding training opportunities. Many suggested offering additional layout total station, CAD, and parking structure classes to meet demand. They also expressed the importance of hosting events, like the Tournament of Champions and Solidarity Days, to foster camaraderie following a pandemic.

Fellow Carpenters can expect to see many more Heavy Hitters Meetings in the months to come. By creating a space for open dialogue and a sense of understanding, we work together to build a better and stronger Union.

STRONGER THAN EVER 24 LOCAL 951 LOCAL 801 LOCAL 562/1607 LOCAL 213/721 LOCAL 1319 LOCAL 661 LOCAL 909 LOCAL 619

ALP MEETINGS

The shutdown was not enough to stop Apprentices Leadership Program (ALP) meetings. Now that inperson meetings have resumed, Locals and training room floors have overflowed with Carpenters eager to participate and develop their skills as industry professionals.

The ALP meetings are organized to give apprentices a platform to discuss issues and situations that happen because of day-to-day operations. Through breakout sessions, apprentices think critically about ways to problem solve and improve communication on the job site. Many are reintroduced to Councilprovided resources, like the CUPP and BOSS Committees. Once equipped with these tools, ALP participants become a source of information for others on the job site.

By attending an ALP, apprentices can expect to leave with newfound knowledge and confidence as leaders in the field. The success experienced in 2022 further demonstrates how valuable these programs are for our Brothers and Sisters. The SWMSRCC will continue investing in the development of our membership to create a stronger workforce and protect the Carpenter way of life. STRONGER THAN EVER 25

LOCAL 801 LOCAL 909 LOCAL 951 LOCAL 213 LOCAL 619

LOCAL 1319 - 120 YEAR ANNIVERSARY

On December 10th, Querqueans celebrated Local 1319’s 120th anniversary. The training center was packed with over 500 Carpenters and their families. Guest speakers included President Frank Hawk and legendary labor activist Dolores Huerta.

120 years is a long time. In fact, Local 1319 is 10 years older than the state of New Mexico itself; our Carpenters literally built the state from the ground up and from the beginning, Carpenters have been integral in bolstering New Mexico’s community wealth. As part of celebrating this long history, 120 commemorative coins were minted and given to a select group of members and delegates to acknowledge their many years of service. The coins are inscribed with, “Honor the past, celebrate the present, embrace the future.” This inscription aptly sums up what the celebration was about.

Since it was that time of year, the event doubled as a holiday party and Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus made a surprise visit as well. They patiently listened to the Christmas wishes of our youngest Carpenters before taking off in their sleigh. The 120-Year Anniversary Celebration ended with a raffle and a lucky handful of our members left with early Christmas gifts of their own!

CELEBRATING 120 YEARS IN THE COMMUNITY

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STRONGER

BENEFITS

In 2022, Carpenters Southwest Administrative Corporation (CSAC) grew alongside the Southwest Mountain States Regional Council of Carpenters. CSAC received more than 280,000 inbound calls and over 2 million emails last year. To meet the increased demand, CSAC added 20 new employees, for a total of 96 staff members. With this expansion, outstanding service and support remain important priorities for CSAC as the Administrator of the Southwest Carpenters Trusts.

A LOOK AT OUR STATS IN 2022:

Health & Welfare

Over 82,000 adults and children are covered by the Active and Bronze Plans.

8,475 Enrollments processed.

$392 million paid out in benefits.

1,416 Participants accessed the ComPsych Carpenters Assistance Program for mental health assistance, financial counseling, or legal services; a 55% increase over 2021.

Pension

Almost $6 billion in plan assets at the end of the year. Over 21,000 Pensioners and Beneficiaries received benefit payments.

1,232 new Retirement Applications processed. Approximately 8,000 new Participants were added to the Plan with the merger of the Washington-Idaho-Montana Carpenters Employers Retirement Trust on December 31, 2022.

Annuity

$467 million in plan assets at the end of the year. 953 Retirement or Withdrawal Applications processed. Over 4,000 new Participants added to the Plan with the merger of the Millwright Employers Association / Millwright & Machine Erectors Money Purchase Pension Plan on June 30, 2022.

Vacation

$229 million in benefits paid in over 71,000 disbursements. On-Demand Withdrawals were made available for the first time in July 2022 through new programming in MemberXG to provide more flexibility to working Carpenters.

SCAN THE QR TO VIEW YOUR BENEFITS

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JOB SITES AROUND SWMSRCC SO CAL

COPLEY SYMPHONY HALL - SAN DIEGO ACRISURE ARENA - PALM DESERT DEL SOL HIGH SCHOOL - OXNARD INTUIT DOME - INGLEWOOD RANCHERO ROAD EXPANSION - SAN BERNARDINO IRWINDALE BREW YARD - IRWINDALE THE ALLOY - LOS ANGELES WEINGART TOWER - LOS ANGELES SAN DIEGO AIRPORT - SAN DIEGO TILT UP - INLAND EMPIRE SR-99 FREEWAY - CENTRAL VALLEY SANTA MARIA TRAINING CENTER- SANTA MARIA LAX PEOPLE MOVER - LOS ANGELES CITY OF HOPE HOSPITAL - DUARTE

NEVADA

DROPICANA/INTERSTATE 15 - LAS VEGAS RENO SPAGHETTI BOWL - RENO ELARA - LAS VEGAS NORTHEAST CAREER TECHNICAL ACADEMY - NORTH LAS VEGAS GRAND SIERRA RESORT - RENO GOLDEN TRIANGLE - LAS VEGAS PROJECT FONTAINEBLEAU - LAS VEGAS

ARIZONA

OCOTILLO WATER PLANT -CHANDLER ALIGNED PHOENIX 4 DATA CENTER - PHOENIX EMBREY AT 7TH - PHOENIX LIGHT RAIL PARKING STRUCTURE - PHOENIX PIMA COMMUNITY COLLEGE -TUCSON TRES RIOS WATER RECLAMATION FACILITY - TUCSON MESA ARTS DISTRICT LOFTS - MESA

NEW MEXICO

UTAH
UTA
PRIMARY
MYRAID
LDS TEMPLE - SYRACUSE US - 89 FREEWAY PROJECT - DAVIS COUNTY
OF NEW MEXICO
ALBUQUERQUE
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL - ALBUQUERQUE PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL - ALBUQUERQUE UTA PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE- SALT LAKE CITY
PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE- SALT LAKE CITY
CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER - LEHI
GENETICS - SALT LAKE CITY
UNIVERSITY
HOSPITAL -
UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO HOSPITAL - ALBUQUERQUE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO HOSPITAL - ALBUQUERQUE

COLORADO

IDAHO
THE CENTRAL 70 FREEWAY - DENVER FLIGHT TRAINING CENTER EXPANSION - DENVER DENVER ART MUSEUM - DENVER DENVER ART MUSEUM - DENVER HOTEL RENEGADE- BOISE LONGFELLOW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL - BOISE IDAHO YOUTH RANCH, HANDS OF PROMISE CAMPUSCALDWELL / CANYON COUNTY TOP GOLF - MERIDIAN MOUNTAIN METRO ELECTRIC BUS - COLORADO SPRINGS

WYOMING MONTANA

MICROSOFT DATA CENTER CYS17 - CHEYENNE MONTANA HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM - HELENA BILLINGS AIRPORT - BILLINGS BENEFIS HOSPITAL - HELENA

EASTERN WASHINGTON

US 395 - SPOKANE CARLA PEPERZAK MIDDLE SCHOOL - SPOKANE SACAJAWEA MIDDLE SCHOOL - SPOKANE POST STREET BRIDGE - SPOKANE NORTHERN QUEST CASINO - SPOKANE

CONTRACTOR SPOTLIGHT

A&R ROOFING

WELCOMING THE FIRST SIGNATORY ROOFING CONTRACTOR TO THE SOUTHWEST MOUNTAIN STATES

For more than thirty years, A&R Roofing has serviced homeowners in Southern California. They have always believed that every home or business is a treasured investment that deserves the sound protection of a quality roof.

After working in the non-union sector for the past thirty years, A & R Roofing was invited to attend the UBC’s International Roofing & Building Envelope Conference. While at the ITC, they were introduced to what the Union had to offer for contractors.

After several discussions with representatives and leadership from the SWMSRCC, the contract was officially signed in September 2022 making A & R Roofing the first signatory roofing contractor in the Southwest Mountain States Regional Council of Carpenters. This is great news for our residential Carpenters and for the residential industry.

With other projects on the horizon, we look forward to the many good-paying jobs this partnership will provide our fellow Carpenters and to the multitude of opportunities signatory contractor A & R Roofing will surely receive.

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SISTERS IN THE BROTHERHOOD

STRONG YEAR, EVEN STRONGER PRESENCE

The SWMSRCC sent over 50 participants to the UBC International Training Center to be a part of the 2022 SIBS Conference. The theme of this year’s conference was “Seize the Opportunity,” and our fellow Sisters did just that as they took advantage of the breakout sessions to share job leads and opportunities, discuss challenges, and network with different Councils.

SIBS CONFERENCE

3,300 union tradeswomen attended the NABTU’s Tradeswomen Build Nations Conference in Las Vegas celebrating the strength and diversity of women in the trades. The two years of pandemic-related restrictions did not stop this event from having the largest turn out to date. The event culminated in a “Stronger Together” themed march throughout the Paris Hotel and surrounding strip.

WOMEN BUILD NATIONS CONFERENCE

WOMEN’S AUXILIARY

2022 was a year of growth for our Women’s Auxiliaries as WA 1870 and WA 66 proudly received their respective charters. Charity events, backpack and toy drives, and breast cancer awareness were all initiatives that the WA’s focused on. Women’s Auxiliaries bridge our Locals with our communities through volunteer work and fundraising to raise awareness of our Union and help grow community wealth.

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS – NO ONE FIGHTS ALONE

Our Women’s Auxiliaries organized multiple events in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Over 100 women from the Southern California Women’s Auxiliaries kicked off the month by participating in the MudGirl Run in Orange County, CA. Following the MudGirl, WA’s participated in the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk in Costa Mesa, CA. In addition to these events, proceeds from Local merchandise sales were donated to help fund breast cancer research.

Women’s Auxiliary members and their families spent the summer months collecting donations and filling thousands of backpacks with school supplies for their respective backpack drives. Local elementary, middle, high school, and other community organizations were grateful to receive school supplies and other personal hygiene items that were generously provided to them by the Union. These deliveries were a direct result of our Council-wide initiative to give back to the younger members of our communities.

The Women’s Auxiliaries and Southwest Mountain States Regional Council of Carpenters would like to thank everyone that made these backpack drives a success. Whether it was helping prepare students for the upcoming school year or simply to help local families put gifts under their tree come holiday time, thank you. Your acts of compassion and generosity do not go unnoticed.

Mental health remains a top priority for our Council. We recognize that one of the biggest dangers that we face in the construction industry is mental health disorders. The BOSS Committees across the Southwest Mountain States offer our members a safe haven to discuss mental health issues openly with their Brotherhood.

Fellow Brothers, Sisters, and community partners, including Carpenter-endorsed elected officials and Hall of Fame athletes, answered the call to help break the stigma surrounding mental health. BOSS Public Service Announcements, or PSAs, were filmed with the goal of reminding others that they are not alone.

Mental Health was one of the meeting topics at every Local Union meeting in 2022. In addition to providing local mental health resources and information regarding the BOSS Committee, open forums were held where members were given a safe space to share personal experiences, address problems, and discuss different approaches to ending the shame that is associated with seeking help for mental health concerns. BOSS Committees held events at Locals throughout the Council to bring awareness to mental health and to help community organizations with blood donations and food drives.

BOSS was recently selected as the recipient of the Visionary Labor Union Award for the 2023 Construction Working Minds Summit. This award is presented to organizations that are making strides in breaking the stigma of mental health in the construction industry.

It is important to remember that alone we are strong, but together we are stronger. STRONGER THAN EVER 39

SCAN THE QR WATCH BOSS COMMITTEE PSA’S HERE BOSS BLOOD DRIVE LOCAL 661
BOSS PRESENTATION DUARTE, CA

THE CUPP ONLINE STORE IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS

Members who volunteer more than 24 hours during the year are eligible to choose gifts from the CUPP Rewards online store. The store offers a selection of high-quality, USA-made items to choose from. From coolers and fishing reels to Weber barbeques and rings, we’ve got a product in the store that’s right for you.

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A mix of post-pandemic CUPP opportunities and an active election season pushed yearly CUPP hours above the goal of 125,000 hours to 140,093 hours.

Members participated in the election season by canvassing neighborhoods, door knocking, and phone banking for Carpenter-endorsed candidates. Members supported their communities and Community Wealth by partnering with organizations to renovate a Senior Center, place flags at the graves of our fallen heroes, clean up parks and re-sod Little League fields. Members across the Southwest Mountain States continued to partner with national organizations such as Make-a-Wish Foundation, Habitat for Humanity, and the Jared Allen Home for Wounded Warriors.

2022 CUPP STATISTICS INCLUDE:

• • •

9,478 members participated in a CUPP opportunity.

5,531 opportunities were made available to our members for their participation. Our members volunteered a total of 140,093 hours within their communities on behalf of our Union.

11,448 CUPP stipends were issued for a total of $3,132,500.00.

651 members were awarded a total of $312,039.70 through the PHIB program.

YOUR VOLUNTEERISM MADE IT HAPPEN!

BECAUSE OF YOU, THE CUPP PROGRAM SURPASSED 140,000 HOURS IN 2022!
www.cupprewards.com

CAREER CONNECTIONS

The Southwest Mountain States’ Career Connections program brings cuttingedge, technical education and a pathway to a middle-class career to schools across ten states through the innovative, hands-on pre-apprenticeship program.

ARIZONA: 9 SCHOOLS

CALIFORNIA: 84 SCHOOLS

COLORADO: 2 SCHOOLS

MONTANA: 10 SCHOOLS

NEVADA: 13 SCHOOLS

NEW MEXICO: 2 SCHOOLS

UTAH: 2 SCHOOLS

EASTERN WASHINGTON: 12 SCHOOLS

WYOMING: 2 SCHOOLS

DESIGN BUILD COMPETITION

In April, the SWMSRCC sponsored the CIEF (Construction Industry Education Foundation) 37th Annual Design Build Competition held in Costa Mesa, CA. The competition had over 22 schools participate from all over Southern California, eight of which utilize the CITF’s Career Connections program. Students competed for scholarships and various awards.

Participating schools won awards for best build quality, Rookies of the Year, and Safest Crew. Paul Reese from the Career Connections program at Sultana High School was awarded a $2,000 scholarship based on his essay about why he wanted to pursue a career in construction. He became an apprentice with the SWMSTF.

12,000 STUDENTS ACROSS 136 PROGRAMS

LONG BEACH TRADES DAY EVENT

Over 400 students from 14 different SoCal schools descended on Long Beach City College’s Pacific Coast Campus for the Construction Industry Education Foundation’s Trades Day event. Southwest Mountain States Carpenters were proud to be a title sponsor for this event that introduces high school youth to career opportunities in construction, design, subcontracting, heavy equipment, engineering, and other skilled trades.

HENSEL PHELPS TOUR

Twelve Career Connections students from three schools had the opportunity to tour a Hensel Phelps job site in the city of Riverside, California. Students were able to see Union Carpenters in action and ask the site superintendent and general foreman questions on what the daily life of a Carpenter truly looks like. After this job site tour Hensel Phelps sponsored four of the students into the apprenticeship program as general carpenters performing concrete formwork at various locations.

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SWMSCAREERCONNECTIONS.ORG
STRONGER THAN EVER 42 LOCAL 619 LOCAL 1319 LOCAL 805 LOCAL 721 LOCAL 743 LOCAL 213 LOCAL 801 LABOR DAY PARADE
IN THE COMMUNITY
LOCAL 714 LOCAL 661 LOCAL 1977 LOCAL 909 LOCAL 951 LOCAL 1912 LOCAL 555 LOCAL 59

EVEN THOUGH THEY’VE HUNG UP THEIR BAGS, THEY’RE STILL UNION CARPENTERS

BILL MOORE

In 1972, Bill Moore got his start in the Carpenter’s Union with Local 1089 out of Phoenix, Arizona. During the first part of his Carpenter career, Bill was a wood framer, concrete guy, welder, and built elevator shafts and cold silos. However, it was millwork that was his passion. “I worked all over town doing fancy woodwork; every single high-rise building that went up, me and my guys did the millwork!” Moore served as an installation foreman for 29 years until he retired in 2003 at 63 after injuring his knee.

Despite, Bill’s knee injury, he continued to serve the Union in many other capacities and currently proudly serves as Local 1912 PAC Chairman. “I’ve been active in the Union for over 50 years, and it seems like I go to more meetings now than I ever did when I was swinging a hammer!”

CAROL RENZULLI

Carol Renzulli joined San Diego Carpenters Local 1296 in 1973. Her favorite job sites were in San Onofre and Diablo Canyon, where she set trailers for offices, installed lockers in temporary shower trailers, and built many tube-lock structures for refueling. She also served as a Conductor, E-Board member, Delegate, and Recording Secretary at her Local.

Carol stresses that the 70s were a different time. “I was told by many foremen that they couldn’t hire me because the guys would stop working to watch. When I did get hired, they usually sent me to work with the oldest Carpenters doing pickup.” This was a silver lining for Carol because the older (more professional) Carpenters had the knowledge and taught her all the tricks of the trade.

SCAN THE QR TO WATCH CAROL’S VIDEO

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SPOTLIGHT
RETIREE

LARRY HOWE

Larry Howe is a second-generation Carpenter who got his start in 1969 at the age of 17 at a summer job. After high school, Howe achieved a two-year degree and started a family. Carpentry was in his blood though, and he returned to the trade as an apprentice at Caltech Shockwave Lab where he poured concrete. Later, he went on to work in a variety of capacities, even working as a temporary longshoreman. However, his most memorable experiences were underwater as a Carpenter Diver.

Currently, Larry has settled into a new role. “After retiring, I joined Carpenters Local 108 which is the Retirees Club…I have been a member of the retirees for over 10 years and I’m currently president.” He stresses that all retirees are welcome and looks forward to reconnecting with old friends!

ROD JENKINS

Rod Jenkins is a third-generation Carpenter who started his journey with the Union in Los Angeles in 1972. Although most of his work was in class A commercial construction, he has worked on high rises, freeway overpasses, wood framing, metal stud framing, drywall, layout, and interior finishes. “I did or tried anything that was asked of me,” Jenkins proudly states. Two of Mr. Jenkins’ favorite projects that he worked on are: the Broadway Plaza at 7th and Flower in Los Angeles, and the Bacara Resort in Goleta, CA.

Mr. Jenkins retired from Carpentry in 2005 and became a building inspector for the University of Santa Barbara for the next 13 years. His son followed in his footsteps and is currently a fourth-generation Jenkins Carpenter, “One thing I am very proud of is my son, Brent, who started in the Carpenters Union in 2003, worked his way up to being a Union representative at local 1800 and is now the Program Director for the Carpenters International Training Center in Las Vegas, Nevada!”

STRONGER THAN EVER 45

STRONGER THAN EVER 46

CONTACT

Facebook @SWMSCarpenters

SOUTHWEST MOUNTAIN STATES REGIONAL COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS

Executive Secretary-Treasurer / CEO

Pete Rodriguez

President

Frank Hawk

Instagram @SWMSCarpenters

YouTube @SWMSCarpenters

Vice President

Sean Hartranft

Twitter @SWMSCarpenters

TikTok @SWMSCarpenters

Regional Manager Eastern Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming

Antonio Acosta

Regional Manager Whittier

Oscar Cordova

Regional Manager Colorado, Nevada and Utah

Mike Hawk

Regional Manager San Diego

Doug Hicks

Regional Manager Southern California Interior Systems

Jacob Lopez

Regional Manager Kern County, North Los Angeles and Gold Coast

Josh Raper

Regional Manager Arizona and New Mexico

Fabian Sandez

Regional Manager South Los Angeles

Frank Zambrano

Council Office 533 South Fremont Ave. 10th Floor Los Angeles, CA 90071 213-385-1457

swmscarpenters.org

EVERY CARPENTER HAS A JOURNEY . . . We want to know more about what made you join the Union! Submit your story at Comms@swmscarpenters.org for a chance to be featured in our upcoming campaigns.
STRONGER THAN EVER 47

Procedures for Objecting Nonmembers to File with the Union Objections to The Expenditure of Dues for Purposes Not Germane to Collective Bargaining

Union membership is an asset of great value to working people. Union membership alone provides workers with a measure of control over their wages, hours, benefits, and working conditions. Under Section 8(a)(3) of the National Labor Relations Act, 29 U.S.C. 158(a)(3), employers and unions have the right (except in so-called right-to-work states) to enter into agreements requiring that workers, as a condition of employment, join and maintain their membership in the union. This law and policy is consistent with the democratic principle of majority rule, and it ensures that everyone who benefits from union representation shares in the cost of providing that benefit. Consistent with this principle and the law, many collective bargaining agreements between employers and UBC Local Unions and Councils (“affiliates”) of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America (“UBC”) require as a condition of employment that workers enjoying the benefits of these agreements join the union and remain members in good standing. Over the years, however, the National Labor Relations Board and the courts have, to some degree, undermined union security by holding that these clauses can be enforced against workers who refuse to join the union or resign from it only to the extent of requiring “financial core” membership, that is, the payment of union initiation fees and periodic dues. Workers cannot lawfully be required to actually join a union as a condition of employment. But, again, they can be required to pay the union an amount equal to the dues and fees uniformly required of union members. These rulings clearly contradict the plain language of the statute, which specifically states that an employer can lawfully make an agreement with a union “to require as a condition of employment membership” in the union. Nevertheless, unless and until these legal interpretations are changed, the UBC will follow the prevailing law and enforce union security provisions in a manner consistent with the statute and applicable court decisions. Recently, backward-looking court decisions have further narrowed workers’ union security rights, holding that “financial core” nonmembers can file with the union an objection to paying for union activities that are not “germane” to collective bargaining in order to obtain a rebate of that portion of their dues, which is determined to have been expended for nongermane purposes. Like most unions, the UBC spends a great amount of its funds on activities that even the courts agree are directly related to collective bargaining. In addition, the UBC expends some funds for other activities, including organizing, legislative activity, publications, etc. All of these activities help to strengthen our union and thereby create a more favorable position for labor in the collective bargaining process. In that sense, every one of these activities advances our union’s fundamental mission—workers joining together to better their lives. However, backward-looking court decisions have taken an extremely narrow view of the role of the trade union movement, ruling that certain such activities are not “germane” to the labor organization’s function as the legally recognized representative of workers in collective bargaining. “Financial core” membership carries with it very high costs—the loss of all of the benefits, rights, and privileges that workers would otherwise be entitled to as union members. These include

(1) the right to receive union funeral benefits; (2) the right to vote on whether a strike will be called against their employer; (3) the right to vote on the rate of dues they are required to pay; (4) the right to vote on the ratification of collective bargaining agreements that determine their wages, hours, and working conditions; (5) the right to vote in the election of the union officers and stewards who represent them; (6) the right to attend, speak, and vote at union meetings, where union policies that directly affect their jobs are determined; and (7) the right to a transfer card, so that they are not required to pay a new initiation fee if they go to work in a different collective bargaining unit, which frequently happens when a worker changes jobs. In short, these nonmember workers lose very important rights, benefits, and privileges, including the right to meaningful involvement in setting the terms and conditions of their employment—a voice and a vote in union governance—thereby allowing others to unilaterally make decisions affecting them, their families, and their livelihoods. It is illegal for an employer to compensate a nonmember worker in any way for the loss of these valuable union rights and benefits. As for the union, it is required by law to represent nonmembers in the same way that it represents members. While the union will meet this requirement of law, it will not do anything for nonmembers that is not absolutely required by law. Objecting nonmembers who choose to file with the union objections to the expenditure of dues for purposes not germane to collective bargaining must comply with the following procedures:

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SECTION 1: Workers who are covered by a union security agreement, who meet their union security obligation by paying all dues and fees but who choose or who have chosen not to become members of the union, or who have resigned from the union (hereafter

“nonmembers”), may file objections to expenditures of dues for activities not germane to collective bargaining. Such workers filing objections in accordance with procedures set forth herein shall be entitled to receive an appropriate reduction of their dues or fees.

SECTION 2: Nonmembers who wish to file an objection shall do so annually by notifying in writing the General Secretary-Treasurer of the UBC at 101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001, of their objections. For those who have previously filed, the annual notice of objection must be received at the above address between April 1 and April 30 of the current year. The objection must include the objector’s social security number, a statement of the nature of the objection, and the objector’s current home address, and it must identify the objector’s UBC affiliate. Provided, however, that the UBC will honor nonmember employees’ express, written statement to the UBC that they object on a continuing basis to supporting union activities not related to collective bargaining and contract administration. The nonmember objector is obligated to inform the General Secretary-Treasurer of any change in address. Upon receipt of a proper objection as described above, the UBC shall send the objector a letter of acknowledgment and notify the objector’s UBC affiliate that an objection has been filed. Those individuals who, for the first time, regardless of when it occurs during the year, choose to resign their union membership, or who refuse to join the union and who wish to file an objection, must send their objection to the General Secretary-Treasurer no later than 30 days from the date of thei rresignation or refusal, as otherwise specified above.

SECTION 3: Nonmember objectors shall be charged for all activities germane to collective bargaining, including all union expenditures for activities or projects normally or reasonably undertaken by the union to advance the employment-related interests of those it represents in collective bargaining. Such nonmember objectors shall not be charged for those expenditures that are not germane to collective bargaining. The term “germane” shall be given the most expansive scope allowed by law.

SECTION 4: The General Secretary-Treasurer shall review the UBC’s audited records and determine the amounts of expenditures incurred in the prior fiscal year that are chargeable and nonchargeable to the objector, that is, those that are germane to collective bargaining and those that are nongermane. The General Secretary-Treasurer shall allocate union expenses into major categories and shall designate those expenses as either germane or nongermane. The objector’s UBC affiliate shall be responsible for reviewing its audited financial records to determine germane and nongermane expenses in general accordance with the principles and procedures specified herein. These UBC affiliates are independent of the UBC and are solely responsible for complying with the procedure specified in this Notice as respects their own expenditures and implementing reductions communicated to them by the UBC and other affiliates. In this regard the UBC bears no responsibility or liability for the actions or inactions of its affiliates.

SECTION 5: The UBC’s and the affiliate’s review described in Section 4 shall be completed no later than July 31 of the year following the year in which the expenditures were made. As soon thereafter as practicable, a description of chargeable and nonchargeable expenditures shall be mailed to each nonmember who has filed a timely and proper objection under this procedure. The appropriate UBC affiliate shall mail the nonmember objector and the General Secretary Treasurer its description of chargeable and nonchargeable expenditures.

SECTION 6: The amount to be paid by the nonmember objector shall be calculated based upon the percentage of chargeable and nonchargeable expenditures indicated in the review. For the review completed in 2021, the UBC’s chargeable expenses were 68.03% of its total expenditures. Thus, the per capita tax for the objecting nonmember paid by the affiliate to the UBC shall be reduced by that amount. For 2021, the Southwest Regional Council of Carpenters chargeable expenses were 82.26% of its total expenditures. Thus, the objecting nonmember’s dues shall be reduced accordingly. The most current available audit report shall be used by both the UBC and the UBC affiliate to determine the amount to be paid by the nonmember objector. When more current audit reports and reviews become available, the amount to be paid by the objector shall be adjusted accordingly. Any subsequent adjustment in favor of the objector will be sent to the objector as soon as is practicable.

SECTION 7: Nonmembers filing a proper and timely notice of objection pursuant to Section 2 shall receive a dues reduction in the amount calculated under Section 6 above beginning within sixty (60) days of the receipt of their objection. They shall also receive a dues rebate in the percentage amount of their dues reduction back to the date of their objection.

SECTION 8: Nonmembers filing a proper and timely notice of objection pursuant to Section 2 herein may challenge the calculation of chargeable and nonchargeable expenditures by filing a challenge with the General Secretary-Treasurer of the UBC, at the address indicated above. Such challenge must be in writing and must be sent to the UBC within thirty (30) days from the date of mailing of the description of chargeable and nonchargeable expenditures as set forth in Section 5. Failure to comply with this procedure will render any purported challenge invalid.

SECTION 9: The arbitration procedure which follows is not mandatory. Nonmembers may pursue their rights under all other available legal procedures. Upon receipt of a proper and timely challenge, the General Secretary-Treasurer shall refer same to the American Arbitration Association (AAA) for determination under the AAA’s Rules for Impartial Determination of Union Fees. Challenges may be consolidated by the General Secretary-Treasurer for determination by the AAA as appropriate. The General Secretary-Treasurer shall have the authority to informally resolve challenges in the best interests of the UBC. The arbitrator shall have jurisdiction over all procedural matters affecting the arbitration. A court reporter shall make a transcript of all proceedings before the arbitrator at the expense of the UBC. The transcript shall be the official record of the proceeding and may be purchased by the challenger or otherwise made available for inspection as required by the arbitrator. Fees and costs charged or associated with a party’s representative shall be borne by that party.

SECTION 10: At the arbitration the union shall have the burden of establishing that the reduced dues amount being charged to objecting nonmembers is lawful. In determining the correct amount of the dues reduction, the arbitrator shall give full consideration to the legal requirements limiting the amount the objector may be charged and shall set forth the legal and arithmetical basis of such determination in the written decision. The order and decision of the arbitrator shall be final and binding on all parties.

SECTION 11: The UBC shall establish an escrow account containing the portion of dues paid by non members filing challenges pursuant to Section 8 herein which reasonably may be in dispute in arbitration. Upon receipt of the arbitration award, the escrow fund shall be distributed in accordance with the arbitrator’s decision.

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