Issuu on Google+

   

 

 

           

SwedSec's Licensing Programme Syllabus  and Proficiency Requirements  Version 14   1 January 2009 

           

       

 

 

1


Table of contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 4  Background to proficiency requirements .............................................................................. 4  Purpose, target group and basis of proficiency requirements .............................................. 4  Scope and relevance of knowledge and minimum requirements ......................................... 5  Proficiency requirements in operation .................................................................................. 5  Proficiency requirements in brief .......................................................................................... 6  Amendments or additions to proficiency requirements ....................................................... 6  Formulation of proficiency requirements ............................................................................. 6  Setting of examination questions based on proficiency requirements ................................ 7  Cognitive levels ...................................................................................................................... 7  Section 1 – Financial instruments ................................................................................................. 9  Types of saving, financial instruments and asset management ............................................ 9  Derivatives and stock loans ................................................................................................. 11  Insurance and pension savings and insurance broking ....................................................... 11  Risks, risk management, return and risk‐adjusted return ................................................... 12  Alternative investment strategies ....................................................................................... 13  Tax issues ............................................................................................................................. 13  Section 2 – Trading and administration ...................................................................................... 14  Share issue management ..................................................................................................... 14  Account management, clearing and settlement ................................................................. 15  Securities information and prospectuses ............................................................................ 15  Depository management and subsequent transaction reporting ....................................... 16  Trading in financial instruments .......................................................................................... 16  Stock exchange and marketplace activities ......................................................................... 17  Section 3 ‐ Financial economics .................................................................................................. 19  Economic concepts .............................................................................................................. 19  Basic conditions of capital markets ..................................................................................... 20  The time value of capital and the “price of capital” ............................................................ 20   

2


Financial statistics ................................................................................................................ 20  Basic valuation of stock, bonds and derivative instruments ............................................... 21  Concepts of risk and return ................................................................................................. 21  Definition of market index ................................................................................................... 22  Basic portfolio and capital market theories ......................................................................... 22  Effects of national and international diversification ........................................................... 23  Effective portfolios ............................................................................................................... 23  Evaluation of portfolios and funds ...................................................................................... 24  Behavioural finance ............................................................................................................. 24  Section 4 ‐ Ethics and standards ................................................................................................. 26  Ethics and morals ................................................................................................................. 26  Standard setting in the securities market ............................................................................ 27  Conflicts of interest etc. ....................................................................................................... 28  Bribery and corruption ......................................................................................................... 30  Money laundering and terrorist financing ........................................................................... 30  Market abuse ....................................................................................................................... 31  Reporting obligation and keeping a logbook ....................................................................... 32  Basic client protection rules ................................................................................................ 33  Section 5 – Rules and regulations in the securities market ........................................................ 35  Securities business ............................................................................................................... 35  Investment Funds Act .......................................................................................................... 36  Flagging, bid and compulsory redemption .......................................................................... 36  Complaint management ...................................................................................................... 37  Agreements .......................................................................................................................... 37  Basic rules on pledging ........................................................................................................ 38  Questions concerning civil law and family law .................................................................... 38  Company law – Corporate law ............................................................................................. 41  Deposit guarantee and investor protection ........................................................................ 41 

 

3


Introduction  Background to proficiency requirements  SwedSec’s purpose – by licensing employees in the Swedish securities market – is to create  and maintain public confidence in the securities sector. A prerequisite for such confidence is  that staff working in the sector have adequate knowledge and competence to carry out  their duties. The licensing requirement covers various categories of employees with various  functions and roles in firms affiliated to SwedSec. With regard to maintaining public  confidence in the sector, staff providing skilled financial advice to clients or managing  clients’ financial instruments have a unique position. Such staff have been given  considerable trust and responsibility by the client and their advice or management has a  direct impact on clients’ financial situation. They also have direct contact with clients and  are therefore often the institution’s – and indirectly the sector’s – face towards the client.  

Purpose, target group and basis of proficiency requirements  This document sets out to define the knowledge required by a SwedSec licence holder.  Apart from staff providing skilled financial advice to clients or managing clients’ financial  instruments, a number of other categories of employees are covered by the licensing  requirement. These include compliance officers for Swedish securities business and  employees with responsibility for trading on behalf of clients, trading on own account, back  office, asset management, stock analysis and corporate finance. (The regulations on who is  covered by the licensing requirement are to be found in Chapter 2 of SwedSec’s Licensing  Rules and Regulations.)    In the previous section, it was mentioned that staff providing skilled financial advice to  clients or managing clients’ financial instruments have a unique position with regard to  maintaining public confidence in the sector. Accordingly, the proficiency requirements have  primarily been determined on the basis of the knowledge that should be required of these  professional categories. 

 

4


Scope and relevance of knowledge and minimum requirements  It is possible that different employees – depending on their function and professional role –  within the target group may have different ideas about which parts of the proficiency  requirements are most relevant and important. However, the proficiency requirements  constitute a basic level of knowledge, which all licence holders in the above target group  must have, irrespective of function and role. This does not, of course, preclude that an  employee’s function and role may mean that the employee needs deeper and/or further  knowledge over and above that covered by these proficiency requirements.    Consequently, equally high formal requirements are made on all licence holders in all  sections. Examinees must achieve at least 50 per cent correct answers in each section. In  addition to a minimum 50 per cent in each section, the examinee must achieve an overall  score of 70 per cent correct answers in the examination. These minimum requirements  together mean that an examinee who is very competent in one or more sections and  consequently achieves a high overall score in the examination can to some extent  compensate for deficiencies in other sections. Consequently, the examination’s  requirements take account of the fact that all examinees are not, and are thus neither  required to be, specialists in all five sections. 

Proficiency requirements in operation  These requirements are divided into sections (subject areas), subsections, and checkpoints.  A checkpoint specifies what a licence holder is expected to master within a given, relatively  small field of knowledge. Every single item in a candidate's examination paper is thus  directly linked to such a checkpoint in this document.    The proficiency requirements are intended to function as a support when developing a  relevant syllabus and also to serve as a basis when setting exam questions. In addition, they  are designed to give an overview of what is expected of a licence holder. It is the task and  responsibility of professional training providers to accurately interpret the proficiency  requirements and work out a detailed training programme based on this interpretation.   

5


Proficiency requirements in brief   A licensed financial advisor possesses documented proficiency in existing types of financial  instruments, their most important features, characteristics, and risks. A licence holder is also  familiar with the framework within which financial instruments are registered, managed and  sold as well as the legal regime governing these instruments. He or she is also familiar with  the institutional framework within which, for instance, stock exchanges and clearing  organisations work. Finally, a licence holder has a relevant knowledge of the existing rules of  professional conduct and soundness that apply to the securities market. 

Amendments or additions to proficiency requirements  Minor adjustments, e.g. changes in the text, will be found at regular intervals on SwedSec's  website (www.swedsec.se). Major changes, for instance a change in the position of  checkpoints between sections (subsections), will, however, take place on a biannual basis (1  January and 1 July). Amendments or additions to the proficiency requirements shall be  made on SwedSec's website directly after such a decision has been made. It is the  responsibility of each and every professional training provider to be constantly aware of the  latest version. 

Formulation of proficiency requirements  The proficiency requirements are, as previously stated, divided into sections (subject areas),  subsections and checkpoints. The five sections included are:  1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Financial instruments  Administration of financial instruments  Financial economics  Ethics and standards   Rules and regulations in the securities market 

  For each tabular checkpoint there is, under a separate heading, a specially defined Cognitive  level. The meaning of this term is explained in more detail under the heading Cognitive  levels.  

 

6


Setting of examination questions based on proficiency requirements  An examination paper consists of 20 standardised questions from each section. The examination thus comprises a total of 100 standard questions. All standard questions have been subject to a thorough quality check with regard to fact, quality, and language. In addition, all questions have been trialled and analysed using statistical methods. This is done by including five as yet not approved questions from each section, the answers to which will not have an effect on the final result. The candidates' answers to these five questions will therefore not be included in the final score, but will be stored for statistical analysis. The examinees are not in a position to form an opinion on which questions are standard and which are being trialled. The candidate thus answers 125 questions in total, of which 100 will decide the outcome.

To pass the licensing examination a candidate is required to have an overall score of at least 70% correct answers and at least 50% correct answers in each section. A candidate who has failed part of the examination may be re-examined on that section provided his or her overall score is at least 70%.

Cognitive levels  The cognitive levels have been taken from Bloom's taxonomy (1956). The levels are  designed to define the degree of complexity of various questions with reference to a certain  checkpoint.  Level:

Definition:

Recall (R)

A candidate is required to be aware of and remember concepts, definitions, and facts.

Comprehension (C)

A candidate is required to understand and be able to explain various connections and contexts.

Application (P)

A candidate is required to be able to use, for instance, formulae, rules, laws/acts, and methods.

Analysis (A)

A candidate is required to be able to interpret, assess, relate to and draw conclusions from the knowledge available to him or her.

  For each checkpoint there is, on the far right, an “x” defining the cognitive level(s) an  examinee must achieve. The first letter of these defined levels is used to refer to each   

7


specific level, thus R, C, P, or A. The cognitive levels are interrelated and closely connected.  If, for instance, a checkpoint refers to the cognitive level of Application, there will be an “x”  under Recall, Comprehension, and Application. It is thus assumed that if a candidate can  apply a certain piece of knowledge, he or she should also be able to understand it and be  aware of it. Detailed information about the cognitive levels is to be found on the website  http://www.swedsec.se/kognitiva‐nivaer. 

 

8


Section 1 – Financial instruments  Section 1 deals with a knowledge of various types of saving, financial instruments and asset  management in a broad perspective. A licence holder should possess and use this  knowledge as a frame of reference when dealing with clients. In practice, this means a  knowledge of concepts and definitions and a basic knowledge of various financial  instruments, how they work and how they relate to the securities market. In addition to a  factual knowledge, a licence holder is, in certain core areas, also required to have an  understanding of savings products as well as the ability to apply his or her knowledge of  risk‐adjusted return.    Since several of the subsections are interrelated, it is beneficial if study and the acquisition  of knowledge can take place in logical order. These subsections are listed in the table below.  In order to facilitate a candidate's acquisition of the relevant knowledge, the main features  and the subsections that a licence holder must be familiar with are also stated here in more  detail. 

Types of saving, financial instruments and asset management  This subsection deals with a knowledge of various financial instruments, types of saving and  asset management. The licence holder must be able to define the various securities on the  market, be familiar with the workings of different instruments and how they are likely to  affect a client's portfolio. A licence holder is also required to have a working knowledge of  the stock market and understand how different management methods affect the client’s  return.    Moreover, the licence holder should be familiar with how mutual funds are protected in  connection with the bankruptcy of the fund manager or custodian, i.e. that fund assets are  separated from the fund manager and are never involved in the fund manager’s bankruptcy. 

 

9


The licence holder should also be familiar with how mutual funds differ in this respect from  other types of saving, such as bonds and pension funds.    The licence holder should further be familiar with the various types of fund that have been  launched on the market recently, such as exchange‐traded funds (ETFs), 130/30 funds and  Socially Responsible Investment funds. The licence holder should also be familiar with how  they function in different client situations and the risks associated with the various types of  fund, and understand when it may be appropriate for an investor to choose such funds  relative to the risk level that the fund involves.    Further, the licence holder should be familiar with various types of structured products and  derivatives and also be familiar with the differences between various types of exposure,  such as certificates, swaps, CDOs, futures etc. The licence holder should moreover be  familiar with the counterparty risk associated with the respective instrument and  understand the caution required in dealing with this risk.  Cognitive level R

C

Bank savings

X

Stocks

X

X

Swedish and foreign depository receipts

X

X

Share index bonds

X

X

Other structured products (certificates etc.)

X

X

Convertible debentures

X

X

Bonds and other interest-bearing instruments

X

X

General knowledge of fund saving and different types of fund relative to investment strategies

X

X

Mutual funds

X

X

Other funds (fixed income funds, mixed funds, hedge funds etc.)

X

X

Some other types of asset management

X

X

P

A

 

 

10


Derivatives and stock loans  This subsection deals with a knowledge of various derivatives and their workings. A licence  holder should also know when a client can issue options, the requirements that are imposed  by a clearing centre and the agreements that should apply. Stock loans and short selling will  also be covered in this subsection.  Cognitive level R

C

Stock options

X

X

Warrants

X

X

Index options

X

X

Futures, forwards and similar instruments

X

X

Stock loans and short selling

X

X

P

A

Insurance and pension savings and insurance broking   Pension savings have become an increasingly common part of household savings. This  subsection deals with different types of pensions, e.g. Premium Pension Savings (PPM),  Pension insurance (traditional), Mutual fund insurance (Unit Linked), Individual Pension  Savings (IPS), and Endowment insurance. A licence holder is required to be familiar with the  differences between the various types of pensions and how they affect a client's savings not  only in the short term but also in the long term. Various forms of protection for surviving  dependants of pensioners and their taxation are also covered.    The insurance broker must have the knowledge and competence for his or her duties.  Further provisions on competence requirements are to be found in the Swedish Financial  Supervisory Authority’s regulations and general guidance on insurance broking (FFFS  2005:11). Many of the areas of knowledge that the employee should master in accordance  with the above regulations are dealt with in other subsections of the licensing examination.  This subsection deals with some issues with a specific link to the insurance sector.        

11


Cognitive level R

C

Premium Pension Savings (PPM)

X

X

Pension insurance (traditional)

X

X

Mutual fund insurance (Unit Linked)

X

X

Individual Pension Savings (IPS)

X

X

Endowment insurance

X

X

Insurance broking and good practice

X

X

Statutes on insurance broking and insurance business, and insurance law

X

X

P

A

Risks, risk management, return and risk‐adjusted return  Risks can be defined in a number of different ways. This subsection deals with credit and  counterparty risks, company and market risks (e.g. interest, currency and exchange rate  risk). Furthermore, liquidity and operational risks are described. A licence holder is required  to know the implications of different risks and how they could affect a client's investments.  Since risk can be defined in different ways, risk‐adjusted return can also be illustrated using  different risk measures. This is an important area of knowledge for the licence holder’s  client relations.  Cognitive level R

C

Credit and counterparty risks

X

X

Market risks (interest, currency and exchange rate risks)

X

X

Liquidity risks

X

X

Operational risks

X

X

Risk definitions (total risk, market risk)

X

X

Yield and capital growth

X

X

Return relative to risk

X

X

X

Sharpe ratio, Information ratio and Jensen’s alpha as evaluation measures

X

X

X

Interpretation of risk-adjusted return

X

X

X

 

P

A

12


Alternative investment strategies  On the capital market, there are products which, as far as returns are concerned, present a  somewhat different pattern from those of other, everyday products. Here we find, for  instance, unlisted stock, real property, metals or hedge funds. For an investor, and  particularly when investing in a portfolio, the inclusion of such products can dramatically  change the portfolio's return and risk characteristics. It is important for a licence holder to  be familiar with the return and risk characteristics of these investments.  Cognitive level R

C

Purpose of alternative investment strategies (AIS)

X

X

AIS, evaluation of

X

X

P

A

Tax issues  This subsection deals with a knowledge of the tax effects with reference to market  quotations. A licence holder should moreover be familiar with the rules governing taxation  of foreign stock. He or she should also be familiar with the most important parts of capital  gains taxation. A licence holder should also be aware of which services are VATable and  which are non‐VATable. This section also deals with taxation rules with a direct bearing on  various types of saving. Finally, this section deals with personal finance issues with special  reference to existing tax legislation.  Cognitive level R Taxation of Swedish shares and funds Taxation of foreign shares and funds Capital taxation Capital gains taxation VAT issues etc. Personal finances with reference to tax system

 

C

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

P

A

13


Section 2 – Trading and administration   Section 2 deals with a knowledge of the trading and the administration of financial  instruments in a broad perspective. A licence holder should possess and use this knowledge  as a frame of reference when dealing with clients. In practice, this means a knowledge of  concepts and definitions, and a basic knowledge of the trading and the administration of  financial instruments, how they work and how they relate to the securities market. In  addition to a factual knowledge, a licence holder is, in most subject areas, also required to  have an understanding of the whole chain from trading to the administration of financial  instruments as well as the ability to apply the regulations under one particular checkpoint. 

Share issue management  This subsection deals with the question of when a general meeting of shareholders or board  can decide on a share issue. The licence holder should also understand the difference  between a new share issue and a bonus issue, a split and a reverse split, and how these  measures affect the number of shares, the share capital, the share price and the value of  the holding. Further, the licence holder should have an understanding of the rules for  participating in a new share issue. Finally, the licence holder should have an understanding  of the different roles and responsibilities of an advisor, an issuing institution and an account  management institution in connection with an issue. Cognitive level R

C

General meeting’s and board’s roles in connection with an issue etc.

X

Difference between various types of issue, new share issue and bonus issue, split and reverse split, redemption, dividends.

X

X

Notice and subscription procedures in connection with an issue

X

X

Various roles of a securities institution in connection with an issue

X

X

 

P A

14


Account management, clearing and settlement  This subsection includes a knowledge of existing Swedish clearing organisations: OMX  Derivatives Markets (Stockholmsbörsen) and Euroclear Sweden (VPC). The Financial  Instruments Registration Act (LKF) forms the basis for VPC’s right to register securities. The  licence holder should have a knowledge of the basic rules governing account management  and register management. A basic knowledge of the requirements for becoming an account  managing institution or clearing organisation is also included. The legal consequences of  account management are governed by LKF and the licence holder should have a working  knowledge of, for example, acquisition registration. In addition, operations are governed by  the Securities Markets Act and the Companies Act. Further, the licence holder must have a  knowledge of the various Euroclear Sweden (VPC) systems and the most common types of  securities accounts. Finally, this subsection covers trade booking and liquidity management.  Cognitive level R

C

Brief overview of Swedish clearing organisations and the criteria for their operations

X

Administration of financial instruments which are dematerialised documents.

X

X

Basic regulations for account management and register management

X

X

Account managing institutions, clearing organisations

X

Legal consequences of account management

X

X

Securities accounts and the securities system

X

X

Trade booking

X

Liquidity management and payments

X

P

A

X

Securities information and prospectuses  The Securities Markets Act contains rules on information provision by listed companies. This  subsection includes a knowledge of how and when price‐sensitive information and financial  information must be published and reported respectively.   

 

15


This subsection also includes a knowledge of the most common information systems on the  market. Further, the licence holder must know where he or she can find information on  issuers and on various instruments. This may, for example, be a question of finding the  terms and conditions for an issue or the size of a company dividend.     The Financial Instruments Trading Act contains regulations on prospectuses. A licence  holder should be familiar with these regulations.  Cognitive level R Information duty of listed companies

X

Information on issuers and instruments

X

Overview of rules and regulations regarding prospectuses

X

C

P

A

X

Depository management and subsequent transaction reporting  There may be both business and administrative reasons for using a depository. Certain types  of securities transactions call for a client to use a depository. A licence holder must know to  which transactions these rules apply. A licence holder must furthermore be familiar with the  difference between a securities account and a depository. This section also deals with the  duties of a trustee when handling, for example, voting list registration and monitoring  securities transactions on the market. Finally, this section deals with the reporting of  transactions and the rules governing the issuance of transaction notes.  Cognitive level R

C

Depository management in practice

X

X

Duties of trustees

X

X

Reporting transactions

X

X

Notices, transaction notes etc.

X

X

P

A

Trading in financial instruments  This subsection includes a basic knowledge of the trading rules for Swedish stock exchange  members and their reporting obligation to Nasdaq OMX Stockholm (Stockholmsbörsen) and 

 

16


other Swedish marketplaces. The licence holder should have a knowledge of how  commission transactions and counterparty trading function.    A licence holder should understand what the rules on best order execution involve for  various markets, investment services and client categories. Moreover, he or she must  understand what the rules on client order management involve with regard to time order,  aggregation and allocation.    Trading in financial instruments is governed by the regulations contained in the Securities  Markets Act and the Financial Instruments Trading Act as well as the Swedish Financial  Supervisory Authority’s regulations. Moreover, there is self‐regulation through the Swedish  Securities Dealers Association’s guidelines for handling transactions relating to shares and  share‐related financial instruments. Stock exchange members trading on Nasdaq OMX  Stockholm or any of the NOREX exchanges are moreover obliged to comply with the NOREX  member rules. The licence holder should be aware of the existence of these agreements and  the fact that they contain important, civil law‐based rules of conduct for market  participants.  Cognitive level R

C

Trading rules and reporting

X

Delivery rules

X

Commission transactions, trading on own account and counterparty trading

X

X

Best order execution

X

X

Order management in general

X

X

Market participants and their relationship to the market

X

P

A

X

 

Stock exchange and marketplace activities  This subsection deals with Swedish stock exchanges and marketplaces, i.e. both regulated  markets and Multilateral Trading Facility (MTF) platforms. The largest foreign exchanges and   

17


marketplaces are also included. The criteria for stock exchange activities and a basic  knowledge of the relationship of issuers to Nasdaq OMX Stockholm (Stockholmsbörsen) and  other Swedish marketplaces are also covered in this subsection.    The licence holder should be familiar with the definition of an MTF platform, who can start  and operate such a platform, and who grants a licence for such a platform. He or she should  also be familiar with the differences between a regulated market and an MTF platform, and  what is required in order that a security can be traded on an MTF platform. Moreover, the  licence holder should be familiar with the largest new MTF platforms on which Nordic and  European securities will be traded.    The licence holder should also have a knowledge of the most common trading and business  systems on the Swedish and international markets.  Cognitive level R Swedish exchanges and some important foreign exchanges

X

Issuers and their relationship to the marketplace

X

MTF platforms (First North, Chi-X, Turquoise, Burgundy, Nasdaq OMX Europe etc.)

X

Other marketplaces

X

The most common trading and business systems

X

International trading and communication systems

X

C

P

A

X

 

 

18


Section 3 ‐ Financial economics  Section 3 deals with a knowledge of financial economics. A licence holder is required to have  an adequate basic knowledge of the subject area, in order to be able to use this knowledge  as a frame of reference when dealing with clients. In practice, this means that familiarity  with various concepts and definitions as well as a basic knowledge of the valuation of  financial products are important areas, which need to be mastered to some extent.    At first sight, some of the subsections in this section seem to lack a common denominator.  However, there is a common central theme, namely the concepts of return and risk and  their mutual interrelationship. Since several of the subsections are interrelated, it is  beneficial if study and the acquisition of knowledge can take place in logical order. 

Economic concepts  The licence holder should have some understanding of how the macroeconomy, i.e. the  national economy, affects the microeconomy, i.e. the individual client’s finances, and how  this interconnection by extension affects the advisory situation.    Further, a licence holder should be familiar with various central macroeconomic concepts  and definitions, such as gross national product, current account balance, demand and  supply, and monetary policy and fiscal policy, but should also understand how these affect  the advice provided to a client.    The licence holder should also understand how economic policy measures can be  coordinated in a country or in an alliance of several countries, where a specific view of  economic activity is prevalent. The licence holder should also understand how this  coordination has direct effects on capital markets. The licence holder should also be familiar  with these joint bodies (IMF, OECD, ECB etc.) as well as their overall purpose.     

19


Cognitive level R

C

Basic concepts

X

X

Monetary and exchange rate policy

X

X

Fiscal policy

X

X

P

A

Basic conditions of capital markets  One important condition that must be fulfilled if financial markets are to be effective is that  the overall method of pricing underlying financial assets should reflect accurately such  information as has an effect on prices and the lack of arbitrage opportunities.  Cognitive level R Functions of the capital market

X

Effects of arbitrage options, perfect markets

X

Expected or actual return

X

C

P

A

The time value of capital and the “price of capital”  The most important function of the capital market is to act as an intermediary between  those with a deficit and those with a surplus of capital. Fundamentally, it is thus a matter of  “moving” capital forward or backward in time. It is important to understand the factor that  influences valuation, i.e. the interest rate, and how it is formulated. Furthermore, it is  important to be familiar with concepts such as effective rate, nominal rate, and real  interest.  Cognitive level R

C

P

Present value and terminal value

X

X

X

Simple and effective interest

X

X

X

Nominal and real rate of interest (return)

X

X

X

A

Financial statistics  On the capital market, investment risks are usually defined in terms of variations in  investment value. If two investments have the same expected return but different risks, the   

20


investment involving the lower risk is preferred. This applies to separate investments. This  interpretation changes when risk and result characteristics refer to portfolio investment  since portfolio co‐variation with other investments affects the risk level of the entire  portfolio. According to the capital market theory, there is a linear relationship between  expected return and risk. It is therefore important that a licence holder should be familiar  with recourse analysis, and also with the interpretation of the above interrelationship.  Cognitive level R

C

P

Ratios (arithmetic and geometric mean)

X

X

X

Ratios (variance and standard variation)

X

X

X

Correlation and recourse analysis

X

X

X

A

Basic valuation of stock, bonds and derivative instruments  The overall principle with regard to valuation of financial investments is that their value is  determined by the cash flow they are expected to yield. This means, in turn, that their  future cash flow, such as dividends and coupon rates, must be backdated to “today's rate”  for pricing. The licence holder should be familiar with the guiding principles underlying the  valuation and change within parameters.  Cognitive level R

C

P

X

X

X

X

Yield curve

X

Duration

X

Payment policy

X

P/E ratios

X

Justified market value

X

Options (European, US, call, put)

X

Breakeven charts for options

X

X

X

Valuation concepts

X

X

X

A

Concepts of risk and return  According to the portfolio theory, risk is defined in terms of variation in return, i.e. usually in  terms of variance or standard variation. According to the capital market theory’s definition   

21


of risk, however, it is the return on the individual investment compared with the return on  the market portfolio that is of interest, since investors are expected to have well‐diversified  portfolios.  Cognitive level R

C

P

Covariation (correlation)

X

X

Concept of effective portfolios

X

X

X

Markowitz’s portfolio selection

X

X

X

A

Definition of market index  The advantage of an index is that it summarises, in a clear and simple way, the return for a  market, a country or a region. How an index is constructed and when it should be used is of  importance when analysing investments on the capital market.  Cognitive level R Weighted and equally weighted indices

X

Yield and asset indices

X

Regional indices

X

C

P

A

Basic portfolio and capital market theories  Even though these theories are inherently “heavy”, a licence holder should be familiar with  their underlying ideas. The emphasis is thus on application and analysis rather than on  purely technical points. Knowledge of characteristics as well as familiarity with the variables  that have an effect on the valuation of derivative instruments are an integral part of this  subsection.               

22


Cognitive level R

C

P

Characteristics of covariance in investment returns

X

X

X

Diversification strategies

X

X

X

Concept of effective front

X

X

X

Market portfolio, definition and characteristics

X

X

X

Security Market Line, CAPM

X

X

Market risk (beta value)

X

X

X

Underrated and overrated assets

X

X

X

A

Effects of national and international diversification  According to the portfolio theory, a rational investor should spread risks over a variety of  alternatives. This can be achieved without loss of expected returns. To achieve  diversification, the different alternatives must, however, have some particular distinctive  features, which it is important for the licence holder to realise when advising clients.  Cognitive level R

C

P

Overall risk

X

X

X

Market risk and unique risk

X

X

X

Effects of national and international diversification

X

X

A

Effective portfolios  According to the prevailing view within financial economics, investors are expected to  maintain effective portfolios. Deviations from these effective portfolios do not, according to  the theory, increase stock value. Investing in effective portfolios is therefore central to  portfolio investment.               

23


Cognitive level R

C

P

Expected return

X

X

X

Expected return and risk

X

X

X

Risk premium

X

X

X

The safe investment alternative

X

X

X

Portfolio market risk (beta value)

X

X

X

Portfolio risk specific (unique) to companies

X

X

X

A

Evaluation of portfolios and funds  Returns on investments can, in principle, be said to be influenced by three variables, i.e.  direct dependence on market developments (e.g. an index fund), investment  professionalism (e.g. a trade savings allocation fund), and pure coincidence. In order for a  meaningful evaluation to be carried out, returns must also be seen in the light of investment  risks. Risk‐adjusted return will therefore be a keyword in connection with the evaluation of  investments.  Cognitive level R

C

P

Accepted practice

X

X

X

Measures of risk-adjusted return

X

X

X

Key ratios in fund evaluation

X

X

X

Analysis and interpretation of the concepts of excess return and deviation return

X

X

X

A

Behavioural finance  The whole approach in financial economics is based on the assumption that individuals are  rational. They make their choices in the light of investment return but also investment risk.  If  two  investments  have  the  same  expected  return  but  different  risks,  investors  are  thus  expected to be rational and choose the alternative with the lowest risk.      Studies have shown that departures from rational behaviour do occur. Deviations from the  efficient  market  hypothesis  have  been  mapped  and  the  opportunity  for  safe  arbitrage   

24


profits  has  been  proven.  The  licence  holder  should  be  familiar  with  the  main  concepts  of  behavioural finance and the occurrence of systematic deviations from rational behaviour.  Cognitive level R Definition and effects

C

P

A

X

 

 

25


Section 4 ‐ Ethics and standards  Section 4 deals with a knowledge of the ethics and rules, which in a broader perspective  may be said to contribute to maintaining the soundness of the Swedish securities market. A  licence holder should be familiar with and be able to apply the basic ethical guidelines in the  securities market. A licence holder should be familiar with how standards of various sorts  arise and develop. He or she should have a knowledge of and be able to apply the rules on  conflicts of interest, employees’ securities transactions, bribery and corruption, money  laundering and market abuse.    The subsections in this section are relatively self‐contained. However, the common  denominator is that the rules, provided they are complied with, may be said to contribute to  maintaining the soundness of the securities market and to maintaining public confidence in  this market. 

Ethics and morals  Interest in ethical and moral issues has increased in recent years. Both society in general  and the financial market more specifically have become increasingly complex over time.  Demands are made on the way in which firms and individuals conduct themselves on the  securities market. The rules are becoming more comprehensive and detailed, while there  are still areas and situations where it is unclear what is actually “right” or “wrong”. In order  to maintain confidence in the securities market and in the firms and individuals working in  it, it is important that a licence holder possesses a certain basic knowledge of ethics and  morals, as well as a feel for and an interest in how situations and issues that arise should be  handled in an ethically defensible manner.     In this subsection the licence holder should have a knowledge of the existing basic ethical  guidelines in the Swedish securities market, which are issued by trade associations and the   

26


Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority. By being familiar with and applying these values  and guidelines, it will hopefully be easier for a licence holder to keep a safe distance from  prohibited conduct. It is also important for the licence holder to know whom to approach  with ethical issues and in doubtful situations. Special interest is therefore devoted to the  role and position of the compliance function in the organisation.  Cognitive level R

C

P

Basic ethical guidelines in the securities market

X

X

Keeping a safe distance from prohibited conduct

X

X

X

Compliance function and whom to approach with ethical issues and difficult questions of judgement

X

X

X

A

Standard setting in the securities market  Operations and the players in the securities market are subject to different types of  regulation. Rules are set forth in acts passed by the Riksdag, regulations issued by the  Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority, and in certain legal documents issued by the EU.  The latter may have a direct effect or need to be actively implemented in Swedish law. The  knowledge required concerning the actual content of these rules and regulations may be  found elsewhere in the proficiency requirements. Here we deal instead with the actual  standard‐setting process and the different relative value of these rules.     In order to complement and concretise certain provisions in the above rules and  regulations, trade organisations, such as the Swedish Securities Dealers Association, the  Swedish Investment Fund Association and the Swedish Securities Council, have through self‐ regulation created rules for their member companies and where appropriate for the  employees of the companies concerned. A licence holder should be familiar with these  organisations’ respective roles and more important rules.    The organisations above include SwedSec, which is dealt with separately. A licence holder  should have a knowledge of the firms and individuals covered by SwedSec’s rules, the  obligations assumed by the affiliated firms and licence holders, and the sanctions that can   

27


be taken against those who violate these rules and regulations. It is also important to be  familiar with the practice that is gradually arising on the basis of these rules and regulations.    Self‐regulation also arises as a result of the agreements that stock exchange members and  listed companies enter into with regulated markets and other marketplaces and with  clearing organisations. These agreements are dealt with in the subsection Trading in  financial instruments.  Cognitive level R Standard setting in the securities market

X

Self-regulating bodies in the securities market

X

SwedSec’s rules and regulations and how these are applied in practice

X

C

P

A

X

Conflicts of interest etc.  Historically, there has been a “soundness rule” in the Swedish securities market, which has  prescribed that securities business should be conducted in such a way that public  confidence in the securities market is maintained, individuals’ capital investments are not  unduly jeopardised and the securities business in general can be considered sound. This  general regulation is complemented by a large number of more detailed rules.     This subsection covers a number of areas of interest which aim to ensure the soundness of  the securities business. The licence holder should be familiar with and be able to apply the  basic requirement that a securities institution should look after its clients’ interests when  providing investment or subsidiary services, that it should act honestly, fairly and  professionally, and that it should otherwise act in such a way that public confidence in the  securities market is maintained.    Furthermore, this subsection deals with the requirements on a securities institution’s  organisation, risk management, transparency and internal guidelines, procedures and  systems, as well as the question of who is responsible for the fulfilment of these  requirements.   

28


Conflicts of interest arise from time to time in a securities institution and its activities and  these must be handled in an appropriate manner. For example, conflicts of interest may  arise between the institution’s and the employees’ trading on own account versus the  institution’s trading on behalf of clients. The licence holder must be familiar with the rules  that apply in conflicts of interest, various practical methods such as Chinese walls that are  used to avoid conflicts of interest, as well as how private assignments and other conflict of  interest situations that can affect his or her duties should be handled. A licence holder  should also be familiar with the fundamentals of the new rules (in FFFS 2007:16) on  incentives. All these matters are dealt with in this subsection.    The licence holder should also understand the rules (in FFFS 2005:9) on analyses and  investment recommendations and on a fair presentation of interests and conflicts of  interest in the latter.    The licence holder must also be familiar with the background to and the purpose of the  rules on looking after clients’ interests and handling conflicts of interest. It is not sufficient  to know what is permitted or not; the licence holder must, in order to be able to solve  conflict of interest problems that arise in practice, be familiar with the ethical and moral  basis for these rules. In this way, the licence holder can more easily act correctly even in the  absence of explicit regulations and sections of a law.    A licence holder should also be familiar with and be able to apply the rules concerning  employees’ own or related party’s securities transactions. These are to be found in both acts  and in regulations issued by the Swedish Securities Dealers Association and the Swedish  Investment Fund Association. The rules on allotment to employees in case of  oversubscription are also dealt with here.         

29


Cognitive level R

C

P

Requirement to look after clients’ interests and otherwise act honestly, fairly X and professionally

X

X

Requirements on organisation, risk management, internal guidelines etc.

X

X

X

Rules concerning conflicts of interest and how to handle such conflicts

X

X

X

Analyses and investment recommendations

X

X

Rules on own and related party’s securities and foreign exchange transactions

X

X

Purpose of and background to rules on looking after clients’ interests and handling conflicts of interest

X

A

X

Bribery and corruption   In the securities market, clients and other interested parties may offer or be offered gifts,  services or other benefits. This is often with the aim of client care and well‐intentioned, but  can sometimes assume proportions or occur in such situations as to risk being regarded as  bribery and may constitute corruption for the recipient. In order to avoid such situations,  the licence holder must be familiar with and be able to apply the rules and the more  important practice in this area. A licence holder should also be familiar with the activities  conducted by and the guidelines issued by the Anti‐Corruption Institute.  Cognitive level

Rules on bribery and corruption

R

C

P

X

X

X

A

Money laundering and terrorist financing  Money laundering refers to measures taken to conceal, turn over or legitimise, i.e.  “launder”, money received as a result of criminal activity. Terrorist financing refers in the  rules and regulations not only to the financing of terrorism but also to other forms of  particularly serious crime. A licence holder must be familiar with the rules and regulations in  these areas and should be able to apply these rules in practice.    

 

30


The licence holder should also be familiar with the main features of the new rules on money  laundering in the EU’s Third Money Laundering Directive, which is expected to come into  force in Sweden on 15 March 2009.     With reference to these rules, the licence holder should consequently be familiar with the  following: 

• that the purpose of the rules is being extended to prevent financial operations from  being used for terrorist financing, 

• that the rules have a risk‐based starting point and the implications of this, and  • that the requirements for client knowledge are being strengthened and will be more  detailed.     The licence holder must also be familiar with the background to and the purpose of the  rules. It is not sufficient to know what is permitted or not; the licence holder must, in order  to be able to handle actual client meetings, be familiar with the ethical and moral basis for  the rules, so as to be able to achieve the right balance between personal integrity and  combating crime.  Cognitive level

Rules on money laundering and terrorist financing Purpose of and background to the rules

R

C

X

X

P

A

X

Market abuse  The Financial Instruments Trading (Market Abuse Penalties) Act deals with both “ordinary”  insider trading crimes and such trading and conduct as considered calculated to unduly  influence the market price or other securities trading conditions. Further, the rules and  regulations deal with the obligation of securities institutions to report transactions, which  may be assumed to constitute or be connected with insider trading crimes or undue market  manipulation, to the Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority.     

31


A licence holder should understand the crimes and the conduct as well as the reporting  obligation that exists in accordance with the current rules and regulations. Further, a  knowledge and understanding is required of the Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority’s  and the courts’ more important opinions in this area. Finally, the licence holder should have  a basic knowledge of such rules in stock exchange member agreements, mainly Norex  Member Rules, as are related to the rules on undue market manipulation, i.e. primarily the  rules that orders and deals should reflect the market value and constitute real orders and  deals.    The licence holder must also be familiar with the background to and the purpose of these  rules. It is not sufficient to know what is permitted or not; the licence holder must be  familiar with the ethical and moral basis for these rules, in order to be able to handle actual  transactions and the reporting obligation and to achieve the right balance in how he or she  should act.   Cognitive level R

C

Insider trading crimes

X

X

Statutory requirements and stock exchange rules on undue market manipulation

X

X

Obligation to report insider trading crimes and undue market manipulation, and the information ban

X

X

Purpose of and background to the rules

X

P

A

Reporting obligation and keeping a logbook  The Act concerning Reporting Obligations for Certain Holdings of Financial Instruments  contains rules that stock market companies have a duty to report persons with an insider  position in the company to the Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority. Major shareholders  also have a duty to report to the register. Persons with such an insider position have a duty  to report any shareholdings in the company in which they have an insider position as well as  changes in these holdings to the Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority.      

32


Further, there are statutory requirements prohibiting certain persons with an insider  position from trading in shares and other financial instruments in or related to the company  in which they have an insider position within a certain period before an interim report, as  well as requirements to keep a logbook of persons with access to insider information.    A licence holder should be familiar with and understand the above rules and what they  mean in practice.  Cognitive level R

C

Reporting obligation regarding persons with an insider position

X

X

Trading ban

X

X

Keeping a logbook

X

X

P

A

Basic client protection rules  Client protection rules have recently come increasingly into focus. The licence holder should  understand the duty of the institution in various situations, such as in providing advice and  in order execution. The licence holder should be able to apply the rules on suitability and  appropriateness assessments in the Securities Markets Act.     The licence holder should be familiar with and understand the various documentation and  proficiency requirements that apply in different situations. He or she should also understand  the different client categories in the Securities Markets Act.    The licence holder must also be familiar with the background to and the purpose of the  rules on providing advice. It is not sufficient to know what you must do; the licence holder  must – in order to be able to handle actual client meetings – be familiar with the ethical and  moral basis for these rules. Consequently, the licence holder can live up to the clients’  expectations of how a “good” advisor should act.         

33


Cognitive level R

C

Importance of consumer legislation in the financial market

X

X

Good advisory practice and duty of care (incl. suitability assessments)

X

X

Duty of care in non-advisory situations, e.g. in order execution (incl. appropriateness assessments)

X

X

Documentation requirements

X

X

Competence requirements

X

Client categories

X

Purpose of and background to the rules

X

P

A

X

 

 

34


Section 5 – Rules and regulations in the securities market   Section 5 deals with a knowledge of the rules and regulations and supervision in the  Swedish securities market. A licence holder should have a broad knowledge of the subject  and be able to use this knowledge as a frame of reference when dealing with clients. In  practice, this means a familiarity with concepts and definitions and a basic knowledge of the  various business law rules that govern the securities business as well as a knowledge of  certain basic civil law legislation pertaining to the securities market. In addition to a factual  knowledge, a licence holder is, in certain key areas, also required to have an understanding  of regulation and, in some subsections, the ability to apply existing regulations. 

Securities business  Trading in securities requires a licence issued by the Swedish Financial Supervisory  Authority. A licence holder should be familiar with the various licences covering securities  business and other business activities, and which operations can be conducted under the  various licences. It is particularly important for a licence holder to be familiar with the rules  and circumstances concerning the concept of confidentiality.��A licence holder should be  able to apply the confidentiality rules in concrete situations. The licence holder should also  understand the definition of financial instruments in the Securities Markets Act.  Cognitive level R

C

P

X

Operations requiring a licence; various licences and what they cover

X

Prerequisites for a licence to conduct securities business

X

Confidentiality

X

X

Definition of financial instruments

X

X

A

 

 

35


Investment Funds Act  A licence holder should be familiar with the main concepts of the Investment Funds Act  (2004:46) and the prerequisites for obtaining a licence to conduct fund operations.   Cognitive level R Investment Funds Act; fund manager – mutual fund company – mutual fund – special-purpose fund –custodian institution

X

Prerequisites for a licence

X

Supervision and sanctions

X

Corporate governance

X

C

P

A

X

Flagging, bid and compulsory redemption  A licence holder should understand the regulations on when and how a shareholder should  flag a change in shareholdings. The licence holder should also understand the rules on a  mandatory bid. Finally, the licence holder should be familiar with the rules on compulsory  redemption of minority shareholdings.    The licence holder should also understand the rules on a mandatory bid under the Stock  Market (Takeover Bids) Act (2006:451). He or she should understand:  • •

when the rules are applicable, which shares are concerned and the mandatory bid  requirement  the obligations of the person making a bid, i.e. what the mandatory bid involves and  the obligation to prepare an offer document. 

  The licence holder should also be familiar with the rules on compulsory redemption of  minority shareholdings, i.e.   • • •

 

understand when the rules are applicable and  be familiar with the procedure in general; how the price is determined and how to  handle a dispute on whether there is a right or liability to redemption or on the size  of the redemption sum as well as what advance vesting of title means.      36


Cognitive level

Flagging regulations Mandatory bid Compulsory redemption

R

C

X

X

X

X

X

X

P

A

Complaint management  Complaint management is of crucial importance to securities institutions. A licence holder  should know how complaint management should be organised in institutions, and how  complaints should be handled. Further, a licence holder should be familiar with which  organisations and institutions advise on complaint practice and which handle such disputes.  Cognitive level R C P A Rectifying mistakes

X X

Handling other client complaints (National Board for Consumer Complaints /ARN/; Consumers' Bank and Finance Agency, enforcement service, and ordinary court of law)

X X

Agreements  The Swedish Securities Dealers Association has drawn up standardised agreements and  general provisions for banks’ and securities companies’ custody clients. Further, Nasdaq  OMX Stockholm (Stockholmsbörsen) has drawn up agreements for trading in standardised  options. The sector also has disposition agreements and agreements concerning  discretionary asset management and investment consultancy. A licence holder must be  familiar with the various agreements, their content and purpose.    The Swedish Securities Dealers Association has also drawn up standardised agreements and  general provisions for banks’ and securities companies’ trading in financial instruments as  well as standardised agreements for securities loans. This subsection includes the various  agreements, their content and purpose.     

37


Cognitive level R C P A General provisions for custody and account agreements – banks and securities companies

X

Client agreements, integrated trading and clearing account at Nasdaq OMX Stockholm

X

Disposition agreements between client and securities company (regulates the securities company’s right to re-pledge financial instruments)

X

Common agreements in different types of asset management

X

General conditions for trading in financial instruments

X

General conditions for securities loans

X

Basic rules on pledging  A licence holder should have a knowledge of basic civil law rules governing pledging and  business law pledging rules pertaining to the securities business. In business law, there are  differences between banks’ and securities companies’ ability to demand pledges, and a  licence holder must be aware of these differences.  Cognitive level R

C

Pledging

X

X

Securities institution’s role and the risks in pledging

X

X

P

A

Questions concerning civil law and family law  In this section a variety of basic civil law concepts and other terms are covered which a  financial advisor could encounter and should therefore know about. Furthermore, a licence  holder is required to have some basic knowledge of, for instance, the fundamentals of  contract law, powers of attorney, and insolvency law. Within the subject area of family law,  a licence holder is required to be familiar with certain basic and essential concepts as well as  having a knowledge of the various forms of family law (marriage and cohabitation). This  section also covers essential questions concerning inheritance, gifts, and wills.   

 

38


Cognitive level R

C

Basic civil law concepts

X

X

Basic contract law

X

X

Powers of attorney and other types of authority

X

X

Insolvency and bankruptcy

X

Basic family law concepts: Marriage and cohabitation, etc.

X

X

Wills, inheritance, and legal incapacity

X

X

P

A

X

Company law – Corporate law  This subsection includes a basic knowledge of the right of association, but with an emphasis  on corporate law. The licence holder should know and understand the difference between  the various forms of association that occur. Moreover, he or she should be familiar with the  share and it legal consequences. This subsection also includes the prerequisites for forming  a limited company and the significance of registration with the Swedish Companies  Registration Office. Finally, the situation for VPC companies is dealt with, where the share  register is handled by a database (VPC) and no physical share certificates are issued.  Cognitive level R

C

Difference between various forms of association

X

X

Share and its legal consequences

X

X

Share register and share certificates

X

X

Other legal formalities (e.g. registration with Swedish Companies Registration Office and certificate of incorporation)

X

VPC companies and handling of these

X

Company’s decision-making body

X

P

A

X

Deposit guarantee and investor protection  Client deposits in accounts in banks, credit market companies and securities companies with  a licence to receive client funds are covered by a deposit guarantee. This guarantee provides   

39


account clients with some protection in the event of the bankruptcy of the account‐ managing institution.     Correspondingly, there is investor protection, which provides the possibility of  compensation for losses of investors’ financial instruments and funds held by securities  institutions, fund managers and certain investment companies.     A licence holder should be familiar with, understand and be able to apply the rules found in  the above rules and regulations.  Cognitive level R

C

P

Deposit guarantee

Investor protection

A

   

 

40


SwedSec's Licensing Programme Syllabus and Proficiency Requirements