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CCIOD Columbus Center for Inovative Objects of Design


Becca Baldus Shannon McGee Emily Hilgendorf Bobbi Jo R


Learn. Gather. Inspire.


Table of Contents Introduction

Client Goals & Mission Statement Client Page Definitions Overall Diagram Historic Legacy

Program

Entrance Museum Store Cafe Exhibits Education Archive Administrative Back of the House Restroom Mechanical Chart

City Transportation Demograpics

City Cont.

Attendance Event Timeline

Site

Solar Study, Building Height, & Soil Analysis Temperature Analysis Wind Analysis Parking View Analysis

Supplemental Information Museum Comprehensive Knowledge Des Moines Art Center Van Gogh Museum Vitra Design Museum Leeum Museum Codes Accessibility

Conclusion Works Cited


Introduction Client Goals & Mission Statement

Spatial Diagram Historic Legacy


Client Goals: *

Our Mission:

Engaging museum with broad appeal Connection to larger community Educate community about innvative objects through interaction Promote a culture of conservation, responsibility, and innovation Sustainable practices Showcase Columbus history Social focal point that promotes community involvement * Key points from Client Letter

Entrance 247 sq m

Education Wing Administrative 120 sq m 120 sq m

This museum is intended to serve as a social landmark for Columbus where residents and visitors can learn, gather, and be inspired. The city of Columbus has a legacy for its history in manufacturing, design, and architecture, but has no place to showcase it. The museum for the Columbus Innovative Objects of Design is the perfect opportunity to do so. Visitors of all walks of life can interact and observe the innovative history of Columbus and its influences on products worldwide. Incorporating hands-on experiences throughout the museum will be a crucial component of educating the public. Education is a key factor in inspiring future innovation. Sustainability, a mission of the city, will be an integral part of the overall museum design. The museum is to become a space where the design and display of the collections becomes a cohesive, inviting space that embodies the local Columbus pride and future innovation. On the next few pages is a synopsis of the museum elements. Back of House 500 sq m

Exhibits 1730 sq m

Archives 280 sq m

CCIODMission

learn. gather. inspire.


Columbus Cultural Foundation Inspired by the combination of our city’s long history of architectural excellence, industrial innovation, and commitment to cultural education, we are please to inform you that the Columbus Cultural Foundation is soliciting proposals for the design of a new museum for Columbus, Indiana. -Columbus Cultural Foundation Building Committee

Columbus Strategic Development Plan

Cummins Inc. Foundation

The Downtown Columbus Strategic Development Plan is a planned process in attracting growth and development into the downtown area of Columbus. -Columbus Strategic Development Plan

Columbus Architectural Archives (T)o collect, conserve, preserve, and promote the use of records that document the architecture, engineering, and arts associated with the built environment of Columbus, Indiana and Bartholomew County - Columbus Architectural Archives

Investing in a vibrant and economically viable community in our headquarters location of Columbus, Ind., has long been an important objective for Cummins.

Columbus Museum for Art & Design The Columbus Museum of Art & Design has as its primary and general purpose the promotion and encouragement of the understanding of art. -Columbus Museum for Art & Design

-Cummins Inc. Foundation

Indiana University Center for Art and Design Indiana University has formed a partnership with the Community Education Coalition of Columbus to establish a center in downtown Columbus that will specialize in teaching art and design. -Indiana University Center for Art and Design

CCIODClients


Innovate

CafĂŠ

is to introduce something new or to evolve something existing.

fulfills a void of the Central Downtown District by providing a comfortable, small-scale eating environment for the public and museum guests.

Innovative Objects of Design

Archive

are objects of life and work that were influential in society at the time of their origination. Innovative objects of design layer throughout time, promoting new ideas.

a space designated to demonstrate the rich architectural history of Columbus. It allows museum guests to observe original drawings and models of Columbus landmarks.

Back of House 500 sq m

Exhibit Space

intended to showcase the objects of historical Columbus linked to contemporary examples. It serves as a space of education and interaction.

Education Wing 120 sq m

Store

A public space for guests to purchase items that benefit the museum and city of Columbus.

Exhibits 1730 sq m Archives 280 sq m Entrance 252 sq m

Administrative 120 sq m

Loading Area fulfills the requirements of museum operations by providing a location for unloading, unpacking, storage, and transferring of objects to their final museum destination.

Parking

Education Wing

an interactive space for visitors to receive a deeper level of interaction with the museum goals. It can serve as an encouraging space for students and adults to demonstrate their innovation skills.

Administrative

Site

back-of-house area for staff to coordinate museum activities.

CCIODComponents


Outside

Indirect Connection Direct Connection

CafĂŠ 150 sq m Entrance 15 sq m Coat Room 5 sq m

Bathroom 50 sq m

Shared Dividable Space

Mechanical 150 sq m

Increase in Density of Traffic

3 Connecting Classrooms 85 sq m each Lobby 60 sq m

Store 115 sq m

Classroom Storage 10 sq m

Entrance Archives Exhibits

Bathroom 25 sq m

Curator Office 20 sq m Security 2 sq m

Education

Director Office 20 sq m

Library/Research 75 sq m

Administrative

Break Room 40 sq m

Education Office 20 sq m

Back of House Conference Room 30 sq m

Conservation Area 75 sq m Model Gallery 110 sq m

Archives 95 sq m

Storage 140 sq m Unloading Area 95 sq m

Archive Office 20 sq m

Loading Dock 40 sq m

Outside Receiving Office 20 sq m

Bathroom 25 sq m

Permanent Exhibits 1125 sq m

Temporary Exhibits 555 sq m

Bathroom 25 sq m

CCIODDiagram


Columbus has a strong legacy of both Architecture and Manufacturing featuring excellent design. The diagram below illustrates the desired impact of the CCIOD on the legacy of manufacturing in Columbus and the surrounding region. New Generations of Innovators Reeve’s

Arvin Cummins Cosco

City

Region

1888

1919

1925

1939

Elsewhere

Past

CCIOD Opening

Hypothetical Future

CCIODLegacy

columbus historical legacy


Program Diagram

Entrance Museum Store Cafe Exhibits

Reeves Cummins Arvin Reeves Intermediate Contemporary Temporary

Education Archive Administrative Back of the House Restroom Mechanical

Chart


The entry sequence serves as the progression into the museum. It involves the access from outside to the first impressions of the interior. It is important that the space reflect the museum goals and provide a welcoming introduction to the museum. The store and cafĂŠ in the entrance sequence also serve as the opportunity to promote the museum.

CCIODEntrance


Outside CafĂŠ 150 sq m Entrance 20 sq m

Bathroom 50 sq m

3 Connecting Classrooms 85 sq m each

Coat Room 5 sq m Lobby 60 sq m

Store 115 sq m

Security 2 sq m

CCIODEntrance

overall diagram


1.21 m

The entry vestibule is designed to accommodate a small number of people comfortably. In the winter months school field trips may result in a group of twenty to thirty students entering the museum at one time. Multiple doors will accommodate this rush of people. The vestibule will have breathing space on the side to accommodate students if they stall in the vestibule while instructors gather tickets from the main desk. During both winter and summer months the vestibule will serve as an energy saving device for the museum. It will prevent heat loss during the winter and heat gain during he summer. The lobby provides a space for guests to become acquainted with the museum. It is a lofty space that feels welcoming to new arrivals. A daylighting strategy would provide this welcoming environment as well as reflect the sustainable goals of the city. It is also a location for guests to become acquainted with museum layout and obtain any information along with tickets from the main desk before proceeding into the exhibits.

Wheelchair Accessible

Standing Height

A main desk can serve as the hub for tickets and museum information. This desk will need to be staffed by one to two people depending on the museum traffic that will vary day-to-day. The desk will need to be equipped with cash registers so museum guests can pay for their entry. Pamphlets and maps can be obtained here as well.

CCIODEntrance


The coat closet in the museum will need to be able to accommodate coats of museum guests in the winter and other belongings during the summer months.

60 cm

10-14 cm

40 cm

45 cm

A winter coat on average takes up 10 to 14 centimeters on a closet rod. If on average 50 guests are in the museum that want to check their coats, the coat closet will need to accommodate 50 coats. This equates to a coat rod of about 5 to 7.5 meters wide. The cost storage depth will need to be at least 75 cm. To store other personal items such as backpacks that either pose as a potential museum hazard or guest inconvenience, cubbies could be placed below the coats. To store a backpack a cubby size of 45 cm width x 60 cm height x 40 cm depth will be required.

The security component of the front entrance is simple. Other than standard security measures such as cameras and alarms, the museum will need a security guard to check for proof of entry purchase at the exhibit entry doors. This ensures that the public components have some separation from the paid components of the museum. The security guard will need to be located in an area confined enough for one person to control. A desk with a phone and computer will help keep the guard in touch with other museum staff. The desk will also serve as a place for the security guard to sit if the museum is experiencing a slow day.

CCIODEntrance


To make the store accessible for all patron the standard guidelines are as follows:

.92 m

.92 m

1.5 m turning radius

- Minimum of .92 m for all accessible routes - A 1.5 m turning ratius is needed where adjacent routes are not accessible - If an object is displayed on the floor by an accessible route it may not lessen the routes span of .92 m - Objects displayed on the floor must remain out of the clear walkway to prevent tripping hazards

CCIODStore space needs


Entry to the store will be off the lobby making it accessible to museum patrons. Museum staff will supervise the store during regular museum hours. It is approximated for the store to take up 115 sq m. The space is large enough to possibly hold a small office for the store manager and a small storage room for products not on display.

The store will need a counter for a cash register and a security system in place. Products sold in the store can be displayed on varying shelving units, tables, or on the floor it the product is larger or too bulky for shelves. The museum store will sell a variety of products from innovative objects of design and books to products related to the museum displays. Room may also be provided for local artists to display and sell their work.

CCIODStore


The café will provide a space accessible to the public as well as museum patrons. By acting as a merging point, the café will draw in a more diverse community than the museum alone. The 150 sq m interior is designed to accommodate up to 40 people comfortably in a casual dining room of approximately 90 sq m. The remaining 60 sq m hold the kitchen and storage for the establishment. Along with entrances will be provided from the café to the exterior for direct access for patrons and supply delivery. A variety of beverages and quickly prepared food items will provide a menu to cater to the mass community.

.6 m x .6 m 2 people .91 m

.6 m x 1.1 m 4 people .91 m .76 m .3 m Standard Table and Chair Dimensions

.8 m x .6 m 4 people

Standard Café Table Sizes

CCIODCafé


To make the cafĂŠ accessible and comfortable the standard design guidelines are as follows:

.16 m .92 m

- Minimum of .92 m for all accessible routes - Minimum of .46 m between two extended back-to-back chairs, accounts for limited passage between seating - Minimum of .16 m between back of extended chairs and wall - Minimum of 5% of seating must be accessible

.46 m

.46 m

.92 m

CCIODCafĂŠ space needs


The exhibits serve as the heart of the museum. The spaces showcase the designs from the legacy companies of Columbus as well as contemporary objects, historic artwork, and traveling exhibits. Division of the exhibits and links between these parts are vital to the spirit of the whole. In addition, the lighting and interaction aspects of the exhibit designs are essential to the goals of educating and inspiring visitors.

CCIODExhibits


b Cummins

2 Temp. Below

a

Reeves

3

1

Arvin

c 4

Circulation Categorical Link Chronological Link

Cosco

The organization of the exhibit spaces is a progression with focused areas featuring the objects from the legacy companies. A chronological sequence of historic art occurs between each legacy space; these spaces are labeled Intermediate Exhibits a, b, and c. Perpendicular to the company foci, a space is dedicated to contemporary objects with design categories similar to the adjacent company; these areas are labeled Contemporary Exhibits 1, 2, 3, and 4. The rotating exhibit is located in the center with a visual connection rather than a physical link in order to keep it from interferring with the story of the permenent collection while maintaining a connection with the museum.

CCIODExhibits overall diagram


b Cummins

2

Arvin

Temp. Below

a

Reeves

3

1

c 4

Cosco

-Founded in 1888 by Marshal T. Reeves, his two brothers, and his father -Designed and manufactured steam engines, saw mills, thrashing machines, industrial wooden pulleys, the first variable speed drive transmission, and a couple of early automobiles -Sold to Emerson-Brantingham Co. in 1912

2D Objects: Advertisements

3D Objects: Products

2D Objects: Images

CCIODExhibits reeves pulley co


b Cummins

2

3 Temp. Below

a

Reeves

1

Arvin

c 4

This Reeve’s Motorcycle was the first automobile model they designed and manufactured. Due to its age and materiality, the object is susceptible to damage. In order to protect it, the object will need to be roped off and monitored by a security guard. Avoiding natural daylight and controlling ammounts and types of light hitting the object will also prevent unneccesary damage.

Cosco

Human Interaction Diagram 2m 1m Object Lighting Diagram Roped Off

Dimensions and Scale Diagram

1.5 m

2m

1m

-Top Light or Side Light using LED Lighting -Avoid Daylighting due to Sensitivity of Materials and Age

CCIODExhibits

reeves pulley co: large object


b Cummins

2

Arvin

Temp. Below

a

Reeves

3

1

c 4

Cosco

-Founded in 1919 as Cummins Engine Company, an auto mechanic operation and machine shop, by Clessie Lyle Cummins -First company to mount a diesel engine in an automobile -Known for manufacturing race car diesel engines, heavy truck diesel engines, and generator diesel engines -Currently a Fortune 500 company -Main operation remains in Columbus

2D Objects: Advertisements

3D Objects: Products

2D Objects: Images

CCIODExhibits cummins inc


b Cummins

2 Temp. Below

a

Reeves

3

1

Arvin

c 4

Cosco

This new V-16 QSK95 diesel engine is the largest designed and manufactured by Cummins. The engine is used in large mining equipment and train locomotives. Due to its age and materiality, human interaction will not jeopordize the object. Human interaction will also allow for further engagement and increased learning. Daylighting is not an issue for this object and should be used whenever outdoor conditions allow. Dramatic artifical lighting during overcast days and during the night will create interesting shadows transforming the object into a sculpture.

Human Interaction Diagram 3.3 m

Dimensions and Scale Diagram

2m Object Lighting Diagram

2.3 m

3.3 m

-Daylight when Outdoor Conditions Allow -Under Light, Side Light, and/or Top Light using Various Types of Light when Outdoor Conditions Require Artifical Light

CCIODExhibits

cummins inc: extra large object


b Cummins

2

Arvin

Temp. Below

a

Reeves

3

1

c 4

Cosco

-Founded in 1919 as the Indianapolis Air Pump Company -Began selling Arvin Heaters in 1923 -Moved to Columbus in 1925 as Noblitt-Sparks Industries Inc -Became Arvin Industries in 1950 -Designed and manufactured items ranging from car parts, electronics such as radios and televisions, appliances such as space heaters and toasters, and furniture -Now Arvin Meritor, Inc.

2D Objects: Advertisements

3D Objects: Products

2D Objects: Images

CCIODExhibits arvin industries inc


b Cummins

2

3 Temp. Below

a 1

Reeves

Arvin

This Arvin Heater is the namesake of Arvin Industries Inc. Due to its age human interaction may be undesirable so a enclosed glass display may be best. However due to its materiality it can withstand higher light levels and should be daylight when outdoor conditions allow.

c 4

Cosco

Dimensions and Scale Diagram

30 cm

Human Interaction Diagram

Object Lighting Diagram

50 cm 30 cm

50 cm

20 cm

80 cm Tall Pedistal

50 cm

-Daylight when Outdoor Conditions Allow -Under Light using Various Types of Light when Outdoor Conditions Require Artifical Light

CCIODExhibits

arvin industries inc: small object


b Cummins

2 Temp. Below

a

Reeves

3

1

Arvin

c 4

Cosco

3M

2M

1M

CCIODExhibition

legacy company object scale comparison


b Cummins

2

Arvin

Temp. Below

a

Reeves

3

1

c 4

Cosco

-Also known as COSCO or Hamilton Manufacturing Corporation -Founded in 1939 when an Arvin employee designed a matchbox for his wife -Designed and manufactured step stools, household stools, high chairs, utility carts, office furniture, and folding furniture -Remains recall-free -Now Dorel Industries with headquarters in Montreal

2D Objects: Advertisements

3D Objects: Products

2D Objects: Images

CCIODExhibits

columbus specialties company


This step stool is one of Cosco’s most iconic products. Due to its age human interaction may not be desirable however two stools could be displayed one for interation and one for display. Due to its materiality, the object can withstand higher light levels and should be daylight when conditions allow.

b Cummins

2

3 Temp. Below

a

Reeves

1

Arvin

c 4

Cosco

Dimensions and Scale Diagram

Human Interaction Diagram

Object Lighting Diagram

50 cm 30 cm 1m

30 cm

.3 m

.3 m

.5 m Tall Pedistal

50 cm

-Daylight when Outdoor Conditions Allow -Under Light using Various Types of Light when Outdoor Conditions Require Artifical Light

CCIODExhibits

columbus specialties company: medium object


b Cummins

2

3

1

Arvin

c

Temp. Below

a Reeves

Intermediate Exhibit a (19th Century)

4

Cosco

Within each of the intermediate exhibits a time period is showcased, exhibiting the objects of work and life. Intermediate a exhibits the 19th century, b the early 20th century, and c the late 20th century. Among these objects are 2D and 3D fine art, innovative fashion, innovative furniture, and innovative machinery. Examples of paintings, dresses, chairs, and small household machines from each time period are shown to the right.

Intermediate Exhibit b (Early 20th Century)

Intermediate Exhibit c (Late 20th Century)

CCIODExhibits

intermediate exhibits a b c: proposed objects


b Cummins

2 Temp. Below

a

Reeves

3

1

Arvin

c 4

Cosco

Within contemporary exhibits 1 and 2 objects related to the products of Reeves Pulley Company and Cummins Inc are showcased to inspire younger generations of viewers. Objects such as the advertisement, photograph, and thrasher head from John Deere relate to Reeves division of farm equipment. Objects such as those from Toyota’s Prius are similar to the innovative engine designs of Cummins.

Exhibit 1: Extra Large Object

Exhibit 1: Advertisement

Exhibit 1: Photograph

Exhibit 2: Advertisement

Exhibit 2: Photograph

Exhibit 2: Large Object

CCIODExhibits

contemporary exhibits 1 & 2: proposed objects


b Cummins

2 Temp. Below

a

Reeves

3

1

Arvin

c 4

Cosco

Within contemporary exhibits 3 and 4 objects related to the products of Arvin Industries Inc. and Columbus Specialties Company are showcased to inspire younger generations of viewers. Objects such as the advertisement, photograph, and Iphone 5 from Apple relate to Arvin’s division of entertainment electronics. Objects such as those from IKEA are similar to the innovative furniture designs of COSCO.

Exhibit 3: Advertisement

Exhibit 3: Photograph

Exhibit 4: Advertisement

Exhibit 4: Photograph

Exhibit 3: Small Object

Exhibit 4: Medium Object

CCIODExhibits

contemporary exhibits 3 & 4: proposed objects


b Cummins

2 Temp. Below

a

Reeves

3

1

Arvin

c 4

Cosco

3M

2M

1M

CCIODExhibition

contemporary exhibits object scale comparison


Proposed Layout

b Cummins

2 Temp. Below

a

Reeves

3

1

Arvin

c 4

Cosco

Temporary Exhibit Displays (with or without glass enclosures)

A

D

B

E

C

F

4m 2.5 m

Temporary Exhibit Moveable Walls

The temporary exhibit space proposed above is a large open space furnished with several moveable walls and numerous display pedistals/cases. These furnishings allow for the space to be seperated into multiple traveling exhibits at the same time.

CCIODExhibits temporary exhibit


An interactive space for visitors to receive a deeper level of interaction with the museum goals. It can serve as an encouraging space for students and adults to demonstrate their innovation skills and build on them with inspiration from the collections.

CCIODEducation


CafĂŠ 150 sq m

3 Connecting Classrooms 85 sq m each

Classroom Storage 10 sq m

Storage 140 sq m

Bathroom 25 sq m

Curator Office 20 sq m

Director Office 20 sq m

Break Room 40 sq m

Education Office 20 sq m

Conference Room 30 sq m

CCIODEducation


Site Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools

Elementary Schools

Middle Schools

High Schools

Universities

Average Student Total: 584 Students

Average Student Total: 820 Students

Average Student Total: 1670 Students

Average Class Size: 27 Students

Average Class Size: 27 Students

Average Class Size: 28 Students

Indiana University Bloomington 48 Min. - 110,000 Students

Average Classes per Grade: 4

Average Classes per Grade: 9

Average Classes per Grade: 16

Approximately 216 Schools within an hour of the site

Approximately 120 Schools within an hour of the site

Approximately 126 Schools within an hour of the site

Approximately 125,000 Elementary school students within an hour of the site

Approximately 98,000 Middle school students within an hour of the site

Approximately 210,420 High school students within an hour of the site

Franklin College 30 min - 1,000 Students Indiana Wesleyan University 7 min - 3,200 Students University of Indianapolis 44 mins - 4,200 Students Indiana Institute of Technology 1 hr 45 min - 4,200 Students

CCIODEducation

local and regional school research


Classrooms

sink and cabinet are for storage of activities storage closet for chairs of varying sizes adjustable table heights large bulletin boards for work to be hung any equipment to assist the handicapped in the activities flexible wall layout to allow for small and large spaces

27 students per class

Accessibility

125,000 5-10 yr olds

Office

98,000 11-13 yr olds

possible entry separate from main entrance access to an office for education coordinator visual link to contemporary exhibits

for education coordinator file cabinets for class paperwork and safety waivers access to wing restroom close proximity to administrative offices

Restrooms

210,420 14-18 yr olds

at least two accessible stalls per gender one water closet for every 65 people

Event Space

three classrooms have moveable walls or partitions classroom necessities can be easily stored open into the exhibit spaces

150 person capacity CCIODEducation requirements


Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Event Space In a museum of this size, flexibility of the spaces is key. Using the classroom spaces as a optional event space as well provides the museum with options for their visitors. Since most events will take place at night, it makes sense that the classrooms, which will be predominantly used during the day, can be used in multiple ways

CCIODEducation space flexibility


Spot Light

used for hanging work and presentations

General Lighting

used for night classes and events that needed homogenous light cover

Day Light

used for day classes whenever possible

Lighting is very important for the education wing due to the level of work and study that will be in progress in these rooms. Since it is a multi-purpose room there will only be two walls minimum in which to use permanent lighting fixtures. For this reason, daylighting strategies and over head lights for night will be necessary.

CCIODEducation lighting


2M

1M

Age

5

8

Due to the variety of age ranges that the education wing will need to facilitate, multiple varieties and sizes of furniture will need to be available for all the rooms. These tables and chairs will be put in either the back of house storage or in storage closets in each of the rooms.

11

14

Adult

= Pinup wall space height

CCIODEducation furniture analysis


A space designated to demonstrate the rich architectural history of Columbus. It allows museum guests to observe original drawings, correspondence and models of Columbus landmarks.

CCIODArchives


Director Office 20 sq m

Library/Research 75 sq m

Security 2 sq m

Model Gallery 110 sq m

Archives 95 sq m

Archive Office 20 sq m

Conservation Area 75 sq m

CCIODArchives


The mission of the Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives is to collect, conserve, preserve, and promote the use of records that document the architecture, engineering, and arts associated with the built environment of Columbus, Indiana and Bartholomew County. -

The Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives

Current Collection

32,432 sheets of drawings Blueprints Sketches Construction Documents Architects’ Letters and Correspondence Photos Articles Videotapes and Sound Bytes 75 flat files with 5 drawers each 30 Scaled Models

CCIODArchives background


1.26 m

Space Needs

75 flat files 27.877 sq m of floor space

1.22 m

2 m min.

.914 m

The archive space that holds all of the documents will be a predominantly service space. The space for research and investigation will be in the library. The first two files will be handicap accessible. Assistance will be necessary for the top file.

CCIODArchives space necessary


12 m

1.37 m

7m

3.048 m

Space Needs

at least 4 large research tables small collection of books Book shelves will line the perimeter of the room and the four tables places in the space in an accessible manner. The lighting will be from artificial lights that provide both task lighting for reading and researching and bounced light to provide a general light in the whole space.

CCIODArchives library and research


Space Needs

at least 30 models on display avg model size: .61M x .9144M x .15 M multiple circulation types Models should be able to be viewed from the research area and the archives themselves. Predominant use of the space will be for viewing and studying the models. Lighting options consist of artificial accent and spot lights on the individual models at the heights in which is appropriate for the

CCIODArchives model gallery


The administrative area provides a space for museum staff to coordinate everyday museum activities. The space consists of offices for directors and a break-room for all staff. We feel that it is important for staff to have spaces for connection to one another to promote collaboration.

CCIODAdministrative


Curator Office 20 sq m

Director Office Education Office 20 sq m 20 sq m

Break Room 40 sq m

Conservation Area 75 sq m

Conference Room 30 sq m

Unloading Area 80 sq m

Archive Office 20 sq m

Receiving Office 20 sq m

CCIODAdministrative

overall diagram


2.7 m

.7 m

.7 m

.7 m

The following are diagrams that illustrate the minimum sizes needed for offices. An office consists of three basic components: a desk, a computer, and a filing cabinet. The diagrams illustrate proposals that can be modified to fit the needs of specific users.

2.4 m

.8

1.7 m

1.7 m

m

1.5 m

2.4 m

4m

CCIODAdministrative minimum space diagrams


The “back of house� system provides a series of docks and rooms for receiving and sending exhibit pieces. Among the rooms are unpacking facilities, storage rooms, and facilities for maintaining and caring for the condition of the collection. It is important to provide controlled rooms for the care and storage for the collection pieces not on display.

CCIODBack of House


Classroom Storage 10 sq m

Storage 100 sq m

Conservation Area 75 sq m

Unloading Area 80 sq m

Archive Office 20 sq m

Loading Dock 40 sq m

Outside Receiving Office 20 sq m

Bathroom 25 sq m

CCIODBack of House


Covered Loading Dock: 40 sq m - needs to accommodate a forklift and other moving equipment - covered to protect deliveries from the elements - needs to be at the height of the truck bed Unloading: 80 sq m - 7 m minimum turning radius required for loaded forklift - easy access to tools for unpacking and stages of preparation Storage: 100 sq m - may hold permanent collection not on display, packing materials for temporary displays and tools.

The back of house system has been developed to receive, pack or unpack, and maintain pieces that are owned or borrowed by the museum. All the components of the “back of house” system are located directly next to one another for easy transportation of the pieces from stage to stage. Total the system needs about 315 sq m for the staging and storing system. Below is a possible configuration of a few of the key components of the system.

Conservation and Restoration: 75 sq m - contains tool and materials used to maintain the collection pieces Receiving Office: 20 sq m - managed by one of the museum staff to aid in supervising deliveries

Tools to take apart Crates

Crate Storage

Unloading

To Exhibits & Elevator

Magnet Lock Door so it can be “held” open

Elevator: 30 sq m - freight elevator for transporting exhibits

1.22 m

Covered Loading Dock

Turning Radius

Conservation/Restoration

4m 7m

Working Table

CCIODBack of House

space necessary


The temporary exhibits will be shipped on trucks varying in sizes from a delivery truck to semi trailers. The museum needs adequate paved surfaces for the trucks to easily back into the loading dock and unload the exhibits. Due to the varying nature of exhibition dimensions, taller ceilings and height clearances are needed for the loading dock and “back of house� rooms.

5.1 m 4m 3.1 m

Taller Doors (3 m) to be able to accommodate for larger objects

Packaging

CCIODBack of House space necessary


Electric Forklift

Size: 1.17 m x 3.84 m Load Capacity: 2500 kg Transports large, heavy objects Turning Radius 4 - 7 m

An electric forklift is needed to move the large scale, heavy displays into the museum. The electric model is preferred over the combustion model because it is quieter and has no no smoke emissions which would damage the displays.

CCIODBack of House moving equipment


Foldable Dolly

Size: 1.25 m (height) x .5 m Load Capacity: 363 kg Transports smaller objects Turning Radius .75 m

Multi Cart Dolly

Size: .4 m x 1.3 m Load Capacity: 227 kg Transports lighter, large objects Turning Radius 2.6 m

Warehouse Cart

Size: 1 m x 1.8 m Load Capacity: 907 kg Transports larger objects Turning Radius 2.75 m

CCIODBack of House moving equipment


Elevator Shaft

Upper Level

Ground Floor

A large freight elevator is needed to move larger displays from floor to floor. The freight elevator can also double as a passenger elevator for museum guests. A minimum elevator door opening of 3.66 m is needed to accommodate the moving equipment needed for the larger displays. A hydraulic elevator holds more weight than a standard passenger elevator and can be installed in low to mid-rise building. By using a two door system the elevator can easily access multiple exhibits on each floor.

CCIODBack of House elevator


Paths for waste management need to be carefully considered. For example, paths of food service and food service waste need to be kept separate from the path of exhibit objects. Organic waste poses a threat to exhibit objects because they attract damaging pests.

The trash container must also be shielded from public view due to its size. The shielding device must be a minimum of 1.8 m tall. The screening device must also be opaque, as to not reveal the function of the space. These regulations are a result of the Columbus, Indiana building codes.

CafĂŠ

Trash Disposal Container Unloading

2.4 m

4.5 m

CafĂŠ

Trash Disposal Container Unloading

2.4 m

4.5 m

CCIODBack of House waste management


10 m 2.5 m Garbage Truck

.7 m

13

9.1 m

6m

Access for the Garbage Trucks needs to be a minimum of 6 m in width with a minimum height of 4.3 m. To allow the truck a proper area to turn, the minimum inner turning radius needs to be a minimum of 9.1 m and the outer radius needs to be a minimum of 13.7 m. The trucks should not have to back into the public right-of-way, blocking traffic. The above diagram illustrates a situation the truck may have to incur with minimum dimensions indicated.

CCIODBack of House waste management


Necessary Conservation Equipment for paper archive conservation and minor maintenance of models and small objects

Cold Suction Table 1530 X 1830 (mm) Direct Suction Table 1530 X 1830 Hot Vacuum Table 1830 X 2440 Washing Table 1520 X 2440 Basic Work Table 2440 X 2440 Drying Rack/Wheeled Carts 1220 X 915 X 1830 At least 25 spaces for maximum anticipated amount of pieces in conservation at one time Products from Museum Services Corporation

CCIODBack of House conservation equipment


Hot Vaccuum Table

Drying Rack

Drying Rack

Washing Table

Wall Counter Tops

Basic Work Table Cold Suction Table

Direct Suction Table

25-39 sq m per person for a large conservation lab space according to the Manual of Museum Planning. Possible conservation room configuration based off of equipment and paper sizes.

CCIODProgram conservation plan


In order to keep our guests comfortable and able to enjoy the museum, we are providing multiple restroom options in multiple wings and locations of the museum.

CCIODRestrooms


3 Connecting Classrooms 85 sq m each CafĂŠ 150 sq m Entrance 20 sq m Bathroom 25 sq m Director Office 20 sq m Curator Office 20 sq m

Coatroom 5 sq m

Break Room 40 sq m

Lobby 60 sq m

Bathroom 50 sq m

Store 115 sq m

Education Office 20 sq m

Bathroom 25 sq m

Permanent Exhibits 1125 sq m

Temporary Exhibits 555 sq m

Bathroom 25 sq m

CCIODRestrooms diagram


1.42 m min.

1.54 m min.

1.54 m min.

.89 - .93 m min.

1.07 m min.

There will need to be a minimum of 1 toilet stall for every 65 guests that the museum can hold. There will need to be two accessible handicapped stalls: one that is wheel chair accessible and one is non-wheelchair accessibly, but is equipped with grab bars. We anticipate at least 4 toilets per gender to service the administration and education wing. At least 5 toilets per gender per floor for the exhibits will also be necessary along with three per gender for the archives. All specific ADA requirements are in the supplemental information at the back of this book.

CCIODRestroom space needs


Mechanical systems are what maintain this museum and keeps it able to properly showcase the work and items that represent the history and future of innovation.

CCIODMechanical


Mechanical 150 sq m

CCIODMechanical overall diagram


Temperature 21Ëš C +/- 3Ëš C

Relative Humidity 55% +/-5%

Stationary heating and cooling system

uses the walls and ceiling as a storage for the tempered air tempers the external skin to maintain the temperature significant decrease in mechanical room size because of stationary air expensive system, but far more efficient reduces operation cost

Combination of systems

humidity system and air handling systems are combined reduces space necessary for air storage reduces space of the mechanical room

Zonal system

zones based on the collection housed in the zones paintings and fine art have less of a range of humidity and temperature no variation temperature and humidity between seasons and daytime versus nigh time

CCIODMechanical space needs


Main Museum Contaminants:

Relative Humidity: Relationship between the volume of air and the amount of water vapor it holds at a given temperature. It is important because it is a main determining factor in deterioration of museum objects.

Required Relative Humidity Levels: 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Paintings Paper

Contaminants: disintegrate, discolor or corrode all types of objects, especially reactive and porous materials. Ex: grease from human hands, oxygen, dust, air pollution Radiation: Ultraviolet light, which can disintegrate, fade or otherwise damage the outermost layer of organic materials and some colored inorganic materials. Unnecessary visible light, which can fade or darken paint and wood Incorrect Temperature: Too High: can disintegrate or discolor inorganic materials Too Low: can fracture paints, plasters or adhesives.

Photographs/Film Wood Leather/Textiles Metals Ceramics/Glass Ivory Stone

Fluctuating: can fracture or delaminate inorganic materials. Incorrect Relative Humidity:   EBNQ DBODBVTFNPME >0%: supports hydrolysis which can disintegrate or discolor materials. Fluctuating: can disintegrate, delaminate, fracture, loosen joints or otherwise damage materials

CCIODEnvironmental

Relative humidity


Types of Lighting: Lighting is a vital component of a museum design. It provides an impression of the museum space. Different types of bulbs and the direction of light affect how exhibits are interpreted. It is also important to consider environmental effects of lighting and safety of museum guests when choosing lighting. incandescent lighting

Incandescent: generally used for ambient and accent lighting with track luminaires. One of the most common light sources in a museum because of flexibility. Line-voltage incandescent lamps have a low initial cost which makes them a good fit for small galleries and limited budgets. Fluorescent: Have a long life and have a full choice of light colors. Not frequently used for lighting a display, but makes a good ambient light source. It is efficient and flexible. Good dimmability allows it to be controlled in relationship to exhibit lighting. Shielding is necessary for visual and UV exposure.

fluorescent lighting

Halogen: Fresh, warm white light. Their light levels remain a constant throughout its life. A special coating can reduce energy consumption by up to 45%. They cost more initially than incandescent lights, but have a longer life and better control over dimmability. LEDs: Very small and generate light efficiently. They have a very long life. 5IFZFNJUNPOPDISPNBUJDSBEJBUJPO5IFMJHIUDPOUBJOTOPVMUSBWJPMFU 67  PSJOGSBSFE *3 SBEJBUJPO5IFZDBOCFBHPPEDIPJDFGPSFYIJCJUTXIFSF objects are light- and heat-sensitive. Daylighting: Direct daylighting should be avoided to prevent UV radiation and glare. Glazing on window surfaces can prevent UV radiation from harming objects.

halogen lighting

LED and indirect daylighting

CCIODMechanical

lighting


Direct versus Indirect Light: Direct light accentuates the objects in the exhibit, whereas planar lighting creates uniform illumination on the object. Where it is desired to accentuate details in objects, direct light will serve as an effective lighting method.

Track Lighting: Track lighting in a museum provides flexibility to adjust lighting as exhibits change. This is an important consideration in a museum because display objects are frequently cycled through to prevent prolonged exposure to damaging light. Different objects require different amounts or different angles of light. Track lighting can combine multiple systems. For example, flood lights could be used in the middle of a spatial zone with spotlights at the ends to help eliminate unwanted shadows.

CCIODMechanical lighting techniques


Narrow Spotlight:

Spotlight:

Flood:

Wide Flood:

Used to accentuate small objects. Narrow spotlights create high light intensity, which projects over greater distances between light and target object.

Spotlights are standard for creating accent lighting. They can be used for all kinds of objects, but help emphasize 3D shape. Care needs to be taken when setting up spotlights as to not create too harsh of contrast.

Flood lights are used for accenting large objects or to emphasize s spatial zone by creating uniform light. The light they emit is more diffused than spotlights.

Wide flood lights are used for flexible illumination that floods a wall with light. Like flood lights, they can be used to emphasize a spatial zone.

Oval Flood:

Wall Washer:

Oval flood lights create a flood of light in an oblong shape rather than a perfect circle. They can be used to emphasize a spaital zone.

A wall wash would create a system of uniformity on a wall. This can help specify a spatial zone of like objects. A wall wash system could be created out of track lighting.

CCIODMechanical lighting techniques


x=lighting distance away from wall

30˚ Optimum lighting angle is 30˚. The lighting angle should not be greater than 45˚ because it will either shine directly or as a reflection into visitor’s eyes

y=distance from lighting height to eye level

30˚ 70˚

Minimizing shadows cast by the viewer is another important consideration for museum lighting design. Shadows can interfere with the viewing of an object for observers. A method to prevent shadows are to have two lights to the side of the work. To minimize distracting shadows and to illuminate key components on larger objects, multiple light sources will be needed. Uplighting and downlighting methods can be used to accomplish this. Lighting in museums must be placed to not interfere with the visitor’s viewing. To prevent direct glare or reflection into the viewers eyes, guidelines for distance and lighting angles should be followed. To determine the distance of lighting away from the wall use the the formula: YZtUBO „

Where x is the distance away from the wall and y is the distance from lighting fixture to eye level.

CCIODMechanical lighting techniques


Lighting Maximums:

50 lux maximum

The human eye is able to adapt to different lighting conditions as long as there is a gradual change between lighting levels. Where possible, the minimum lighting situations should be used to prevent deterioration of museum objects. Objects that are light sensitive, such as paintings, should be not be located near windows. The chart to the right shows the maximum lighting levels that an object can be subject too without deterioration. For comparison, the typical 60 watt incandescent light bulb is about 850 lux. However, 90% this energy is lost to heat. The actual lux emitted is only about 85 lux.

dyed organic materials textiles watercolors photographs and blueprints tapestries prints and drawings manuscripts leather wallpapers biological specimens fur feathers

1 lux = 1 lumen/m2 1m

1m

1 candle = 1 lumen

250 lux maximum undyed organic materials oil and tempera paintings finished wooden surfaces

2

sur

fac ea

rea

300 lux maximum 1m

metals stone ceramic some glass

CCIODMechanical lighting


Museum lighting involves more than safety of the objects, but also must involve the safety of guests. To make sure the museum is accessible to all guests, some standards must be met. These standards are indicated in the diagram to the right. If objects cannot be lit above 50 lux and do not meet accessibility standards, objects can be presented in an alternate format such as brochures or images in a brighter location. Even lighting without direct spotlights and ambient lighting will help create an accessible environment for museum guests. Accessible Lighting Levels Ambient Lighting

50 - 300 lux

Text Panels

100-300 lux

Controls

100 lux

Directional Signage

200-300 lux

Specimens, Objects

100-300 lux

Ramps, Stairs

100-300 lux

Visitor Pathways

100-300 lux

CCIODMechanical lighting accessibility


Program Elements Entrance

Occupancy Type A-3

Occupancy Number 29

Sq M Per Person 2.8

Security Medium

Plumbing No Yes

Store

M

24

4.6

Low

No

CafĂŠ

A-2

107

1.4

Low

Exhibits

A-3

602

2.8

A-3

137

A-3

n Back of House

n

Archives

s

Noise Level High

Equipment Cash Register, Counter

Outside Access Yes

Yes

High

No

Yes

Yes

High

Cash Register, Shelves, Counter Kitchen Equipment, Counter, Cash Register, Machine

High

Yes

Varies

Low

1.8

Medium

Yes

Yes

Medium/High

60

4.6

High

No

No

Low

Model Stands, Tables, No Chairs, Flat Files

B

15

9.3

Medium

Yes

Yes

Low

Desks, Chairs, Files Cabinet, Computer

S

10

27.9

High

No

Varies

Medium

Yes Fork Dollies, Shelves, Tables, Workshop Equipment, Cleaning Equipment

A-3

44

2.8

Low

Yes

No

Low

Toilet, Sink, Urinal, Mirrors,

Allowed

Yes

Model Stands, No Guard Rails Tables, Chairs, Sinks, No Shelves, Drying Racks, Pinup Space

No

No

These numbers have been derived from space percentage break downs, number of people expected, type of objects or equipment necessary, and activity in the space. Referenced: Museum Precedents, International Building Code

CCIODOverall space needs


City Transportation Zoning Demographics Attendance


The analyzation of transportation patterns led to an awareness of public access. The museum site is situated to allow for a broad range of transportation types. The museum will need to be designed to accommodate for these transportation types in order to maximize museum attendance. The following pages demonstrate our findings.

CCIODCity


N

Immediate Site Context

Route 46

Interstate 65

Washington Street

Architectural Landmarks

CCIODCity transportation


N

Immediate Site Context

Public Bus Routes

Bike Routes

Bike Accessible Roads

CCIODCity

bicycle & public transportation


Improvements Needed for Biking 70%

61%

60%

56%

Preferred Bike Racks

51%

50%

40%

40%

40%

30% 16%

9%

Post & Loop

st s

“A”

cy cli

an

Inverted “U”

Fe l

The city of Columbus can support the sustainable act of biking by providing an increase in bicycle racks. The current model provides a limited area to park your bike that may be inconvenient for bikers, causing them to choose another mode of transportation. The museum could increase the number of visitors by supporting bikers through the addition of required amenities to the building program. Many citizens show an interest in biking to the downtown area as their final destination.

ro m

ct Re

sp

ec

tf

sp e Re

lo w

Pe d m

fro

Tr ai

es tri

an nt en

ai lM

m fro

Re

5%

s

ce

y Sa

ht in Lig

M

fe t

g

s ist ot or

ct ne sp e

ct

Co n

Bi

ke

Pa r

ki

iv ity

ng

10%

Bi

20%

Where Columbus Citizens Would be Willing to Bike 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20%

Undecided

No

y Gr oc er

ng

Sh

op

pi

ol ho Sc

ra nt s

Re st

au

k W or

n nt ow

s Pa rk

Do w

Pe o

pl

eT ra ils

10%

Yes

CCIODCity

bicycle & public transportation


Site Commercial Mixed Use

Education Residential

Neighborhood zoning is an even mix between residential and non-residential establishments. The portion of the neighborhood east of the site is mostly composed of residential homes, apartment, public and private schools. West of the site is primarily commercial and mixed use center and public library on the southern boundary. Zoning helps better understand the site context and relationships to neighboring buildings.

CCIODCity

commercial context


Site Restaurant Bar Chain Restaurant Lodging Commercial Store

pedestrians travel from store to store and restaurants.

CCIODCity

commercial Context


Housing Distribution

The demographics of Columbus, Indiana are important in order to understand the local population that will be visiting and using the museum.

10-19 Unit 4.7%

It is clear from the statistics that the majority of the population consists of young families. The largest age range of the population is under five years old. It is important that we incorporate exhibits that interest both young children growing up and their parents.

Mobile Home 20+ Unit 4.6% 4.4%

5-9 Unit 6.7% 3-4 Unit 4.7% 2 Unit 3.4%

The housing distribution also shows that the city’s density is low and consists mostly of single family detached homes.

Attached Single Family 3.2% Detached Single Family 68.3%

Age Distribution

= 1000 People

= National Data

4 Million

<5

5-9

10-14

15-19 20-24

25-29

30-34 35-39

40-44 45-49

50-54

55-59 60-64

65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 >90

CCIODCity

demographics


Mills Race Arts Council Events (Attendees per year)

Commons Art Council Events (Attendees per year)

Kidscommons (Attendees per year)

= 1,000 Attendees Columbus Museum of Art and Design (Attendees in 241 days)

Other: The Crump Theater (with a limited budget put on 35 events) (with a limited budget put on 35 events)

The Columbus Indiana Philharmonic (no annual total given) -650 season ticket holders -Sells out most performances

CCIODCity

downtown columbus fine art event attendance


Winter

Spring

Dec.

Feb.

Jan.

Apr.

Mar.

May

Spring Farmer’s Market Hope Arts & Antiques Fair

Hope Civil War Days

Festival of Lights Parade

Fall

Summer Jul.

Jun.

Aug.

Oct.

Sep.

Nov.

Neighborfest Columbus CIty Farmer’s Market Midweek Farmer’s Market Columbus Farmer’s Market

Girlfriend Ride A Country Gathering

Bartholomew County 4-H Fair

AJGA Golf Tournament

Biggest Block Party Ever!

Rock the Park

Columbus Artfest Glassblowing & Iron Pour

Scottish Festival

Cummins Marathon

Hope Bike Hope Ride Heritage Days Hot Rods & Rock N’ Roll

Ethnic Expo

Indiana Healthcare Challange

Night of a Thousand Jacks

Deja Vu Art and Craft show

Historic Tour of Homes

CCIODCity event timeline


Site Solar Study, Building Height & Soil Analysis Temperature Analysis Wind Analysis Parking View Analysis


Analyzing environmental forces such as wind, sun, and temperature allow us to gain an understanding of the Columbus climate. This information is vital to aid in designing a museum with a stable interior environment to prevent damage to exhibit objects. The following pages demonstrate our findings on these environmental forces along with site specific issues such as parking.

CCIODSite


Soil Analysis Sandy Loam 150˚ 140˚

June 21st Sunset

160˚ 170˚ N

130˚

170˚160˚ 150˚ 140˚ 130˚

Loam 33 cm

June 21st Sunrise

110˚

110˚ 100˚

Clay Loam

100˚

Site

March 21st Sunset 80˚

80˚

61 cm

March 21st Sunrise

Gravelly Clay Loam

70˚

70˚

Dec. 21st Sunset

20 cm

50˚ 40˚

91 cm

Dec. 21st 50˚ Sunrise 30˚

20˚

10˚

10˚

20˚

30˚

40˚

Gravelly Coarse Sand

153 cm

Immediate Site Context N

9.1 m - 13.7 m 4.5 m - 9.1 m

CCIODSite environment


Annual Temperatures

Less than 32

32-70

70-75

75-100

In Fahrenheit

0 am 2 am 4 am 6 am

Sunrise

8 am 10 am

Image location Suggestion

Image location Suggestion

Image location Suggestion

12 Noon 2 pm 4 pm

Sunset

6 pm 8 pm 10 pm Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

Jun.

Jul.

Aug.

Sep.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

12 pm

CCIODSite environment


It is important to take wind directions and speeds into consideration when looking at possible programmatic orientation in relation to the site. After analyzing annual and seasonal wind data passive ventilation systems can be developed for the programmatic spaces that will not need highly controlled environmental conditions. 1 - 16 km/h

10%

20%

30%

(1-10 mph)

17 - 32 km/h

(11 - 20 mph)

33 - 48 km/h

(21 - 30 mph)

49 + km/h

Annual Wind Directions

(31 + mph)

Seasonal Wind Directions Spring

Winter

10 % 20% 30%

Summer

10 % 20% 30%

Fall

10 % 20% 30%

10 % 20% 30%

CCIODSite environment environment


Parking is an important component of any building because it is the starting and ending point. Parking needs to accommodate all users, which requires the addition of accessible stalls close to the building. Providing parking for employees is also an important consideration.

Layfayette

Franklin

P

5th

4th

3rd

P

Court House

N

Public Parking

Total Museum Occupancy is 1,028 people

Post Office

Washington St

t4FDVSJUZ(VBSE Y

t$PBU$IFDL&NQMPZFF t.VTFVN$VSBUPS t.VTFVN%JSFDUPS t"SDIJWF%JSFDUPS t&EVDBUion Director t3FDFJWJOH%JSFDUPS t$BGĂ?8PSLFST Y

t4UPSF8PSLFST Y

t(FOFSBM.VTFVN&NQMPZFFT Y

Library

Jackson

         

Site

Brown

         

7th

Cummins

P

Lindsey

With a museum of approximately 3716 square meters the employees will consist of:

Opportunity for Parking Expansion

Landmarks

Site

The city of Columbus does provide other alternatives for marking within a couple blocks, but the Downtown Strategic Plan mentions a shortage of parking. If the site could accommodate large number of parking spots it would help encourage visitors to the museum.

CCIODParking


According to International Building Code, the museum provides 30 parking spots a minimum of 2 spots need to be accessible.

Access to Building

Parking lot options: 60Ë&#x161; angled parking spots are the most common because they are easiest for people to pull in and out of.

45Ë&#x161;

60Ë&#x161;

75Ë&#x161;

Parking Space Accessible Aisle 2.44 m 1.5 m N GPSWBOT

0Ë&#x161;

CCIODParking


It will be important to incorporate or apply the context of the site and surrounding structures to our design. Understanding scale relationships and views to and from our site will influence our approach for the museum.

CCIODViews


CCIODSite site views


CCIODSite site views


Supplemental Information Museum Comprehensive Knowledge Leeum Museum Van Gogh Museum Des Moines Art Center Vitra Design Museum


To evaluate elements necessary for the Columbus Institute of Design we looked to supplemental information to guide our search. Information such as museum precedent studies and city codes enabled us to determine proportions and elements important to not only the Columbus Institute of Design, but Columbus as a whole.

CCIODSupplemental


Des Moines Art Center

The Des Moines Art Center is a compilation of three building additions. Each addition focuses on varying gallery sizes and circulation patterns appropriate to their rotating collections pieces. A large education wing filled with studios makes art education a prominent component of the museum program.

Van Gogh Museum

Although the Van Gogh Museum houses mainly paintings, it serves as a good example of incorporating differing circulation patterns and the needed flexibility of museums overtime. The museum has undergone multiple renovations including an addition and blends different architectural styles. Varying lighting and spatial conditions show methods of flexibility.

Vitra International Furniture Design Museum The Vitra International Furniture Museum is a unique small museum created to house the personal chair collection of the owners of the Vitra Furniture Company as well as two temporary exhibits at a time. The museum shares multiple similarities with that of the CCIOD. The size of the museum as well as its location among several influential pieces of architecture are two of these comparisons.

Leeum Samsung Art Museum

The most distinctive feature of the Leeum Art Museum is the three separate buildings in which they house their collections. Dividing up the collections by the time period in which they were created and then placing them in buildings of very different styles is a bold decision that distinguishes the identity of the museum.

CCIODSupplement

precedent studies


Exhibit Space

0.33% 8%

3%

6%

Lounge 5.66%

4%

Offices Entrance 16%

Circulation

14% 0.33%

Bathrooms Archives

4%

7%

Storage Mechanical Room Indoor Parking

32%

Modern and Contemporary Art

CafĂŠ

Education and Temporary exhibits

Education Wing

Traditional Art

Definition of spaces through vertical heights and artificial to natural daylight mixture

Clerestory Windows Daylighting Strategy

Black Box Specialized Exhibition Space

In Direct Lights Lighting Strategy

Vertical visual connection between exhibits Structural elements frame rather than separate the spaces Three separate structures that compliment each other, but separate the eras represented.

CCIODSupplement leeum samsung museum of art


This campus of museum is meant to physically separate the history and current art in which the museum is tasked with holding and displaying. building circulation

The wide variety of collections from ancient Korean mental works to educational exhibits are housed in the three structures. The northwestern structure is the museum of traditional art where ancient art and sculpture is housed. This is also the location of the main entrance from which visitors can come through after they have parked in the basement of the southern most building.

service alley

This building houses the educational activities along with an auditorium and exhibits that appeal to children. The northeastern building connected to the traditional art building, houses contemporary and modern art exhibits that both rotate as temporary exhibits and a permanent collection that is housed in the rectangular projections from the face of the project.

parking main roadways

CCIODSupplement leeum samsung museum of art


2%

1%

7% 2%

0.5%

Exhibit Space Rietveld Wing

Offices

5.5%

Kurokawa Wing

Auditorium Entrance

12%

Circulation Bathrooms

4%

Coat room

5% 52% 9%

Store Storage Mechanical Room Café

Balance Between Artificial Light & Daylight Social Dimension–Buses of People

Open Circulation Promotes Socialization Skylights Daylight Strategy

Differing Ceiling Heights

Outdoor Patio for Restaurant

Image location Open Area Suggestion

Can people watch as well as observe the works.

CCIODSupplement

van gogh art museum


The Van Gogh Art Museum demonstrates how museums change over time. It originated as one building, but as the need for additional space grew, the museum was expanded. The museum integrates daylighting strategies with artificial lighting to help create a welcoming, open environment for guests.

secluded by foliage

The exhibit space of the museum contains different options for the different types of work that may be shown in each space. exhibit space

The circulation pattern of the museum is interesting because it has above and below ground elements. The addition is connected to the older structure via an underground channel. Above this channel is an outdoor eating space that is adjacent to the cafĂŠ. This interesting connection demonstrates how different museum programs can be woven together to create a cohesive space.

cafĂŠ

outdoor eating

community gathering

underground circulation above ground circulation

CCIODSupplement

van gogh art museum


1% 4% 7%

10%

1%

1%

Exhibit Space Offices Entrance

9%

Education Wing 4%

Circulation

2%

Bathrooms Auditorium Storage 61%

Mechanical Room CafĂŠ

Each of the Art Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main buildings focuses on providing galleries capable of displaying both two and three dimensional pieces. The two later additions house the majority of sculptures on display due to the higher ceiling heights. A large education wing flanks the southern side of the parking lot and connects the main galleries through the upper level office wing and the lower level auditorium.

CCIODSupplement

des moines art center


Primary Exhibit Displays: Paintings, Drawings, etc. Sculpture Even Mix of 2D and 3D Education Wing

CCIODSupplement

des moines art center


Exhibit Space

0.3% 13%

2%

9%

1% 5%

Offices Entrance Education Wing Circulation

14%

Bathrooms Archives

5%

Storage

2% 49%

Mechanical Room CafĂŠ

Gehryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vitra Design Museum is located in rural Germany alongside the Vitra factory. The museum is 9,500 square feet and includes two permenent exhibit halls and a temporary exhibit hall. Other programs include a cafe, combination library education room, offices, and digital archives.

CCIODPrecedent

vitra international furniture design museum


Codes and Works Cited


City Codes t4JUFJTDMBTTJöFEBT;POFBOEJTMPDBUFEJOUIF$FOUSBM%JTUSJDU $%

t.JOJNVN-PUBSFBGPS$%%JTUSJDUTRN t.JOJNVN-PU8JEUIN t.JOJNVN-PU'SPOUBHFN t.BYJNVN-PU$PWFSBHF tNNJOJNVNTFUCBDLTPOBMMTJEFT t.BYJNVNQSJNBSZTUSVDUVSFTQFSMPU t5IFNBYJNVNIFJHIUPGUIFQSJNBSZTUSVDUVSFN FYDFQU m within one half block of any residential zoning district. As a result UIFNVTFVNIBTBMJNJUFEIFJHIUPGNGU "SUJDMF

t"OZBDDFTTPSZ4USVDUVSFIBTBNBYJNVNIFJHIUPGN "SUJDMF 

  t&YDFQUJPOTUPIFJHIUSVMFJODMVEFDIVSDITUFFQMFT  bell towers, spires, industrial storage tanks, mechanical equipment, and smokestacks.

38.1 m 15. 3 m

Environmental Regulations: t&YJTUJOHOBUVSBMGFBUVSFTUIBUXJMMBEEUPUIFDPNNVOJUZ JFNBUVSF USFFT TUSFBNT MBLFT XFUMBOET FUD TIPVMECFQSFTFSWFE t-BOETIBMMCFDPOTFSWFEUPNJOJNJ[FTUPSNXBUFSSVOPòBOE conserve natural cover and soil.

Lighting Regulations: t1SPIJCJUFEMJHIUJOHJODMVEFTIJHIJOUFOTJUZMJHIUT IB[BSEPVTMJHIUT  exposed bulb, flashing, or moving lights, traffic control, or emergency lights. tBuilding facades may be illuminated using either uplighting or downlighting, or a combo. Waste Management: t%VNQTUFSTCJHHFSUIBODVCJDZBSETNVTUCFTDSFFOFEGSPNWJFX of all public streets and roads and all adjacent properties.    t4DSFFOJOHDBOCFQFSGPSNFECZBTUSVDUVSF    t4DSFFOJOHNVTUCFBOPQBRVFTVSGBDFB  minimum of 1.8 m tall. Buffering Standards: t#VòFSZBSEJTSFRVJSFEXIFOFWFSBQSPQFSUZJOBNPSFJOUFOTJWF zoning district is adjacent to land in a less intensive zoning district. t5IFCVòFSZBSEXJMMCFQSPWJEFEVQPOUIFQSPQFSUZXJUIJOUIFNPSF intensive district. The required buffer shall be installed on each individual lot as each is developed. t#VòFSZBSETIBMMBQQMZBMPOHUIFQSPQFSUZMJOFTBOECFQSPWJEFE entirely on the subject property. t/PCVòFSTIBMMCFSFRVJSFEXIFSFBTUSFFUPSSPBETFQBSBUFT[POJOH districts.

CCIODCodes


Codes in accessibility are important to research and take into consideration to create a design access able for all users. By following accessibility guidelines the museum will create an environment friendly for patrons with abilities of all levels.

CCIODAccessibility


2.5 cm

.9 m

1.22 m

Minimum Turning Dimensions

Maximum Slope

30 cm

.9 m

Distance Required Between Double Doors

1.2 m

.9 m

Required Passing Distance

1.06 m

1.06 m

Maximum Exhibit Height for Cane Detection

.69 m

1.21 m

1.52 m

CCIODAccessibility required dimensions


1.42 m

1.5 m

1.575 m

1.675 m

.125 m

.205 m

.38 m

1.525 m .15 m

.28 m .43 m

Diagrams taken from Access for Everyone by Dr. Arvid E. Osterberg

CCIODAccessibility required dimensions


Diagrams taken from Access for Everyone by Dr. Arvid E. Osterberg

CCIODAccessibility required dimensions


Accessible Parking Lot Dimensions

Diagrams taken from Access for Everyone by Dr. Arvid E. Osterberg

CCIODAccessibility required dimensions


Education "School Information, Ratings and Rankings on BARTHOLOMEW CON SCHOOL CORP, COLUMBUS, IN 47201." School Information, Ratings and Rankings on BARTHOLOMEW CON SCHOOL CORP, COLUMBUS, IN 47201. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Sept. 2013. <http://schoolmatch.com/ppsi/schools/s1800360.cfm>. "Valentine One." : Sliding Room Dividers. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. <http://valentineonewallpaper.blogspot.com/2013/01/sliding-room-dividers.html>. "Room Dividers." Dwell. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. <http://www.dwell.com/furniture-and-products/room-dividers>.

"Po Leung Kuk Cam천es Tan Siu Lin Primary School." Po Leung Kuk Cam천es Tan Siu Lin Primary School. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. <http://www.plkctslps.edu.hk/school_information-facilities.php>. "MoMA | Small Scale, Big Change | Inner-City Arts." MoMA | Small Scale, Big Change | Inner-City Arts. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. <http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/smallscalebigchange/projects/inner_city_arts>. "Image Gallery | Ledalite." Image Gallery | Ledalite. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. <http://www.ledalite.com/imag e-gallery?product%5B%5D=1093&type=0>. Hilger, Oliver, and Paul Von Naredi-Rainer. Museum Buildings: A Design Manual. Boston: Birkh채user, 2004. Print. Archives "Columbus, Indiana Convention and Visitors Bureau." Columbus, Indiana Convention and Visitors Bureau. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Aug. 2013. <http://www.columbus.in.us/static/index.cfm?contentID=74> "20 Products Found." Flat File Cabinets. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/ecatalog/N-1z0dn2d>. Hilger, Oliver, and Paul Von Naredi-Rainer. Museum Buildings: A Design Manual. Boston: Birkh채user, 2004. Print. <https://www.facebook.com/pages/Columbus-Indiana-Architectural-Archives/123794607722673> "Cummins.com Corporate Responsibility About Corporate Responsibility Cummins Foundation." Cummins.com Corporate Responsibility About Corporate Responsibility Cummins Foundation. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Sept. 2013. <http://www.cummins.com/cmi/navigationAction.do?nodeId=6&siteId=1&nodeName=Cummins+Foundation&menuId=1003>. Administrative Grimley, Chris, and Mimi Love. Color, Space, and Style: All the Details Interior Designers Need to Know but Can Never Find. Beverly, MA: Rockport, 2007. Print.

CCIODWorks Cited


Restrooms "International Plumbing Code." American Restroom Association. American Restroom Association, n.d. Web. 11 Sept. 2013. <Office for education coordinator file cabinets for class paperwork and safety waivers access to wing restroom close proximity to administrative offices> Back of House Cool Way of Concealing Dumpsters, But Is It Legal? | PoPville. N.d. Photograph. PoPville. 29 Mar. 2013. Web. 30 Sept. 2013. Komatsu Utility Co., Ltd. Forklift Company. Forklift Specifications. Japan: Komatsu Utility, Forklift, 2013. Print. McMorrough, Julia. Materials, Structures, and Standards: All the Details Architects Need to Know but Can Never Find. Gloucester, MA: Rockport, 2006. Print. Schumacher Elevator Company. Hydraulic Freight Elevators. N.p.: Schumacher Elevator, 2013. Print. Schumacher Elevator Company. Traction Freight Elevators. N.p.: Schumacher Elevator, 2013. Print. WBDG Staff. "Presidential Library." WBDG. National Institute of Building Sciences, 21 Apr. 2011. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. <http://www.wbdg.org/design/presidential_library.php>. "MSC Products." Museum Services Corporation. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Sept. 2013. <http://www.museumservicescorporation.com/equip.html>. Huxtable, Marryl. "Conservation Journal." Victoria and Albert Museum, Online Museum, Web Team, Webmaster@vam.ac.uk. N.p., July 1996. Web. 29 Sept. 2013. <http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/journals/conservation-journal/issue-20/time-for-a-change-the-new-paper-conservation-studios/>. Palermo, Gregory. National Portrait Gallery Conservation Room. 2011, Photograph. National Portrait Gallery, Washington DC. "Textile Washing Table." Conservation Tools & Preservation Equipment. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Sept. 2013. <http://www.willard.co.uk/textile-washing-table>. Lord, Barry, Gail Dexter Lord, and Lindsay Martin. Manual of Museum Planning: Sustainable Space, Facilities, and Operations. Lanham, MD: AltaMira, 2012. Print. Komatsu Utility Co., Ltd. Forklift Company. Forklift Specifications. Japan: Komatsu Utility, Forklift, 2013. Print. "Site Design Standards." City of College Station, n.d. Web. 30 Sept. 2013. Schumacher Elevator Company. Traction Freight Elevators. N.p.: Schumacher Elevator, 2013. Print.

CCIODWorks Cited


Cafe Cont. http://restaurantinteriors.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/restaurant_table_layout_drawings1.jpg http://www.ciarestaurants.com/wp-content/gallery/cia-bakery-cafe/display-case-food-offerings.jpg http://www.fashionseating.com/Handlers/Image-Handler.ashx?Path=Products%5CMD-0008-GG.jpg&Width=600&Height=600 Exhibits Image Websites: http://columbusin.proboards.com/board/25/copyrighted-life-photos-1950-1961 http://columbusin.proboards.com/thread/49/reeves-pulley-pulleys-etc?page=1#scrollTo=609 http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Wood-Reeves-Pulley-Co-12-Flat-Split-Machine-Belt-Wheel-Columbus-Indiana-/290924314697 http://columbusin.proboards.com/thread/49 http://columbusin.proboards.com/thread/45/cummins-engine-company http://gabeweb.tumblr.com/post/25968336735/2013-cummins-qsk95-95-liter-16-cylinder-diesel https://mulberrystonline.com/date/2011/05/ http://columbusin.proboards.com/thread/42/arvin Image Websites: http://www.flickriver.com/photos/jjzimmermann/sets/72157621958078685/ http://thereluctantpaladin.blogspot.com/2011/03/arvin-space-heater-restoration.html http://columbusin.proboards.com/thread/41/hamilton-cosco http://www.target.com/p/cosco-retro-chair-with-step-stool-black/-/A-683292

CCIODWorks Cited


Mechanical Fordergemeinschaft Gutes Licht. "Good Lighting for Museums, Galleries and Exhibitions." N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <http://www.licht.de/fileadmin/shop-downloads/lichtwissen18_light_museums_galleries.pdf>. Frazier, Mary C. "Optimizing Museum Lighting." N.p., Sept. 2008. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <https://www.candela.com/SiteDocuments/Articles/MCF_Museum_Lighting_LD_A_09-08_pdf.pdf>. Herskovitz, Bob, and Rich Rummel. "Track Lighting in Museums." Tech Talk. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.mnhs.org/about/publications/techtalk/TechTalkNovember2006.pdf>. Hilger, Oliver, and Paul Von Naredi-Rainer. Museum Buildings: A Design Manual. Boston: Birkhäuser, 2004. Print. Incandescent Lamp: Photography. N.d. Photograph. Encyclopedia, Britannica, Inc. -- Kids Encyclopedia. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <http://kids.britannica.com/comptons/art-123027/Interior-scenes-are-often-photographed-with-the-use-of-lighting>. Miller, Jack V., and Ruth Ellen Miller. "Museum Lighting - Pure and Simple." Nouvir, n.d. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <http://www.nouvir.com/pdfs/MuseumLighting.pdf>. "Museum Collections Environment." National Park Service, n.d. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <http://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/MHI/CHAPTER4.pdf>. Museum Lighting. N.d. Photograph. Pegasus Lighting. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <http://www.pegasuslighting.com/museum-lighting.html>. Museums. N.d. Photograph. Museum Signs. Web. 15 Sept. 2013. <http://www.sign-age.com/industries/museums.html>. Museum Switches from Halogen Bulbs to LED Lights. N.d. Photograph. Environmental Lights Museum Switches from Halogen Bulbs to LED Lights Comments. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <http://www.environmentallights.com/library/museum_switches_from_halogen_bulbs_to_led_lights/>. N.d. Photograph. News Posts by Doug Hubley. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <http://www.bates.edu/news/author/dhubley/page/2/>. Block Museum. N.d. Photograph. Cameron Crawford. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. Signage News – Wheaton, IL. N.d. Photograph. Museum Exhibit Signs in Wheaton. Web. 15 Sept. 2013. <http://cityscoop.us/wheatonilsignage/2013/07/24/museum-exhibit-signs-wheaton-il/>. Demographics "US 2010 Census." American FactFinder - Columbus, IN. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Sept. 2013. <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_DP_DPDP1>

CCIODWorks Cited


Transportation "Columbus, Indiana Bicycle & Pedestrian Plan." City of Columbus. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <http://www.columbus.in.gov/cityofcolumbus/index.cfm/linkservid/697D53A2-1231-3D16-E9005479F4F977E6/showMeta/0/>. "Transit Map." City of Columbus. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <http://www.columbus.in.gov/cityofcolumbus/assets/File/Transit-Map.pdf>. Site "Columbus, Indiana Convention and Visitors Bureau." Columbus, Indiana Convention and Visitors Bureau. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Aug. 2013. <http://www.columbus.in.us/listings/index.cfm?catId=336>. "Downtown Columbus Parking Options." Columbus, Indiana Visitors Center, n.d. Web. 15 Sept. 2013. <http://www.columbus.in.us/docs/DowntownParking.pdf>.Site Cont. General Parking Standards. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Aug. 2013. <http://www.columbus.in.gov/linkservid/20BBF4FD-BC30-5BDD7FF8AD3284D32D2C/showMeta/0/>. McMorrough, Julia. Materials, Structures, and Standards: All the Details Architects Need to Know but Can Never Find. Gloucester, MA: Rockport, 2006. Print. "MesoWest Data." MesoWest Data. University of Utah, Department of Atmospheric Science, 2012. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. <http://mesowest.utah.edu/>. "Museum Collections Environment." National Park Service, n.d. Web. 12 Sept. 2013. <http://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/MHI/CHAPTER4.pdf> Codes "2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design." Department of Justice, 15 Sept. 2010. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. <http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/gpo22806/2010ADAStandards-prt.pdf>. "Building Code Revisions for Energy Efficiency." Building Code Revisions for Energy Efficiency. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Aug. 2013. <http://www.energymatterscolumbus.org/index.php/component/k2/item/270-building-code-revisions-for-energy-efficiency>. "City of Columbus Indiana." Zoning & Subdivision Regulations -. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Sept. 2013. <http://www.columbus.in.gov/planning/zoning/#columbus>. Majewski, Janice. "Accessible Exhibition Design." Smithsonian, n.d. Web. 14 Sept. 2013. <http://accessible.si.edu/pdf/Smithsonian%20Guidelines%20for%20accessible%20design.pdf>.

CCIODWorks Cited


Entry MUSEUM SECURITY. N.d. Photograph. MUSEUM SECURITY. Web. 14 Sept. 2013. <http://www.arscives.com/historysteel/mam.security.htm>. Security Guard. N.d. Photograph. Security Guard. Web. 14 Sept. 2013. <http://hartforddailyphoto.blogspot.com/2013/01/security-guard.html>. Smith, Steve. "Dimensions of a Coat Closet | EHow." EHow. Demand Media, 12 May 2011. Web. 14 Sept. 2013. <http://www.ehow.com/info_8406735_dimensions-coat-closet.html>. Store Grimley, Chris, and Mimi Love. Color, Space, and Style: All the Details Interior Designers Need to Know but Can Never Find. Beverly, MA: Rockport, 2007. Print. McMorrough, Julia. Materials, Structures, and Standards: All the Details Architects Need to Know but Can Never Find. Gloucester, MA: Rockport, 2006. Print. Image Websites: http://www.mam.gov.mo/images/service5.jpg http://www.tamarackwv.com/shared/content/WEBWVGiftshopOpening-B.jpg http://www.worcesterart.org/Services/shop.jpg Cafe Grimley, Chris, and Mimi Love. Color, Space, and Style: All the Details Interior Designers Need to Know but Can Never Find. Beverly, MA: Rockport, 2007. Print. McMorrough, Julia. Materials, Structures, and Standards: All the Details Architects Need to Know but Can Never Find. Gloucester, MA: Rockport, 2006. Print. Image Websites: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-jGzOL1dLtdw/TnkrrZFya8I/AAAAAAAAAKM/Cht9dozhyj0/s1600/cafe-1.jpg http://blogs-images.forbes.com/tomiogeron/files/2011/11/1115_cafe-coupa_1024x768.jpeg http://i2.wp.com/edforum.adventist.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/coffee-shop-business-plan.jpg

CCIODWorks Cited

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