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Fal l / Wi nt er2019

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• Over 30 years sales and marketing executive in telecom and hi-tech • Serves on the boards of two non profit senior care corporations • 4th generation Peninsula resident & has lived in Los Altos for over 30 years • Consistent top producer & member of Alain Pinel’s President Club

Serving The Communities Of Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Mountain View, Sunnyvale, And Cupertino

Lynn North Respect, Service, Results, & Referrals

RESULTS: All homes have sold in an average of 9 days and all for over the asking price!

“I am personally committed to your success in selling or finding your dream home.” Lynn North direct 650.209.1562 | cell 650.703.6437 | fax 650.941.1411 lnorth@apr.com | www.LynnNorth.com


• Over 30 years sales and marketing executive in telecom and hi-tech • Serves on the boards of two non profit senior care corporations • 4th generation Peninsula resident & has lived in Los Altos for over 30 years • Consistent top producer & member of Alain Pinel’s President Club

Serving The Communities Of Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Mountain View, Sunnyvale, And Cupertino

Lynn North Respect, Service, Results, & Referrals

RESULTS: All homes have sold in an average of 9 days and all for over the asking price!

“I am personally committed to your success in selling or finding your dream home.” Lynn North direct 650.209.1562 | cell 650.703.6437 | fax 650.941.1411 lnorth@apr.com | www.LynnNorth.com


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Buyers and Sellers immediately benefit from Cat’s instinctive abilities gained from over 18 years of practicing law. She started her journey in real estate during the housing crisis where she defended hundreds of homeowners, both investors and primary residents in foreclosure proceedings. She negotiated with lenders and worked alongside agents and tax advisers to ensure the most favorable results for her clients. You can trust that Cat will work hard to protect your interests and keep you informed and empowered during the entire process. As an attorney and broker who routinely works with high profile professional athletes and executives, you can rest assured that your privacy will always be protected. Having grown up in Lafayette and making Orinda her home, she understands the local mar-

ket and recognizes the value of owning in Lamorinda. She will help you avoid pitfalls that aren’t always identifiable and will take the stress and anxiety out of what should always be a positive experience! Cat is an alum of Santa Clara University and New York Law School and is licensed with the California and Florida State Bars. She is a board member of the San Francisco 49ers Academy in East Palo Alto and advocates for former NFL players with disability claims. “As my client, you will work with me one-on-one. Not with my team or my assistant. This is why I take on only a select number of clients at a time. I recognize when there are potential conflicts of interest and I strive for quality vs. quantity.”


A SPECIAL CONVERSATION

WITH PAT WADORS, Senior Vice President of Global Talent Organization at LinkedIn

ful and fastest growing companies in Silicon Valley and the world. Pat joined LinkedIn in January 2013 “to lead its world-class talent (HR) team. In addition to hiring, retaining and inspiring top talent, Pat is also responsible for all employee related HR programs at LinkedIn, including compensation and benefits and performance management”. Since her arrival, the company has nearly tripled in size. All this, and more, is why she is one of the most respected voices in business. In this brief conversation, enjoy what is some of her vision and philosophies, as we indeed have … Q: How do you see HR evolving – from what it was to where it is and your vision of where you see it heading? PW: HR is evolving from a function that is often viewed as process oriented to more of an innovative role. Typically, HR folks are not the first to deviate from the norm, but successful companies will have HR teams that are not only subject matter experts but they innovate at the same time. They are the ones in the industry that are making Human Resources hip and progressive. This is what we aspire to at LinkedIn. For instance, I am always looking to move the needle and to

yond their own boarders and think of talent issues that affect the world. They become game changers. SVL: Regarding talent – What are some of the key elements looked for – How important are data analytics and PW: When it comes to talent I hire for humility and intellectual curiosity. The candidate needs to have a decent amount of the skills required for the role, but as long as they have humility and curiosity, then the rest can almost always be learned. I am also a strong believer in treating people beautiful-

The HR Organization of the Future … What Does It Mean?” nization at LinkedIn. LinkedIn is one of the most success-

ny culture. Typically, these are individuals who think be-

what can aspiring employees learn to improve?

“How LinkedIn Is Creating

Pat Wadors is Senior Vice President of Global Talent Orga-

have the ability to inspire leaders and influence compa-

ly. At LinkedIn we are in hyper growth and in order to maintain our wonderful culture we need to continue to hire people who believe in this sentiment. We also need gain a fresh perspective. What better way to do this, and tap into the collective brainpower, than by bringing together the best and the brightest interns from around the Bay Area? We did just that this past summer when we hosted our first ever HR Hackathon event. Teams comprised of technical and non-technical interns competed against each other to come up with the coolest, most creative, out-of-the box solutions to today’s toughest HR problems. Over 150 interns from companies across the Bay Area participated, and the energy level and breadth of ideas generated from each team was inspiring. The future of HR is not about avoiding policies and processes, it is more about innovation and knowing what should be global vs. local, and creating unique experiences that differentiate your company. These leaders help evolve/create an amazing talent brand for their organizations and influence HR practices in their community. They are willing to experiment and compete for talent in new ways. I meet with my peers and other HR and Talent Acquisition leaders every single week. What I am discovering, are more leaders are in that third bucket or are leaders who aspire to be in that space. It means taking more intelligent risks. They

to constantly reinforce our culture through our behaviors and decisions we make every

Pat Wadors and participants of LinkedIn’s inaugural HR Hackathon. Photo credit: Tony Chung

to work for. Connect with those employees and see how they navigate the company. Remember – a company’s best hire is a referral from someone else at the company. If you really want to work somewhere try to find alumni from your alma mater that already works there, grab coffee with a current employee, follow the company, etc. Leverage your network to help you get your next job.

day. Pulsing our employees twice

SVL: HR is the catalyst - What

a year on an employee voice sur-

makes a good employee, man-

vey is one way in which we gauge

ager, leader desirable and great

our culture and engagement.

for the company and also for the

To help drive talent strategies

employee, himself/herself?

that truly enable our businesses success – we need data. Talent Analytics is the new oil. At LinkedIn we have built a talent analytics team to help us find, engage, hire and retain the right people. The data helps us understand things like where the candidates are, what skillsets they have, and who our competition is. This data also helps me keep an eye on our organizational health. What is our hiring pattern? Where do we have the most effective leaders? What do they do different that we can leverage in other teams? What are the key drivers to engagement? Data helps us solve problems and improve as a company. Regarding aspiring employees they need to learn to build out their network; connect with people who they went to school with, or worked with. Add your friends and family. Then learn about the companies and cultures you aspire

PW: I believe that a good employee is always learning, has a strong work ethic and is a brand ambassador for their organization. Managers and leaders need to lead the way. They create the vision that others aspire to achieve. They need to be authentic and treat people beautifully. They should ensure their teams are working on a good mix of projects that both stretches them in their skills and contributes to the success of the company. They encourage the team to come to the table with solutions, not problems. They realize that mistakes are just part of the necessary learning curve and should not be hidden. They believe in transparency to build trust. They strive to be both empowering while holding themselves and their teams accountable.


A SPECIAL CONVERSATION

WITH PAT WADORS, Senior Vice President of Global Talent Organization at LinkedIn

ful and fastest growing companies in Silicon Valley and the world. Pat joined LinkedIn in January 2013 “to lead its world-class talent (HR) team. In addition to hiring, retaining and inspiring top talent, Pat is also responsible for all employee related HR programs at LinkedIn, including compensation and benefits and performance management”. Since her arrival, the company has nearly tripled in size. All this, and more, is why she is one of the most respected voices in business. In this brief conversation, enjoy what is some of her vision and philosophies, as we indeed have … SVL: How do you see HR evolving – from what it was to where it is and your vision of where you see it heading? PW: HR is evolving from a function that is often viewed as process oriented to more of an innovative role. Typically, HR folks are not the first to deviate from the norm, but successful companies will have HR teams that are not only subject matter experts but they innovate at the same time. They are the ones in the industry that are making Human Resources hip and progressive. This is what we aspire to at LinkedIn. For instance, I am always looking to move the needle and to

yond their own boarders and think of talent issues that affect the world. They become game changers. Q: Regarding talent – What are some of the key elements looked for – How important are data analytics and PW: When it comes to talent I hire for humility and intellectual curiosity. The candidate needs to have a decent amount of the skills required for the role, but as long as they have humility and curiosity, then the rest can almost

The HR Organization of the Future … What Does It Mean?” nization at LinkedIn. LinkedIn is one of the most success-

ny culture. Typically, these are individuals who think be-

what can aspiring employees learn to improve?

“How LinkedIn Is Creating

Pat Wadors is Senior Vice President of Global Talent Orga-

have the ability to inspire leaders and influence compa-

gain a fresh perspective. What better way to do this, and tap into the collective brainpower, than by bringing together the best and the brightest interns from around the Bay Area? We did just that this past summer when we hosted our first ever HR Hackathon event. Teams comprised of technical and non-technical interns competed against each other to come up with the coolest, most creative, out-of-the box solutions to today’s toughest HR problems. Over 150 interns from companies across the Bay Area participated, and the energy level and breadth of ideas generated from each team was inspiring. The future of HR is not about avoiding policies and processes, it is more about innovation and knowing what should be global vs. local, and creating unique experiences that differentiate your company. These leaders help evolve/create an amazing talent brand for their organizations and influence HR practices in their community. They are willing to experiment and compete for talent in new ways. I meet with my peers and other HR and Talent Acquisition leaders every single week. What I am discovering, are more leaders are in that third bucket or are leaders who aspire to be in that space. It means taking more intelligent risks. They

Pat Wadors and participants of LinkedIn’s inaugural HR Hackathon. Photo credit: Tony Chung

always be learned.

to work for. Connect with those employees and see how

I am also a strong believer in treating people beautiful-

they navigate the company. Remember – a company’s

ly. At LinkedIn we are in hyper growth and in order to

best hire is a referral from someone else at the company.

maintain our wonderful culture we need to continue to

If you really want to work somewhere try to find alum-

hire people who believe in this sentiment. We also need

ni from your alma mater that already works there, grab

to constantly reinforce our culture through our behav-

coffee with a current employee, follow the company, etc.

iors and decisions we make every

Leverage your network to help you get your next job.

day. Pulsing our employees twice a year on an employee voice sur-

Q: HR is the catalyst - What

vey is one way in which we gauge

makes a good employee, man-

our culture and engagement.

ager, leader desirable and great

To help drive talent strategies

for the company and also for the

that truly enable our businesses

employee, himself/herself?

success – we need data. Talent Analytics is the new oil.

PW: I believe that a good em-

At LinkedIn we have built a talent analytics team to help

ployee is always learning, has a strong work ethic and is a

us find, engage, hire and retain the right people. The data

brand ambassador for their organization.

helps us understand things like where the candidates

Managers and leaders need to lead the way. They cre-

are, what skillsets they have, and who our competition is.

ate the vision that others aspire to achieve. They need to

This data also helps me keep an eye on our organization-

be authentic and treat people beautifully. They should

al health. What is our hiring pattern? Where do we have

ensure their teams are working on a good mix of proj-

the most effective leaders? What do they do different

ects that both stretches them in their skills and contrib-

that we can leverage in other teams? What are the key

utes to the success of the company. They encourage the

drivers to engagement? Data helps us solve problems

team to come to the table with solutions, not problems.

and improve as a company.

They realize that mistakes are just part of the necessary

Regarding aspiring employees they need to learn to build

learning curve and should not be hidden. They believe

out their network; connect with people who they went to

in transparency to build trust. They strive to be both em-

school with, or worked with. Add your friends and family.

powering while holding themselves and their teams ac-

Then learn about the companies and cultures you aspire

countable.


WWW. FACEBOOK. COM/ BAYAREAWOMENMAG


Any realtor will sell you a house. I’ll search high and low until we find your home. I won’t sell any home I wouldn’t live in myself. What does this mean for my clients? It means that I know all of the market trends, neighborhood comps, and statistics. But I don’t rely exclusively on the numbers. I get to know you, what you need, and what you want in your next home. And I won’t settle for a house that checks all the data boxes but feels cold or unwelcoming. I want you to have a stable investment and build equity. I also find spaces with atmosphere and smart, livable design. My knack for relationship building means I make a great selling agent as well. Once you list with me, you can sit back and relax, knowing that I’m constantly networking with other local realtors and meeting new buyers to make sure we find a perfect match and sell your home for its full value.

If you’re interested in this kind of buying and selling experience, I’d love to work with you. I’ll walk you through the process, distill the complexities into easy steps, and answer the questions you might not even think to ask. And if we begin working together and you find a different agent who’s more your style - just let me know! I’m might not be the perfect realtor for every single person - and that’s ok. But for those who choose to continue working with me, I give 100% of my focus and attention to finding you the very best solution. I discovered my passion for real estate when my husband and I purchased our first home. After we closed, I found myself continuing to check home prices and following the market. I find it fascinating - and I know not everyone does, so feel free to borrow my nerd-level expertise for your own real estate adventures.


Featured Local Business

Since 1977 — A Tradition in Downtown Mountain View

The Garcia-Lopez family invites you to enjoy our family recipes that have been handed down to us for generations. From our “Mole Poblano” to our “Grandma’s Special”, enjoy the taste and ambiance of Mexico. We feature the greatest Margaritas, more than 200 Blue Agave Tequilas & a wide selection of beers. Thank you all - We appreciate again being voted: The Best Mexican Restaurant in Mountain View by the Mountain View Voice, The Best Margarita in Mountain View by the Mountain View Voice and also The Best Mexican Restaurant in Silicon Valley by the Metro. Open 7 Days a Week for Lunch and Dinner, plus a Champagne/Sangria Brunch Saturday and Sunday. Banquet facilities available with seating up to 40. Wonderful for Birthdays, Weddings, Anniversaries, Engagements, Quincineras - any and all Special Events and Get Togethers - for Families and Friends.

Champagne/Sangria Brunch Saturday and Sunday 11am-3pm

Banquet Facilities Seat up to 40 Monday-Thursday 11:00am-2:00pm and 5:00pm-9:00pm Friday 11:00am-2:00pm and 5:00pm-10:00pm Saturday 11:00am-10:00pm • Sunday 11:00am-9:00pm

Contact us today! (650)968-1364

240 Villa St., Mountain View, CA 94041 • (650) 968-1364


Featured Local Business

Since 1977 — A Tradition in Downtown Mountain View

The Garcia-Lopez family invites you to enjoy our family recipes that have been handed down to us for generations. From our “Mole Poblano” to our “Grandma’s Special”, enjoy the taste and ambiance of Mexico. We feature the greatest Margaritas, more than 200 Blue Agave Tequilas & a wide selection of beers. Thank you all - We appreciate again being voted: The Best Mexican Restaurant in Mountain View by the Mountain View Voice, The Best Margarita in Mountain View by the Mountain View Voice and also The Best Mexican Restaurant in Silicon Valley by the Metro. Open 7 Days a Week for Lunch and Dinner, plus a Champagne/Sangria Brunch Saturday and Sunday. Banquet facilities available with seating up to 40. Wonderful for Birthdays, Weddings, Anniversaries, Engagements, Quincineras - any and all Special Events and Get Togethers - for Families and Friends.

Champagne/Sangria Brunch Saturday and Sunday 11am-3pm

Banquet Facilities Seat up to 40 Monday-Thursday 11:00am-2:00pm and 5:00pm-9:00pm Friday 11:00am-2:00pm and 5:00pm-10:00pm Saturday 11:00am-10:00pm • Sunday 11:00am-9:00pm

Contact us today! (650)968-1364

240 Villa St., Mountain View, CA 94041 • (650) 968-1364


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Mirella is an expert who specializes in investment-grade properties, particularly apartments and mixed-use properties located throughout

Mirella Webb

Senior Investment Advisor DRE lic.: 01409540 O: 415.814.6699 M: 415.640.4133 mirella.webb@compass.com

San Francisco and the Bay Area. With 15 years of experience specializing in these properties, she clearly understands the intricacies of San Francisco’s rent controlled apartment buildings and she’s become one of the best sources for market information. Prior to joining Compass, Mirella worked at Alain Pinel RE Investment Group where her team built the strongest group of apartment brokers in San Francisco. Prior to APR, Mirella worked at Grubb & Ellis Commercial Real Estate for over 10 years where she successfully completed over $150 million in transactions and she was Rookie of the Year in 2005. Since joining APR in 2008, Mirella has become one of the top producers for the Alain Pinel Investment Group earning the coveted President’s Club Membership for the last 7 years and a totol of over $1 billion in sales volume. Mirella’s market knowledge has earned her a column in the San Francisco Apartment Magazine where she writes regularly about the most recent sales. With her many years of experience in selling investment properties, Mirella can help maximize the value of your property. She takes pride in always achieving the highest price for her clients and she has the track record to prove it.

commercial

https://www.compass.com/agents/sf/mirella-webb/


Infoblox - a global leader in delivering Actionable Network Intelligence to enterprise, government, and service provider customers around the world - has launched a global initiative entitled the“Women’s Internal Network”(WIN) to increase the representation of women at the company. The purpose of WIN is to build an internal support system to attract, retain and promote women in the workplace. A global initiative of this magnitude can only be successful with active support at the highest level.

Bay Area Women Magazine caught up with the Executive Board for the WIN group … • Jesper Andersen, CEO • Sonya Andreae, Vice President of Global Customer Advocacy • Norma Lane, Executive Vice President of People & Places Read on to see what each has to say . . .


Infoblox - a global leader in delivering Actionable Network Intelligence to enterprise, government, and service provider customers around the world - has launched a global initiative entitled the“Women’s Internal Network”(WIN) to increase the representation of women at the company. The purpose of WIN is to build an internal support system to attract, retain and promote women in the workplace. A global initiative of this magnitude can only be successful with active support at the highest level.

Bay Area Women Magazine caught up with the Executive Board for the WIN group … • Jesper Andersen, CEO • Sonya Andreae, Vice President of Global Customer Advocacy • Norma Lane, Executive Vice President of People & Places Read on to see what each has to say . . .


Q&A with Infoblox’s WIN Executive Team “Our primary focus is to expand the presence of women in leadership, enterprise direct sales, and engineering roles.” JESPER ANDERSEN - INFOBLOX CEO

Q: What is the purpose of Infoblox’s “Women’s Internal Network” and what need will it serve? JA: Our purpose is to build an internal support system to attract, retain and promote women in the workplace. Our primary focus is to expand the presence of women in leadership, enterprise direct sales, and engineering roles.

SONYA ANDREAE - GLOBAL CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT EXECUTIVE

Q: As a company, what made you stop and say … “we need to create a WIN program?” JA: We value diversity at all levels and in all job categories throughout the organization. We’re fortunate to have a diverse workforce, in general. However, we lack broad representation of Women in senior leadership and technical roles. We decided to create an internal network for women to learn together and from each other. Additionally, we want to support external efforts that inspire young women to pursue engineering and technology careers. This will help fill the pipeline with qualified candidates in the future. Collectively, we think we can make a difference. The result will be a more engaged and productive workforce, and ultimately a more successful organization. Q: What goals do you hope to achieve and what is your time frame? JA: We haven’t established a timeframe or specific quotas to achieve. Instead we’re taking direct action to achieve our goals in everything we do. From recruitment, to employee development, outreach activities and mentoring efforts. Additionally, we’re participating in a variety of community initiatives that align with our goal. Q: How will you monitor the progress of WIN? JA: We’ll measure our effectiveness in engagement levels of women employees through our mid-year and annual employee engagement survey. Additionally, we’ll measure our percent of women representation in leadership and technology positions.

JESPER ANDERSEN - INFOBLOX CEO

Q: What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership? SA: A primary concern is the lack of women entering the Engineering/technical profession resulting in fewer women available to assume leadership position in the high-tech industry. There are a variety of social and economic reasons that have resulted in an imbalance of women in leadership and technology. Many women don’t have mentors at home to help shape their career aspirations. Others were preoccupied with fulfilling traditional roles of being a mother and/or caretaker, placing their career goals on the back burner. Additionally, there are still deep-seated biases that have existed for many generations. During the last few decades I’ve seen a positive shift in this mindset. As a result, women are achieving parity in the workplace. Although we’re seeing positive change in the workplace, it will require sustainable change in institutional mindset to correct these biases over time. Male presence still dominates the boardroom and C-Suite positions.

Q: Why is tech the fastest-growing industry in the U.S. which is predicted to provide more job opportunities than all other professional sectors, still failing to attract and retain women in your opinion? SA: I wouldn’t say the high-tech industry is failing at attracting and retaining women in the workplace. Quite the opposite. I think we’re making significant progress. More than ever, employers are sponsoring mentorships for women in technology and proactively pursuing opportunities to expand their representation of women, particularly in technical positions. Additionally, there are now many Corporate-backed outreach programs designed to attract and inspire women to enter high-tech careers. STEM and Code.org come to mind as two well-funded programs sponsored by employers in the high-tech industry. However, as noted earlier, it takes time to change mindset and practice resulting from generations of gender bias. Infoblox is one of many employers who are embracing this change in mindset by promoting women leadership in the workplace and sponsoring programs aligned with our beliefs.


Q&A with Infoblox’s WIN Executive Team “Our primary focus is to expand the presence of women in leadership, enterprise direct sales, and engineering roles.” JESPER ANDERSEN - INFOBLOX CEO

Q: What is the purpose of Infoblox’s “Women’s Internal Network” and what need will it serve? JA: Our purpose is to build an internal support system to attract, retain and promote women in the workplace. Our primary focus is to expand the presence of women in leadership, enterprise direct sales, and engineering roles.

SONYA ANDREAE - GLOBAL CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT EXECUTIVE

Q: As a company, what made you stop and say … “we need to create a WIN program?” JA: We value diversity at all levels and in all job categories throughout the organization. We’re fortunate to have a diverse workforce, in general. However, we lack broad representation of Women in senior leadership and technical roles. We decided to create an internal network for women to learn together and from each other. Additionally, we want to support external efforts that inspire young women to pursue engineering and technology careers. This will help fill the pipeline with qualified candidates in the future. Collectively, we think we can make a difference. The result will be a more engaged and productive workforce, and ultimately a more successful organization. Q: What goals do you hope to achieve and what is your time frame? JA: We haven’t established a timeframe or specific quotas to achieve. Instead we’re taking direct action to achieve our goals in everything we do. From recruitment, to employee development, outreach activities and mentoring efforts. Additionally, we’re participating in a variety of community initiatives that align with our goal. Q: How will you monitor the progress of WIN? JA: We’ll measure our effectiveness in engagement levels of women employees through our mid-year and annual employee engagement survey. Additionally, we’ll measure our percent of women representation in leadership and technology positions.

JESPER ANDERSEN - INFOBLOX CEO

Q: What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership? SA: A primary concern is the lack of women entering the Engineering/technical profession resulting in fewer women available to assume leadership position in the high-tech industry. There are a variety of social and economic reasons that have resulted in an imbalance of women in leadership and technology. Many women don’t have mentors at home to help shape their career aspirations. Others were preoccupied with fulfilling traditional roles of being a mother and/or caretaker, placing their career goals on the back burner. Additionally, there are still deep-seated biases that have existed for many generations. During the last few decades I’ve seen a positive shift in this mindset. As a result, women are achieving parity in the workplace. Although we’re seeing positive change in the workplace, it will require sustainable change in institutional mindset to correct these biases over time. Male presence still dominates the boardroom and C-Suite positions.

Q: Why is tech the fastest-growing industry in the U.S. which is predicted to provide more job opportunities than all other professional sectors, still failing to attract and retain women in your opinion? SA: I wouldn’t say the high-tech industry is failing at attracting and retaining women in the workplace. Quite the opposite. I think we’re making significant progress. More than ever, employers are sponsoring mentorships for women in technology and proactively pursuing opportunities to expand their representation of women, particularly in technical positions. Additionally, there are now many Corporate-backed outreach programs designed to attract and inspire women to enter high-tech careers. STEM and Code.org come to mind as two well-funded programs sponsored by employers in the high-tech industry. However, as noted earlier, it takes time to change mindset and practice resulting from generations of gender bias. Infoblox is one of many employers who are embracing this change in mindset by promoting women leadership in the workplace and sponsoring programs aligned with our beliefs.


NORMA LANE - CHRO AND EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES NORMA

“We would like to see a significant increase of women represented in our management and technical positions. We are committed to creating and maintaining a work environment that reflects gender diversity, which in turn, will result in higher employee morale, superior performance, and ultimately profitability. ” NORMA LANE - EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES

Q: Focusing on diversity in the workplace is an essential step in building a great culture. How has Infoblox responded to this challenge as a company thus far? NL: Fortunately, we’ve built a great culture and a cool work environment which focuses on collaboration, respecting others, and having fun. (“We believe that a fun, caring, collaborative, and learning work environment will stimulate creativity and innovation that results in customer satisfaction and business success,” said Jesper Andersen, CEO of Infoblox) We also maintain a diverse work environment and fully embrace diversity in all areas of the company. Our challenge is finding qualified candidates in our senior management, direct enterprise sales, and Engineering environment. We’re taking steps to sponsor programs (like Hour of Code) that promote women in technology through STEM and various professional associations (such as Watermark) who are also aligned with our purpose. This will help build a strong pipeline of female candidates for future consideration. Additionally, we’re sponsoring a variety of programs to develop and promote women currently employed at Infoblox. Q: There is currently lack of women in tech … does Infoblox have a goal of how many Women they would like to employ in the company? NL: We would like to see a significant increase of women represented in our management and technical positions. We are committed to creating and maintaining a work environment that reflects gender diversity, which in turn, will result in higher employee morale, superior performance, and ultimately profitability. Q: A diverse workplace is proven to get better results, more accurately reflects your customer/client base, and ensures a wider range of experience. Do you feel WIN project will help Infoblox meet its goals? NL: Absolutely! A diverse work environment offers diverse opinions on broad business issues. Ultimately, business decisions are well thought out and result in sustainable solutions because we’ve considered a variety of creative ideas and in-depth insight.

SONYA ANDREAE - GLOBAL CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT EXECUTIVE

NORMA LANE - EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES

Q: What woman inspires you and why? NL: Personally, I relate to women who are successful because of their resilience and grit. They’ve been through their share of life experiences that may have been challenging. However, they remained focused and determined, despite the obstacles. These women were not born with a silver spoon. They didn’t come from privileged families who paved the way for their success. Instead, these women envisioned their dreams and seized opportunities to pursue them; Overcoming many speed bumps along the way. Even after achieving success they remained humble and gave back to their community so that others can also prosper. Oprah Winfrey comes to mind. My Grandma is another.


NORMA LANE - CHRO AND EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES NORMA

“We would like to see a significant increase of women represented in our management and technical positions. We are committed to creating and maintaining a work environment that reflects gender diversity, which in turn, will result in higher employee morale, superior performance, and ultimately profitability. ” NORMA LANE - EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES

Q: Focusing on diversity in the workplace is an essential step in building a great culture. How has Infoblox responded to this challenge as a company thus far? NL: Fortunately, we’ve built a great culture and a cool work environment which focuses on collaboration, respecting others, and having fun. (“We believe that a fun, caring, collaborative, and learning work environment will stimulate creativity and innovation that results in customer satisfaction and business success,” said Jesper Andersen, CEO of Infoblox) We also maintain a diverse work environment and fully embrace diversity in all areas of the company. Our challenge is finding qualified candidates in our senior management, direct enterprise sales, and Engineering environment. We’re taking steps to sponsor programs (like Hour of Code) that promote women in technology through STEM and various professional associations (such as Watermark) who are also aligned with our purpose. This will help build a strong pipeline of female candidates for future consideration. Additionally, we’re sponsoring a variety of programs to develop and promote women currently employed at Infoblox. Q: There is currently lack of women in tech … does Infoblox have a goal of how many Women they would like to employ in the company? NL: We would like to see a significant increase of women represented in our management and technical positions. We are committed to creating and maintaining a work environment that reflects gender diversity, which in turn, will result in higher employee morale, superior performance, and ultimately profitability. Q: A diverse workplace is proven to get better results, more accurately reflects your customer/client base, and ensures a wider range of experience. Do you feel WIN project will help Infoblox meet its goals? NL: Absolutely! A diverse work environment offers diverse opinions on broad business issues. Ultimately, business decisions are well thought out and result in sustainable solutions because we’ve considered a variety of creative ideas and in-depth insight.

SONYA ANDREAE - GLOBAL CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT EXECUTIVE

NORMA LANE - EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES

Q: What woman inspires you and why? NL: Personally, I relate to women who are successful because of their resilience and grit. They’ve been through their share of life experiences that may have been challenging. However, they remained focused and determined, despite the obstacles. These women were not born with a silver spoon. They didn’t come from privileged families who paved the way for their success. Instead, these women envisioned their dreams and seized opportunities to pursue them; Overcoming many speed bumps along the way. Even after achieving success they remained humble and gave back to their community so that others can also prosper. Oprah Winfrey comes to mind. My Grandma is another.


WWW. FACEBOOK. COM/ BAYAREAWOMENMAG


I sincerely enjoy my career as a real estate agent. For over 20 years I have lived and provided excellent service, as well as practical guidance, in the listing and sale of properties in the Santa Clara Valley and beyond. Whether I am negotiating to garner the best contract price for my sellers or working hard in a multiple offer scenario for my buyers, I thrive on helping my clients realize their property ownership dreams. I bring Honesty, Integrity, and Passion for the Job! If I am not with a client or working on marketing and advertising a new listing, you will find me at the gym working out, running, spending time with my two grown daughters, playing a competitive tennis match, or sipping a wonderful glass of wine with my husband at the end of the day. For many years I have supported and volunteered for local ballet and dance troupes and I am passionate about supporting Breast Cancer Awareness events and finding a cure for Lyme disease. As a prospective client, you may be assured that I will always place your interests and needs as my first priority. I take my responsibilities VERY seriously and am more than full time in your service. One extremely satisfied client of mine summarized my work ethic better than I could, “Kerry is extremely professional and has the commitment and high energy needed for top performance… Kerry’s sales efforts show preparation and creativity, along with quick and excellent results.” I bring a wealth of experience, education, tenacity, and ingenuity to each transaction. I believe my degree in psychology from the University of Colorado, Boulder has provided me with the ability to keep interactions between people positive. My training as a Certified Residential Specialist and Relocation Specialist enhances my capacity to represent your interests at the highest level. I am thankful to have received numerous honors over the years from my full-service broker, Alain Pinel Realtors including: Top Producing Agent, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Circle Awards, and Rookie of the Year. APR has since joined forces with Compass Real Estate.


Bay Area

WOMEN magazine

We Support Diversity and Gender Equality – An Issue Greater Than Just “Equal Pay in the Workplace”

The story behind Bay Area Women Magazine and Website has always been to empower, inspire and support women in our local communities and the workplace. We believe in diversity and gender equality, equal pay for equal work and believe that no woman should have to be in fear of harassment or assault in her community or workplace. Women have made unquestionable advances — from American boardrooms and courts of law, to political and sports arenas — but inequality remains,  especially in poor or rural areas. By simply being inclusive of an equitable number of women in an organization, it has availed itself of a larger talent pool, increased its attractiveness to potential talent, increased its ability to retain talent and has brought an insightful eye to market to potential users and clients of the organization’s products or services. While outcomes of equality in the workplace should be achievable equally among genders, these outcomes may not necessarily be the same for all. Still, it’s essential to advance the trend of acceptance and advancement in gender equality to ensure that access and enjoyment of the same rewards, resources and opportunities are available to all. This includes freedom from gender discrimination and its stereotypes, pregnancy and parenting, freedom from discrimination in fields of employment where women have traditionally been excluded or discouraged and the systemic undervaluing of work traditionally performed by women. Workplaces need to provide equal opportunities and pay for equal work; there is no justifiable reason based on gender not to do so. There should never be limits to the equal participation of women in the workforce. All should have access to all positions and industries; including leadership roles regardless of gender. Women represent nearly half of the U.S. workforce and the number of women in politics is increasing rapidly. At some point in their career, one in four women has been subjected to harassment at work. Management has a responsibility to ensure they act early to both identify and stop harassment, but unfortunately, in many companies, occurrences are often ignored. If there are signs of harassment taking place within the workplace– no matter how big or small – it should be rectified immediately, and preventative processes reevaluated to avert such occurrences from happening again. Organizations have a responsibility to maintain an environment that is free of sexual harassment. Today we are asking that our communities’ most prominent workplaces and community organizations take a step to join Bay Area Women Magazine and its website to advocate for respectful, fair and dignified treatment of women. Thank You Rich Borell Founder & Publisher


Bay Area

WOMEN magazine

We Support Diversity and Gender Equality – An Issue Greater Than Just “Equal Pay in the Workplace”

The story behind Bay Area Women Magazine and Website has always been to empower, inspire and support women in our local communities and the workplace. We believe in diversity and gender equality, equal pay for equal work and believe that no woman should have to be in fear of harassment or assault in her community or workplace. Women have made unquestionable advances — from American boardrooms and courts of law, to political and sports arenas — but inequality remains,  especially in poor or rural areas. By simply being inclusive of an equitable number of women in an organization, it has availed itself of a larger talent pool, increased its attractiveness to potential talent, increased its ability to retain talent and has brought an insightful eye to market to potential users and clients of the organization’s products or services. While outcomes of equality in the workplace should be achievable equally among genders, these outcomes may not necessarily be the same for all. Still, it’s essential to advance the trend of acceptance and advancement in gender equality to ensure that access and enjoyment of the same rewards, resources and opportunities are available to all. This includes freedom from gender discrimination and its stereotypes, pregnancy and parenting, freedom from discrimination in fields of employment where women have traditionally been excluded or discouraged and the systemic undervaluing of work traditionally performed by women. Workplaces need to provide equal opportunities and pay for equal work; there is no justifiable reason based on gender not to do so. There should never be limits to the equal participation of women in the workforce. All should have access to all positions and industries; including leadership roles regardless of gender. Women represent nearly half of the U.S. workforce and the number of women in politics is increasing rapidly. At some point in their career, one in four women has been subjected to harassment at work. Management has a responsibility to ensure they act early to both identify and stop harassment, but unfortunately, in many companies, occurrences are often ignored. If there are signs of harassment taking place within the workplace– no matter how big or small – it should be rectified immediately, and preventative processes reevaluated to avert such occurrences from happening again. Organizations have a responsibility to maintain an environment that is free of sexual harassment. Today we are asking that our communities’ most prominent workplaces and community organizations take a step to join Bay Area Women Magazine and its website to advocate for respectful, fair and dignified treatment of women. Thank You Rich Borell Founder & Publisher


Raised in the Bay Area and Silicon Valley, Angelé is intimately familiar with the area, neighborhoods, schools, and lifestyle. Going on 25 years as a full-time agent, Angelé has developed her talent for selling and finding dream homes for her clients so well that she is consistently a top producer. She now works with Compass, a cutting-edge real estate company sleekly designed with the goal of helping clients find their place in the world. Being part of such an organization gives both her sellers and buyers the competitive edge needed in today’s complicated market. Markets served: Santa Clara County, parts of San Mateo County, and Santa Cruz County. Angelé has earned her SRES® Desgination as her commitment to assist Baby Boomers and the 50+ homeowners with decisions about aging in place, reverse mortgages, or senior housing options. First time homebuyers and up-sizing homeowners are specialties as well!


Recognized Education Leader,

Meet Dr. Mary Ann Dewan, Santa Clara County Superintendent of Schools Q: When your career in Education started, did you have any idea, you would be where you are today? Dr. Dewan: I began my career in education as a fourth grader teacher. I loved teaching and I had no idea at that time what the future would hold nor what the possibilities for advancement were.

Dr. Dewan, presiding over the Opportunity Youth Academy’s (OYA) ribbon cutting ceremony at Snell. The blended program engages 16-24 year olds to earn their high school diploma and leave with a path to post graduation college or career.

“As a teacher, I thought it was important to create the conditions in the classroom for active learning and collaboration. I believed that children enjoy learning, like to set goals and embrace new challenges.”

Q: When you began your career as a teacher, can you describe your philosophy of teaching? Dr. Dewan: As a teacher, I thought it was important to create the conditions in the classroom for active learning and collaboration. I believed that children enjoy learning, like to set goals, and embrace new challenges. Students demonstrate their knowledge and are most engaged with “Hands on” learning lessons and projects. I believed that it was my job to be prepared and I was always eager to work long hours to prepare lesson plans and materials for students. Q: How long were you a teacher before you knew you wanted to take the next step as Principal? Can you share with our audience what motivated you to take that step up to Principal? Dr. Dewan: My career in Educational administration started when a leader I admired greatly encouraged me to become a school principal. I was hesitant at first to leave the classroom after nine years because the students inspired me. I had taken on several leadership roles with committees and schoolwide projects and really enjoyed the work. My mentor convinced me that I could do even more as a school principal and that I could make a bigger contribution to the community. Q: Tell us about the time you spent as Director of Special Education?

The Santa Clara County Office of Education (SCCOE) is a champion of public education, providing instructional, administrative, business, and technology services to the 31 school districts of Santa Clara County, representing over 275,000 students from preschool through 12th grade.

Dr. Dewan: I served as Director of Special Education for about five years. It was a remarkably challenging and extremely rewarding position in which I could create programs and support young people and their families. During this time, we explored the concepts of universal design for learning as a means to break down silos and support all students. Q: How is education changing? Dr. Dewan: It is a very exciting time in education. We know more about how students learn than we ever have before. We are able to engage students in learning about science, technology, computer science, engineering and math through project based learning and hands on projects. We are also seeing the value of civics education, encouraging youth to understand and participate in our democracy, understanding history through varying perspectives and applying the skills of civil discourse. Q: In your opinion, what are the biggest challenges that teachers face today? Dr. Dewan: Teachers today are facing many challenges. Teachers worry about the increasing levels of anxiety that young people are experiencing. Safety and emergency preparedness are top of mind for many educators today as well. Teachers have to be prepared for potential emergencies cre-

ated by fire, earthquake or flood. Campus safety continues to be an area of challenge for all of us in education. Q: Can you share with us some of the educational opportunities you have championed as Superintendent? Dr. Dewan: I am a strong advocate for the expansion of Early care, heath, and education. The first five years of a child’s life are the most vulnerable years and also the time when the most brain development is occurring. Along with my colleagues on the County Board of Education, we have championed efforts to increase access to quality early learning. I was an early champion of Educare of California at Silicon Valley, a high quality early learning campus in east San Jose. Inclusive learning is a high priority and one way that I demonstrate the importance is through support of the Inclusion Collaborative. We expanded the Inclusion Collaborative to have a focus on equity and to serve families and children birth to Grade 12. Q: In your role as Superintendent, what steps can you implement to see that every child gets the opportunity to succeed and be prepared for college, career and life? Dr. Dewan: Every child is precious, and it


Recognized Education Leader,

Meet Dr. Mary Ann Dewan, Santa Clara County Superintendent of Schools Q: When your career in Education started, did you have any idea, you would be where you are today? Dr. Dewan: I began my career in education as a fourth grader teacher. I loved teaching and I had no idea at that time what the future would hold nor what the possibilities for advancement were.

Dr. Dewan, presiding over the Opportunity Youth Academy’s (OYA) ribbon cutting ceremony at Snell. The blended program engages 16-24 year olds to earn their high school diploma and leave with a path to post graduation college or career.

“As a teacher, I thought it was important to create the conditions in the classroom for active learning and collaboration. I believed that children enjoy learning, like to set goals and embrace new challenges.”

Q: When you began your career as a teacher, can you describe your philosophy of teaching? Dr. Dewan: As a teacher, I thought it was important to create the conditions in the classroom for active learning and collaboration. I believed that children enjoy learning, like to set goals, and embrace new challenges. Students demonstrate their knowledge and are most engaged with “Hands on” learning lessons and projects. I believed that it was my job to be prepared and I was always eager to work long hours to prepare lesson plans and materials for students. Q: How long were you a teacher before you knew you wanted to take the next step as Principal? Can you share with our audience what motivated you to take that step up to Principal? Dr. Dewan: My career in Educational administration started when a leader I admired greatly encouraged me to become a school principal. I was hesitant at first to leave the classroom after nine years because the students inspired me. I had taken on several leadership roles with committees and schoolwide projects and really enjoyed the work. My mentor convinced me that I could do even more as a school principal and that I could make a bigger contribution to the community. Q: Tell us about the time you spent as Director of Special Education?

The Santa Clara County Office of Education (SCCOE) is a champion of public education, providing instructional, administrative, business, and technology services to the 31 school districts of Santa Clara County, representing over 275,000 students from preschool through 12th grade.

Dr. Dewan: I served as Director of Special Education for about five years. It was a remarkably challenging and extremely rewarding position in which I could create programs and support young people and their families. During this time, we explored the concepts of universal design for learning as a means to break down silos and support all students. Q: How is education changing? Dr. Dewan: It is a very exciting time in education. We know more about how students learn than we ever have before. We are able to engage students in learning about science, technology, computer science, engineering and math through project based learning and hands on projects. We are also seeing the value of civics education, encouraging youth to understand and participate in our democracy, understanding history through varying perspectives and applying the skills of civil discourse. Q: In your opinion, what are the biggest challenges that teachers face today? Dr. Dewan: Teachers today are facing many challenges. Teachers worry about the increasing levels of anxiety that young people are experiencing. Safety and emergency preparedness are top of mind for many educators today as well. Teachers have to be prepared for potential emergencies cre-

ated by fire, earthquake or flood. Campus safety continues to be an area of challenge for all of us in education. Q: Can you share with us some of the educational opportunities you have championed as Superintendent? Dr. Dewan: I am a strong advocate for the expansion of Early care, heath, and education. The first five years of a child’s life are the most vulnerable years and also the time when the most brain development is occurring. Along with my colleagues on the County Board of Education, we have championed efforts to increase access to quality early learning. I was an early champion of Educare of California at Silicon Valley, a high quality early learning campus in east San Jose. Inclusive learning is a high priority and one way that I demonstrate the importance is through support of the Inclusion Collaborative. We expanded the Inclusion Collaborative to have a focus on equity and to serve families and children birth to Grade 12. Q: In your role as Superintendent, what steps can you implement to see that every child gets the opportunity to succeed and be prepared for college, career and life? Dr. Dewan: Every child is precious, and it


is our obligation to provide each and every child with opportunities. Strong partnerships are key. When we work together to offer enriching programs and services in and out of school and remove barriers to access, children have their best chance. A firm foundation in the first few years is an important component and investments in health and wellness pay dividends. Q: I see several issues facing Public Schools like; Classroom Size, Parent Involvement, Student Health (Obesity) along with Bullying. I’m sure funding is a big issue … what do you feel still needs to be done to assure that no child is left behind? Dr. Dewan: I am glad that you brought up funding. It is the biggest challenge facing our schools. California still ranks near the bottom in the nation in terms of per pupil spending, despite the fact that we are one of the wealthiest economies in the world. I think there is more that could be done to address funding in education. Educators, families, and community want schools to be able to support the needs of their students in many areas including social and emotional wellness. Another issue that is becoming more prominent in the bay area is homelessness and housing insecurity. More families and children are impacted by the devastating consequences of instable housing on their health, wellness, and education. Q: What types of programs can be implemented to assure students and teachers can have a continued successful partnership? Dr. Dewan: Programs that create a safe and healthy community and promote equity build the foundation for successful partnership. Mindfulness and trauma informed practices building community and wellness. Q: What’s the toughest part of your job? Dr. Dewan: I sincerely love my work. The things that make the work tough are the same things that make it rewarding. I enjoy tackling new challenges and problem solving. I hope that in some small way, every day, I can make a difference for the children in Santa Clara County. Q: What will be the biggest challenge for the generation of women behind you? Dr. Dewan: The pace of change today is incredibly fast, and the allure of the next new thing is ever present. This environment can be challenging and anxiety inducing. Living, working, and leading in this environment requires balance in ways previous generations did not have to worry about. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career that you can share with our audience? Dr. Dewan: Leaders make mistakes. We don’t always get it right. The leadership lesson is forgiveness. We have to be willing to reflect, learn from our mistakes, forgive ourselves and then extend the same to those with whom we work. Leadership is a people business. Q: Can you share with our audience one of your most memorable events of your career? Dr. Dewan: One of the most memorable events of my career was at the first graduation of our Opportunity Youth Academy. Each graduation continues to be memorable. Opportunity Youth Academy is a school for young people who need another chance and some additional support and encouragement to earn their high school diploma and embark on college and career. As one of the architects of the program, I was overjoyed at our first graduation. The stories of perseverance and gratitude from the students are unforgettable. We demonstrated that we believed in them and they achieved despite all odds.

L-R: Dr. Dewan, County Superintendent of Schools; Rebecca Reynolds Lytle, CEO of Santa Clara County Federal Credit Union; and Ron Gonzales, President and CEO Hispanic Foundation of Silicon Valley and former Mayor of the City of San Jose, attend the 49th Annual Teacher Recognition Celebration in 2018. Every fall the Teacher Recognition Celebration honors Santa Clara County’s finest teachers, each selected by their respective school districts. The SCCOE produces the annual gala with the generous support of community partners. The Teacher Recognition Celebration is the oldest and largest celebration of teachers in California, and the most prestigious local award given to classroom teachers.

Q: Which woman inspires you and why? Dr. Dewan: I am inspired by women and girls every day. I admire the courage of women who run for elected office and engage in public service. This calling to elected office is foundational to preserving our democracy. Qualified, committed women who serve in elected office deserve our support and admiration. I would like to honor my deceased grandmother, Rosella. She inspired me as a young person and continues to do so. Rosella advocated for inclusion and acceptance of her daughter with Down’s Syndrome at a time in our country’s history when individuals with disabilities were removed from their families and institutionalized. She fought against institutionalization knowing that inclusion, acceptance, and love were inherent rights for all children. Rosella encouraged me to pursue college and to

have a career, opportunities that she and other women of her generation did not have. I continue to be inspired by her courage, persistence, and wisdom to advocate for all children. Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? Dr. Dewan: Women continue to face challenges related to wage equity, affordable childcare, and access to diverse opportunities. We still have a long way to go towards equity in representation in elected office, CEO positions, and in the board room. And, in certain fields of work, women are still underrepresented. Women working in careers that have been traditionally dominated by women such as childcare and early education have lower than average wages. Q: Can you offer some advice for young women that

may want to pursue a career as an educator? Dr. Dewan: I hope more young women will consider a career in education. I have found it to be a very rewarding profession. There are many types of positions in education so consider all of the possibilities. Not everyone who works as an educator is a classroom teacher. All types of positions exist such as college professor, community college instructor, tutor, special educator, school psychologist, interpreter, audiologist, speech therapist, occupational therapist, physical therapist, and school nurse. Educators are everyday heroes. The first few years can be challenging so it is important to take care of yourself, establish a network of colleagues, and never stop learning. The more we learn, the more we realize how much there is to learn about children, teaching and learning, curriculum, brain development, and building community in the classroom.


is our obligation to provide each and every child with opportunities. Strong partnerships are key. When we work together to offer enriching programs and services in and out of school and remove barriers to access, children have their best chance. A firm foundation in the first few years is an important component and investments in health and wellness pay dividends. Q: I see several issues facing Public Schools like; Classroom Size, Parent Involvement, Student Health (Obesity) along with Bullying. I’m sure funding is a big issue … what do you feel still needs to be done to assure that no child is left behind? Dr. Dewan: I am glad that you brought up funding. It is the biggest challenge facing our schools. California still ranks near the bottom in the nation in terms of per pupil spending, despite the fact that we are one of the wealthiest economies in the world. I think there is more that could be done to address funding in education. Educators, families, and community want schools to be able to support the needs of their students in many areas including social and emotional wellness. Another issue that is becoming more prominent in the bay area is homelessness and housing insecurity. More families and children are impacted by the devastating consequences of instable housing on their health, wellness, and education. Q: What types of programs can be implemented to assure students and teachers can have a continued successful partnership? Dr. Dewan: Programs that create a safe and healthy community and promote equity build the foundation for successful partnership. Mindfulness and trauma informed practices building community and wellness. Q: What’s the toughest part of your job? Dr. Dewan: I sincerely love my work. The things that make the work tough are the same things that make it rewarding. I enjoy tackling new challenges and problem solving. I hope that in some small way, every day, I can make a difference for the children in Santa Clara County. Q: What will be the biggest challenge for the generation of women behind you? Dr. Dewan: The pace of change today is incredibly fast, and the allure of the next new thing is ever present. This environment can be challenging and anxiety inducing. Living, working, and leading in this environment requires balance in ways previous generations did not have to worry about. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career that you can share with our audience? Dr. Dewan: Leaders make mistakes. We don’t always get it right. The leadership lesson is forgiveness. We have to be willing to reflect, learn from our mistakes, forgive ourselves and then extend the same to those with whom we work. Leadership is a people business. Q: Can you share with our audience one of your most memorable events of your career? Dr. Dewan: One of the most memorable events of my career was at the first graduation of our Opportunity Youth Academy. Each graduation continues to be memorable. Opportunity Youth Academy is a school for young people who need another chance and some additional support and encouragement to earn their high school diploma and embark on college and career. As one of the architects of the program, I was overjoyed at our first graduation. The stories of perseverance and gratitude from the students are unforgettable. We demonstrated that we believed in them and they achieved despite all odds.

L-R: Dr. Dewan, County Superintendent of Schools; Rebecca Reynolds Lytle, CEO of Santa Clara County Federal Credit Union; and Ron Gonzales, President and CEO Hispanic Foundation of Silicon Valley and former Mayor of the City of San Jose, attend the 49th Annual Teacher Recognition Celebration in 2018. Every fall the Teacher Recognition Celebration honors Santa Clara County’s finest teachers, each selected by their respective school districts. The SCCOE produces the annual gala with the generous support of community partners. The Teacher Recognition Celebration is the oldest and largest celebration of teachers in California, and the most prestigious local award given to classroom teachers.

Q: Which woman inspires you and why? Dr. Dewan: I am inspired by women and girls every day. I admire the courage of women who run for elected office and engage in public service. This calling to elected office is foundational to preserving our democracy. Qualified, committed women who serve in elected office deserve our support and admiration. I would like to honor my deceased grandmother, Rosella. She inspired me as a young person and continues to do so. Rosella advocated for inclusion and acceptance of her daughter with Down’s Syndrome at a time in our country’s history when individuals with disabilities were removed from their families and institutionalized. She fought against institutionalization knowing that inclusion, acceptance, and love were inherent rights for all children. Rosella encouraged me to pursue college and to

have a career, opportunities that she and other women of her generation did not have. I continue to be inspired by her courage, persistence, and wisdom to advocate for all children. Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? Dr. Dewan: Women continue to face challenges related to wage equity, affordable childcare, and access to diverse opportunities. We still have a long way to go towards equity in representation in elected office, CEO positions, and in the board room. And, in certain fields of work, women are still underrepresented. Women working in careers that have been traditionally dominated by women such as childcare and early education have lower than average wages. Q: Can you offer some advice for young women that

may want to pursue a career as an educator? Dr. Dewan: I hope more young women will consider a career in education. I have found it to be a very rewarding profession. There are many types of positions in education so consider all of the possibilities. Not everyone who works as an educator is a classroom teacher. All types of positions exist such as college professor, community college instructor, tutor, special educator, school psychologist, interpreter, audiologist, speech therapist, occupational therapist, physical therapist, and school nurse. Educators are everyday heroes. The first few years can be challenging so it is important to take care of yourself, establish a network of colleagues, and never stop learning. The more we learn, the more we realize how much there is to learn about children, teaching and learning, curriculum, brain development, and building community in the classroom.


ustin Design Design CREATORS CREATORS OF OFDISTINCTION DISTINCTION COMBINING COMBININGTHE THEOLD OLD WITH THE NEW WITH THE NEW

Catherine Canfield

has been creating distinctive interiors unique to each client’s personal taste since 1985. Her design philosophy involves working hand in hand with her clients, listening carefully, so as to define their individual style. By integrating their treasured possessions, combined with the necessary experience, imagination and inspiration, to result in an exceptional interior and loyal clientele. Catherine consults on design concepts, color, space planning, lighting, finish materials, fixtures, furnishings, wall coverings and finishes floor and window coverings, art and accessories. Our focus is to assist our clients in expressing their own unique

and individual style, which best suits their budget and lifestyle. Specializing in all phases of interior design, from in home consultation to complete redesign, remodel or design & build, providing design advice for every aspect of your home or office. Austin Design can assist you with conceptual design and specification and/or purchase of custom furnishings, lighting, window, wall & floor coverings, color selection, space planning, kitchen & bath design, artwork and accessories, as well as, many other resources available to the design trade. Regardless of your personal style, Catherine combines vision, presence, sophistication and beauty to create the perfect artful enhancements for your home.

AWARD-WINNING INTERIOR DESIGN AWARD-WINNING INTERIOR DESIGN RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL

ALLIED ASID, IDG CERTIFIED INTERIOR DESIGNER #2497

ALLIED ASID, IDG CERTIFIED INTERIOR DESIGNER #2497

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CATHLEEN GOUVEIA DESIGN PRINCIPAL AT CATHLEEN GOUVEIA DESIGN, ALLIED ASID

Cathleen Gouveia is the Design Principal of Cathleen Gouveia Design, an award-winning design firm based in Belvedere-Tiburon, California delivering high-end residential Interior Design and Project Management services to the San Francisco Bay Area, Lake Tahoe, the Napa and Sonoma Wine Region, the Hamptons, Nantucket and beyond. Her work has been featured on Home and Garden Television (HGTV), California Living® Television, in The San Francisco Chronicle, and several other periodicals. Cathleen is the 2016/17 President of ASID California North, and an Associate Member of the IIDA. CGD was founded in Sausalito in 2004. Cathleen previously designed spaces for prestigious residential design firms in San Francisco. Her work has appeared at The Traditional Home Napa Showhouse (2012 and 2014), The San Francisco Decorator Showcase House (2011), The Elle Décor Home Tour (2011) and the Marin Designers Showcase House (2004, 2005, 2007, 2010). The San Francisco Chronicle named Cathleen a, “San Francisco Stylemaker”. Ms. Gouveia was the recipient of The 2011 ASID Cal North Design Excellence Award for, “Best Sustainable Residential Interior Design Project”; The 2015 Design Excellence Award for, “Best Showhouse Design” (1st Place); “The Best Residential Project Under 3,000SF” (2nd Place), and ASID Design Excellence Award this year, “Best Residential Space in the Public Domain (Living Rooms, Dining Rooms). Cathleen graduated with Honors from the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) where she received an MFA Degree in Interior Architecture and Design, and received The Departmental Award for Design Excellence. She studied European Architecture, Art and Design in London, Paris, and Rome; and completed post-baccalaureate studies at The School of Visual Arts (SVA), and The N.Y. School of Interior Design. The hallmark of Cathleen’s style is a conceptual perspective unique to the history and vernacular of each building and design client. Cathleen has established a cornucopia of unique sources, artisans and suppliers. In her free time, Cathleen may be found indulging her passion for travel, art, design, music and boating. She divides her time between San Francisco, CA; Bay Head NJ; and East Hampton, NY and one day plans to open a design studio in Nantucket, MA.

P.O. BOX 1203 | TIBURON, CA 94920 TEL. 415.203.8663 | FAX: 888.908.1634 WWW.GOUVEIADESIGN.COM


If you want to find the best home or investment, partner up with an experienced and proven agent, Jessie Lee. She is an award-winning realtor with a track record of among the top 1% of real estate professionals in the Bay Area. Anyone who worked with Jessie is familiar with her tenacity and exceptional negotiating skills. She is well-informed, well-connected, a Graduate of the Realtor Institute (GRI), and a consistent top-earning producer for her brokerage since 2010. Jessie specializes in high-rise condos, urban lofts, corporate, and personal investments, multi-family units, and single-family homes. Over the years, she has cultivated valued client relationships, which help continue to grow her business through referrals. Jessie offers her clients the most up-to-date market analysis and investment opportunities, and her guidance continually leads to smoother transactions. She also prides herself on her hard-working team to provide resources and the best service possible to clients. Raised in Korea by parents who are real estate

investors, Jessie’s formative years were heavily influenced by entrepreneurs who often discussed real estate-related topics at dinner. Her upbringing taught her invaluable real-world business experience long before many of her peers began their path to entrepreneurship. Today, Jessie is a product of Korean, American, and French influences, having married a French hubby. She is multilingual and can speak English, Korean, Japanese, and French. Outside of work and family, Jessie is active in the Foreign Investment Professionals Group, and serves as the Vice President of the Korean American Chamber of Commerce in San Francisco. She is an avid traveler who frequently visits Asia and Europe while keeping a close eye on global and local real estate market trends and always brewing up ways to expand her network of investors, financial service providers, and other agents and brokers. Jessie aims to continually bring value to her clients and foster new relationships. If interested in real estate, partner up with Jessie and gain a true friend in the business.


Pamela Lindsay Pamela Lindsay co-founded the College of Adaptive Arts (CAA) with DeAnna Pursai in the spring of 2009, launching a vision of lifelong collegiate education for those who have historically not had access to such opportunity. The effort began with one student and endless possibilities, a twinkle in the eye, and a call upon their hearts. However, that little-vision-that-could has developed into one of their community’s most historic and impactful contributions to accessible, lifelong higher education for adults with differing abilities. The importance of this mission has been recognized locally and state-wide while the college itself has grown strong as a California charitable organization. CAA “Cardinals” are spirited collegiate men and women with a whole wide and beautiful range of learner profiles, including those who happen to have Down syndrome and autism. They have collectively earned over 11,000 credits to-date toward private diplomas in designated areas of adapted classroom study. The students do not need to leave the program upon graduation or cease their learning journey. They can stay and pursue as many diploma tracks as they like or take just one class. Like any community college, CAA is there for students whenever and however they need it. Lindsay explains that adults with differing abilities ages 18 to 70+ can experience obstacles to their pursuit of lifelong academic development including cost, age-out, class content, pace of study, and access to programs. These obstacles inhibit movement toward ongoing diploma goals. Lindsay’s M.A. in Theatre Arts, background in special needs education and consulting, and experience in college classroom instruction guide continual invention of innovative designs for eliminating these limits. She is currently completing her doctorate in research and development of ground-breaking ways for CAA staff, students, families, and community partners to collaboratively construct new solutions for curriculum and instruction within this disruptive and adaptive learning model. A day in Cardinal life has expanded to include joyful learning moments in nine schools of study. However, the need for expanded classroom space also grows every year. According to Lindsay, this is a great problem. They are now launching the next stage of their vision to accommodate growth: the move of their students and programs from current studio space to an existing college campus. The significance of this step will only be surpassed by the increase in the students’ learning and contribution potential. Colleges with space on their campus and in their plans for expanded impact

will experience another stratosphere of identified inclusive learning opportunities when they add CAA to their student community. The battle cry for this revolutionary work is, “Move the mountain!” The students’ motto is, “Showcase ability!” The community cry is “Transform perception!” Lindsay describes these as ingredients for powerful momentum and change if, as their alma mater asks, we all work together and “Just Believe.”

Pamela Lindsy, Co-Founder | College of Adaptive Arts 1401 Parkmoor Ave. #260 | San Jose, CA 95126 | mobile: 408-538-3809


DeAnna Pursai DeAnna Pursai teamed up with Pamela Lindsay in 2009 to co-found College of Adaptive Arts, which provides an equitable collegiate experience to adults with special needs who historically have not had access to college education. This lifelong college model is one the first of its kind in the country, and it’s grow 12-fold since inception. CAA’s vision is empowering the student body to creatively transform perception of individuals with disabilities. The long-term vision is to make this model of lifelong education as flexible and scalable so that it can be replicated across the country to become the Special Olympics model in the education space. DeAnna received her Bachelor’s at Purdue University in special education and elementary education and her Master’s from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Educational Policy Analysis. She’s active in the San Jose in San Jose Rotary Club, in the MyProGroup business leads/referrals group, and she sits on the board of Christmas in the Park. Her guiding force is her sister, Angel, who happens to have Down syndrome, who is a constant source of love, guidance, and in rethinking possibility.

DeAnna Pursai, Executive Director | Official Mountain Mover, College of Adaptive Arts 1401 Parkmoor Ave. #260 | San Jose, CA 95126 | mobile: 408-394-6816


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istrative tasks, that there is a human goal and a larger purpose for the work we do. Q: Can you share with our audience one of your most memorable events your career? LKM: I will not soon forget what it took successfully running for the office of County Superintendent of Schools. It was without a doubt one of the hardest things I have ever done — but an incredible learning experience. The opportunity to now impact policy and give voice to the critical issues affecting the students we serve is a privilege. Q: I’ve read that STEM has a diversity problem… how bad is it and what is being done to improve these gaps for girls and especially students of color? LKM: An important part of our work is laying the foundation for increasing opportunities for our students and especially our students of color and our girls in the STEM fields. We know the need is there. Data tells us that only two percent of STEM jobs have included of people of color and women over the past three decades. California is home to 1.4 million jobs in this sector alone. We need to prepare our students not just for the jobs of the future, but the jobs of today. The jobs in these critical fields are here and we need capable, driven young people to fill them.

Alameda County Superintendent of Schools L. Karen Monroe addresses graduates of the Pregnant and Parenting Team Program.

Proven Leadership: Meet L. Karen Monroe, Alameda County Superintendent of Schools Q: How did your career begin and what led to becoming a School Superintendent? LKM: My career began with an interest in college in public affairs and public policy. I graduated from USC with my Bachelor’s degree in public affairs. From there I went to Washington D.C. to work for Shirley Chisholm and began to understand better the nexus between education and policy. I came back to California and went to work in city government. I worked for the City of Compton and then for several non-profits before deciding I would become a teacher like my mother. I soon realized that I had an opportunity to step into leadership and realized the power to affect change through leadership and I followed the opportunity to lead and vision on behalf of students. That ultimately led me to

We are leading an effort called Alignment Bay Area that brings together leaders of industry, school districts, college, labor and community organizations. By putting all of these people together, we are looking to harness their experience, energy and resources to transform systems and come up with solutions to persistent inequities. We need a collective effort to expose our students to careers that will allow them to earn a living wage and launch them into productive adult lives.

the Superintendency in Alameda County. Though I wasn’t certain then where my career path would lead, I now feel I am in the exact right place at to have affect outcomes for the students who need it most. Q: What’s the toughest part of your job? LKM: One of the most difficult parts of the job is to make sure that for districts and for leaders, there is a sense of accountability while focusing on the fact that we are educating children. You really have to hold both of those things at one time. As the County Superintendent, my role is to ensure providing accountability and oversight for the purpose of the success of the 220,000 kids in Alameda County. We must continually remember, amid our admin-

Superintendent L. Karen Monroe speaks to students of Teacher of the Year Ann Villegas at Hillside Elementary, San Lorenzo Unified.

Q: I see several issues facing Public Schools like; Classroom Size, Parent Involvement, Student Health (Obesity) along with Bullying. I’m sure funding is a big issue … what do you feel still needs to be done to assure that no child is left behind? LKM: Funding is a critical issue. I was proud to have led an effort by the 21 Superintendents in in Alameda County in delivering a letter to the gubernatorial candidates advocating for a significant increase in education funding in our state. We have seen increases in recent years, but 90 percent of states in the U.S. fund public schools at a higher level than California. And it has an unmistakable impact on the instruction, programs and services we offer our kids. We must do better. The world is moving and changing fast and our students deserve the opportunity to keep pace. Chief among the services that we need to increase is mental health services for our students. Our kids are facing unprecedented pressures – academic, financial, social. They need support and resources and there must be funding for that. Q: What types of program can be implemented to assure students and teachers can have a continued successful partnership? LKM: School climate is so critical to the success of students and teachers. We need to create conditions where both students and teachers feel empowered to learn, take risks and make the best decisions. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career that you can share with our audience? LKM: Stay open to opportunities to lead and trust your instincts about leadership. You always need to make sure you are well-informed as a leader, but at the end of the day, trust what your gut and your heart is telling you is the right decision to make. I would also say to be gracious with those you lead, be sensitive to the jobs they have and understand who they are as people.


istrative tasks, that there is a human goal and a larger purpose for the work we do. Q: Can you share with our audience one of your most memorable events your career? LKM: I will not soon forget what it took successfully running for the office of County Superintendent of Schools. It was without a doubt one of the hardest things I have ever done — but an incredible learning experience. The opportunity to now impact policy and give voice to the critical issues affecting the students we serve is a privilege. Q: I’ve read that STEM has a diversity problem… how bad is it and what is being done to improve these gaps for girls and especially students of color? LKM: An important part of our work is laying the foundation for increasing opportunities for our students and especially our students of color and our girls in the STEM fields. We know the need is there. Data tells us that only two percent of STEM jobs have included of people of color and women over the past three decades. California is home to 1.4 million jobs in this sector alone. We need to prepare our students not just for the jobs of the future, but the jobs of today. The jobs in these critical fields are here and we need capable, driven young people to fill them.

Alameda County Superintendent of Schools L. Karen Monroe addresses graduates of the Pregnant and Parenting Team Program.

Proven Leadership: Meet Karen Monroe, Alameda County Superintendent of Schools Q: How did your career begin and what led to becoming a School Superintendent? LKM: My career began with an interest in college in public affairs and public policy. I graduated from USC with my Bachelor’s degree in public affairs. From there I went to Washington D.C. to work for Shirley Chisholm and began to understand better the nexus between education and policy. I came back to California and went to work in city government. I worked for the City of Compton and then for several non-profits before deciding I would become a teacher like my mother. I soon realized that I had an opportunity to step into leadership and realized the power to affect change through leadership and I followed the opportunity to lead and vision on behalf of students. That ultimately led me to

We are leading an effort called Alignment Bay Area that brings together leaders of industry, school districts, college, labor and community organizations. By putting all of these people together, we are looking to harness their experience, energy and resources to transform systems and come up with solutions to persistent inequities. We need a collective effort to expose our students to careers that will allow them to earn a living wage and launch them into productive adult lives.

the Superintendency in Alameda County. Though I wasn’t certain then where my career path would lead, I now feel I am in the exact right place at to have affect outcomes for the students who need it most. Q: What’s the toughest part of your job? LKM: One of the most difficult parts of the job is to make sure that for districts and for leaders, there is a sense of accountability while focusing on the fact that we are educating children. You really have to hold both of those things at one time. As the County Superintendent, my role is to ensure providing accountability and oversight for the purpose of the success of the 220,000 kids in Alameda County. We must continually remember, amid our admin-

Superintendent L. Karen Monroe speaks to students of Teacher of the Year Ann Villegas at Hillside Elementary, San Lorenzo Unified.

Q: I see several issues facing Public Schools like; Classroom Size, Parent Involvement, Student Health (Obesity) along with Bullying. I’m sure funding is a big issue … what do you feel still needs to be done to assure that no child is left behind? LKM: Funding is a critical issue. I was proud to have led an effort by the 21 Superintendents in in Alameda County in delivering a letter to the gubernatorial candidates advocating for a significant increase in education funding in our state. We have seen increases in recent years, but 90 percent of states in the U.S. fund public schools at a higher level than California. And it has an unmistakable impact on the instruction, programs and services we offer our kids. We must do better. The world is moving and changing fast and our students deserve the opportunity to keep pace. Chief among the services that we need to increase is mental health services for our students. Our kids are facing unprecedented pressures – academic, financial, social. They need support and resources and there must be funding for that. Q: What types of program can be implemented to assure students and teachers can have a continued successful partnership? LKM: School climate is so critical to the success of students and teachers. We need to create conditions where both students and teachers feel empowered to learn, take risks and make the best decisions. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career that you can share with our audience? LKM: Stay open to opportunities to lead and trust your instincts about leadership. You always need to make sure you are well-informed as a leader, but at the end of the day, trust what your gut and your heart is telling you is the right decision to make. I would also say to be gracious with those you lead, be sensitive to the jobs they have and understand who they are as people.


Members of Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos launch festive inaugural 2017 WE Vibe Block Party highlighting the women-owned businesses of Los Altos. Superintendent Monroe speaks with students about their robotics project at Altamont Creek Elementary in Livermore.

Superintendent Monroe shakes hands with a new graduate at the Court and Community Schools Graduation Ceremony.

Oakland Unified Teacher of the Year Micaela Morse is visited by Superintendent L. Karen Monroe in her dual language kindergarten classroom.

Q: Which woman inspires you and why? LKM: Working for Shirley Chisholm, as a historical figure, as a woman, she inspired me on so many levels. She was a first. She was brave and strong and understood the value of education. Closer to home, my mother is a person who absolutely inspires me. Being a teacher and a principal and really breaking barriers in her time as a teacher in Berkeley in the 60s, and an award-winning principal who really did meaningful work closing achievement gaps for students. Q: What will be the biggest challenge for the generation of women behind you? LKM: As someone who has a daughter in her early 30s, I feel as if the women of my generation were more able to easily step into a career and follow our aspirations. I think it can be more difficult for young people and women with the challenges they face, to do that now. The economics are different, the jobs of the present and future are different. And social media has a big impact on how young women perceive themselves, to the positive and the negative. I think the most important thing that helps young women is mentorship and positive roles models and making sure that they can be connected to people who can speak to what empowerment looks like.

Q: Can you offer advice to parents with daughters graduating from high school? LKM: I am no better equipped than anyone else to offer advice to parents of teens, but the most important thing to me is to build that relationship with your daughter. It is not easy during these years and you have to be intentional about spending time and making time and knowing what you have to offer, as parents, is enough. Yes, explore opportunities to expose them to great mentors and role models, but that is not a substitute for spending time as a parent. And for mothers and daughters, I think that’s extremely important. Q: Can you tell us how you manage your work life balance? LKM: It’s something I continually focus on because I still have work to do there. Entering my second term, particular things are in place here and I know the job better and can organize my work in a way that I’m hopeful it becomes more manageable. But it is something that I give serious consideration and thought to, because if you don’t, it will never happen. Even if you do, it can be a challenge. You need to have partners and allies in life who will hold you responsible for that balance, who will spend time with you doing things outside of work, who you give permission to check you

Superintendent Monroe visits kindergarten students from Hillside Elementary School, San Lorenzo Unified.

Superintendent Monroe with a student from Ruby Bridges Elementary in Alameda.

when that balance is not in place. I do have those people in my life. Q: What do you like the most about living in the Bay Area? LKM: I have lived in Southern California and in Washington D.C. and whenever I’m in those places, I find myself longing to return to the Bay Area. The Bay Area feels like home. I have always appreciated its diversity of people and geography and I feel like it’s nice to be from a place where people want to be. People want to be here for the great food, the great people and the great landscape. It’s certainly why I want to be here. Q: What are some of your favorite interests and hobbies that you enjoy? LKM: I enjoy spending time with family and friends or hiking or just having a really good conversation. One of the things I really enjoy doing is writing letters. It’s a lost art and I enjoy the art of penmanship and crafting a great retort.


Members of Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos launch festive inaugural 2017 WE Vibe Block Party highlighting the women-owned businesses of Los Altos. Superintendent Monroe speaks with students about their robotics project at Altamont Creek Elementary in Livermore.

Superintendent Monroe shakes hands with a new graduate at the Court and Community Schools Graduation Ceremony.

Oakland Unified Teacher of the Year Micaela Morse is visited by Superintendent L. Karen Monroe in her dual language kindergarten classroom.

Q: Which woman inspires you and why? LKM: Working for Shirley Chisholm, as a historical figure, as a woman, she inspired me on so many levels. She was a first. She was brave and strong and understood the value of education. Closer to home, my mother is a person who absolutely inspires me. Being a teacher and a principal and really breaking barriers in her time as a teacher in Berkeley in the 60s, and an award-winning principal who really did meaningful work closing achievement gaps for students. Q: What will be the biggest challenge for the generation of women behind you? LKM: As someone who has a daughter in her early 30s, I feel as if the women of my generation were more able to easily step into a career and follow our aspirations. I think it can be more difficult for young people and women with the challenges they face, to do that now. The economics are different, the jobs of the present and future are different. And social media has a big impact on how young women perceive themselves, to the positive and the negative. I think the most important thing that helps young women is mentorship and positive roles models and making sure that they can be connected to people who can speak to what empowerment looks like.

Q: Can you offer advice to parents with daughters graduating from high school? LKM: I am no better equipped than anyone else to offer advice to parents of teens, but the most important thing to me is to build that relationship with your daughter. It is not easy during these years and you have to be intentional about spending time and making time and knowing what you have to offer, as parents, is enough. Yes, explore opportunities to expose them to great mentors and role models, but that is not a substitute for spending time as a parent. And for mothers and daughters, I think that’s extremely important. Q: Can you tell us how you manage your work life balance? LKM: It’s something I continually focus on because I still have work to do there. Entering my second term, particular things are in place here and I know the job better and can organize my work in a way that I’m hopeful it becomes more manageable. But it is something that I give serious consideration and thought to, because if you don’t, it will never happen. Even if you do, it can be a challenge. You need to have partners and allies in life who will hold you responsible for that balance, who will spend time with you doing things outside of work, who you give permission to check you

Superintendent Monroe visits kindergarten students from Hillside Elementary School, San Lorenzo Unified.

Superintendent Monroe with a student from Ruby Bridges Elementary in Alameda.

when that balance is not in place. I do have those people in my life. Q: What do you like the most about living in the Bay Area? LKM: I have lived in Southern California and in Washington D.C. and whenever I’m in those places, I find myself longing to return to the Bay Area. The Bay Area feels like home. I have always appreciated its diversity of people and geography and I feel like it’s nice to be from a place where people want to be. People want to be here for the great food, the great people and the great landscape. It’s certainly why I want to be here. Q: What are some of your favorite interests and hobbies that you enjoy? LKM: I enjoy spending time with family and friends or hiking or just having a really good conversation. One of the things I really enjoy doing is writing letters. It’s a lost art and I enjoy the art of penmanship and crafting a great retort.


After graduating from the University of San Francisco in 1976 with an elementary credential, Jackie was faced with a downturn in the education system with schools closing and teaching jobs scarce. Wanting to use the degree she obtained, she searched for a position in the corporate world where she’d not only be an employee but educator as well. Always fascinated with construction and property, she landed her first job with Century 21 Real Estate in their Regional Office in San Francisco where she oversaw the company’s real estate school; scheduling classes and managing the students, as well as acting as activities coordinator organizing events for the 144 franchises. In 1979, a new marriage took her to San Diego and another real estate firm, only this time it was as an Asset Manager for The Koll Company, a real estate investment group. Her projects were the Rancho San Diego Shopping Center, with seven major stores and forty small “mom and pop” business. It was her responsibility to see construction was done on time, move the tenants in, and manage the rents. Her next project was The Bank of America Building in downtown San Diego, a twenty-two-story high rise. In 1981, Jackie moved back to the Bay Area with her children’s father to start their family and raised four children in Los Altos. Twenty-three years later, in 2004, as her last child left the nest, Jackie knew her talents would be best served to help others with the largest investment they ever own, their home, and became a residential real

estate agent. In her practice, she prides herself on acting as a consultant, not a salesperson. Her duties to her clients include the education necessary for making the proper decisions when buying or selling a home, as well as serving them above and beyond their expectations. She works to bring her sellers top dollar and guide buyers to properties that will not only have resale value but a home where memories are created, shared and last a lifetime. Her primary goal is to make realty a reality. With her Senior Real Estate Specialist designation, she works closely with the older population and their families making transitions in their life smooth and stress-free. She also holds a certification in dealing with distressed properties. In her spare time, she volunteers at the YMCA, helping adults and children reach their fitness goals; is a mentor with Partnering for Next Generation guiding high school students towards college; and spends her free time raising money for the American Cancer Society, Relay for Life, Habitat for Humanity, and The 100 Women Foundation. Jackie is also a published author. Her first book, My Life in a Tutu, a memoir, was launched in June 2018 with WriteLife Publishers. She is currently working on her next project, The Promise I kept, and is a columnist for the Los Altos Town Crier newspaper with her column Haugh-about-That, covering newsworthy and human-interest stories.


Dr. Aparajita Sohoni Physician Lead, QTbreasthealth

For every woman who is diagnosed with breast cancer, 19 more are likely to endure the sleepless nights, depression and anguish commonly associated with a false positive. And those are just some of the reactions felt by women who have been mistakenly told they have a potentially life-threatening disease. At QTbreasthealth, our mission is to provide reassurance without radiation. With two locations right here in the Bay Area, we provide the only true 3D, FDA-cleared breast imaging technology for women as a follow-up to mammography – and with no radiation, compression or injections. Throughout my career as an ER doctor, I’ve witnessed the results of delayed cancer diagnoses or side effects from treatments and wondered what may have happened with earlier detection or a more progressive approach to medicine like we have at QTbreasthealth. It’s time you put the decision making about your breast health in the most qualified hands – yours.

3 Hamilton Landing, Suite 180 Novato, CA 94949 415-497-4800


Sunaina Arora is proud to be part of Compass, one of the most sophisticated and dominant real estate companies in the Bay Area. She is a full-service real estate professional and brings years of experience to the business. She is committed to growth and is constantly educating herself on ever changing real estate laws and learning new skills. She brings wealth of knowledge and professionalism to the business. Sunaina strongly believes that in business, the best reward is a happy customer. She is patient and takes all the time necessary to guide her clients through the process. Her relentless commitment to clients and their needs, and her passion and enthusiasm for her work has enabled her to build a strong referral based business. A business that is built on partnership, trust and client focus. Whether you are a first time homebuyer or a seasoned seller, Sunaina guarantees that you receive the highest level of service. She is highly skilled in marketing and negotiation. And ensures that you have the best representation in every transaction.


Honest, Funny & Filled with Passion to Empower Women!

Dion Lim,

News Anchor / Reporter ABC7 News, KGO-TV Q: How did your career start as news anchor? DL: By a stroke of pure luck!  I had always wanted to be a reporter, then a network correspondent before the age of 30.  This was the career path I had carved out in my head.  But during my first on-air job in tiny Springfield, Massachusetts, (market 109) just a year into the job, somehow, my agent got a call from the ABC station in Kansas City (market 33) and asked if I wanted to try anchoring.   Having never anchored before, and wanting to keep it a secret, a friend of mine from a competing station snuck me into their studios after hours to record a demo using the day’s old scripts. When I got the job and first sat down at that desk, (much to the chagrin of my much older, experienced, talented co-workers) I made a lot of mistakes but learned so much. All it took was for one person to believe in me, someone who thought I had talent and just needed the experience and skills.  He laid the foundation for what I do today, and I wouldn’t trade it for anything else in the world. Q: What is a typical day like for you? DL: After working nights most of my career, I’ve discovered unless you are regimented on waking up it’s far too easy to sleep in until noon! So, when the alarm goes off, usually around 8 I immediately get on my phone and scroll through social media and catch up on the big news of the day. That keeps me from going back to sleep. DION AT THE OSCARS 2019

In the news business you never know what your

REPORTING ON THE KAVANAUGH HEARING

shift will be depending on the day...and that some weeks I work day shifts and night shifts and the occasional early morning 3am shift! The hours before my shift starts at 2:30 or 3 pm, I try to be as productive as possible. This week, I’m meeting with the Asian Realtors Association of America to go over a speech I’m presenting for their yearly gala.Other days I meet up with friends for lunch since I’m at work at the time most people go out to dinner and drinks. I’ve been a part of an online food group called #FoodTravelChat for several years and for the San Francisco members, we explore new places to eat and we jokingly refer to ourselves as “those people” who take photos of our food to post on social media later! As soon as work begins, it’s go-go-go. For reporting shifts, I’m in assignment meetings, making calls, in the field grabbing interviews and trying to juggle many tasks at once. A photographer friend of mine introduced me to a device called a Hot Logic, which is like a portable oven the size of a lunchbox. I use it to eat while I write my story script and web script. Depending on what I’m covering, I could be live in the 11 pm newscast. The fact you never know where you’ll be on any given day is what makes reporting exciting. On anchoring days, it’s equally as busy, but inside the station. There is proofing and writing of scripts. Recording teases and tracking story packages and calls to set up stories for reporting days. Since we have a lot of newscasts at ABC7 during

the week and on the weekend, I usually use my Hot Logic at my desk for dinner or we’ll all order delivery. Postmates, Caviar and Uber Eats are a must some nights! Some evenings, we’ll have special guests visit the studio. I’m involved with a group called Best Buddies, which promotes friendship, job creation and confidence for those with physical and developmental disabilities. Recently, a generous donor spent $1600 to sponsor a group of 10 Buddies and their family members to watch one of our newscasts. My co-anchor Eric Thomas and I, along with meteorologist Drew Tuma spent time answering their questions, showing them the technology of the studio and just spending quality time eating cake with them. These evenings are very special to me and part of why I love what I do! After getting home at around midnight, (or later if I’m reporting and live somewhere far away from the station) I stay up another hour or two reading, unwinding with all of my DVR’d shows and eating my 4th meal with my husband. He is a professional poker player and has a flexible schedule, so it’s good he’s a night-owl too! Q: Can you share with our audience one of your most memorable events you’ve covered? DL: My first day on air at ABC7 was when the North Bay Fires broke out. As soon as I stepped into the newsroom, a colleague thrust a big red


Honest, Funny & Filled with Passion to Empower Women!

Dion Lim,

News Anchor / Reporter ABC7 News, KGO-TV Q: How did your career start as news anchor? DL: By a stroke of pure luck!  I had always wanted to be a reporter, then a network correspondent before the age of 30.  This was the career path I had carved out in my head.  But during my first on-air job in tiny Springfield, Massachusetts, (market 109) just a year into the job, somehow, my agent got a call from the ABC station in Kansas City (market 33) and asked if I wanted to try anchoring.   Having never anchored before, and wanting to keep it a secret, a friend of mine from a competing station snuck me into their studios after hours to record a demo using the day’s old scripts. When I got the job and first sat down at that desk, (much to the chagrin of my much older, experienced, talented co-workers) I made a lot of mistakes but learned so much. All it took was for one person to believe in me, someone who thought I had talent and just needed the experience and skills.  He laid the foundation for what I do today, and I wouldn’t trade it for anything else in the world. Q: What is a typical day like for you? DL: After working nights most of my career, I’ve discovered unless you are regimented on waking up it’s far too easy to sleep in until noon! So, when the alarm goes off, usually around 8 I immediately get on my phone and scroll through social media and catch up on the big news of the day. That keeps me from going back to sleep. DION AT THE OSCARS 2019

In the news business you never know what your

REPORTING ON THE KAVANAUGH HEARING

shift will be depending on the day...and that some weeks I work day shifts and night shifts and the occasional early morning 3am shift! The hours before my shift starts at 2:30 or 3 pm, I try to be as productive as possible. This week, I’m meeting with the Asian Realtors Association of America to go over a speech I’m presenting for their yearly gala.Other days I meet up with friends for lunch since I’m at work at the time most people go out to dinner and drinks. I’ve been a part of an online food group called #FoodTravelChat for several years and for the San Francisco members, we explore new places to eat and we jokingly refer to ourselves as “those people” who take photos of our food to post on social media later! As soon as work begins, it’s go-go-go. For reporting shifts, I’m in assignment meetings, making calls, in the field grabbing interviews and trying to juggle many tasks at once. A photographer friend of mine introduced me to a device called a Hot Logic, which is like a portable oven the size of a lunchbox. I use it to eat while I write my story script and web script. Depending on what I’m covering, I could be live in the 11 pm newscast. The fact you never know where you’ll be on any given day is what makes reporting exciting. On anchoring days, it’s equally as busy, but inside the station. There is proofing and writing of scripts. Recording teases and tracking story packages and calls to set up stories for reporting days. Since we have a lot of newscasts at ABC7 during

the week and on the weekend, I usually use my Hot Logic at my desk for dinner or we’ll all order delivery. Postmates, Caviar and Uber Eats are a must some nights! Some evenings, we’ll have special guests visit the studio. I’m involved with a group called Best Buddies, which promotes friendship, job creation and confidence for those with physical and developmental disabilities. Recently, a generous donor spent $1600 to sponsor a group of 10 Buddies and their family members to watch one of our newscasts. My co-anchor Eric Thomas and I, along with meteorologist Drew Tuma spent time answering their questions, showing them the technology of the studio and just spending quality time eating cake with them. These evenings are very special to me and part of why I love what I do! After getting home at around midnight, (or later if I’m reporting and live somewhere far away from the station) I stay up another hour or two reading, unwinding with all of my DVR’d shows and eating my 4th meal with my husband. He is a professional poker player and has a flexible schedule, so it’s good he’s a night-owl too! Q: Can you share with our audience one of your most memorable events you’ve covered? DL: My first day on air at ABC7 was when the North Bay Fires broke out. As soon as I stepped into the newsroom, a colleague thrust a big red


newscast from her. She taught me every has a season and a place to shine.  Lyanne Melendez here at ABC7 News/KGO-TV is inspirational because she’s reported all over the world for CNN and is tough as nails, knows who she is and has been a cheerleader for me as the relative new kid at KGO.   Members of Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos launch festive inaugural 2017 WE Vibe Block Party highlighting the women-owned businesses of Los Altos.

I’ve had a lot of success, but behind it also came a lot of rejection. But it’s those who said “yes” and took a chance or believed in me that helped me get to where I am today.

DION VISITS GOOD MORNING AMERICA

bag my direction and inside was my fire-retardant suit, a face mask, and hard helmet. I’ve covered tornadoes and hurricanes and all other natural disasters...but a wildfire, which grows, and spread is unlike anything I could ever imagine. I met so many people those first few days who had experienced tremendous loss.  A man, covered in ash, dazed and wandering the streets. A family frantically packing up their belongings to evacuate.  A woman who had lost a dozen horses to the flames. I still keep in touch with some of them today, and it’s been encouraging to hear how they’re starting to rebuild and piece their lives back together. The funniest?  A time in Kansas City when a man was arrested after licking a frog, hoping the animal’s poisonous venom would create a hallucinogenic experience!   Q: What’s one lesson you’ve learned in your career that you can share with our audience? DL: That you don’t have to be the smartest, the most talented or most skilled in order to thrive in your career. (I’m definitely not and have the grades from school to prove it!)   It’s about being able to communicate, not

Q: Do you have any advice you can share for those women who may want to pursue a career in broadcast journalism? DL: Don’t be discouraged by the “no’s”. Let them fuel your passion to strive for something better. This is a subjective business.  It’s not like mathematics, where there is always a clear and defined right or wrong answer to an equation.  In TV news, you could be a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, but if one person doesn’t like your voice, and you don’t get the job, does that mean you’re not talented?  Absolutely not.

only with an audience but during those day-to-day “microinteractions” in the workplace and also with yourself. Being comfortable in your own skin to have the confidence to tackle any challenge that comes your way. This is the theme of my book “untitled” (McGraw-Hill 2019) coming out this fall. Q: Which woman inspires you and why? DL: Do I have to pick just one?!  The cliché thing to say would be my mom but she is truly remarkable in many ways.  My mother grew up in Taiwan and because girls were not viewed as valuable like boys, she was given away to another family.  When that family rejected her and gave her back, can you imagine what that must do to you psychologically? Later as an immigrant she faced tremendous racism and adversity in the US.  I’m amazed by her work ethic and grit to get things done and to take care of our family despite all of the hurdles. When it comes to  TV news, I’ve had the fortune of working with some remarkable women in my career.  Sonja Gantt the former main anchor at the NBC station in Charlotte taught me how to lead a newsroom with kindness and empathy when I took over the 11pm

Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? DL: What AREN’T some challenges women face today? An important topic I speak about often at schools and at women’s conferences is being “ok” with who you are and understanding you are “enough”.  There is so much pressure to look and sound a certain way.  To fit the standard of beauty and success. But unless you wholeheartedly grasp the notion of acceptance of who you are,  you cannot effectively emote and communicate with your audience, your colleagues, the environment around you. Early in my career, I was very insecure.  Unaware of my unique talents as a person.  But during this time, I was portraying this image of perfection on TV. It was not authentic.  My advice is to never let others take away your confidence.  Your sense of self-worth.  It empowers you to pass on these lessons to others and empower them. If you remember what that is, you’ll be untouchable. Q: What advice would you give to young women who want to succeed in the workplace?

DION AT THE 2018 OSCARS

DL: It’s why I partnered with my literary agent at Full Circle Literary and my publisher, McGraw-Hill to write a book about communication. It’s number one. Unlike in say, college, workplaces are filled with people from all different backgrounds, all different ages. The bringing together of a diverse workforce means each person can bring inherent skills and talents to the table.  But it also can mean breakdowns in communication style. This breeds stress, drama, and frustration.  You don’t have to be the smartest, the quickest or the most talented.  But when you know how to listen and react appropriately with those you interact with, you’ll have a more productive, harmonious work environment. Q: What do you like the most about living in the Bay Area? DL: Hands down the diversity, which is reflected in the thinking, the lifestyle, and the FOOD!  Every city I’ve had the opportunity to work in has shaped who I am today, and I’m so grateful for those experiences.  But San Francisco has a vibrancy like no other, which makes me feel alive.


newscast from her. She taught me every has a season and a place to shine.  Lyanne Melendez here at ABC7 News/KGO-TV is inspirational because she’s reported all over the world for CNN and is tough as nails, knows who she is and has been a cheerleader for me as the relative new kid at KGO.   Members of Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos launch festive inaugural 2017 WE Vibe Block Party highlighting the women-owned businesses of Los Altos.

I’ve had a lot of success, but behind it also came a lot of rejection. But it’s those who said “yes” and took a chance or believed in me that helped me get to where I am today.

DION VISITS GOOD MORNING AMERICA

bag my direction and inside was my fire-retardant suit, a face mask, and hard helmet. I’ve covered tornadoes and hurricanes and all other natural disasters...but a wildfire, which grows, and spread is unlike anything I could ever imagine. I met so many people those first few days who had experienced tremendous loss.  A man, covered in ash, dazed and wandering the streets. A family frantically packing up their belongings to evacuate.  A woman who had lost a dozen horses to the flames. I still keep in touch with some of them today, and it’s been encouraging to hear how they’re starting to rebuild and piece their lives back together. The funniest?  A time in Kansas City when a man was arrested after licking a frog, hoping the animal’s poisonous venom would create a hallucinogenic experience!   Q: What’s one lesson you’ve learned in your career that you can share with our audience? DL: That you don’t have to be the smartest, the most talented or most skilled in order to thrive in your career. (I’m definitely not and have the grades from school to prove it!)   It’s about being able to communicate, not

Q: Do you have any advice you can share for those women who may want to pursue a career in broadcast journalism? DL: Don’t be discouraged by the “no’s”. Let them fuel your passion to strive for something better. This is a subjective business.  It’s not like mathematics, where there is always a clear and defined right or wrong answer to an equation.  In TV news, you could be a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, but if one person doesn’t like your voice, and you don’t get the job, does that mean you’re not talented?  Absolutely not.

only with an audience but during those day-to-day “microinteractions” in the workplace and also with yourself. Being comfortable in your own skin to have the confidence to tackle any challenge that comes your way. This is the theme of my book “untitled” (McGraw-Hill 2019) coming out this fall. Q: Which woman inspires you and why? DL: Do I have to pick just one?!  The cliché thing to say would be my mom but she is truly remarkable in many ways.  My mother grew up in Taiwan and because girls were not viewed as valuable like boys, she was given away to another family.  When that family rejected her and gave her back, can you imagine what that must do to you psychologically? Later as an immigrant she faced tremendous racism and adversity in the US.  I’m amazed by her work ethic and grit to get things done and to take care of our family despite all of the hurdles. When it comes to  TV news, I’ve had the fortune of working with some remarkable women in my career.  Sonja Gantt the former main anchor at the NBC station in Charlotte taught me how to lead a newsroom with kindness and empathy when I took over the 11pm

Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? DL: What AREN’T some challenges women face today? An important topic I speak about often at schools and at women’s conferences is being “ok” with who you are and understanding you are “enough”.  There is so much pressure to look and sound a certain way.  To fit the standard of beauty and success. But unless you wholeheartedly grasp the notion of acceptance of who you are,  you cannot effectively emote and communicate with your audience, your colleagues, the environment around you. Early in my career, I was very insecure.  Unaware of my unique talents as a person.  But during this time, I was portraying this image of perfection on TV. It was not authentic.  My advice is to never let others take away your confidence.  Your sense of self-worth.  It empowers you to pass on these lessons to others and empower them. If you remember what that is, you’ll be untouchable. Q: What advice would you give to young women who want to succeed in the workplace?

DION AT THE 2018 OSCARS

DL: It’s why I partnered with my literary agent at Full Circle Literary and my publisher, McGraw-Hill to write a book about communication. It’s number one. Unlike in say, college, workplaces are filled with people from all different backgrounds, all different ages. The bringing together of a diverse workforce means each person can bring inherent skills and talents to the table.  But it also can mean breakdowns in communication style. This breeds stress, drama, and frustration.  You don’t have to be the smartest, the quickest or the most talented.  But when you know how to listen and react appropriately with those you interact with, you’ll have a more productive, harmonious work environment. Q: What do you like the most about living in the Bay Area? DL: Hands down the diversity, which is reflected in the thinking, the lifestyle, and the FOOD!  Every city I’ve had the opportunity to work in has shaped who I am today, and I’m so grateful for those experiences.  But San Francisco has a vibrancy like no other, which makes me feel alive.


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SANDRA HUGHES

Sandra Hughes is a business strategist and coach who has created programs especially for people leaving their corporate life to become solopreneurs and small business owners. Her tools and coaching, coupled with her expertise in strategy, help owners create a solid foundation for their business and put a plan in place that is realistic, with achievable goals.

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Q: How did you get involved in the nonprofit sector? PD: I wanted to make a difference and give back to the community and felt the nonprofit sector was aligned with my values. I started off my career providing direct services in education to migrant children and immigrant families in the Salinas and Pajaro Valleys. Being a child of immigrant parents and wanting to give back to my community, I decided to pursue a master’s in social work with a focus in serving low-income Latino children as a therapist. As I was pursuing my degree, I gained a better understanding on how policies impact low-income families and decided to concentrate my career in policy advocacy and community building. For the past 20 years, I’ve worked in the nonprofit sector advocating for improving the lives and opportunities of Latino and immigrant families. It’s my passion and it’s personal. Q: Tell us about your time with the SIREN organization … what changes did you bring about in your role as Executive Director? PD: SIREN, an immigrant rights organization in San Jose, will always be close to my heart. I first started working at SIREN as their policy director. I’m so grateful for SIREN providing me the space and tools to learn how to bring the voice of the immigrant community on issues that are impacting them. I left SIREN to continue advocating for the Latino community in Sacramento with UnidosUs (formerly National Council of La Raza) and Latino Coalition for a Healthy California. I was happy to return to SIREN as their Executive Director in 2005. During my ten years at SIREN, I brought the organization to financial stability, reorganized its program priorities, and partnered with key statewide and national partners that led to victories for immigrants and their families. This couldn’t have happened without having a dynamic and dedicated Board and staff. Q: In your current position as Executive Director of the Chicana / Latina Foundation, can you share with our audience the foundations mission? PD: The mission of the Chicana Latina Foundation (CLF) is to empower Latinas and Chicanas through personal, educational and professional development. We invest in helping Latinas find their own path to success and open a path for others. It’s about cultivating leadership so that they have the confidence and skills to succeed in college, career and life. Q: What has been the impact of Chicana / Latina Foundation in the Bay Area since its inception in 1977? PD: The Chicana Latina Foundation was founded by three Latinas attending UC Berkeley who found the need to support other Latinas pursuing higher education. As first-generation college students, they realized the importance to come together to support each other and future generations of Latina college students. As of today, CLF has awarded nearly $1 million dollars in scholarship assistance to over 600 low-income and first-generation Latina college students in Northern California. Of this number, 400 scholarship awardees have participated in CLF’s leadership institute to succeed as leaders in social change. In 2015, CLF conducted a survey to its alumnae and found that CLF doubled the rate of educational attainment compared to Latinos statewide average.

Promoting Professional & Leadership Development of Latinas,

Patricia Diaz,

Executive Director of the Chicana Latina Nonprofit Foundation

Q: Tell us about your role as Executive Director of the foundation. PD: I joined CLF in January 2018. As their Executive Director, I’m responsible for the agency’s leadership and oversee program and organizational management, resource and fund development, financial operations and administration, and the management and evaluation of personnel. During my time at CLF, I am amazed by the love, community and support that underlies everything we do. CLF is successful because at the core of its work is an inherent love for the women we serve and a desire to serve as their cornerstone as they seek to grow as individuals and as leaders. When we provide a scholarship, we are saying “we believe in you.” When we provide our leadership program, we are helping them find their voice and make their words powerful and impactful. And what results, is a group of activated women who are involved in our communities and effecting change. Our participants and alumnae are powerful Latinas who will transform our future. Q: What are some of the goals you would like to achieve for the foundation? PD: First, it’s an honor to be able to follow in the footsteps of Olga Talamante and to receive so much love from the CLF board and community. As its first Executive Director, Olga led CLF for the last 15 years to be a respected and effective organization in building the power of Latinas.

With 40 years of investing in the leadership of Latinas, my goal is to listen and learn what has made CLF programs effective and through partnerships with the board, staff, alumnae, and supporters. I look forward to building onto that success to take it to the next level. It’s a great opportunity to reflect on our past and current work and the impact we want to make in the future. I’m excited of the endless opportunities. Q: Can you share with our audience your most memorable achievement in your career? PD: Obtaining my college degrees. I’m the first one and the only one in my family that graduated from college. My parents and siblings made sacrifices so that I could go to college. Because of that I am forever grateful to my family and completely understand what first-generation college students go through. When you receive that college degree, it has your name but it’s a family accomplishment. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career that you can share with our audience? PD: Embrace your cultural identity. This is what makes you a leader and better able to serve your community. As a woman and person of color, I’m strongly attached to my cultural identity. I had been to numerous leadership trainings that were very much related to skill acquisition. While they were very helpful, it didn’t get to the deep core of your identity. Growing up in the 70’s, my culture was not seen as an asset. The messaging we are hearing from the administration about Mexicans is similar to what I heard growing up. Oftentimes we internalize these beliefs and thoughts and they affect how we “show up.” After going through the Rockwood leadership program, I embraced my identity as a proud second-generation immigrant from the Salinas Valley. I learned from my immigrant parents and relatives to be courageous and brave, resilient, determined, and compassionate. This is what it means to be an immigrant. And that is why I’m grateful my journey landed me to the Chicana Latina Foundation. Their leadership program develops the student’s awareness and positive identification with the Latinx community by engaging them in the process of framing their individual stories of their past experiences from a deficit to an asset. We help our students build a strong cultural identity and pride in their heritage that propels their leadership and passion to create positive change. Q: Which woman inspires you and why? PD: It’s not necessarily one person but all the women in my family and relatives inspire and motivate me - My mom, sisters, tias (aunts), and primas (cousins). They are all immigrants or children of immigrants. They are all strong, determined and hardworking mujeres (women). They are my foundation. Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? PD: As a Latina, we still face discrimination and gender stereotypes. In just 12 years, Latinas will make up the largest share of California’s workforce. Even though Latinas college graduation rates are increasing, far too many Latinas live in poverty and have the lowest median earnings. Keeping Latinas unprepared and things as they are, is a reality we cannot afford. Q: What advice would you give to young women who want to succeed in the workplace? PD: First, be true to who you are by embracing your identity and culture with pride. What you have to offer is vital and needed. You deserve to be at the table and your voice matters. Next, build a network of people you trust to be vulnerable. Have people in your circle who will support and uplift you and provide honest feedback with love. These are people who will help you through your growth and development. We’re always learning regardless of our age. Finally, take care of yourself both physically and mentally. Self-care is so important to be able to give your best, and I recommend integrating this at an early age. Selfcare shows that you value yourself. Q: What do you like the most about living in the Bay Area? PD: The food! My children are such foodies. When we moved to Eastern Washington, I learned how to cook Mexican and Indian foods – our favorite! I never learned how to cook and joke how my husband taught me how to boil chicken.


Q: How did you get involved in the nonprofit sector? PD: I wanted to make a difference and give back to the community and felt the nonprofit sector was aligned with my values. I started off my career providing direct services in education to migrant children and immigrant families in the Salinas and Pajaro Valleys. Being a child of immigrant parents and wanting to give back to my community, I decided to pursue a master’s in social work with a focus in serving low-income Latino children as a therapist. As I was pursuing my degree, I gained a better understanding on how policies impact low-income families and decided to concentrate my career in policy advocacy and community building. For the past 20 years, I’ve worked in the nonprofit sector advocating for improving the lives and opportunities of Latino and immigrant families. It’s my passion and it’s personal. Q: Tell us about your time with the SIREN organization … what changes did you bring about in your role as Executive Director? PD: SIREN, an immigrant rights organization in San Jose, will always be close to my heart. I first started working at SIREN as their policy director. I’m so grateful for SIREN providing me the space and tools to learn how to bring the voice of the immigrant community on issues that are impacting them. I left SIREN to continue advocating for the Latino community in Sacramento with UnidosUs (formerly National Council of La Raza) and Latino Coalition for a Healthy California. I was happy to return to SIREN as their Executive Director in 2005. During my ten years at SIREN, I brought the organization to financial stability, reorganized its program priorities, and partnered with key statewide and national partners that led to victories for immigrants and their families. This couldn’t have happened without having a dynamic and dedicated Board and staff. Q: In your current position as Executive Director of the Chicana / Latina Foundation, can you share with our audience the foundations mission? PD: The mission of the Chicana Latina Foundation (CLF) is to empower Latinas and Chicanas through personal, educational and professional development. We invest in helping Latinas find their own path to success and open a path for others. It’s about cultivating leadership so that they have the confidence and skills to succeed in college, career and life. Q: What has been the impact of Chicana / Latina Foundation in the Bay Area since its inception in 1977? PD: The Chicana Latina Foundation was founded by three Latinas attending UC Berkeley who found the need to support other Latinas pursuing higher education. As first-generation college students, they realized the importance to come together to support each other and future generations of Latina college students. As of today, CLF has awarded nearly $1 million dollars in scholarship assistance to over 600 low-income and first-generation Latina college students in Northern California. Of this number, 400 scholarship awardees have participated in CLF’s leadership institute to succeed as leaders in social change. In 2015, CLF conducted a survey to its alumnae and found that CLF doubled the rate of educational attainment compared to Latinos statewide average.

Promoting Professional & Leadership Development of Latinas,

Patricia Diaz,

Executive Director of the Chicana Latina Nonprofit Foundation

Q: Tell us about your role as Executive Director of the foundation. PD: I joined CLF in January 2018. As their Executive Director, I’m responsible for the agency’s leadership and oversee program and organizational management, resource and fund development, financial operations and administration, and the management and evaluation of personnel. During my time at CLF, I am amazed by the love, community and support that underlies everything we do. CLF is successful because at the core of its work is an inherent love for the women we serve and a desire to serve as their cornerstone as they seek to grow as individuals and as leaders. When we provide a scholarship, we are saying “we believe in you.” When we provide our leadership program, we are helping them find their voice and make their words powerful and impactful. And what results, is a group of activated women who are involved in our communities and effecting change. Our participants and alumnae are powerful Latinas who will transform our future. Q: What are some of the goals you would like to achieve for the foundation? PD: First, it’s an honor to be able to follow in the footsteps of Olga Talamante and to receive so much love from the CLF board and community. As its first Executive Director, Olga led CLF for the last 15 years to be a respected and effective organization in building the power of Latinas.

With 40 years of investing in the leadership of Latinas, my goal is to listen and learn what has made CLF programs effective and through partnerships with the board, staff, alumnae, and supporters. I look forward to building onto that success to take it to the next level. It’s a great opportunity to reflect on our past and current work and the impact we want to make in the future. I’m excited of the endless opportunities. Q: Can you share with our audience your most memorable achievement in your career? PD: Obtaining my college degrees. I’m the first one and the only one in my family that graduated from college. My parents and siblings made sacrifices so that I could go to college. Because of that I am forever grateful to my family and completely understand what first-generation college students go through. When you receive that college degree, it has your name but it’s a family accomplishment. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career that you can share with our audience? PD: Embrace your cultural identity. This is what makes you a leader and better able to serve your community. As a woman and person of color, I’m strongly attached to my cultural identity. I had been to numerous leadership trainings that were very much related to skill acquisition. While they were very helpful, it didn’t get to the deep core of your identity. Growing up in the 70’s, my culture was not seen as an asset. The messaging we are hearing from the administration about Mexicans is similar to what I heard growing up. Oftentimes we internalize these beliefs and thoughts and they affect how we “show up.” After going through the Rockwood leadership program, I embraced my identity as a proud second-generation immigrant from the Salinas Valley. I learned from my immigrant parents and relatives to be courageous and brave, resilient, determined, and compassionate. This is what it means to be an immigrant. And that is why I’m grateful my journey landed me to the Chicana Latina Foundation. Their leadership program develops the student’s awareness and positive identification with the Latinx community by engaging them in the process of framing their individual stories of their past experiences from a deficit to an asset. We help our students build a strong cultural identity and pride in their heritage that propels their leadership and passion to create positive change. Q: Which woman inspires you and why? PD: It’s not necessarily one person but all the women in my family and relatives inspire and motivate me - My mom, sisters, tias (aunts), and primas (cousins). They are all immigrants or children of immigrants. They are all strong, determined and hardworking mujeres (women). They are my foundation. Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? PD: As a Latina, we still face discrimination and gender stereotypes. In just 12 years, Latinas will make up the largest share of California’s workforce. Even though Latinas college graduation rates are increasing, far too many Latinas live in poverty and have the lowest median earnings. Keeping Latinas unprepared and things as they are, is a reality we cannot afford. Q: What advice would you give to young women who want to succeed in the workplace? PD: First, be true to who you are by embracing your identity and culture with pride. What you have to offer is vital and needed. You deserve to be at the table and your voice matters. Next, build a network of people you trust to be vulnerable. Have people in your circle who will support and uplift you and provide honest feedback with love. These are people who will help you through your growth and development. We’re always learning regardless of our age. Finally, take care of yourself both physically and mentally. Self-care is so important to be able to give your best, and I recommend integrating this at an early age. Selfcare shows that you value yourself. Q: What do you like the most about living in the Bay Area? PD: The food! My children are such foodies. When we moved to Eastern Washington, I learned how to cook Mexican and Indian foods – our favorite! I never learned how to cook and joke how my husband taught me how to boil chicken.


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Meet

Keynote speakers Randi Zuckerberg and NASA’s Dr. Natalia Batalha, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, playwright Lauren Gunderson, and speaker Ann Bowers at TheatreWorks’ Leading Ladies, held in 2014, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

Jenny

Dearborn,

Senior Vice Present, Chief Learning Officer, SAP

Speaking on The Art of Learning, Developing & Inspiring Leadership When you talk about Leadership, Management, Human Relations, Sales, and Excellence and someone who is one of the most inspiring, leading positive role models in Silicon Valley - Jenny Dearborn’s name will come up. 

J

at Hewlett-Packard, Sun Microsystems (acquired by Oracle), Suc-

peers are awesome and my manager is visionary and just

cessFactors and SAP. I’ve been a Chief Learning Officer at four

an all-around great guy. I love the type of work that I do,

different companies.

it’s challenging and rewarding. I love the variety in the work I do – leading the function at my company, helping

SVL: Who and what inspired you along your path to be where you

customers solve complex business challenges, writing arti-

are?

cles and speaking at conferences on topics that are import-

JD: I am severely Dyslexic, have ADHD (Attention Deficit Hy-

ant to me like data analytics, business strategy, the future

peractivity Disorder) and mild OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Dis-

of workplace and diversity & inclusion.

order) and was undiagnosed until age 18. The most formative part of my early life was

enny is Senior Vice President and Chief Learning Officer

and a Teaching Credential in 1993, and San Jose State University

growing up knowing that I was very smart

of SAP, the world’s largest business-to-business software

with a MBA in Organizational Development in 2003.

and capable, but placed in the lower tracked and Special Education classes at school. I felt

company, and is accountable for the learning and devel-

I love the type of work that I do, it’s challenging and rewarding. I love the variety in the work I do

SVL: You have learned so much about the special dynamics of Leadership … First, what is your definition of Leadership? JD: Great leaders inspire a common purpose, collaboratively create a shared vision and

opment of the 75,000 SAP employees worldwide. She has won

Q: Where do you work? What do you do? What has been your

that my early education years were wasted.

many top industry awards, including recognition as one of the 50

path leading you to today?

I felt great resentment towards the teach-

Most Powerful Women in Technology by the National Diversity

JD: I work at SAP, the world’s largest business software company.

ers and school system and vowed to make

Council in 2014 and 2015.

As the Chief Learning Officer, I’m accountable for the training, ed-

a difference in the education system so no

Her invaluable experience...plus interviews with more than 100

ucation, development and readiness of SAP’s 75,000 employees

student would ever experience the frustra-

global leaders,...has led to her best seller: Data Driven - How Per-

world-wide. I am in Human Resources and report to the Chief Hu-

tion and humiliation that I went through in

formance Analytics Delivers Extraordinary Sales Results.

man Resources Officer who reports to the CEO. I started as a high

my K-12 years. I felt great passion to drive

In the high tech universe, Jenny serves as a highly regarded advo-

school English, Public Speaking and Drama teacher at Woodside

change in our education system. This fire

cate and inspiration for many. Please enjoy this delightful conver-

High School. After two years I transitioned to corporate education

got me started in education, then after 2 years as a high school

their greatest potential. “Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to

sation with Jenny Dearborn...

as an instructor at Hewlett-Packard teaching the personal devel-

teacher I transitioned to the corporate education world for the

high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher stan-

opment, management and leadership courses. I worked my way

opportunity to apply exciting and growing new learning tech-

dard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations.”

Q: Where were you born and raised? Where did you go to

up through all the various roles in corporate learning and educa-

nology to impact learners on a mass scale.

—Peter Drucker

school and what did you study?

tion including carrying a quota in Sales selling learning services

JD: I was born in Marin, California and raised K-12 in Davis, Califor-

to external corporate customers and partners. I’ve worked at a

SVL: What do you like most about what you do?

ple, they instinctively redirect all credit to the team when praise

nia. I graduated from Davis High School in 1987, American River

small learning technology start-up that went public (Docent, now

JD: There are so many things I like, that I can’t say what I

comes and absorb all blame when criticism comes. They are slow

College with an AA in Social Science in 1989, UC Berkeley with a

Sum Total Systems), and had a succession of executive roles with

like the most. I love my team, they are hands down the

to punish and swift to reward. Leadership is about the courage to

BA in English in 1991, Stanford University with a MA in Education

increasing responsibility in Human Resources, Sales & Services

best professionals I’ve ever worked with in my career. My

stand alone and the integrity of intent. “Leadership and learning

translate that vision into reality. Leadership is about action and driving results for the greatest good, great leaders see solutions where others only see challenges and obstacles. Great leaders know that people want to “make a dent in the universe” as Steve Jobs famously said, and make the world a better place. This comes through empowering others to achieve

Great leaders have the humility to be a servant leader to their peo-


Meet

Keynote speakers Randi Zuckerberg and NASA’s Dr. Natalia Batalha, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, playwright Lauren Gunderson, and speaker Ann Bowers at TheatreWorks’ Leading Ladies, held in 2014, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

Jenny

Dearborn,

Senior Vice Present, Chief Learning Officer, SAP

Speaking on The Art of Learning, Developing & Inspiring Leadership When you talk about Leadership, Management, Human Relations, Sales, and Excellence and someone who is one of the most inspiring, leading positive role models in Silicon Valley - Jenny Dearborn’s name will come up. 

J

at Hewlett-Packard, Sun Microsystems (acquired by Oracle), Suc-

peers are awesome and my manager is visionary and just

cessFactors and SAP. I’ve been a Chief Learning Officer at four

an all-around great guy. I love the type of work that I do,

different companies.

it’s challenging and rewarding. I love the variety in the work I do – leading the function at my company, helping

Q: Who and what inspired you along your path to be where you

customers solve complex business challenges, writing arti-

are?

cles and speaking at conferences on topics that are import-

JD: I am severely Dyslexic, have ADHD (Attention Deficit Hy-

ant to me like data analytics, business strategy, the future

peractivity Disorder) and mild OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Dis-

of workplace and diversity & inclusion.

order) and was undiagnosed until age 18. The most formative part of my early life was

enny is Senior Vice President and Chief Learning Officer

and a Teaching Credential in 1993, and San Jose State University

growing up knowing that I was very smart

of SAP, the world’s largest business-to-business software

with a MBA in Organizational Development in 2003.

and capable, but placed in the lower tracked and Special Education classes at school. I felt

company, and is accountable for the learning and devel-

I love the type of work that I do, it’s challenging and rewarding. I love the variety in the work I do

Q: You have learned so much about the special dynamics of Leadership … First, what is your definition of Leadership? JD: Great leaders inspire a common purpose, collaboratively create a shared vision and translate that vision into reality. Leadership is

opment of the 75,000 SAP employees worldwide. She has won

SVL: Where do you work? What do you do? What has been your

that my early education years were wasted.

many top industry awards, including recognition as one of the 50

path leading you to today?

I felt great resentment towards the teach-

Most Powerful Women in Technology by the National Diversity

JD: I work at SAP, the world’s largest business software company.

ers and school system and vowed to make

Council in 2014 and 2015.

As the Chief Learning Officer, I’m accountable for the training, ed-

a difference in the education system so no

Her invaluable experience...plus interviews with more than 100

ucation, development and readiness of SAP’s 75,000 employees

student would ever experience the frustra-

global leaders,...has led to her best seller: Data Driven - How Per-

world-wide. I am in Human Resources and report to the Chief Hu-

tion and humiliation that I went through in

formance Analytics Delivers Extraordinary Sales Results.

man Resources Officer who reports to the CEO. I started as a high

my K-12 years. I felt great passion to drive

In the high tech universe, Jenny serves as a highly regarded advo-

school English, Public Speaking and Drama teacher at Woodside

change in our education system. This fire

cate and inspiration for many. Please enjoy this delightful conver-

High School. After two years I transitioned to corporate education

got me started in education, then after 2 years as a high school

their greatest potential. “Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to

sation with Jenny Dearborn...

as an instructor at Hewlett-Packard teaching the personal devel-

teacher I transitioned to the corporate education world for the

high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher stan-

opment, management and leadership courses. I worked my way

opportunity to apply exciting and growing new learning tech-

dard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations.”

SVL: Where were you born and raised? Where did you go to

up through all the various roles in corporate learning and educa-

nology to impact learners on a mass scale.

—Peter Drucker

school and what did you study?

tion including carrying a quota in Sales selling learning services

JD: I was born in Marin, California and raised K-12 in Davis, Califor-

to external corporate customers and partners. I’ve worked at a

Q: What do you like most about what you do?

ple, they instinctively redirect all credit to the team when praise

nia. I graduated from Davis High School in 1987, American River

small learning technology start-up that went public (Docent, now

JD: There are so many things I like, that I can’t say what I

comes and absorb all blame when criticism comes. They are slow

College with an AA in Social Science in 1989, UC Berkeley with a

Sum Total Systems), and had a succession of executive roles with

like the most. I love my team, they are hands down the

to punish and swift to reward. Leadership is about the courage to

BA in English in 1991, Stanford University with a MA in Education

increasing responsibility in Human Resources, Sales & Services

best professionals I’ve ever worked with in my career. My

stand alone and the integrity of intent. “Leadership and learning

about action and driving results for the greatest good, great leaders see solutions where others only see challenges and obstacles. Great leaders know that people want to “make a dent in the universe” as Steve Jobs famously said, and make the world a better place. This comes through empowering others to achieve

Great leaders have the humility to be a servant leader to their peo-


are indispensable to each other.” —John F. Kennedy Q: What is the best course of action for management when it comes to Leadership? What is the best course of action for the employee when it comes to Leadership? JD: I believe in leadership at every level, leadership is about person power not position power. Everyone, regardless if they are people managers or individual contributors, can and should be a leader.

Hone your management skills – When managing your work and family, you’re managing a complex organization. Do activities as a family, to maximize efficiency.

Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

Q: How do you see the workplace evolving and improving?

Keynote speakers Congresswoman Anna G. Eshoo, New York Times best-selling author Lalita Tademy, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, and Emmy Award-winning writer and producer Margaret Nagle at TheatreWorks Silicon Valley’s Leading Ladies event celebrating passion in arts and innovation, held in 2015, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography TheatreWorks Artistic Director Robert Kelley, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, and TheatreWorks Managing Director Phil Santora at TheatreWorks’ Leading Ladies, held in 2014, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

JD: The overarching theme for the workplace of the future is transparency.

the help you need.

business trip to align with a school break or just pull them from school

• Transparency in how we work: Your mobile device will become your office.

• Let it go – Your house does not have to be spotless. When you have a full

for a week here or there. John (or a grandparent or nanny) and the kids

• Transparency in where we work: We’ll work from everywhere - Workers will be

work and family life, the children have to learn to be independent. With

visit the local sites while I’m at the office working. We’ve done work/

spread across many time zones and countries in numerous satellite offices for

clear and consistent communication, every child can do their own laun-

family trips to: Mexico, Germany, China, Dubai, Singapore, Japan, Pan-

worker interaction, but not necessarily as daily destinations. Always-on video will

dry, clean their own rooms, clean the kitchen and bathrooms, make their

ama, Canada, England, France, Amsterdam, Australia, Belgium, Italy,

facilitate collaboration with colleagues in other locations.

own breakfast and lunch. Learning to be responsible and capable early on

to name a few….

• Transparency of our competence and value: Everyone will have a rating score,

is good for everyone.

I throw myself fully into what my children love as a way to spend time

based on his/her reputation capital, which is the sum total of your personal brand,

• Focus and prioritize – Do the high value work that only you can do and

together doing what interests them. Currently my 12 year old is ab-

the quality of your results, your expertise, depth and breadth of experience and

outsource the rest. You can outsource the laundry but your child only

solutely obsessed with Giants baseball, so he and I watch the games

social networks. The new workplace will be a results only work environment.

wants you there to see her win an award at school. Knowing how to fo-

together. It’s our special thing to do.

• Transparency in who we work for: Every manager will also have a rating score

cus on your highest priorities makes a big career and a big family possible.

I love to be creative. I write and publish articles in business magazines

based on similar criteria plus people management and functional leadership.

SVL: What do you see are some of the major issues facing us in today’s

and my first book Data Driven: How Performance Analytics Delivers

Employees will be hired into a company and then choose which manager they

work environment?

Extraordinary Sales Results was published in March 2015 – it debuted

want to work for based on the rating score of that manager.

JD: The globalization of work and changing demographics of the

at #1 in the new business releases on Amazon. I like to paint large

• Transparency of skill gaps: Big data, predictive analytics and artificial intelli-

workforce; multiple generations in the workplace

scale acrylic on canvas pictures, primarily pop art versions of comic

gence are enabling a workplace of the future that magnifies the global talent

• Contingent labor force

book superheroes.

shortage and makes more sparse highly skilled workers. Thus making lifelong

• Big data and analytics

learning a business requirement.

• Adaptation of mobile and social networks

SVL: Who are some of your favorite authors and what are some of your favorite books? Different topics? Are there books you like to rec-

Q: What do you recommend as tips and strategies for work-life balance?

SVL: If you could wave a magic wand, what would you like to see for

ommend?

JD: Well, I don’t think there is such a thing as work-life balance, but work-life inte-

progress in the workplace?

JD: I try to read what my kids are reading for pleasure or in school to

gration is very do-able. I was recently quoted in the Fortune Magazine article on

JD: I’d like to see a true meritocracy in the workplace. A workplace

make our dinner table conversation richer with the themes they are

this topic - Women with big jobs and big families: Balancing really isn’t that hard.

where people are paid equally for equal work regardless of their gen-

exploring and how to connect with broader issues in the world. So

Here are the tips and strategies mentioned in that article and others that I use.

der or race, and the diversity in the workplace at all levels of an organi-

if it’s a popular young adult series, I’ve probably read it. I go through

• Hone your management skills – When managing your work and family, you’re

zation mirroring the diversity in the population at large.

phases with the books I read. Right now I’m doing a research project on the knowledge and skills first time managers need and I’m reading

managing a complex organization. Do activities as a family, to maximize efficiency. I use a shared on-line calendar and each kid is color coded, they all have an

SVL: Who are some of the people who inspire you most and why?

stacks and stacks of books and white papers on the topic. For fun I

iPhone and can see where they need to be at any given time.

JD: My children and husband. I follow the research of a few social

listen to audio books and love Doris Kearns Goodwin who is such a

• Prioritize self care – Put your own oxygen mask on first. Managing your life takes

scientists, like Amy Cuddy of Harvard and Kelly McGonigal of Stanford,

great story teller.

energy, so never skimp on sleep, nutrition or exercise.

I find their work fascinating. SVL: What are some of your favorite movies, music, theater?

• Build your support team at work – Invest in the development of your staff to be accountable and independent. Seek sponsors and allies that understand and

SVL: You have many interests … please share with us what some of

JD: For movies – I love all horror / thriller / suspense films. I wrote my se-

support you.

these are?

nior thesis at UC Berkeley on the evolving role of women in horror films

• Build your support team at home – Enlist a village to help you and don’t be afraid

JD: I love to travel, I’m always up for going to a country that I’ve nev-

from Nosferatu in 1922 to Silence of the Lambs in 1991. The central idea

to ask for support (it’s a sign of strength not weakness). Live near family if possible.

er been to before. I’ve just passed 60 countries. I’m very fortunate

is that the female character in horror films is the manifestation of how

Invest in things that make your life easier. Not at the same time, but in the last 20

professionally to have worked for companies with operations around

our culture views women in society and as societies views of feminism

years I have employed all of the following: a part-time nanny, a full-time live-in au

the globe and have the opportunity to travel extensively for work. I

evolve, so does the female protagonist.

pair, home cook, meal delivery service, housekeeper, and a personal accountant.

also love to share with my family the cultures of the world and I’ve

For music – I love classic rap, hip hop and alternative punk from the 80s.

Depending on what the big challenge is at a given phase in life, reach out to get

brought them along on many of my business trips. I typically plan a

For theatre – I love any production that my kids are in.


are indispensable to each other.” —John F. Kennedy SVL: What is the best course of action for management when it comes to Leadership? What is the best course of action for the employee when it comes to Leadership? JD: I believe in leadership at every level, leadership is about person power not position power. Everyone, regardless if they are people managers or individual contributors, can and should be a leader.

Hone your management skills – When managing your work and family, you’re managing a complex organization. Do activities as a family, to maximize efficiency.

Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

SVL: How do you see the workplace evolving and improving?

Keynote speakers Congresswoman Anna G. Eshoo, New York Times best-selling author Lalita Tademy, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, and Emmy Award-winning writer and producer Margaret Nagle at TheatreWorks Silicon Valley’s Leading Ladies event celebrating passion in arts and innovation, held in 2015, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography TheatreWorks Artistic Director Robert Kelley, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, and TheatreWorks Managing Director Phil Santora at TheatreWorks’ Leading Ladies, held in 2014, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

JD: The overarching theme for the workplace of the future is transparency.

the help you need.

business trip to align with a school break or just pull them from school

• Transparency in how we work: Your mobile device will become your office.

• Let it go – Your house does not have to be spotless. When you have a

for a week here or there. John (or a grandparent or nanny) and the kids

• Transparency in where we work: We’ll work from everywhere - Workers will be

full work and family life, the children have to learn to be independent.

visit the local sites while I’m at the office working. We’ve done work/

spread across many time zones and countries in numerous satellite offices for

With clear and consistent communication, every child can do their own

family trips to: Mexico, Germany, China, Dubai, Singapore, Japan, Pan-

worker interaction, but not necessarily as daily destinations. Always-on video will

laun-dry, clean their own rooms, clean the kitchen and bathrooms, make

ama, Canada, England, France, Amsterdam, Australia, Belgium, Italy,

facilitate collaboration with colleagues in other locations.

their own breakfast and lunch. Learning to be responsible and capable

to name a few….

• Transparency of our competence and value: Everyone will have a rating score,

early on is good for everyone.

I throw myself fully into what my children love as a way to spend time

based on his/her reputation capital, which is the sum total of your personal brand,

• Focus and prioritize – Do the high value work that only you can do and

together doing what interests them. Currently my 12 year old is ab-

the quality of your results, your expertise, depth and breadth of experience and

outsource the rest. You can outsource the laundry but your child only

solutely obsessed with Giants baseball, so he and I watch the games

social networks. The new workplace will be a results only work environment.

wants you there to see her win an award at school. Knowing how to fo-

together. It’s our special thing to do.

• Transparency in who we work for: Every manager will also have a rating score

cus on your highest priorities makes a big career and a big family possible.

I love to be creative. I write and publish articles in business magazines

based on similar criteria plus people management and functional leadership.

Q: What do you see are some of the major issues facing us in today’s

and my first book Data Driven: How Performance Analytics Delivers

Employees will be hired into a company and then choose which manager they

work environment?

Extraordinary Sales Results was published in March 2015 – it debuted

want to work for based on the rating score of that manager.

JD: The globalization of work and changing demographics of the

at #1 in the new business releases on Amazon. I like to paint large

• Transparency of skill gaps: Big data, predictive analytics and artificial intelli-

workforce; multiple generations in the workplace

scale acrylic on canvas pictures, primarily pop art versions of comic

gence are enabling a workplace of the future that magnifies the global talent

• Contingent labor force

book superheroes.

shortage and makes more sparse highly skilled workers. Thus making lifelong

• Big data and analytics

learning a business requirement.

• Adaptation of mobile and social networks

Q: Who are some of your favorite authors and what are some of your favorite books? Different topics? Are there books you like to rec-

SVL: What do you recommend as tips and strategies for work-life balance?

Q: If you could wave a magic wand, what would you like to see for

ommend?

JD: Well, I don’t think there is such a thing as work-life balance, but work-life inte-

progress in the workplace?

JD: I try to read what my kids are reading for pleasure or in school to

gration is very do-able. I was recently quoted in the Fortune Magazine article on

JD: I’d like to see a true meritocracy in the workplace. A workplace

make our dinner table conversation richer with the themes they are

this topic - Women with big jobs and big families: Balancing really isn’t that hard.

where people are paid equally for equal work regardless of their gen-

exploring and how to connect with broader issues in the world. So

Here are the tips and strategies mentioned in that article and others that I use.

der or race, and the diversity in the workplace at all levels of an organi-

if it’s a popular young adult series, I’ve probably read it. I go through

• Hone your management skills – When managing your work and family, you’re

zation mirroring the diversity in the population at large.

phases with the books I read. Right now I’m doing a research project on the knowledge and skills first time managers need and I’m reading

managing a complex organization. Do activities as a family, to maximize efficiency. I use a shared on-line calendar and each kid is color coded, they all have an

Q: Who are some of the people who inspire you most and why?

stacks and stacks of books and white papers on the topic. For fun I

iPhone and can see where they need to be at any given time.

JD: My children and husband. I follow the research of a few

listen to audio books and love Doris Kearns Goodwin who is such a

• Prioritize self care – Put your own oxygen mask on first. Managing your life takes

social scientists, like Amy Cuddy of Harvard and Kelly McGonigal of

great story teller.

energy, so never skimp on sleep, nutrition or exercise.

Stanford, I find their work fascinating. Q: What are some of your favorite movies, music, theater?

• Build your support team at work – Invest in the development of your staff to be accountable and independent. Seek sponsors and allies that understand and

Q: You have many interests … please share with us what some of

JD: For movies – I love all horror / thriller / suspense films. I wrote my se-

support you.

these are?

nior thesis at UC Berkeley on the evolving role of women in horror films

• Build your support team at home – Enlist a village to help you and don’t be afraid

JD: I love to travel, I’m always up for going to a country that I’ve nev-

from Nosferatu in 1922 to Silence of the Lambs in 1991. The central idea

to ask for support (it’s a sign of strength not weakness). Live near family if possible.

er been to before. I’ve just passed 60 countries. I’m very fortunate

is that the female character in horror films is the manifestation of how

Invest in things that make your life easier. Not at the same time, but in the last 20

professionally to have worked for companies with operations around

our culture views women in society and as societies views of feminism

years I have employed all of the following: a part-time nanny, a full-time live-in au

the globe and have the opportunity to travel extensively for work. I

evolve, so does the female protagonist.

pair, home cook, meal delivery service, housekeeper, and a personal accountant.

also love to share with my family the cultures of the world and I’ve

For music – I love classic rap, hip hop and alternative punk from the 80s.

Depending on what the big challenge is at a given phase in life, reach out to get

brought them along on many of my business trips. I typically plan a

For theatre – I love any production that my kids are in.


Join The Fight Against Human Trafficking Here in Santa Clara County! By Cindy Chavez

Santa Clara County Supervisor, District Two

“Out of sight, out of mind” is a sad but fitting way to describe they recalled many suspicious situations that had occurred how human trafficking has grown into a multi-billion dollar in the past. One of the VTA drivers who received this training illicit industry across the globe. Human trafficking is a form recognized that passengers on his bus seemed to match the of modern day slavery that transcends gender, age, ethnic, description of a kidnapper and his toddler abductee texted socioeconomic and national boundaries. The most vulner- from the VTA operations center. He acted, and when the bus able of us are susceptible to traffickers’ use of deception, reached the Fremont BART Station, police officers immedifraud, threats, coercion, violence, debt ately apprehended the captor and rescued bondage and other manipulative stratethe child. The hero driver, Tim Watson, gies to force people into commercial sex credited the human trafficking training he or labor. had received the week before. The FBI has identified the Bay Area as one We need strong enforcement, too, so the of the nation’s top four hubs for human County has also funded new teams in the trafficking. That is why one of my primaSheriff’s and District Attorney’s offices dedry foci since joining the Board of Supericated to fighting human trafficking. The visors has been to expose and combat Law Enforcement to Investigate Human the scourge of human trafficking in Santa Trafficking (LEIHT) Task Force has investiClara County. gators from the Sheriff, local police and the In 2014, I proposed, and the Board of FBI. The work of the LEIHT Task Force has CINDY CHAVEZ Supervisors unanimously apalready paid off with the arrest of proved, the creation of the multiple human traffickers and Santa Clara County Human Trafrescue of victims from both sex ficking Commission, which I coand labor trafficking. chair with Sheriff Laurie Smith We need your help in identifying, and District Attorney Jeff Rosen. reporting and raising awareness The Human Trafficking Comabout human trafficking. In colmission has already worked on laboration with our community a number of high-profile campartners, Santa Clara County’s paigns, including collaborating Office of Women’s Policy has with the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) developed training materials to help raise awareness and to provide human trafficking awareness training to all VTA decrease the number of people trafficked in our neighbordrivers beginning in March, 2015, and launching the San- hoods. Please learn the red flags of human trafficking and ta Clara County Human Trafficking Awareness Campaign in remember: if you see something, say something. December, 2015. To view the County’s Human Trafficking training video and In the first week of the training provided to VTA drivers and brochure, please visit: fare inspectors, the Office of the Sheriff received eight tips. http://tinyurl.com/SCC-HT-Training-Video (video) VTA employees wished they had this knowledge before, as http://tinyurl.com/SCC-Know-the-Red-Flags (brochure)


WWW. FACEBOOK. COM/ BAYAREAWOMENMAG


FERTILITY PRESERVATION 5 Things You Should Know By Dr. Aimee Eyvazzadeh

Your fertility isn’t skin deep. It’s as simple as that. Just because you look like you’re 28 when you’re 42, doesn’t mean your ovaries are the same. Unlike men who don’t run out of sperm, it is totally normal and expected for every woman to run out of eggs by a certain age. The average age of menopause is 51 and it’s very difficult to get pregnant during the 10 years leading up to that age. Some of us are born with more eggs or run out at a slower rate but at the end of the day most women are not fertile in their 40’s. It’s unfair for women to be made to feel like there’s something wrong with them when they’re told they’re not fertile at the age of 40. Not many women are fertile in their 40’s. Empower yourself with knowledge about your fertility so you can learn more about your options. Running out of eggs doesn’t mean you also run out of options. Women in their 40’s often turn to more creative ways to grow their family: donor eggs, donor embryos and adoption just to name a few. I find that most of my patients who see me over the age of 40 say they wish they had frozen their eggs when they could have. Women today sadly learn that they’re running out of eggs at the same time that they decide to start a family. Egg freezing technology has changed dramatically over the past 5 years or so. Women don’t have to say that they wish they froze their eggs 10 years ago…..a time when egg freezing success rates weren’t as good as they are today. The time is now to ask your doctor whether egg freezing is for you. Here’s what you should know: 1. There are tests you can do to find

Dr. Aimee Eyvazzadeh Photos by Jennifer Crandall

out more about your fertility. Your doctor can order an Anti Mullerian Hormone level (AMH) as a guide regarding how much battery you have in your biological clock. Cycle day 3 FSH and estradiol levels and an antral follicle count (ultrasound looking at your ovaries often done by a reproductive endocrinologist) can also be used clinically as a guide. 2. If your Mom or other female family members had fertility issues related to conditions like endometriosis or early menopause, you should strongly consider preserving your fertility and seeing a doctor


to talk more about your options. 3. There are some medical conditions that require drug treatments that can be what we call “gonadotoxic” ie result in damage to eggs or sperm. Patients who are diagnosed with conditions like Lupus, blood disorders, and cancer are often put on chemotherapeutic Dr. Eyvazzadeh has been hosting “Egg Freezing Parties” designed to raise awareness of fertility issues since 2014. drugs. Freezing eggs/sperm Harvard Medical School, she completed a can give these patients a chance for pregnancy in the future fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility at University of Michigan. She after their treatment is over if they run out also completed a Masters in Public Health in of eggs earlier because of the treatments. Health Management and Policy at University 4. Freezing eggs for future use is best in of Michigan. She has a private practice in younger women because our eggs have a the SF Bay Area. higher chance of being viable the younger Each day she hears story after story we are. If you’re considering freezing your from women struggling to conceive. In her eggs in your late 30’s, you could still have a attempt to alleviate some of this heartbreak, good chance for pregnancy. Speaking with she has gone on a mission of “fertility a fertility specialist would be helpful before awareness”. Her hope is to empower you decide to freeze your eggs. women at an early age, making them more 5. Egg freezing involves a surgical aware of their own personal fertility levels procedure. Women have to take selfadministered shots in the skin of their lower and allowing them to be better educated about their options. Never again does she abdomen for about 10 days prior to the egg want to hear “If I had known 10 years ago extraction procedure. To hear more about the process of IVF or that my egg reserves were running low, I would have done things differently”. egg freezing, please read Dr. Aimee’s next In 2014, she launched her message with article. “Egg Freezing Parties”. These hosted parties Dr. Aimee Eyvazzadeh is a native of offer women a chance to learn more about the Bay Area. She is a graduate of UCLA egg freezing and ask their questions in a School of Medicine. After completing her comfortable, safe environment with likeresidency in Obstetrics & Gynecology at minded women. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and


Making an Incredible Impact on Community Through Selfless, Dedicated Volunteer Work Meet Lynn North, Recognized Top Realtor & Dedicated Community Volunteer Lynn North has been a realtor for the past 15 years & ranked in the top 5% with the prestigious Alain Pinel Realtors in the Bay Area. She has served as coordinator and director of programs and is currently in various leadership positions at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Los Altos, California. Previously, she was director of telecommunications business development at Network Appliance and vice president in sales with SBC and Pacific Bell, where her large team literally built the infrastructure known today as Silicon Valley. After earning her Bachelor of Science degree in Organizational Behavior from University of San Francisco, Lynn’s expertise has been in helping her clients deal with change, whether it be in growing their business or with her recent board experiences, in helping families with seniors deal with the challenges of life changes. Lynn has been the Chair on the Board of Sunny View’s Foundation since 1999 & with Front Porch since 2004. Lynn has been in several key leadership roles at Immanuel Lutheran Church for 33 years. For 3 years, she took 40 youth and adults to Mexico to build homes for the poor and has been an active role in local schools and community sports programs. Lynn is a licensed real estate agent drawing on her wealth of experience helping clients and is a fourth generation Bay Area resident, who has lived in Los Altos for 33 years. She was past president of her neighborhood association. Lynn has earned the reputation among her colleagues and clients for honesty, integrity and loyalty. Lynn’s philosophy on real estate recognizes the need for a knowledgeable consultant who can produce top results. “I work continually to keep up with this ever-changing, complex market and strive to help my clients realize the greatest return on one of their largest investments.”

Sunny View Award Presentation to Francis N Njuakom, Director CDVTA in Cameroon, Africa for senior housing there: Francis accepts his award of $20,000 donated by the residents and staff of Sunny View & Front Porch (left to right: Sally Plank, EVP Front Porch, Francis’ wife Rosie, Jack York (founder of iN2L and large donor to CDVTA), Lynn North, Chair of Sunny View’s Foundation, Francis N. Njuakom, Director of CDVTA in Cameroon)

Q: Can you share with us what made you decide to have a career in Real Estate? LN: I have always loved helping people realize their dreams whether it is helping a couple move to a bigger house to accommodate a growing family or helping an older person move to a more supportive environment like a retirement community that will better meet their needs. Moving is one of the biggest changes and stresses that people can experience, so I leverage my expertise to help them. I have a degree in Organizational Behavior from the University of San Francisco, so throughout my career, I have helped facilitate major changes, such as guiding a telecom company from monopoly to creating a competitive environment during the birth of the Silicon Valley. Q: Looking back, what do you think were the ingredients that kept you as a top Realtor year after year? LN: It is the ability to focus on what clients truly need and give them a concierge experience. Also, I am known by my peers to be fair and honest and to conduct business with integrity. I give every buyer and

his or her agent an equal chance. Also, I leverage my marketing expertise to ensure that their homes are promoted extensively. Q. What is Alain Pinel Realtors’ President’s Round Table? LN: I was honored and recognized as one of the exemplary Alain Pinel Realtor’s agents in 2017, which acknowledges those agents with the highest results. Alain Pinel Realtors has one of the strongest brands and is recognized nationally. It is a privilege being a part of their team. Q: How has technology changed the Real Estate industry over the years? LN: Like all industries, we have evolved with better tools that give buyers and sellers the ability to use technology to obtain more information and be more effective at finding what they want. Candidly, all of the market comparative data analysis is online along with sophis ticated search criteria and other information for the buyers to find their homes too!


Making an Incredible Impact on Community Through Selfless, Dedicated Volunteer Work Meet Lynn North, Recognized Top Realtor & Dedicated Community Volunteer Lynn North has been a realtor for the past 15 years & ranked in the top 5% with the prestigious Alain Pinel Realtors in the Bay Area. She has served as coordinator and director of programs and is currently in various leadership positions at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Los Altos, California. Previously, she was director of telecommunications business development at Network Appliance and vice president in sales with SBC and Pacific Bell, where her large team literally built the infrastructure known today as Silicon Valley. After earning her Bachelor of Science degree in Organizational Behavior from University of San Francisco, Lynn’s expertise has been in helping her clients deal with change, whether it be in growing their business or with her recent board experiences, in helping families with seniors deal with the challenges of life changes. Lynn has been the Chair on the Board of Sunny View’s Foundation since 1999 & with Front Porch since 2004. Lynn has been in several key leadership roles at Immanuel Lutheran Church for 33 years. For 3 years, she took 40 youth and adults to Mexico to build homes for the poor and has been an active role in local schools and community sports programs. Lynn is a licensed real estate agent drawing on her wealth of experience helping clients and is a fourth generation Bay Area resident, who has lived in Los Altos for 33 years. She was past president of her neighborhood association. Lynn has earned the reputation among her colleagues and clients for honesty, integrity and loyalty. Lynn’s philosophy on real estate recognizes the need for a knowledgeable consultant who can produce top results. “I work continually to keep up with this ever-changing, complex market and strive to help my clients realize the greatest return on one of their largest investments.”

Sunny View Award Presentation to Francis N Njuakom, Director CDVTA in Cameroon, Africa for senior housing there: Francis accepts his award of $20,000 donated by the residents and staff of Sunny View & Front Porch (left to right: Sally Plank, EVP Front Porch, Francis’ wife Rosie, Jack York (founder of iN2L and large donor to CDVTA), Lynn North, Chair of Sunny View’s Foundation, Francis N. Njuakom, Director of CDVTA in Cameroon)

Q: Can you share with us what made you decide to have a career in Real Estate? LN: I have always loved helping people realize their dreams whether it is helping a couple move to a bigger house to accommodate a growing family or helping an older person move to a more supportive environment like a retirement community that will better meet their needs. Moving is one of the biggest changes and stresses that people can experience, so I leverage my expertise to help them. I have a degree in Organizational Behavior from the University of San Francisco, so throughout my career, I have helped facilitate major changes, such as guiding a telecom company from monopoly to creating a competitive environment during the birth of the Silicon Valley. Q: Looking back, what do you think were the ingredients that kept you as a top Realtor year after year? LN: It is the ability to focus on what clients truly need and give them a concierge experience. Also, I am known by my peers to be fair and honest and to conduct business with integrity. I give every buyer and

his or her agent an equal chance. Also, I leverage my marketing expertise to ensure that their homes are promoted extensively. Q. What is Alain Pinel Realtors’ President’s Round Table? LN: I was honored and recognized as one of the exemplary Alain Pinel Realtor’s agents in 2017, which acknowledges those agents with the highest results. Alain Pinel Realtors has one of the strongest brands and is recognized nationally. It is a privilege being a part of their team. Q: How has technology changed the Real Estate industry over the years? LN: Like all industries, we have evolved with better tools that give buyers and sellers the ability to use technology to obtain more information and be more effective at finding what they want. Candidly, all of the market comparative data analysis is online along with sophis ticated search criteria and other information for the buyers to find their homes too!


Sunny View’s Annual Benefit Dinner, Lynn North, Chair of the Foundation Sunny View resident, Sara Carter receiving the Oliver Ruud Award (left to right: Bill Penrod, Director of Sunny View’s Foundation, Lynn North, Chair of Sunny View’s Foundation & Sara Carter, resident)

Q: Can you share with our audience one of your most memorable moments your career? LN: There are so many moments where I have had the privilege to help my clients realize their lifelong dreams. For example, I help newlywed couples purchase their first home or young families purchase a larger one near great schools. I help older clients downsize and realize their retirement dreams by finding them a home closer to their families.

use technology to better meet the needs of residents. For example, one project combines Nest and Amazon’s Alexa to give independence to residents in assisted living. The ‘voice first’ technology mitigates falls by turning on a light with a simple voice command. Residents can also adjust the room temperature, make phone calls or listen to music using commands. Another project that was truly special was to provide a shelter for senior residents of Cameroon, Africa.

Q: What’s the toughest part of your job? LN: The toughest part of my job is helping my clients realize the highest return on their homes in a changing and challenging market!

Q: In the years that you’ve been involved with community and nonprofits … tell us, what brings you the greatest joy? LN: We only have a finite amount of time in life to make a difference in this world and help those who need it the most. It is out of gratitude that I help those who are in need. It is very rewarding to share those gifts with others. Recently on behalf of Sunny View, I had the privilege to present an award to Francis N. Njuakom, the director of CDVTA in Cameroon, Africa, (www.cdvta.org). He shared with us that his village, which is located in a very poor area, had to choose to support the children over the

Q: I know you’re very passionate about the work Sunny View Retirement Community does … can you share with our audience some of the volunteer projects you’ve been a part of? LN: Sunny View is a wonderful, caring community. The community works with the Front Porch Center for Innovation and Wellbeing on a number of pilot projects that

seniors, since they only had the resources for one group and the children were their only hope for the future. Therefore, the seniors were homeless and our Sunny View residents and staff along with the Sunny View Foundation and Sunny View’s parent company, Front Porch (www.frontporch.net), matched the resident and staff gifts to build a senior center for elders in Cameroon. It was so heartwarming and so wonderful for our residents to help their peers around the world too. Q: Which woman inspires you and why? LN: As a Christian, Mother Teresa truly has inspired me in her incredible work for the poor of India. I continue to receive inspiration from her reflections and words of wisdom. Michelle Obama is inspirational in terms of how to make a difference in spite of obstacles and even though she started in the projects in Chicago, with perseverance and hard work, she ended up First Lady of the United States. Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? LN: I think that women’s greatest challenges are to continue to believe in themselves and that they can succeed and not lose the confidence and faith that they

are on the right path in spite of the challenges. As a pioneer leader (former VP at Pac Bell and SBC, where my team built the whole infrastructure in the Silicon Valley area), I knew that the people I had the privilege to lead made the difference, as they were closest to the clients’ needs. Q: What advice would you give to young women who want to succeed in the workplace? LN: Respect all those who have led the way, listen and be grateful to your mentors and be confident to take risks! All of us can recollect those who believed in us and were humbled by their incredible support. They were the ones who created your path! Q: What are some of your favorite interests and hobbies that you enjoy? LN: While I serve on two non-profit senior boards, I am active in leadership positions at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Los Altos, including coordinating weddings and truly love helping children (previous Sunday School coordinator) and assisting seniors. We have a very vibrant ministry and everyone can make a difference there! Of course, I enjoy hiking, traveling and time with my children and grandchildren.


Sunny View’s Annual Benefit Dinner, Lynn North, Chair of the Foundation Sunny View resident, Sara Carter receiving the Oliver Ruud Award (left to right: Bill Penrod, Director of Sunny View’s Foundation, Lynn North, Chair of Sunny View’s Foundation & Sara Carter, resident)

Q: Can you share with our audience one of your most memorable moments your career? LN: There are so many moments where I have had the privilege to help my clients realize their lifelong dreams. For example, I help newlywed couples purchase their first home or young families purchase a larger one near great schools. I help older clients downsize and realize their retirement dreams by finding them a home closer to their families.

use technology to better meet the needs of residents. For example, one project combines Nest and Amazon’s Alexa to give independence to residents in assisted living. The ‘voice first’ technology mitigates falls by turning on a light with a simple voice command. Residents can also adjust the room temperature, make phone calls or listen to music using commands. Another project that was truly special was to provide a shelter for senior residents of Cameroon, Africa.

Q: What’s the toughest part of your job? LN: The toughest part of my job is helping my clients realize the highest return on their homes in a changing and challenging market!

Q: In the years that you’ve been involved with community and nonprofits … tell us, what brings you the greatest joy? LN: We only have a finite amount of time in life to make a difference in this world and help those who need it the most. It is out of gratitude that I help those who are in need. It is very rewarding to share those gifts with others. Recently on behalf of Sunny View, I had the privilege to present an award to Francis N. Njuakom, the director of CDVTA in Cameroon, Africa, (www.cdvta.org). He shared with us that his village, which is located in a very poor area, had to choose to support the children over the

Q: I know you’re very passionate about the work Sunny View Retirement Community does … can you share with our audience some of the volunteer projects you’ve been a part of? LN: Sunny View is a wonderful, caring community. The community works with the Front Porch Center for Innovation and Wellbeing on a number of pilot projects that

seniors, since they only had the resources for one group and the children were their only hope for the future. Therefore, the seniors were homeless and our Sunny View residents and staff along with the Sunny View Foundation and Sunny View’s parent company, Front Porch (www.frontporch.net), matched the resident and staff gifts to build a senior center for elders in Cameroon. It was so heartwarming and so wonderful for our residents to help their peers around the world too. Q: Which woman inspires you and why? LN: As a Christian, Mother Teresa truly has inspired me in her incredible work for the poor of India. I continue to receive inspiration from her reflections and words of wisdom. Michelle Obama is inspirational in terms of how to make a difference in spite of obstacles and even though she started in the projects in Chicago, with perseverance and hard work, she ended up First Lady of the United States. Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? LN: I think that women’s greatest challenges are to continue to believe in themselves and that they can succeed and not lose the confidence and faith that they

are on the right path in spite of the challenges. As a pioneer leader (former VP at Pac Bell and SBC, where my team built the whole infrastructure in the Silicon Valley area), I knew that the people I had the privilege to lead made the difference, as they were closest to the clients’ needs. Q: What advice would you give to young women who want to succeed in the workplace? LN: Respect all those who have led the way, listen and be grateful to your mentors and be confident to take risks! All of us can recollect those who believed in us and were humbled by their incredible support. They were the ones who created your path! Q: What are some of your favorite interests and hobbies that you enjoy? LN: While I serve on two non-profit senior boards, I am active in leadership positions at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Los Altos, including coordinating weddings and truly love helping children (previous Sunday School coordinator) and assisting seniors. We have a very vibrant ministry and everyone can make a difference there! Of course, I enjoy hiking, traveling and time with my children and grandchildren.


Congresswoman Jackie Speier CHAMPION FOR EQUALITY & WOMEN’S RIGHTS Q: Growing up, did you know you wanted to be a Politician? Congresswoman Speier: I worked on my first political campaign when I was 16, and I was hooked from that moment on. I later interned in Assemblyman Leo Ryan’s office, and then returned to his office to work for him after I finished law school. It was after our fateful trip to Guyana, where Congressman Ryan was assassinated, and I was shot, that I decided to dedicate my life to public service. I distinctly remember laying on the air strip not knowing whether I’d survive. Fighting injustice and giving a voice to the voiceless has been the constant driver in my life. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career? Congresswoman Speier: You must lead even when the wind is not at your back. You have to stick to it because nothing ever comes easy. We have to take opportunities to get something done in Congress. Look at our fight against sexual assault in the military; after years and years, we are still fighting it. It’s a marathon, not a sprint. You can never stop pursuing what is right and you have to be willing to stick your neck out. Q: What would you say is your greatest accomplishment thus far? Congresswoman Speier: I have a rewarding career, but without a doubt the greatest accomplishment in my life was raising my two children. I firmly believe that there is no greater calling for us and nothing that can bring more joy and fulfillment. Q: If you had the power, what one Government policy would you reverse? Congresswoman Speier: Rather than reverse a policy, I would have the Equal Rights Amendment ratified once and for all so that women are officially recognized as having the same rights as men in our Constitution. Most Americans think discrimination against women is already prohibited in the Constitution; and when they find out that’s not the case, they support ratification of the ERA. As the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia poignantly said in a court opinion, “Certainly the Constitution does not require discrimination on the basis of sex. The only issue is whether it prohibits it. It does not.” It is time for Congress to change that.

Q: What advice do you have for young women who want to pursue a career in politics? Congresswoman Speier: My advice for any young woman, no matter what career she wants to pursue, is to follow your passion and go for it! Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t do something. Lack of confidence is one of the biggest factors holding women back. That’s why when I speak to students I always ask them to ask themselves, “What would you do if you knew you couldn’t fail?” Their answers are always inspiring, and I tell them whatever it is they dream of doing, that’s exactly what they should strive to do. Fear of failure paralyses us, but it shouldn’t. Q: What is one skill you believe that women should have to facilitate a successful career in politics? Congresswoman Speier: You have to have fire in your belly, passion to right a wrong, empathy, and authenticity – voters will see through phonies. Q: Which woman inspires you and why? Congresswoman Speier: Ruth Bader Ginsberg. She is a fearless warrior who has tackled some of the most formidable court cases as an attorney and a jurist, all while fighting misogyny and chauvinism as a student and throughout her career. Her work has been critical to helping women in the fight for economic and social equality. For example, she battled sexual harassment in the workplace as a young law professor at Rutgers after she learned how much less they were paying her compared to a male colleague with the same experience. It was the year the Equal Pay Act was passed. When she pointed out the disparity, the dean said, “Ruth, he has a wife and two children to support. You have a husband with a good paying job in New York.” Ruth didn’t back down. She rallied the women on staff, and the university settled. Q: Is there an interesting fact that most people wouldn’t know about you? Congresswoman Speier: I took judo as a youngster and achieved a brown and white belt. I love to play gold and am terrible at it.

MORE THAN 1,900 CONSTITUENTS ATTENDED CONGRESSWOMAN SPEIER’S TOWN HALL IN HALF MOON BAY IN FEBRUARY OF 2017. SHE HELD A TOTAL OF 11 TOWN HALLS IN THE FIRST YEAR OF THE PRESIDENCY OF DONALD TRUMP. SAN MATEO COUNTY SUPERVISOR CAROLE GROOM, ASSEMBLYMEMBER KEVIN MULLIN AND CONGRESSWOMAN JACKIE SPEIER GIVE A LEGISLATIVE UPDATE AT THE ANNUAL SENIORS ON THE MOVE CONFERENCE.


Congresswoman Jackie Speier CHAMPION FOR EQUALITY & WOMEN’S RIGHTS Q: Growing up, did you know you wanted to be a Politician? Congresswoman Speier: I worked on my first political campaign when I was 16, and I was hooked from that moment on. I later interned in Assemblyman Leo Ryan’s office, and then returned to his office to work for him after I finished law school. It was after our fateful trip to Guyana, where Congressman Ryan was assassinated, and I was shot, that I decided to dedicate my life to public service. I distinctly remember laying on the air strip not knowing whether I’d survive. Fighting injustice and giving a voice to the voiceless has been the constant driver in my life. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career? Congresswoman Speier: You must lead even when the wind is not at your back. You have to stick to it because nothing ever comes easy. We have to take opportunities to get something done in Congress. Look at our fight against sexual assault in the military; after years and years, we are still fighting it. It’s a marathon, not a sprint. You can never stop pursuing what is right and you have to be willing to stick your neck out. Q: What would you say is your greatest accomplishment thus far? Congresswoman Speier: I have a rewarding career, but without a doubt the greatest accomplishment in my life was raising my two children. I firmly believe that there is no greater calling for us and nothing that can bring more joy and fulfillment. Q: If you had the power, what one Government policy would you reverse? Congresswoman Speier: Rather than reverse a policy, I would have the Equal Rights Amendment ratified once and for all so that women are officially recognized as having the same rights as men in our Constitution. Most Americans think discrimination against women is already prohibited in the Constitution; and when they find out that’s not the case, they support ratification of the ERA. As the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia poignantly said in a court opinion, “Certainly the Constitution does not require discrimination on the basis of sex. The only issue is whether it prohibits it. It does not.” It is time for Congress to change that.

Q: What advice do you have for young women who want to pursue a career in politics? Congresswoman Speier: My advice for any young woman, no matter what career she wants to pursue, is to follow your passion and go for it! Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t do something. Lack of confidence is one of the biggest factors holding women back. That’s why when I speak to students I always ask them to ask themselves, “What would you do if you knew you couldn’t fail?” Their answers are always inspiring, and I tell them whatever it is they dream of doing, that’s exactly what they should strive to do. Fear of failure paralyses us, but it shouldn’t. Q: What is one skill you believe that women should have to facilitate a successful career in politics? Congresswoman Speier: You have to have fire in your belly, passion to right a wrong, empathy, and authenticity – voters will see through phonies. Q: Which woman inspires you and why? Congresswoman Speier: Ruth Bader Ginsberg. She is a fearless warrior who has tackled some of the most formidable court cases as an attorney and a jurist, all while fighting misogyny and chauvinism as a student and throughout her career. Her work has been critical to helping women in the fight for economic and social equality. For example, she battled sexual harassment in the workplace as a young law professor at Rutgers after she learned how much less they were paying her compared to a male colleague with the same experience. It was the year the Equal Pay Act was passed. When she pointed out the disparity, the dean said, “Ruth, he has a wife and two children to support. You have a husband with a good paying job in New York.” Ruth didn’t back down. She rallied the women on staff, and the university settled. Q: Is there an interesting fact that most people wouldn’t know about you? Congresswoman Speier: I took judo as a youngster and achieved a brown and white belt. I love to play gold and am terrible at it.

MORE THAN 1,900 CONSTITUENTS ATTENDED CONGRESSWOMAN SPEIER’S TOWN HALL IN HALF MOON BAY IN FEBRUARY OF 2017. SHE HELD A TOTAL OF 11 TOWN HALLS IN THE FIRST YEAR OF THE PRESIDENCY OF DONALD TRUMP. SAN MATEO COUNTY SUPERVISOR CAROLE GROOM, ASSEMBLYMEMBER KEVIN MULLIN AND CONGRESSWOMAN JACKIE SPEIER GIVE A LEGISLATIVE UPDATE AT THE ANNUAL SENIORS ON THE MOVE CONFERENCE.


TOP

10

Reasons to Shop at Local Stores

Y

ou may already shop locally because it is convenient, or perhaps you don’t shop locally at all. There are however, many excellent reasons why shopping at local stores is very beneďŹ cial to you and the community in which you live. Here are the top ten reasons why you should do more local shopping: Better Customer Experience

Are you tired of being served by a grumpy, miserable, or even downright rude checkout operator? If you shop locally you are more likely to be received with a smile and have a very pleasant customer experience. At your local shop you are not just a faceless money-carrier, you are a person. Building a friendly relationship with the local shop owner makes for a much more relaxed atmosphere and a nicer shopping experience allround. Rather than making your day worse, shopping at a local store might just brighten your day. Helping to Local stores are owned and Maintain the operated by local people. The Community very same people as yourselves who care about the neighbourhood they live in. Local businesses donate to local charities and causes and improve the surrounding area. Why? They care about the area in which they live, just like you. Support local stores and you are supporting your local community.

Local Economic Properity

Money you spend at local shops and businesses is money that is kept in your community, enriching it for all. When you spend at a superstore the profits are taken by the corporation, whereas when you spend locally your whole community indirectly benefits, since that money will be re-invested in your region.


Unique Nothing destroys a region’s Community character like the imposition of Charactor an all-purpose megastore store. Local communities are unique places that have their very own culture, history and individual quality. Local stores are a part of this rich history and culture, having usually been around for several decades serving as pillars of the community. By supporting these local businesses you are ensuring the maintenance of the tradition and character of your area. A traditional diner or grocer is part of a town’s identity, and you would do well to support them with your custom. Unique When you shop at a local store, Products and you get to buy unique, local prodQuality ucts of a diverse range that you Produce would not find at a superstore. The stock has been carefully picked by the owner, rather than the dictates of market research and profitability. Especially when it comes to fruit and vegetables, shopping locally is superior to supermarket shopping in every way. The produce is fresher and tastier than supermarket goods, often picked only a day or two beforehand. Fresh, organic, locallygrown food is also not only healthier for you, but it is also healthier for your community, as you are sustaining local agriculture.

Using local businesses encourLocal ages healthy competition. This Competition ultimately brings you, the consumer, and a cheaper, wider range of goods. Multiple companies competing in individual markets is much better for everyone than one huge conglomerate selling a narrow range of every type of product. More Local Jobs

Small local companies create a wide variety of local jobs which help sustain community economies. By shopping at local stores and using local businesses you are ultimately creating a supply of jobs in your local area, through increasing demand for goods and services. Supporting Regional Agriculture

Through buying your fruit and vegetables from local outlets there are multiple positive effects. Aside from cheaper food bills and fresh produce, by supporting local farmers you are reinvesting money into your community and also helping the environment by reducing transport pollution. Helping In the world today everyone wants the to do what they can to help conserve Environment the environment and the planet’s natural resources. Shopping locally serves this cause in several ways. Major road congestion is reduced, as is general transport pollution. Buying goods from local stores also reduces fuel and energy consumption by bypassing the need to import from around the world. Local shops require little infrastructure, further decreasing our impact on the environment. Local Decision Making

Important decisions made by local stores and businesses ought not be harmful to the community since the owners are part of the community too – they have a vested interest and are committed to the area’s future themselves. Decisions affecting the community are not made in corporate board rooms hundreds of miles away, they are made by fellow members of the community who appreciate their impact. Happy Shopping!


stop and say, ‘Wow this or Wow, I’m a success at this’. Well, I’m just doing it. I’m still doing it. It’s never over. You’re always working to get better. SVL: What advice do you offer to aspiring basketball players or aspiring youth? TV: In anything, if you want to be accomplished, you have to put a lot of time into something. You have to love it. You have to have passion for it. For someone to do anything, you need to be passionate about it, excited about it, enthusiastic and work at it every day. And you don’t know where it’s going to take you. I had no idea that basketball would take me to where it has taken me. But, I love basketball. I love to watch

THE LOVE OF THE GAME,

A great student ... a great teacher ... a great leader. Tara VanDerveer and team in their pregame preparation as they were about to play UConn in the Final Four.

Music and Life A Fascinating Conversation with Stanford’s Tara VanDerveer

it, I love to play it; I love to think about it, talk about it. I still do. To be good at something, yes, you have to put a lot of time into it, and you have to have a plan - how to always improve and get better. SVL: What advice do you offer people in life in general? TV: Young people that I meet, or even if I’m speaking, I think first of all, for the most part - I mean look at our lives, how fortunate we are to live where we live, the people that we are around, the opportunities that we have, the beauty of the Bay Area, all this great weather … It’s not to say that there aren’t problems or issues. I say to our team: when you wake up in the morning, you have two choices: Are you going to have a good day or are you going to have a great day? Make it a

Tara VanDerveer is the Setsuko Ishiyama Director of Women’s Basketball at

life and the people she meets … and she loves her coaching. There is so

Stanford University. She is one of the greatest coaches, men or women, bas-

much … in basketball … in music … and in life … She is the ultimate student

ketball or any sport, of any era. She is just one of six Women’s College Basket-

of all … and the ultimate teacher, too. I hope you enjoy this visit with her as

ball coaches to win more than 900 games … and coaches at one of the very

much I certainly have.

few schools where the academic standards are so high, so many of the best recruits cannot be admitted and play for Stanford.

Q: What is your definition of leadership? TV: I think leaders are people that don’t complain; they are people that get

Tara has won two national championships, 23 Pac-12 Championships, 11 Pac-

things done. Leaders to me are people with high energy; they really care

12 Tournament Championships and was the coach of the US Olympic Wom-

about the people they are working with. They care about the outcome of

en’s Basketball Team in Atlanta that went 60-0 and won the Gold Medal. She

events; they are unselfish, are very determined and are very resilient. I like

is also on the verge of becoming the winningest NCAA Women’s Basketball

resilient leaders. Having worked with different teams, leaders have to set a

Coach in history.

good example, they have to be people that you can identify with. Yes, the same can be said about coaching.

In 1985, Tara accepted the challenge of coming to Stanford where on the west coast women’s basketball was merely an afterthought. Tara saw some-

Q: What is your definition of success?

thing … it called to her … and she has never looked back. She loves it here.

TV: I don’t know that I have a definition of success just because it seems like

“There is a culture of excellence here. We are part of a special place in time, to

it’s so fluid. To me, nothing is “done”. It is always a journey. So maybe you’re

be here, to be in the Silicon Valley and the Bay Area. It is very energizing and

lying on your deathbed and then you can say, “Wow, that was a success”. But,

it’s motivating. It gives me an incredible amount of energy.”

everything to me, a success seems like it’s a final answer. A final, here’s a successful season - Well, you’re always working on always improving and getting

She loves her piano every day, she loves her training for a triathlon, she loves

better. So, that’s a hard one for me. I am just kind of in the moment. I don’t

great day and do the things to make it a great day, by giving to others and by being excited. SVL: What would you say about how much life is about sports and sports is about life? TV: To me basketball is just my medium. Basketball, it could be an art, it could be ballet, it could be music. Anything you do, if someone is passionate about computers, or cars, what-

So excited. Tara VanDerveer loved being the honorary coach of the

ever it is you’re passionate about, that’s what you try to do,

Stanford football team. It was such fun and, sure enough, Stanford won big.

you try and learn as much as you can about them – work as hard as you can, like for me, to making our team as good as

cruiting weekend this weekend, so we are hoping there will be some more of those that want

it can be. Like Tesla, how do you make a great car, how do

what we call, “to be on the wall” … To be on the wall, they are great players, or All-Americans,

you make the great working environment. Whatever it is, it’s

or they’re great team players - teammates like Krista Rappahahn, who is now a doctor here at

all the same to me. You’re always recruiting, you’re always

Stanford – so it’s not just the All-American best, but All-American caliber players, teammates,

coaching. But basketball is my medium.

the whole thing. It’s going to be a big game this weekend vs. Arizona. You know, I’m the honorary coach this

SVL: What do you look for in your recruits?

weekend at the football game. I am very excited about it. I’m going to be talking to the team

TV: You know, really, it’s are they great basketball players and

Friday night. We have our recruits here, so it’s going to be a very busy weekend. I’ll be running

are they great students? And, then, those are people that we

out onto the field, will be there for the toss of the coin, I’ll be on the field and also in the stands

recruit. You hope the fact that they are very disciplined aca-

with our recruits, so I’ll be running back and forth. I am really excited about it.

demically and that they work really hard.

Over the years, I have been here with such great Football coaches … I have been very close

We just try to keep recruiting and it’s going to be a big re-

with a number of them. Coaches like Bill Walsh, Tyrone Willingham, Jim Harbaugh, David


stop and say, ‘Wow this or Wow, I’m a success at this’. Well, I’m just doing it. I’m still doing it. It’s never over. You’re always working to get better. Q: What advice do you offer to aspiring basketball players or aspiring youth? TV: In anything, if you want to be accomplished, you have to put a lot of time into something. You have to love it. You have to have passion for it. For someone to do anything, you need to be passionate about it, excited about it, enthusiastic and work at it every day. And you don’t know where it’s going to take you. I had no idea that basketball would take me to where it has taken me. But, I love basketball. I love to watch

THE LOVE OF THE GAME,

A great student ... a great teacher ... a great leader. Tara VanDerveer and team in their pregame preparation as they were about to play UConn in the Final Four.

Music and Life A Fascinating Conversation with Stanford’s Tara VanDerveer

it, I love to play it; I love to think about it, talk about it. I still do. To be good at something, yes, you have to put a lot of time into it, and you have to have a plan - how to always improve and get better. Q: What advice do you offer people in life in general? TV: Young people that I meet, or even if I’m speaking, I think first of all, for the most part - I mean look at our lives, how fortunate we are to live where we live, the people that we are around, the opportunities that we have, the beauty of the Bay Area, all this great weather … It’s not to say that there aren’t problems or issues. I say to our team: when you wake up in the morning, you have two choices: Are you going to have a good day or are you going to have a great day? Make it a

Tara VanDerveer is the Setsuko Ishiyama Director of Women’s Basketball at

life and the people she meets … and she loves her coaching. There is so

Stanford University. She is one of the greatest coaches, men or women, bas-

much … in basketball … in music … and in life … She is the ultimate student

ketball or any sport, of any era. She is just one of six Women’s College Basket-

of all … and the ultimate teacher, too. I hope you enjoy this visit with her as

ball coaches to win more than 900 games … and coaches at one of the very

much I certainly have.

few schools where the academic standards are so high, so many of the best recruits cannot be admitted and play for Stanford.

SVL: What is your definition of leadership? TV: I think leaders are people that don’t complain; they are people that get

Tara has won two national championships, 23 Pac-12 Championships, 11 Pac-

things done. Leaders to me are people with high energy; they really care

12 Tournament Championships and was the coach of the US Olympic Wom-

about the people they are working with. They care about the outcome of

en’s Basketball Team in Atlanta that went 60-0 and won the Gold Medal. She

events; they are unselfish, are very determined and are very resilient. I like

is also on the verge of becoming the winningest NCAA Women’s Basketball

resilient leaders. Having worked with different teams, leaders have to set a

Coach in history.

good example, they have to be people that you can identify with. Yes, the same can be said about coaching.

In 1985, Tara accepted the challenge of coming to Stanford where on the west coast women’s basketball was merely an afterthought. Tara saw some-

SVL: What is your definition of success?

thing … it called to her … and she has never looked back. She loves it here.

TV: I don’t know that I have a definition of success just because it seems like

“There is a culture of excellence here. We are part of a special place in time, to

it’s so fluid. To me, nothing is “done”. It is always a journey. So maybe you’re

be here, to be in the Silicon Valley and the Bay Area. It is very energizing and

lying on your deathbed and then you can say, “Wow, that was a success”. But,

it’s motivating. It gives me an incredible amount of energy.”

everything to me, a success seems like it’s a final answer. A final, here’s a successful season - Well, you’re always working on always improving and getting

She loves her piano every day, she loves her training for a triathlon, she loves

better. So, that’s a hard one for me. I am just kind of in the moment. I don’t

great day and do the things to make it a great day, by giving to others and by being excited. Q: What would you say about how much life is about sports and sports is about life? TV: To me basketball is just my medium. Basketball, it could be an art, it could be ballet, it could be music. Anything you do, if someone is passionate about computers, or cars, what-

So excited. Tara VanDerveer loved being the honorary coach of the

ever it is you’re passionate about, that’s what you try to do,

Stanford football team. It was such fun and, sure enough, Stanford won big.

you try and learn as much as you can about them – work as hard as you can, like for me, to making our team as good as

cruiting weekend this weekend, so we are hoping there will be some more of those that want

it can be. Like Tesla, how do you make a great car, how do

what we call, “to be on the wall” … To be on the wall, they are great players, or All-Americans,

you make the great working environment. Whatever it is, it’s

or they’re great team players - teammates like Krista Rappahahn, who is now a doctor here at

all the same to me. You’re always recruiting, you’re always

Stanford – so it’s not just the All-American best, but All-American caliber players, teammates,

coaching. But basketball is my medium.

the whole thing. It’s going to be a big game this weekend vs. Arizona. You know, I’m the honorary coach this

Q: What do you look for in your recruits?

weekend at the football game. I am very excited about it. I’m going to be talking to the team

TV: You know, really, it’s are they great basketball players and

Friday night. We have our recruits here, so it’s going to be a very busy weekend. I’ll be running

are they great students? And, then, those are people that we

out onto the field, will be there for the toss of the coin, I’ll be on the field and also in the stands

recruit. You hope the fact that they are very disciplined aca-

with our recruits, so I’ll be running back and forth. I am really excited about it.

demically and that they work really hard.

Over the years, I have been here with such great Football coaches … I have been very close

We just try to keep recruiting and it’s going to be a big re-

with a number of them. Coaches like Bill Walsh, Tyrone Willingham, Jim Harbaugh, David


The Girls’ Basketball Camp in Maples Pavilion at Stanford. The teaching and the learning of the game start early on. It’s fun and exciting and valuable, in so many ways, for a lifetime. TV: I think the main thing is to have a great attitude and make a great effort

ski or play tennis when I am 80. So, maybe I will, I don’t know.

… and I’ll get along with players that do that. I love players that are great

So very proud of all her kids as if they’re her own. Here, Chiney and Nneka Ogwumike stand with their gleaming coach as they receive their WBCA All-America awards at the Final Four festivities.

teammates. They’re not just talented players. Talented players that work

SVL: Please tell us something about your wonderful Summer Basketball

hard, that have a great attitude, that work well with other people, that are re-

Camp …

spectful. You know, it is fun. Yes, it often is a grind. It is a lot of traveling. I want

TV: It’s something we do every year. It’s a great camp. There are over 700

people that are fun to be around, that are upbeat and positive, that are not

who attend, from all across the country, from all around the world. Our

complainers or deadbeat. Unfortunately, I think it is a challenge sometimes.

Eileen Roche (Assistant Athletic Director of Basketball Operations) here

Everyone says that the athletes have changed. Well, it’s the environment that

at Stanford runs it. It’s an opportunity to learn so much. I think in any

has changed … You know now with Social Media, Twitter, Facebook, all that,

sport you have to learn the fundamentals. And so many kids want to skip

that has made people different. I think at the core people are the same, but

through that. Like in music you have to learn the scales. You are not going

Shaw … I have been here with eight different Head Football Coaches … I

little bit. I work out. I’m kind of doing my own training for a triathlon. I swim

the circumstances are very different. We all want to feel appreciated; we want

to be a great pianist just sitting down hacking away at Beethoven or some-

have seen a lot, you know, and learned a lot.

twice a week, I bike twice a week and I run twice a week; I’m trying to get into

to work with people that care about us.

thing. You have to start right at the beginning.

better shape.

I am shocked at the number of people that I talk to out in the business world

SVL: In closing, a few words of gratitude …

Q: What have been some of your favorite moments and memories. What’s it

I love to read. As for the kids, I think they have so much studying to do, maybe

who don’t really learn the lessons that are learned in the gym or on a team. I

TV: Something I want to include here, is a part of my life that is so very

like, such special moments?

during a break I’ll give them a book, or recommend a book to them, maybe

have talked with friends of mine that are CEO’s and they tell me about shock-

important, my sister, Heidi. She is the Women’s Basketball Head Coach

TV: Fabulous winning national championships; winning the first one in 1990,

over the summer, but for the most part, they are in summer school and al-

ing adult misbehavior that is really very sad in this day and age, when we

at University of California San Diego. I am so fortunate that I can bounce

was unbelievable. To go from being a .500 team, Jennifer Azzi’s freshman

ready have so much reading to do. I’m reading right now, Dead Wake, a book

want to be efficient and we want to win as a team.

ideas off of her and I talk with her all the time. We are so close and I think

year, to a National Championship Team in Knoxville. I mean, it was a Cinder-

about the sinking of the Lusitania. I read about 15 books over the summer,

ella Story … it was just fabulous. I loved that. And winning again in 1992 was

mostly non-fiction. One book about the Wright Brothers … some historical

SVL: What’s this about your training for a triathlon?

Also, something I am becoming more involved with, is one of our games

awesome. I think cutting down the nets from the Regional Championship

fiction … but a lot of variety.

TV: I do triathlon training … but I do my own triathlon. I do it with friends

called the Nike N7 Game … it’s our “Native American Game”. This grew

to go the Final Four that’s really exciting. Winning the Olympics Gold Medal

I love music. I love Opera. I am hoping to go to the San Francisco Opera this

in the summer, in June, July and August. We’ll do a mile swim and a fifteen

out of a fabulous clinic that was put together - with Ganon Baker, who’s

was really fun.

year. I don’t feel like I take advantage of all the great things in the Bay Area. I

mile bike ride and a five mile run. And maybe we’ll do more the next time,

like a God in what he does in basketball skills training, who was there – he

You know, I take pleasure in each day. Just watching the improvement,

love to listen to music and love going to concerts. Basically, I have too many

and maybe we’ll increase upon it each time, each month. During the season,

came with his wife - along with Johnny (Johnny Dawkins, Stanford Men’s

watching the young people grow up. Watching the young people, I’m just so

interests for the time I have in a day. And work, too. I get up early and stay up

during the year, I try to exercise every day.

Basketball Coach) – one call was all it took, “I’ll be there for you, Coach!”, he

proud of them. You know, someone like Jennifer Azzi, who is now the Head

late and I go to bed exhausted. But I sleep well.

Coach at USF; Sonja Henning, who is a Vice President up at Nike; Kate Starbird,

we benefit from that.

said … I just love Johnny Dawkins! – also Amy (Amy Tucker, Stanford WomSVL: Do You have your favorite music? Your favorite composers? Inspira-

en’s Basketball Coach), my sister, Heidi, Ceal (Ceal Barry, retired University

who is a Professor up at the University of Washington; just go through the

Q: Are you close to any nonprofits?

tions?

of Colorado Women’s Basketball Coach) and myself. This was on the Salish

whole list (it’s a long list) of all these great players and great people I’ve been

TV: I am. Two. One is JobTrain. JobTrain is a fantastic service basically giving

TV: There are so many great … I love Chopin, Brahms, Mozart. I love the

Kootenai Indian reservation in Montana. I am so grateful to all, that we

around; it’s always fun, it’s really exciting.

people a skill set to get hired. I am on the JobTrain Board and I am very proud

classics more than anything. There are so many, that I wouldn’t want to limit

were all there. It was, it is fantastic.

of what JobTrain does. It is a fantastic organization. It is located right by Face-

myself to one or two or three. I have been playing for about 15 years, but I am

Q: What are some of your outside hobbies, interests, passions and activi-

book. The other nonprofit I am close to is the Humane Society Silicon Valley.

not very good. It’s the hardest thing. Playing the piano is the hardest thing.

I think a big part of who I want to be is to give back. I feel so fortunate. Wheth-

ties?

I love my dogs.

But I love it.

er it’s helping the Onetta Harris Community Center (in East Palo Alto) or Job-

I am very fortunate that I have a great teacher. But, lately, I have been doing

Train … or doing things with our team like volunteering at the hospital or

TV: I love to ski, snow skiing (I don’t get to do too much of it because it’s during the season), water skiing (I enjoy getting in a lot of water skiing). I sail,

Q: Great coaches bring great winning philosophies. What are some of

more active, physical things just because I realize I want to be in better shape.

serving Thanksgiving meals … I think it’s really an important part of what I do

I love to sail, I have three sailboats actually at different places. I play tennis a

Coach Tara VanDerveer philosophies?

I can play the piano when I am 80, whereas I might not be able to water ski or

… and who I am.


The Girls’ Basketball Camp in Maples Pavilion at Stanford. The teaching and the learning of the game start early on. It’s fun and exciting and valuable, in so many ways, for a lifetime. TV: I think the main thing is to have a great attitude and make a great effort

ski or play tennis when I am 80. So, maybe I will, I don’t know.

… and I’ll get along with players that do that. I love players that are great

So very proud of all her kids as if they’re her own. Here, Chiney and Nneka Ogwumike stand with their gleaming coach as they receive their WBCA All-America awards at the Final Four festivities.

teammates. They’re not just talented players. Talented players that work

Q: Please tell us something about your wonderful Summer Basketball

hard, that have a great attitude, that work well with other people, that are re-

Camp …

spectful. You know, it is fun. Yes, it often is a grind. It is a lot of traveling. I want

TV: It’s something we do every year. It’s a great camp. There are over 700

people that are fun to be around, that are upbeat and positive, that are not

who attend, from all across the country, from all around the world. Our

complainers or deadbeat. Unfortunately, I think it is a challenge sometimes.

Eileen Roche (Assistant Athletic Director of Basketball Operations) here

Everyone says that the athletes have changed. Well, it’s the environment that

at Stanford runs it. It’s an opportunity to learn so much. I think in any

has changed … You know now with Social Media, Twitter, Facebook, all that,

sport you have to learn the fundamentals. And so many kids want to skip

that has made people different. I think at the core people are the same, but

through that. Like in music you have to learn the scales. You are not going

Shaw … I have been here with eight different Head Football Coaches … I

little bit. I work out. I’m kind of doing my own training for a triathlon. I swim

the circumstances are very different. We all want to feel appreciated; we want

to be a great pianist just sitting down hacking away at Beethoven or some-

have seen a lot, you know, and learned a lot.

twice a week, I bike twice a week and I run twice a week; I’m trying to get into

to work with people that care about us.

thing. You have to start right at the beginning.

better shape.

I am shocked at the number of people that I talk to out in the business world

Q: In closing, a few words of gratitude …

SVL: What have been some of your favorite moments and memories. What’s

I love to read. As for the kids, I think they have so much studying to do, maybe

who don’t really learn the lessons that are learned in the gym or on a team. I

TV: Something I want to include here, is a part of my life that is so very

it like, such special moments?

during a break I’ll give them a book, or recommend a book to them, maybe

have talked with friends of mine that are CEO’s and they tell me about shock-

important, my sister, Heidi. She is the Women’s Basketball Head Coach

TV: Fabulous winning national championships; winning the first one in 1990,

over the summer, but for the most part, they are in summer school and al-

ing adult misbehavior that is really very sad in this day and age, when we

at University of California San Diego. I am so fortunate that I can bounce

was unbelievable. To go from being a .500 team, Jennifer Azzi’s freshman

ready have so much reading to do. I’m reading right now, Dead Wake, a book

want to be efficient and we want to win as a team.

ideas off of her and I talk with her all the time. We are so close and I think

year, to a National Championship Team in Knoxville. I mean, it was a Cinder-

about the sinking of the Lusitania. I read about 15 books over the summer,

ella Story … it was just fabulous. I loved that. And winning again in 1992 was

mostly non-fiction. One book about the Wright Brothers … some historical

Q: What’s this about your training for a triathlon?

Also, something I am becoming more involved with, is one of our games

awesome. I think cutting down the nets from the Regional Championship

fiction … but a lot of variety.

TV: I do triathlon training … but I do my own triathlon. I do it with friends

called the Nike N7 Game … it’s our “Native American Game”. This grew

to go the Final Four that’s really exciting. Winning the Olympics Gold Medal

I love music. I love Opera. I am hoping to go to the San Francisco Opera this

in the summer, in June, July and August. We’ll do a mile swim and a fifteen

out of a fabulous clinic that was put together - with Ganon Baker, who’s

was really fun.

year. I don’t feel like I take advantage of all the great things in the Bay Area. I

mile bike ride and a five mile run. And maybe we’ll do more the next time,

like a God in what he does in basketball skills training, who was there – he

You know, I take pleasure in each day. Just watching the improvement,

love to listen to music and love going to concerts. Basically, I have too many

and maybe we’ll increase upon it each time, each month. During the season,

came with his wife - along with Johnny (Johnny Dawkins, Stanford Men’s

watching the young people grow up. Watching the young people, I’m just so

interests for the time I have in a day. And work, too. I get up early and stay up

during the year, I try to exercise every day.

Basketball Coach) – one call was all it took, “I’ll be there for you, Coach!”, he

proud of them. You know, someone like Jennifer Azzi, who is now the Head

late and I go to bed exhausted. But I sleep well.

Coach at USF; Sonja Henning, who is a Vice President up at Nike; Kate Starbird,

we benefit from that.

said … I just love Johnny Dawkins! – also Amy (Amy Tucker, Stanford WomQ: Do You have your favorite music? Your favorite composers? Inspira-

en’s Basketball Coach), my sister, Heidi, Ceal (Ceal Barry, retired University

who is a Professor up at the University of Washington; just go through the

SVL: Are you close to any nonprofits?

tions?

of Colorado Women’s Basketball Coach) and myself. This was on the Salish

whole list (it’s a long list) of all these great players and great people I’ve been

TV: I am. Two. One is JobTrain. JobTrain is a fantastic service basically giving

TV: There are so many great … I love Chopin, Brahms, Mozart. I love the

Kootenai Indian reservation in Montana. I am so grateful to all, that we

around; it’s always fun, it’s really exciting.

people a skill set to get hired. I am on the JobTrain Board and I am very proud

classics more than anything. There are so many, that I wouldn’t want to limit

were all there. It was, it is fantastic.

of what JobTrain does. It is a fantastic organization. It is located right by Face-

myself to one or two or three. I have been playing for about 15 years, but I am

SVL: What are some of your outside hobbies, interests, passions and activi-

book. The other nonprofit I am close to is the Humane Society Silicon Valley.

not very good. It’s the hardest thing. Playing the piano is the hardest thing.

I think a big part of who I want to be is to give back. I feel so fortunate. Wheth-

ties?

I love my dogs.

But I love it.

er it’s helping the Onetta Harris Community Center (in East Palo Alto) or Job-

I am very fortunate that I have a great teacher. But, lately, I have been doing

Train … or doing things with our team like volunteering at the hospital or

SVL: Great coaches bring great winning philosophies. What are some of

more active, physical things just because I realize I want to be in better shape.

serving Thanksgiving meals … I think it’s really an important part of what I do

Coach Tara VanDerveer philosophies?

I can play the piano when I am 80, whereas I might not be able to water ski or

… and who I am.

TV: I love to ski, snow skiing (I don’t get to do too much of it because it’s during the season), water skiing (I enjoy getting in a lot of water skiing). I sail, I love to sail, I have three sailboats actually at different places. I play tennis a


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Meet Denise Bevers

Our mission is to bring our pets the same kinds of innovative, safe, and effective medicines that our human family members enjoy

Co-Founder & COO of KindredBio Q: Why/how did you get into the animal health industry? DB: For over 20 years I worked in the human drug development and medical communications industries, managing dozens of products and development programs from Phase I though Phase IV. While I enjoyed what I was doing, I wanted to do something that also paired with my love for animals and degree in zoology. I was fortunate to be able to leverage my years of experience in drug development and investor relations to co-found KindredBio, a company dedicated to developing cutting-edge therapeutics for cats, dogs, and horses. As the parent of frogs, hermit crabs, mice, rats, bunnies, hamsters, and a dog as a child (not all at the same time), my mother is not surprised by my success or that of KindredBio! Q: Who has been a career inspiration to you? DB: I met my co-founder and KindredBio CEO, Dr. Richard Chin, when we worked together at Elan Pharmaceuticals. Right away, I felt connected to him and his business philosophies. As a Harvard-trained physician and former Rhodes Scholar, with a track record of almost a dozen drug approvals, I knew I could learn from him and that my clinical operations expertise and management skills would benefit him as well. When we left Elan, we kept in touch and I always knew we would work together again. Then, in 2012, we began to talk about how we could pair our decades of experience and love of animals to start a veterinary biopharmaceutical company. That’s when we started KindredBio and never looked back. I feel very fortunate to be in partnership with Richard because our diverse skill set and management styles that really complement one another. Q: People think of pets as part of their family, how does that fit in with what you do? DB: Our fury companions have truly become members of the family proven by Americans spending $700 million each year on Valentine’s Day gifts for our beloved pets. The evolution of the pet as a family member has been relatively short. In my lifetime, I have seen dogs move from the yard, to the dog house, to a sequestered room behind a gate, and now, 40% of pets sleep in bed with their pet parents! In 2016, pet owners in the U.S. spent over $66 billion on their pets, and increase of over 10% from the year before. There is a critical need, and

willingness to pay, for innovative medicines for our pets. We found that there are few companies dedicated to developing such therapies for companion animals, with a market in dire need, which is why we founded KindredBio. Q: What’s KindredBio’s mission? DB: Our mission is to bring our pets the same kinds of innovative, safe, and effective medicines that our human family members enjoy. Our core strategy is to leverage the billions of dollars that have been invested in human drug development by modifying, improving, and repurposing pre-existing drugs and pursuing biological targets that have already proven to be safe and effective in humans. We have developed a team of veterinarians, scientists, and operational experts who love animals and want to develop therapeutics that have been appropriately studied and, eventually, approved by FDA for use in pets. The passion that we have for pet wellness is infectious throughout the organization. Q: Why did you decide to headquarter the company in Silicon Valley? DB: We love the energy that comes with working in an innovative hub of technology like Silicon Valley. The bay area is an epicenter of biotechnology and Richard, who spent years as the head of Clinical Research for biotherapeutics at Genentech, has recruited a world-class team of scientists and protein engineers to develop our cutting-edge biologics for cats, dogs, and horses. Because of the talent in the area, we have put together an incredible team that is innovating in lockstep with human breakthroughs, such as those in immunotherapy. Importantly, the energy of the valley, along with the great weather and access to outdoor pursuits, is what allows us to attract top talent to our organization. Q: What were some of the challenges you faced as a woman raising money on Wall Street? DB: I grew up in biotech and pharma in California, and was fortunate that I did not feel limited by a glass ceiling in my career trajectory. It was quite apparent to me as we began our testing-the-waters meetings and eventual IPO roadshow that there were many fewer female decision-makers on Wall Street. There were entire days on the roadshow when I would not see a single woman at the table. I have always felt that, regardless of gender, it is critical to know your business and industry better than any-

one else in the room. Because we had a very strong business plan that I knew inside-and-out, I did not feel a need to alter my pitch because of my gender. The fact that my passion for animals and KindredBio shines through my pitch, perhaps more because of my delivery as a woman, is only an asset. I am happy to say that, in the nearly four years as a publicly-held company, I do meet more and more female investors at the table who are decision-makers.

and competitors to the product and the customer. Do your homework. Combine your passion and knowledge with drive and persistence, and you are well on your way.

SVL: Tell me about the drugs you have in development and how they help animals? DB: We are currently anticipating FDA approval and launch of Zimeta™ (dipyrone injection), a novel, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory for the control of fever in horses, and Mirataz™ (mirtazapine 2% topical ointment) for the management of weight loss in cats. It says so much about our team that we have two drugs under review by FDA in less than 5 years of founding the company. In addition to those products, we have approximately 20 products in development for a variety of diseases for cats, dogs, and horses. In the future, we will be helping animals with autoimmune diseases, cancer, and metabolic disorders, to name a few.

SVL: What is the best advice you’ve ever received? DB: While my Mom didn’t verbalize advice as much as she led by example, she taught me to follow my passion, regardless of where society pushed me (or even where she thought I should be heading). She raised two girls as a single parent and worked two jobs at once, as a special education teacher and a waitress. She also got her Master’s degree before I graduated high school and found time to attend the Academy of Dramatic Arts to fulfill her creative needs. As a child of the 70’s and 80’s, she was a phenomenal role model, who taught me that a woman could be anything she set out to be. She supported my every whim as a child, as long as it was something I was passionate about. I saw the way she loved teaching and nurturing children with learning challenges, and the fulfillment she received in return, which showed me how to have a

SVL: What is your advice for companies who are fundraising for their businesses? DB: Tout your brain and your heart. Telling your story and conveying your vision is a huge part of connecting with a potential investor. Your heart will show how much you believe in what you are doing. Investors will see that. It’s equally important to show your knowledge of what you are selling. Investors want to see that you know what you are talking about – from the industry

rewarding career, driven by passion. SVL: What hobbies or interests do you enjoy when you aren’t working? DB: My husband, Lon, and I enjoy traveling, music, and theater in our spare time. We have had the opportunity to support theatrical productions on and off Broadway. In additional to adventure travel, we find the dozens of concerts we attend each year to be a great way to be in the moment and relax. We have recently become horse enthusiasts and owners of a grand prix show jumper, Wasco, as well as parent to a border collie, Betty, and two cats, Gladys and Glover.


Meet Denise Bevers

Our mission is to bring our pets the same kinds of innovative, safe, and effective medicines that our human family members enjoy

Co-Founder & COO of KindredBio SVL: Why/how did you get into the animal health industry? DB: For over 20 years I worked in the human drug development and medical communications industries, managing dozens of products and development programs from Phase I though Phase IV. While I enjoyed what I was doing, I wanted to do something that also paired with my love for animals and degree in zoology. I was fortunate to be able to leverage my years of experience in drug development and investor relations to co-found KindredBio, a company dedicated to developing cutting-edge therapeutics for cats, dogs, and horses. As the parent of frogs, hermit crabs, mice, rats, bunnies, hamsters, and a dog as a child (not all at the same time), my mother is not surprised by my success or that of KindredBio! SVL: Who has been a career inspiration to you? DB: I met my co-founder and KindredBio CEO, Dr. Richard Chin, when we worked together at Elan Pharmaceuticals. Right away, I felt connected to him and his business philosophies. As a Harvard-trained physician and former Rhodes Scholar, with a track record of almost a dozen drug approvals, I knew I could learn from him and that my clinical operations expertise and management skills would benefit him as well. When we left Elan, we kept in touch and I always knew we would work together again. Then, in 2012, we began to talk about how we could pair our decades of experience and love of animals to start a veterinary biopharmaceutical company. That’s when we started KindredBio and never looked back. I feel very fortunate to be in partnership with Richard because our diverse skill set and management styles that really complement one another. SVL: People think of pets as part of their family, how does that fit in with what you do? DB: Our fury companions have truly become members of the family proven by Americans spending $700 million each year on Valentine’s Day gifts for our beloved pets. The evolution of the pet as a family member has been relatively short. In my lifetime, I have seen dogs move from the yard, to the dog house, to a sequestered room behind a gate, and now, 40% of pets sleep in bed with their pet parents! In 2016, pet owners in the U.S. spent over $66 billion on their pets, and increase of over 10% from the year before. There is a critical need, and

willingness to pay, for innovative medicines for our pets. We found that there are few companies dedicated to developing such therapies for companion animals, with a market in dire need, which is why we founded KindredBio. SVL: What’s KindredBio’s mission? DB: Our mission is to bring our pets the same kinds of innovative, safe, and effective medicines that our human family members enjoy. Our core strategy is to leverage the billions of dollars that have been invested in human drug development by modifying, improving, and repurposing pre-existing drugs and pursuing biological targets that have already proven to be safe and effective in humans. We have developed a team of veterinarians, scientists, and operational experts who love animals and want to develop therapeutics that have been appropriately studied and, eventually, approved by FDA for use in pets. The passion that we have for pet wellness is infectious throughout the organization. SVL: Why did you decide to headquarter the company in Silicon Valley? DB: We love the energy that comes with working in an innovative hub of technology like Silicon Valley. The bay area is an epicenter of biotechnology and Richard, who spent years as the head of Clinical Research for biotherapeutics at Genentech, has recruited a world-class team of scientists and protein engineers to develop our cutting-edge biologics for cats, dogs, and horses. Because of the talent in the area, we have put together an incredible team that is innovating in lockstep with human breakthroughs, such as those in immunotherapy. Importantly, the energy of the valley, along with the great weather and access to outdoor pursuits, is what allows us to attract top talent to our organization. SVL: What were some of the challenges you faced as a woman raising money on Wall Street? DB: I grew up in biotech and pharma in California, and was fortunate that I did not feel limited by a glass ceiling in my career trajectory. It was quite apparent to me as we began our testing-the-waters meetings and eventual IPO roadshow that there were many fewer female decision-makers on Wall Street. There were entire days on the roadshow when I would not see a single woman at the table. I have always felt that, regardless of gender, it is critical to know your business and industry better than any-

one else in the room. Because we had a very strong business plan that I knew inside-and-out, I did not feel a need to alter my pitch because of my gender. The fact that my passion for animals and KindredBio shines through my pitch, perhaps more because of my delivery as a woman, is only an asset. I am happy to say that, in the nearly four years as a publicly-held company, I do meet more and more female investors at the table who are decision-makers.

and competitors to the product and the customer. Do your homework. Combine your passion and knowledge with drive and persistence, and you are well on your way.

Q: Tell me about the drugs you have in development and how they help animals? DB: We are currently anticipating FDA approval and launch of Zimeta™ (dipyrone injection), a novel, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory for the control of fever in horses, and Mirataz™ (mirtazapine 2% topical ointment) for the management of weight loss in cats. It says so much about our team that we have two drugs under review by FDA in less than 5 years of founding the company. In addition to those products, we have approximately 20 products in development for a variety of diseases for cats, dogs, and horses. In the future, we will be helping animals with autoimmune diseases, cancer, and metabolic disorders, to name a few.

Q: What is the best advice you’ve ever received? DB: While my Mom didn’t verbalize advice as much as she led by example, she taught me to follow my passion, regardless of where society pushed me (or even where she thought I should be heading). She raised two girls as a single parent and worked two jobs at once, as a special education teacher and a waitress. She also got her Master’s degree before I graduated high school and found time to attend the Academy of Dramatic Arts to fulfill her creative needs. As a child of the 70’s and 80’s, she was a phenomenal role model, who taught me that a woman could be anything she set out to be. She supported my every whim as a child, as long as it was something I was passionate about. I saw the way she loved teaching and nurturing children with learning challenges, and the fulfillment she received in return, which showed me how to have a

Q: What is your advice for companies who are fundraising for their businesses? DB: Tout your brain and your heart. Telling your story and conveying your vision is a huge part of connecting with a potential investor. Your heart will show how much you believe in what you are doing. Investors will see that. It’s equally important to show your knowledge of what you are selling. Investors want to see that you know what you are talking about – from the industry

rewarding career, driven by passion. Q: What hobbies or interests do you enjoy when you aren’t working? DB: My husband, Lon, and I enjoy traveling, music, and theater in our spare time. We have had the opportunity to support theatrical productions on and off Broadway. In additional to adventure travel, we find the dozens of concerts we attend each year to be a great way to be in the moment and relax. We have recently become horse enthusiasts and owners of a grand prix show jumper, Wasco, as well as parent to a border collie, Betty, and two cats, Gladys and Glover.


GRATITUDE:

A POWERFUL ANTIDOTE TO ENTITLEMENT By Carole Pertofsky, M.Ed. Director, Wellness and Health Promotion Services at Stanford University I was meeting up with friends in the latest hot restaurant in Palo Alto. As I walked towards my group, a very cool looking guy wearing a classy expensive black T-shirt leaned back in his chair and almost crashed into me as I squeezed between tables. He glared at me. And there, nestled just below his sculpted pecks, was the message, in bold Elephant Font: “You don’t get my respect. You have to earn it.” There may be many interpretations. What might you think? Would you be attracted to his swagger? Turned off by the implied entitlement? Be curious about how this attitude plays out in his life? Wonder how this message impacts those around him? I don’t know what goes through this guy’s mind when he awakens at 3 in the morning. But I know too many people of all ages who brand themselves with some display of entitlement, even arrogance. The attitude is fueled by media that offers top billing to those who display their entitlement and arrogance as strengths of character, even virtues. What is the impact on you, me, our kids looking for successful role models?

The truth is that on the surface, these people appear to be dominant, accomplished, on top of things. But trust me, it’s an illusion. Because deep down, they often experience isolation, emptiness and frustration. “Superiority” masks vulnerability. Recent studies indicate that this loss of empathy and connection to self and others is a growing concern among all ages. Is there a way out of this trend towards displaying arrogance or entitlement as valor? Consider the power of gratitude as an antidote to this deep well of discontent. Gratitude isn’t just a soft filmy blur of appreciation. It takes gumption and courage to live with gratitude in a culture that rewards snarky digs and hostile irony. It takes grit to choose to live with thankfulness for what we have, rather than focusing on endless lists of what is missing. Gratefulness is a gold standard of deep happiness, positive emotion and good health. Dr. Robert Emmons, UC Davis, leading researcher and author of “Thanks”, reminds us, “Gratitude can be as easy as a beautiful sunset, an exquisite bite of chocolate, a child, or the brilliance of autumn leaves. No matter what shape

or form gratitude takes, it fills us with a warmth and a reminder that life is good; this moment is special. Gratitude provides lessons to make us stronger. It is more than appreciation- it is a gift.” Research suggests why the experience of gratitude is transformative and offers tremendous health benefits. Thankfulness awakens our brain’s pleasure centers, and our bodies produce bio-chemicals that activate a strong and powerful sense of our potential, well-being and connection. Our bodies respond with vitality and a stronger immune system. We may be inspired to serve others, to contribute to the greater good. Power up your gratitude muscle with a few simple actions. Do these with your family. Do these with your friends. Do them alone. Mix it up. If you practice just three times a week, you’ll begin noticing a stronger sense of ease, fun, and lightness. Best of all, these practices will spark new connections among your friends and family in fun heart-warming ways. - Gratitext: Everyone takes out their cell phone or notepad. Each person imagines a particular person to whom you are grateful, maybe someone who helped you get where you are today. Send them a “gratitext” or a note, expressing your thoughts and feelings of gratitude to them for adding some benefit- or sparkle- to your life. Notice the good feelings that arise when you send this note- and how you feel when they respond. - Reach Out: Notice the many people who earn minimum wage performing a service that adds value to your day. Reach out, and thank them. Experience the gentle exchange of appreciation. - 3 Good Things:. Begin a “gratitude” journal and several times a week, write down 3 good things that happened. Even if you aren’t feeling particularly grateful, no problem. Just take a deep breath, and give thanks for the simple things. Hot and cold running water. A daily meal. The people who contribute to your comfort, whether or not you personally know them. Gratitude is a powerful antidote to entitlement, indifference, the “blahs”, and discontentment. - -

- Just Like Me. Find a good place to “people watch”. Relax and just be aware of others, take a deep breath and bring to mind the following thought: “Just like me this person has faced struggles, suffering and disappointments, and just like me, this person wants to be content and happy.” Observe what gets stirred up in you or how this guided attention changes your emotional state. Do you feel more empathy or perhaps appreciation for our shared humanity? Share your experience with each other. - Soak in this awesome 5 minute video with your family and friends: Just watch and notice your thoughts and feelings. www.youtube.com/watch?v=nj2ofrX7jAk - Gratitude. Simple. Powerful. Transformative. It is an act of courage to express your thankfulness. Do stuff that opens your heart. Tell your friends and family how they contribute to your life. When you savor and appreciate the goodness in your life, the little things and the million dollar moments, no one will ever need to earn your respect. Gratitude itself is an act of deepest respect, freely given, for life itself.


GRATITUDE:

A POWERFUL ANTIDOTE TO ENTITLEMENT By Carole Pertofsky, M.Ed. Director, Wellness and Health Promotion Services at Stanford University I was meeting up with friends in the latest hot restaurant in Palo Alto. As I walked towards my group, a very cool looking guy wearing a classy expensive black T-shirt leaned back in his chair and almost crashed into me as I squeezed between tables. He glared at me. And there, nestled just below his sculpted pecks, was the message, in bold Elephant Font: “You don’t get my respect. You have to earn it.” There may be many interpretations. What might you think? Would you be attracted to his swagger? Turned off by the implied entitlement? Be curious about how this attitude plays out in his life? Wonder how this message impacts those around him? I don’t know what goes through this guy’s mind when he awakens at 3 in the morning. But I know too many people of all ages who brand themselves with some display of entitlement, even arrogance. The attitude is fueled by media that offers top billing to those who display their entitlement and arrogance as strengths of character, even virtues. What is the impact on you, me, our kids looking for successful role models?

The truth is that on the surface, these people appear to be dominant, accomplished, on top of things. But trust me, it’s an illusion. Because deep down, they often experience isolation, emptiness and frustration. “Superiority” masks vulnerability. Recent studies indicate that this loss of empathy and connection to self and others is a growing concern among all ages. Is there a way out of this trend towards displaying arrogance or entitlement as valor? Consider the power of gratitude as an antidote to this deep well of discontent. Gratitude isn’t just a soft filmy blur of appreciation. It takes gumption and courage to live with gratitude in a culture that rewards snarky digs and hostile irony. It takes grit to choose to live with thankfulness for what we have, rather than focusing on endless lists of what is missing. Gratefulness is a gold standard of deep happiness, positive emotion and good health. Dr. Robert Emmons, UC Davis, leading researcher and author of “Thanks”, reminds us, “Gratitude can be as easy as a beautiful sunset, an exquisite bite of chocolate, a child, or the brilliance of autumn leaves. No matter what shape

or form gratitude takes, it fills us with a warmth and a reminder that life is good; this moment is special. Gratitude provides lessons to make us stronger. It is more than appreciation- it is a gift.” Research suggests why the experience of gratitude is transformative and offers tremendous health benefits. Thankfulness awakens our brain’s pleasure centers, and our bodies produce bio-chemicals that activate a strong and powerful sense of our potential, well-being and connection. Our bodies respond with vitality and a stronger immune system. We may be inspired to serve others, to contribute to the greater good. Power up your gratitude muscle with a few simple actions. Do these with your family. Do these with your friends. Do them alone. Mix it up. If you practice just three times a week, you’ll begin noticing a stronger sense of ease, fun, and lightness. Best of all, these practices will spark new connections among your friends and family in fun heart-warming ways. - Gratitext: Everyone takes out their cell phone or notepad. Each person imagines a particular person to whom you are grateful, maybe someone who helped you get where you are today. Send them a “gratitext” or a note, expressing your thoughts and feelings of gratitude to them for adding some benefit- or sparkle- to your life. Notice the good feelings that arise when you send this note- and how you feel when they respond. - Reach Out: Notice the many people who earn minimum wage performing a service that adds value to your day. Reach out, and thank them. Experience the gentle exchange of appreciation. - 3 Good Things:. Begin a “gratitude” journal and several times a week, write down 3 good things that happened. Even if you aren’t feeling particularly grateful, no problem. Just take a deep breath, and give thanks for the simple things. Hot and cold running water. A daily meal. The people who contribute to your comfort, whether or not you personally know them. Gratitude is a powerful antidote to entitlement, indifference, the “blahs”, and discontentment. - -

- Just Like Me. Find a good place to “people watch”. Relax and just be aware of others, take a deep breath and bring to mind the following thought: “Just like me this person has faced struggles, suffering and disappointments, and just like me, this person wants to be content and happy.” Observe what gets stirred up in you or how this guided attention changes your emotional state. Do you feel more empathy or perhaps appreciation for our shared humanity? Share your experience with each other. - Soak in this awesome 5 minute video with your family and friends: Just watch and notice your thoughts and feelings. www.youtube.com/watch?v=nj2ofrX7jAk - Gratitude. Simple. Powerful. Transformative. It is an act of courage to express your thankfulness. Do stuff that opens your heart. Tell your friends and family how they contribute to your life. When you savor and appreciate the goodness in your life, the little things and the million dollar moments, no one will ever need to earn your respect. Gratitude itself is an act of deepest respect, freely given, for life itself.


A Conversations with

Katie Jacobs Stanton,

CMO of Color & Former Vice President of Global Media at Twitter Q: Can you share with us your experience working at the White House and State Department?

nities. I’m thrilled that the Gates Foundation has committed $170 million towards improving economic

KJS: Working in the Obama Administration was the honor of a lifetime. At the White House, I served

leverage for women worldwide. According to Melinda Gates, “when money flows into the hands of

as the Director of Citizen Participation, trying to make it easier for citizens to engage with the govern-

women who have the authority to use it, everything changes.”

ment using digital platforms like Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram. At the State Department, I worked in the Office of Innovation, helping the government use 21st century tools to address 21st century challenges. For example, we organized Town Halls for the President in China where participants could Tweet and text questions (even when these tools were blocked in China).

Q: What are some strategies that can help women achieve a more prominent role in their organizations? KJS: 1. Build your own personal Board of Directors. Cultivate relationships with people you admire, seek

Q: Of the 8 countries you’ve lived in, which was your favorite and why?

out their advice and collaborate with them on projects you’re passionate about. For example, I’m a

KJS: I’ve greatly appreciated all the countries I’ve been fortunate to spend time in, but

founding partner of #Angels, which I started with five of my friends from Twitter. We share access to

I’ve always felt a strong personal connection with France. I like the way Thomas Jeffer-

deals, networks and opportunities. I also lean on entrepreneurs and execs including Tina Sharkey, Dan

son put it; “a walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty and the point of life.”

Rosensweig, Dick Costolo and Elad Gil for career and industry advice.

Q: What was your experience like working as Vice President of Global Media at Twitter? KJS: Twitter was one of the highlights of my career. When I joined, we didn’t have any employees, offices, revenues or partnerships outside of the U.S. My role was to help build our teams globally and then lead the Media team which was responsible for partnerships across government, news, sports, music, and TV. We brought the best content from each of our markets to the platform and tried to help build the most vibrant and safest digital town square. I worked with exceptional people at Twitter and I’m proud of how much we were able to achieve. Q: You were an Angel Investor for Color Genomics … what made you decide to step in as Chief Marketing Officer? KJS: There are 4 core values that help me decide on new roles:

2. Pay it forward - help women at all levels. I’m pretty sure I’m going to work for the women on my team at Color one day and am really excited about that! 3. Make sure women’s voices are heard and presences are felt. Work to ensure that they’re seated at the table and included in the conversation. 4. Have conviction in your beliefs and share them. Don’t be afraid to bring new ideas forward. 5. Be passionate about what you’re doing. Life is short. 6. Choose wisely. Look for a manager and team that help you be your best self. 7. Don’t worry about the job title - do your best work and the title and prominence will follow. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career? KJS: My media team at Twitter had a great motto: Dream big, do big, act big. Follow these principles as a leader and you can’t go wrong.

1. Are the people smart and ethical? 2. Is this a product I would use?

Q: What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership?

3. Is this an opportunity I would be proud of?

KJS: There is still plenty of gender bias in our society and structural barriers that make it difficult for

4. Can I make an impact?

women to rise to the top: lack of access to paid leave, affordable childcare, and equal pay. We’re making progress, but not fast enough. We need to keep pushing and make it easier for women to stay in

Color checked all of these boxes. Othman Laraki, our CEO and co-founder, is one of the smartest and most ethical people I’ve ever known. Cancer has hit my family, as it has so many others, and I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to join a movement to help beat cancer and other hereditary conditions. Q: Can you share with us some of the advancements and discoveries Color Genomics has made? KJS: When you buy a car, a home or a phone, you get an owner’s manual. Unfortunately, that’s not the case with our bodies! Color is making it easier to unlock the DNA inside of us to make it easier to stay healthy. Specifically, Color has made access to medically actionable genetic testing easier and more affordable. We’re empowering people to learn their risk of hereditary conditions and use that early knowledge to take control of their healthcare and develop personalized plans to prevent illness or detect it early.

the workplace, advance quickly, and get paid fairly. Q: Can you offer advice to parents with daughters graduating from high school? KJS: Not yet! My older daughter graduates this year. Please send me advice on Twitter: @katies! Q: Tell us about your hobbies outside of work? KJS: I love Zumba with Ula Ghosheh. She’s the best instructor. I’m the worst in the class. Q: Is there an interesting fact that most people wouldn’t know about you? KJS: I wanted to be a pilot and was briefly in Air Force ROTC in college. Maybe one day I’ll finish getting my pilot’s license!

Q: What would you like to see Color Genomics accomplish in the next 5 years?

Q: How do you achieve work-life balance?

KJS: I would love to look back in 2023 to see that Color helped eliminate all hereditary conditions,

KJS: There’s no such thing as a balance - it’s more of a mashup. I try to prioritize the most important

including breast and ovarian cancers, caused by genetic mutations.

things and be present wherever I am.

Q: Which woman inspires you and why? KJS: My daughters, Ellie and Kiki. They’re passionate, fearless, strong, curious, and funny. Most importantly, they are focused on making a positive difference in the world! Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? KJS: One of the biggest challenges for women is economic power. It’s also one of our biggest opportu-

Q: What would you say is your greatest professional accomplishment thus far? KJS: I can Tweet reasonably well. :) Q: What do you enjoy most about living in the Bay Area? KJS: The Bay Area is a magical place filled with smart, optimistic people who want to make the world a better place and have the skillset to have massive positive impact at scale.


A Conversations with

Katie Jacobs Stanton,

CMO of Color & Former Vice President of Global Media at Twitter Q: Can you share with us your experience working at the White House and State Department?

nities. I’m thrilled that the Gates Foundation has committed $170 million towards improving economic

KJS: Working in the Obama Administration was the honor of a lifetime. At the White House, I served

leverage for women worldwide. According to Melinda Gates “when money flows into the hands of

as the Director of Citizen Participation, trying to make it easier for citizens to engage with the govern-

women who have the authority to use it, everything changes.”

ment using digital platforms like Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram. At the State Department, I worked in the Office of Innovation, helping the government use 21st century tools to address 21st century challenges. For example, we organized Town Halls for the President in China where participants could Tweet and text questions (even when these tools were blocked in China).

Q: What are some strategies that can help women achieve a more prominent role in their organizations? KJS: 1. Build your own personal Board of Directors. Cultivate relationships with people you admire, seek

Q: Of the 8 countries you’ve lived in, which was your favorite and why?

out their advice and collaborate with them on projects you’re passionate about. For example, I’m a

KJS: I’ve greatly appreciated all the countries I’ve been fortunate to spend time in, but

founding partner of #Angels, which I started with 5 of my friends from Twitter. We share access to

I’ve always felt a strong personal connection with France. I like the way Thomas Jeffer-

deals, networks and opportunities. I also lean on entrepreneurs and execs including Tina Sharkey, Dan

son put it; “a walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty and the point of life.”

Rosensweig, Dick Costolo and Elad Gil for career and industry advice.

Q: What was your experience like working as Vice President of Global Media at Twitter? KJS: Twitter was one of the highlights of my career. When I joined, we didn’t have any employees, offices, revenues or partnerships outside of the U.S. My role was to help build our teams globally and then lead the Media team which was responsible for partnerships across government, news, sports, music, and TV. We brought the best content from each of our markets to the platform and tried to help build the most vibrant and safest digital town square. I worked with exceptional people at Twitter and I’m proud of how much we were able to achieve. Q: You were an Angel Investor for Color Genomics … what made you decide to step in as Chief Marketing Officer? KJS: There are 4 core values that help me decide on new roles:

3. Pay it forward - help women at all levels. I’m pretty sure I’m going to work for the women on my team at Color one day and am really excited about that! 4. Make sure women’s voices are heard and presences are felt. Work to ensure that they’re seated at the table and included in the conversation. 5. Have conviction in your beliefs and share them. Don’t be afraid to bring new ideas forward. 6. Be passionate about what you’re doing. Life is short. 7. Choose wisely. Look for a manager and team that help you be your best self. 8. Don’t worry about the job title - do your best work and the title and prominence will follow. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career? KJS: My media team at Twitter had a great motto: Dream big, do big, act big. Follow these principles as a leader and you can’t go wrong.

1. Are the people smart and ethical? 2. Is this a product I would use?

Q: What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership?

3. Is this an opportunity I would be proud of?

KJS: There is still plenty of gender bias in our society and structural barriers that make it difficult for

4. Can I make an impact?

women to rise to the top: lack of access to paid leave, affordable childcare, and equal pay. We’re making progress, but not fast enough. We need to keep pushing and make it easier for women to stay in

Color checked all of these boxes. Othman Laraki, our CEO and co-founder, is one of the smartest and most ethical people I’ve ever known. Cancer has hit my family, as it has so many others, and I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to join a movement to help beat cancer and other hereditary conditions. Q: Can you share with us some of the advancements and discoveries Color Genomics has made? KJS: When you buy a car, a home or a phone, you get an owner’s manual. Unfortunately, that’s not the case with our bodies! Color is making it easier to unlock the DNA inside of us to make it easier to stay healthy. Specifically, Color has made access to medically actionable genetic testing easier and more affordable. We’re empowering people to learn their risk of hereditary conditions and use that early knowledge to take control of their healthcare and develop personalized plans to prevent illness or detect it early.

the workplace, advance quickly, and get paid fairly. Q: Can you offer advice to parents with daughters graduating from high school? KJS: Not yet! My older daughter graduates this year. Please send me advice on Twitter: @katies! Q: Tell us about your hobbies outside of work? KJS: I love Zumba with Ula Ghosheh. She’s the best instructor. I’m the worst in the class. Q: Is there an interesting fact that most people wouldn’t know about you? KJS: I wanted to be a pilot and was briefly in Air Force ROTC in college. Maybe one day I’ll finish getting my pilot’s license!

Q: What would you like to see Color Genomics accomplish in the next 5 years?

Q: How do you achieve work-life balance?

KJS: I would love to look back in 2023 to see that Color helped eliminate all hereditary conditions,

KJS: There’s no such thing as a balance - it’s more of a mashup. I try to prioritize the most important

including breast and ovarian cancers, caused by genetic mutations.

things and be present wherever I am.

Q: Which woman inspires you and why? KJS: My daughters, Ellie and Kiki. They’re passionate, fearless, strong, curious, and funny. Most importantly, they are focused on making a positive difference in the world! Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? KJS: One of the biggest challenges for women is economic power. It’s also one of our biggest opportu-

Q: What would you say is your greatest professional accomplishment thus far? KJS: I can Tweet reasonably well. :) Q: What do you enjoy most about living in the Bay Area? KJS: The Bay Area is a magical place filled with smart, optimistic people who want to make the world a better place and have the skillset to have massive positive impact at scale.


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From Google to Entrepreneur:

Meet Upuia Ahkiong, Founder of Kua Body and Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos Q: Did you know growing up you wanted to be a Massage Therapist (Entrepreneur)? UA: Not at all. I knew I wanted to help people and make meaningful impact, as well as find a way to help my family, but becoming a massage therapist came as a complete surprise (to everyone). As a first-generation Samoan-Chinese American growing up in the SF Bay Area and the first in my family to obtain a masters degree, I was determined to live out the American Dream, but I had very limited resources. My family started our humble beginnings in Hunters Point, San Francisco, Ca. in the mid-60s and moved around the Bay Area. As a 4-year-old, when I visited my grandmother Upuia Tuialuuluu who migrated from American Samoa (Gogo / Tau Manu’a Tele) to San Bruno, Ca., I observed her use of native Samoan plants and massage techniques to help people with ailments including myself. She was considered a Taulasea Samoan village healer and our family’s matriarch. My grandmother will be 102 years old this August, has 14 children and I’m the first grandchild to proudly carry her name. My hope is to make her and my family proud and live out her legacy as the founder, owner and practitioner of Kua Body. Q: Share with us your 10-year experience while working at Google as Lead Massage Therapist?

Anne Wojcicki (CEO/Co-Founder of 23andMe) and Upuia Ahkiong at 2017 WE Vibe Block Party in Los Altos.

UA: Prior to joining Google in 2004, I had never heard of this company nor its’ reputation. (My excuse is I lived in Hawaii in the 90s and wasn’t exposed to the Silicon Valley bubble.) I spent the majority of my massage career at Google and was instrumental in helping to grow and lead the most successful in-house corporate worldwide Massage Program that still exists today. While working at Google’s Mountain View headquarters, I was one of the top and leading therapists with a strong clientele base, influential in obtaining full-time benefits for therapists, and successful in launching the current Thai Massage and Craniosacral Programs. In addition, I coordinated the first-ever educational massage “Tech Talk”, and many other successful events. I’m proud of my Google legacy. Q: What happened that made you think it’s time to leave Google and become an Entrepreneur? UA: Google offered amazing opportunities and perks with so many cool memories! It was hard to leave after 10 years but the desire to hone my leadership skills and the need for a creative outlet had a stronger calling. As a visionary, I wanted a place to grow and be challenged, Google helped me refine my leaderships skills and was a springboard to becoming a full-fledged Entrepreneur! If I could make it at Google, I could make it beyond!

Members of Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos launch festive inaugural 2017 WE Vibe Block Party highlighting the women-owned businesses of Los Altos.

Q: How did you choose the name Kua Body? UA: In 2002, while I was a new massage student, we had an assignment to envision our massage practice and business. I used the initials of my first, middle and last names - KUA. I also learned in Samoan Kua means backbone or vertebrae. It was destiny! And, in 2014 the word BODY came to me while laying on a mat in my yoga class. Q: How has Kua Body grown since you started in 2014? UA: I executed my exit plan from Google to Kua Body with very little down time. I opened both the Los Altos and Pleasanton offices in August and September 2014 respectively. In 2016, both studios underwent an expansion, and now in 2018 we’re on track to build again in Los Altos. Our clientele base has grown exponentially. We added more therapists to our team, hosted wellness workshops and developed a Mentor Program for new massage therapists. Nearly 4 years ago when we opened our doors, Kua Body was an unknown in both communities but now we are becoming a household neighborhood name.

In addition, Kua Body is instrumental in leading and inspiring local community engagement, and in 2016 I founded Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos (WE Los Altos), a grass-roots local business group with nearly 70 members and growing. Q: Can you explain to our audience, what is a “Massage Studio Incubator” and what it means to your clients? UA: The Kua Body “incubator” model is that we build-out turnkey high-end massage studios in the most desirable communities. Seasoned massage professionals can build and run their own practice without the needed startup capital or lack of desire to own and run their own facility. Our facilities are not spas but sophisticated and stylish venues. In addition, we provide ongoing professional, business, and financial mentoring for all of our team members. Our clients can expect consistent high-quality service and the opportunity to work with their own personal therapist. Entering the workforce as a new massage therapist, I was shocked by the lack of industry compensation and business prepa-

ration. I quickly realized in order to make a living, I would need multiple jobs to match the School Counselor salary I just left. I designed the Kua Body Incubator to solve this issue and give talented massage therapists an opportunity to succeed financially and professionally. Q: You’re also the founder of “Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos” … what happened that took you down this exciting venture? UA: During the pre-launch of Kua Body, I had hopes of making connections in both communities with other businesses by going door-to-door or emailing but wasn’t very successful. In December 2015, I had the “Aha!” moment - “I’m going to put on a community-wide event during March Women’s History Month 2016 to celebrate the women business owners of Los Altos”. I pitched the idea to Kathleen Dylan of Dylan Studios (Los Altos) and my boyfriend, and WE Los Altos was born. After noticing so many female-owned


From Google to Entrepreneur:

Meet Upuia Ahkiong, Founder of Kua Body and Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos Q: Did you know growing up you wanted to be a Massage Therapist (Entrepreneur)? UA: Not at all. I knew I wanted to help people and make meaningful impact, as well as find a way to help my family, but becoming a massage therapist came as a complete surprise (to everyone). As a first-generation Samoan-Chinese American growing up in the SF Bay Area and the first in my family to obtain a masters degree, I was determined to live out the American Dream, but I had very limited resources. My family started our humble beginnings in Hunters Point, San Francisco, Ca. in the mid-60s and moved around the Bay Area. As a 4-year-old, when I visited my grandmother Upuia Tuialuuluu who migrated from American Samoa (Gogo / Tau Manu’a Tele) to San Bruno, Ca., I observed her use of native Samoan plants and massage techniques to help people with ailments including myself. She was considered a Taulasea Samoan village healer and our family’s matriarch. My grandmother will be 102 years old this August, has 14 children and I’m the first grandchild to proudly carry her name. My hope is to make her and my family proud and live out her legacy as the founder, owner and practitioner of Kua Body. Q: Share with us your 10-year experience while working at Google as Lead Massage Therapist?

Anne Wojcicki (CEO/Co-Founder of 23andMe) and Upuia Ahkiong at 2017 WE Vibe Block Party in Los Altos.

UA: Prior to joining Google in 2004, I had never heard of this company nor its’ reputation. (My excuse is I lived in Hawaii in the 90s and wasn’t exposed to the Silicon Valley bubble.) I spent the majority of my massage career at Google and was instrumental in helping to grow and lead the most successful in-house corporate worldwide Massage Program that still exists today. While working at Google’s Mountain View headquarters, I was one of the top and leading therapists with a strong clientele base, influential in obtaining full-time benefits for therapists, and successful in launching the current Thai Massage and Craniosacral Programs. In addition, I coordinated the first-ever educational massage “Tech Talk”, and many other successful events. I’m proud of my Google legacy. Q: What happened that made you think it’s time to leave Google and become an Entrepreneur? UA: Google offered amazing opportunities and perks with so many cool memories! It was hard to leave after 10 years but the desire to hone my leadership skills and the need for a creative outlet had a stronger calling. As a visionary, I wanted a place to grow and be challenged, Google helped me refine my leaderships skills and was a springboard to becoming a full-fledged Entrepreneur! If I could make it at Google, I could make it beyond!

Members of Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos launch festive inaugural 2017 WE Vibe Block Party highlighting the women-owned businesses of Los Altos.

Q: How did you choose the name Kua Body? UA: In 2002, while I was a new massage student, we had an assignment to envision our massage practice and business. I used the initials of my first, middle and last names - KUA. I also learned in Samoan Kua means backbone or vertebrae. It was destiny! And, in 2014 the word BODY came to me while laying on a mat in my yoga class. Q: How has Kua Body grown since you started in 2014? UA: I executed my exit plan from Google to Kua Body with very little down time. I opened both the Los Altos and Pleasanton offices in August and September 2014 respectively. In 2016, both studios underwent an expansion, and now in 2018 we’re on track to build again in Los Altos. Our clientele base has grown exponentially. We added more therapists to our team, hosted wellness workshops and developed a Mentor Program for new massage therapists. Nearly 4 years ago when we opened our doors, Kua Body was an unknown in both communities but now we are becoming a household neighborhood name.

In addition, Kua Body is instrumental in leading and inspiring local community engagement, and in 2016 I founded Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos (WE Los Altos), a grass-roots local business group with nearly 70 members and growing. Q: Can you explain to our audience, what is a “Massage Studio Incubator” and what it means to your clients? UA: The Kua Body “incubator” model is that we build-out turnkey high-end massage studios in the most desirable communities. Seasoned massage professionals can build and run their own practice without the needed startup capital or lack of desire to own and run their own facility. Our facilities are not spas but sophisticated and stylish venues. In addition, we provide ongoing professional, business, and financial mentoring for all of our team members. Our clients can expect consistent high-quality service and the opportunity to work with their own personal therapist. Entering the workforce as a new massage therapist, I was shocked by the lack of industry compensation and business prepa-

ration. I quickly realized in order to make a living, I would need multiple jobs to match the School Counselor salary I just left. I designed the Kua Body Incubator to solve this issue and give talented massage therapists an opportunity to succeed financially and professionally. Q: You’re also the founder of “Women Entrepreneurs of Los Altos” … what happened that took you down this exciting venture? UA: During the pre-launch of Kua Body, I had hopes of making connections in both communities with other businesses by going door-to-door or emailing but wasn’t very successful. In December 2015, I had the “Aha!” moment - “I’m going to put on a community-wide event during March Women’s History Month 2016 to celebrate the women business owners of Los Altos”. I pitched the idea to Kathleen Dylan of Dylan Studios (Los Altos) and my boyfriend, and WE Los Altos was born. After noticing so many female-owned


Upuia Ahkiong at Kua Body Los Altos studio.

PHOTOGRAPHY:

Juliana Stoy MAKE UP & HAIR:

Elizabeth Chang, Skyla Arts ACCESSORIES:

Gitane of Los Altos and Glenn Ahkiong COLORIST:

Ena Byun

shops in downtown Los Altos, I realized it was time to acknowledge these hard-working small business leaders of our community. Kathleen and I were able to identify over 200 female-owned businesses in Los Altos, we launched WELosAltos. com, created our social media presence and successfully hosted three major events at local venues drawing nearly 300 attendees in the month of March alone. WE Los Altos made history! Q: How has WE Los Altos made a difference and what’s next? UA: WE Los Altos exists because there is a need for genuine human connection and

support of small-business communities everywhere. As a business owner in the Silicon Valley, there is so much emphasis on investing in technology or creating the next billion-dollar company. WE Los Altos has grown annually in membership, created an advisory committee, established monthly events, networking receptions, retreats, community block parties and much more. Members have collaborated on business projects, supported each other’s businesses, volunteered on WE Los Altos events and have given back to the community.

We were grateful to have Los Altos resident Anne Wojcicki, CEO/Co-Founder of 23andMe as our keynote at our 2016 kickoff event who is also an active member of the community and proponent of small businesses. WE Los Altos is meeting a need for many business owners and looking to expand in other Bay Area cities and beyond. We encourage locals, small companies and corporations to support their neighborhoods and business communities by investing dollars, time, or adopting a local business. Q: Which woman inspires you and why?

UA: There isn’t one specific woman, instead I am inspired by the dozens of mentors (women and men) I have had since I was a child and now as an entrepreneur. I wholeheartedly encourage everyone to consider embracing a mentor. It could be a natural relationship that forms, a professional coach or someone you seek out you respect and admire who can offer you honest and sound insight, wisdom and perspective. I’m grateful to my mentors, these inspirational individuals who took the time to care for me, guide me and help me in my journey of life. I hope this article, and the success of Kua Body and WE Los Altos inspires others.

Q: What is one challenge you feel women face today? UA: One challenge women (and men) face is letting their “ego” get the best of them. You are not the center of the Universe. When people are self-serving and use others for personal or professional gain, they will not experience true fulfillment, respect and success in life. Q: Can you tell us how you manage your work life balance? UA: I never understood “work life balance” so instead where I focus my time and what I value most in life is I love spending quality time with my favorite groups of

people. Surrounding myself with genuine and authentic people really matters most to me vs. being around a lot of superficial individuals. I also believe in solitude, having alone time is probably my ultimate favorite past time and allows me the opportunity to bring things into perspective and balance. Q: What do you like the most about living in the Bay Area? UA: As a native of the Bay Area, I love the diversity of opportunities, people, culture, and access to the coast, wine country and San Francisco.


Upuia Ahkiong at Kua Body Los Altos studio.

PHOTOGRAPHY:

Juliana Stoy MAKE UP & HAIR:

Elizabeth Chang, Skyla Arts ACCESSORIES:

Gitane of Los Altos and Glenn Ahkiong COLORIST:

Ena Byun

shops in downtown Los Altos, I realized it was time to acknowledge these hard-working small business leaders of our community. Kathleen and I were able to identify over 200 female-owned businesses in Los Altos, we launched WELosAltos. com, created our social media presence and successfully hosted three major events at local venues drawing nearly 300 attendees in the month of March alone. WE Los Altos made history! Q: How has WE Los Altos made a difference and what’s next? UA: WE Los Altos exists because there is a need for genuine human connection and

support of small-business communities everywhere. As a business owner in the Silicon Valley, there is so much emphasis on investing in technology or creating the next billion-dollar company. WE Los Altos has grown annually in membership, created an advisory committee, established monthly events, networking receptions, retreats, community block parties and much more. Members have collaborated on business projects, supported each other’s businesses, volunteered on WE Los Altos events and have given back to the community.

We were grateful to have Los Altos resident Anne Wojcicki, CEO/Co-Founder of 23andMe as our keynote at our 2016 kickoff event who is also an active member of the community and proponent of small businesses. WE Los Altos is meeting a need for many business owners and looking to expand in other Bay Area cities and beyond. We encourage locals, small companies and corporations to support their neighborhoods and business communities by investing dollars, time, or adopting a local business. Q: Which woman inspires you and why?

UA: There isn’t one specific woman, instead I am inspired by the dozens of mentors (women and men) I have had since I was a child and now as an entrepreneur. I wholeheartedly encourage everyone to consider embracing a mentor. It could be a natural relationship that forms, a professional coach or someone you seek out you respect and admire who can offer you honest and sound insight, wisdom and perspective. I’m grateful to my mentors, these inspirational individuals who took the time to care for me, guide me and help me in my journey of life. I hope this article, and the success of Kua Body and WE Los Altos inspires others.

Q: What is one challenge you feel women face today? UA: One challenge women (and men) face is letting their “ego” get the best of them. You are not the center of the Universe. When people are self-serving and use others for personal or professional gain, they will not experience true fulfillment, respect and success in life. Q: Can you tell us how you manage your work life balance? UA: I never understood “work life balance” so instead where I focus my time and what I value most in life is I love spending quality time with my favorite groups of

people. Surrounding myself with genuine and authentic people really matters most to me vs. being around a lot of superficial individuals. I also believe in solitude, having alone time is probably my ultimate favorite past time and allows me the opportunity to bring things into perspective and balance. Q: What do you like the most about living in the Bay Area? UA: As a native of the Bay Area, I love the diversity of opportunities, people, culture, and access to the coast, wine country and San Francisco.


HOW TO PERFECT YOUR GOLF SWING

T

he search for the perfect swing is the Holy Grail for golfers all over the world as they strive to ďŹ nd an action that will permit them to play the game to a high standard. Grooving a golf swing that is repeatable and dependable can only be achieved through practice, and this will require time and patience. Trying to perfect a swing while playing in competition is never advisable as you cannot possibly give your full concentration to the areas that need attention. Professional golfers will work tirelessly on their swings, some even hiring teachers who will give advice on elements of the swing. For recreational golfers, perhaps securing the services of a club professional will help, but for most golfers, it is a case of trial and error on the practice range. What can you do to improve

you swing? The starting point for anyone who hopes to improve their game is to ensure that the fundamentals are in place. These include a good grip, proper stance, correct alignment and tempo of the swing. When the basics are in place, you will be in position to hit golf shots that are reasonably good. Your next step is to experiment with things that may improve your swing allowing you to hit the ball longer, straighter and with more spin. For example, ball position is something that can have a real impact on your swing as it often determines the angle at which you approach the ball and how this affects your arms and shoulders on the downswing. If you position the ball too far toward your front foot, this can encourage an over-the-top pass at the


ball, probably resulting in a pull or a slice. On the other hand, if you position the ball too far back in your stance, you may find you are blocking the ball to the right or hooking it wildly. Experiment with ball position and you will most likely find that placing the ball in the middle of your stance or just fractionally toward your front foot will reap dividends. On longer clubs like the driver, the ball will be further toward your front foot. A tip you will find helpful when working on grooving your golf swing, is to experiment on the practice range with different tempo swings. Some recreational golfers swing very hard and fast in order to attempt to hit the ball further. You may be surprised to find that with a more leisurely, smooth swing, you will actually achieve greater distance. In reality, you want to hit the ball better, not harder. Fast swings tend to pull the arms into play too quickly and this often results in cutting across the ball, leading to a slice. The tempo of your swing is possibly the most crucial element you can work on as it will promote a repeatable swing you can rely on under pressure. In fact, you can groove such a swing in the garden at home without the need to hit golf balls. Find the tempo that works best for you, and make this part of your golf game. Another element that impacts on your swing

is how you stand to address the ball. This can make a real difference to the quality of your shots and determine how high or low your ball trajectory will be. It can also influence how you bring the club head to the ball. Are you possibly stretching for the ball at address? Or is your stance too upright causing you to slice? Again, take time on the practice range to experiment by hitting shots while taking a variety of address positions. A tall person will naturally stand more upright to the ball while a shorter person will reach more for the ball and have a flatter swing. On that subject, if you are serious about grooving a solid, repeatable golf swing, you would do well to make sure you are using golf clubs suited to your height. Badly fitted clubs will have you swinging on an arc that is unnatural and will inevitably result in hooking or slicing. As is true for even the best of players, grooving a good golf swing is a matter of practice. You may find that there is a great deal of trial and error involved until you find a swing that suits you individually. Do not treat this as a chore, but enjoy those times you spend on the practice ground, realizing that it will result in a better golf swing that will in turn, allow you to derive greater enjoyment from the game and improve you score.

As is true for even the best of players, grooving a good golf swing is a matter of practice.


Anna G. Eshoo,

U.S. House of Representatives DEVOTING ALL THE BEST, EAST TO WEST Q: Where did you grow up and go to school? Congresswoman Eshoo: I was born and raised in New Britain and Old Saybrook, Connecticut, and have lived in California most of my life. I have an AA degree from Cañada College, and I am a graduate of the CORO Foundation. I also hold an Honorary Degree from Menlo College. Q: What prepared you, who inspired you to go into politics? What did you do before being elected to Congress? Congresswoman Eshoo: I was elected to the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors in 1982, and served for ten years before being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1992. Previous to my Board service, I was Chief of Staff to the late Leo T. McCarthy, Speaker of the California Assembly. He was a man of great integrity and a mentor to me. Previous to my work in the public sector, I worked in the private sector. Q: How long have you been in the House of Representatives? Is it what you thought it would be like? Has it changed over these years? Congresswoman Eshoo: I have served as a Member of the House of Representatives for 22

t her sciences Rep. Eshoo speaks with @BioCentury TV abou e. mitte Com e merc Com agenda for the Energy and

years, and representing my constituents has been beyond rewarding. My Silicon Valley district has changed, as have politics in Washington, but my devotion to public service remains steadfast. Q: A day in the life, a week in the life of, it’s always full, it’s always busy, especially going back and forth, coast to coast, as often as you do … what might this look like? Congresswoman Eshoo: Week days I am in Washington, D.C. for voting and my legislative work. As the top Democrat on the subcommittee overseeing communications and technology issues, I participate in congressional hearings to examine proposed policies or write bills. My days begin early and can end late, and they are always very full. I read all communications from my constituents every night and they are always instructive to me. I’ve commuted across

Rep. Eshoo established the 18th Congressional District Student Advisory Board in 1993 for San Mateo and Santa Counties to give young peo ple a voice in our government.


Rep. Eshoo announces a new law aimed at developing better treatments and potential cures for the deadliest of cancers. She was joined by Julie Fleshman, President and CEO of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Lisa Niemi Swayze, wife of the late Patrick Swayze and Chief Ambassador of Hope for the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, in addition to leading cancer research advocates at Stanford University Hospital. Eshoo was recognized by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network for her leadership and presented with the Congressional Champion of Hope Award by Fleshman.

the country over all the years I have been in Congress because it’s important for me to be in the community with my constituents. I learn so much from them and they’re a constant source of inspiration to me. Q: What is the best piece of advice anyone has ever given you? Congresswoman Eshoo: I am fond of a wise quote of Eleanor Roosevelt, who once said, “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” My family also instilled in me to be a ‘giver’…not a ‘taker’. Q: What are the questions people ask most of you? Congresswoman Eshoo: Many constituents ask me about the dysfunction in Congress and when it will return to being a productive, bipartisan legislature for the good of the country. They also express their concerns about our national economy, the cost of education and climate change. Q: Who are some of the people on both sides of the aisle (past and present) that you have worked with, respected, truly liked and appreciate? Congresswoman Eshoo: I was honored to work with the late Senator Ted Kennedy to enact a law that for the first time established an approval process for biosimilars, in effect creating a biosimilars industry, just as Congress did with generic drugs in 1984. Biosimilars, or biologics, are drugs created using biological rather than chemical properties. I am always proud to work across the aisle

with my Republican colleagues. A majority of the bills I introduce have a Republican co-sponsor, including legislation I have long spearheaded with Congressman Frank Wolf of Virginia to bring about greater protections for persecuted religious minorities in the Middle East. I have also worked with Representatives Joe Barton (R-Texas), Leonard Lance (R-New Jersey), Mike Rogers (R-Michigan) and Senator Richard Burr (R-North Carolina), and we have been successful in having our legislation signed into law. Q: Do you love history? Congresswoman Eshoo: I respect history. Our past instructs our future. Q: What do you enjoy and love most about what you do? Congresswoman Eshoo: Being a problem solver; getting complex issues resolved for my constituents; and shaping policies to improve the lives of people and strengthen our country. Q: What are some of your proudest moments and/or accomplishments? Congresswoman Eshoo: My two children. Q: What’s an issue close to your heart that you are working on, striving for? Congresswoman Eshoo: Biomedical research because it holds the promise to cure diseases and heal humankind. Investment in biomedical research at the National Institutes of Health is at unprecedented lows, jeopardizing our national health and preventing future breakthroughs. More than half of basic research funding in the U.S. comes from the federal government, yet we spend two-thirds less on research and development than


be afraid to fail. Q: What advice do you have for aspiring women? Congresswoman Eshoo: Follow your dreams. Think big. Keep going. Keep your friends, teammates and family close to help you reach your goal. Q: What can people do to help make this a better community, such as volunteerism and philanthropy? Congresswoman Eshoo: The American education reformist Horace Mann said, “Doing nothing for others is the undoing of ourselves.” Our citizenship is a gift…it’s also a responsibility. Every generation is called to build on the progress of the past and move our communities and our country forward. There are hundreds of non-profit organizations in our communities and our churches that carry out noble efforts. Find one. Join one. there any that stand out that we should know about…and Q: What in your spare time do you like to do? Do you like to possibly watch and listen to? read? Do you have favorite Congresswoman Eshoo: Jeff Weiner, the CEO of LinkedIn, has authors, favorite books? Movies? ambitious ideas about how to Music? Sports? Do you have a employ Americans and people hidden talent? around the world. Congresswoman Eshoo: I am a voracious reader, a big fan of Q: In 2011, you were public broadcasting, and I enjoy interviewed by Carl Guardino, walking. Our community theaters CEO of the Silicon Valley are terrific, and a healthy meal Leadership Group, at what with family and friends renews was called “an unprecedented me. gathering of leaders focused on working together to get the Q: Do you have hobbies, Rep. Eshoo, along with four other interests? Do you enjoy travel? economy on a sustainable path female representatives, visited our What may be some of your for growth.” That was then and troops in Afghanistan and spoke favorite places you have visited we have come a long way since. with Regional Support Command or like to visit? You and Carl both do so much (South) leadership about working Congresswoman Eshoo: I have for community and have a great to promote women’s rights under traveled many times to visit our working relationship. Please the Afghan constitution and the troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, comment. positive role of women in the Afghan National Security Forces. attended foreign policy workshops Congresswoman Eshoo: in Africa, and I had the honor Carl Guardino and the Silicon to be a member of the official Valley Leadership Group are a congressional delegation for the force for good in our region and inauguration of Pope Francis. our country, advocating for issues ranging from immigration reform to investment in STEM, job Q: Lastly, if you could host a dinner, and you could invite anyone (living or not), who creation, infrastructure and housing—investments would you like to have as your guests? that bolster our economy and improve people’s Congresswoman Eshoo: My entire family, lives. I am proud to have Carl and the SVLG as Katherine Hepburn, Mother Teresa, Pope John partners in my work. XXII, Pope Francis, FDR and Eleanor, Albert Q: What advice do you have for aspiring Einstein, Gloria Steinem, the Dalai Lama, JFK and young people? Bono. Imagine the dinner conversation! Congresswoman Eshoo: Learn. Lead. Don’t we did in 1965. I have spearheaded legislation in this Congress—the America HEALS Act—to reverse this troubling trend by establishing a trust fund for our biomedical research agencies and ensure that the United States is the leader in scientific discovery. Q: What would you still like to see accomplished? Congresswoman Eshoo: Comprehensive immigration reform, addressing climate change, a stronger economy that benefits all Americans, and more advancement for women and girls. Q: What do you feel is our biggest challenge? Congresswoman Eshoo: Climate change is one of the most serious issues facing our nation and the world. Q: You have gotten to know a number of leading CEO’s and community leaders. Are


Want to Advance your Career?

Find a Mentor! By Dr. Frumi Rachel Barr

Lux was a top performer. In the 20 years before I met her she was always considered a high potential employee. In her two decades in the IT department of a large financial institution she progressed slowly but steadily through the ranks. If there were a complex problem to resolve –Lux would get it done. And then she got stuck. She couldn’t understand why she was overlooked time and again to achieve a top position. The reason was simple – she never asked. Sometime being good at what you do can be what prevents you from getting ahead. Why would anyone advance Lux further when she was doing such an excellent job just where she was? And for her part, she never let anyone know that she had her eye on a very senior position. The game changer for her was the suggestion to find a Mentor. She chose the CFO of the organization who was both flattered and interested in being her guide. Within a very short time, after expressing her interest in moving up the ladder, and following her mentor’s suggested roadmap to success, she achieved her objective of being a senior V.P. And now it’s your turn. A Mentor is a wise and trusted counselor and guide. In “traditional” corporations an executive or senior person is assigned a “high potential” to assist in his or her development. A Mentor has a body of knowledge that a Mentee would like to learn. For example, in an accounting firm, information regarding technical matters and professional development are often transferred from Mentor to Mentee. There are many reasons why having a Mentor can acceler-

ate your career. Here are three for you to consider: • Guidance regarding how to navigate corporate politics. For women, it sometimes helps to have a Mentor who is also female. Your role as a Mentee is to be open to the feedback, suggestions, and critiques that are offered to you. This will maximize the effect of the support you receive. • Assistance finding connections, the “whos” who can help you get where you’d like to be more quickly. The question to ask is “who do you know who….” • And thirdly, guidance in how to improve your skills. Within the context of a mentoring relationship the Mentor assists an individual fill a particular knowledge gap by learning how to do things more effectively. In your search for a Mentor, it’s a good idea to choose someone working in the same functional area as you are, as well as someone who shares your values. Professional organizations in your field, whether they offer formal mentoring programs or not, can be excellent sources of Mentors. Test the waters by asking for advice first. Be open to sharing your concerns and fears. Mentors are most likely to invest themselves in those in whom they see a little of themselves. Don’t think that you, as a Mentee, get all the benefits from the relationship. In my experience mentoring is a rich and rewarding experience and I’ve learned more about technologies from my Mentees than I would ever have learned on my own! Having a well chosen Mentor to guide you can be a game changer in accelerating your career. Do it now! DrFrumi@Scaling4growth.com www.Scaling4Growth.com


MEET

Vicki Hennessy

Neighborhood mobilization in support of Sheriff Hennessy prior to her election in November 2015. Volunteers went door-to-door in the neighborhood.

SAN FR A N C I S CO ’S F I RS T EL E C T E D WO MA N S H E RIF F

SFL: Who and what inspired you to go into Law Enforcement?

Department are separate – so the Sheriff’s Department does

When and how did you come up with this idea for a career …

not do general patrol. We basically would do the running of

and what ultimately inspired you to run for Sheriff?

the county courts, providing bailiffs for the jails, and also pro-

Sheriff Hennessy: Like I said, it was rather a fluke. There was

viding for the civil process. So, what I did was I worked in a

On November 3rd, 2015, Vicki Hennessy was elected by a large 61%

for a six-month period. This prepared her for her campaign to run

a test, I took the test and I got in. My first day on the job was

county jail, on the swing shift, night shift, any shift; when I was

of the vote and on January 8th, 2016, she was sworn in to become San

for and be elected to the Office of Sheriff … and it also earned for her

Christmas Eve, 1975. At the time, the Department had newly

new, I worked every shift, in a women’s jail to begin with.

Francisco’s first-ever elected woman sheriff. Since joining the San

practically everyone’s strong endorsement.

turned over to a new sheriff, Sheriff Richard Hongisto. Until

SFL: Your husband is a retired San Francisco Mounted Police

then, the Sheriff’s Department was pretty much left to its own

Officer, what was that like meeting, dating, marrying a police

Francisco Sheriff’s Department in 1975, Sheriff Hennessy has had a truly distinguished, storied career.

Upon her winning the election, Sheriff Hennessy said, “I had so

devices for years and so I came in at

officer … and then also raising a

In 1983, in what was just seven years, she reached the rank of Cap-

much good support and people have been so good to me and I

the cusp of customizing and build-

family?

tain, becoming the youngest in California to do so. Then, in 1997, she

appreciate their confidence in me. It’s a daunting journey I will

ing the department into a profes-

Sheriff Hennessy: I met him when

became the Chief Deputy Sheriff. In 2006, she became the Deputy

be on now, working for the people of San Francisco, but I believe

sional, well-considered Sheriff’s

he was riding on the horses for the

Director of the San Francisco Department of Emergency Manage-

I am up to it.”

Department, first under Richard

San Francisco Police Department

ment, and from 2008 to 2011, she became San Francisco’s Director of

Up to it, indeed, she is. I hope you will enjoy this conversation

Hongisto and then Michael Hen-

and I was not yet in the Sheriff’s

Emergency Management. In 2011, she retired, but was brought out of

with her as much as I have. Meet Sheriff Vicki Hennessy, the

nessey (no relation) and I just loved

Department when I first met him.

retirement in 2012 when Mayor Ed Lee appointed her interim sheriff

Sheriff of San Francisco

it. It was such a great time to be

I got to know him and he encour-

there. SFL: When you joined the San

Sheriff Hennessy at an Alice B Toklas event before the Pride Parade. The two people are candidates from the 2011 Sheriff’s race supporting the Sheriff for her race in 2015.

aged me to join the Sheriff’s Department. And, I think like any oth-

Q: What prepared you for this very special path to become

I enjoyed quite a few majors in college - I majored in Art His-

Francisco Sheriff’s Department,

Sheriff and how special is it becoming Sheriff of your Home-

tory and then Art (because I love to draw and paint); another

what was it like then, early on, in

town?

was Business, and I did a major in Administrative Justice (after I

the 1970’s being a woman in what was a truly male dominated

me … but we had relatives who assisted us and we were able

Sheriff Hennessy: The first thing you should know about me

joined the Department) and then a major also in Management,

career path?

to arrange our schedules so we could support each other and

is that I really don’t like talking about myself. It does not come

as well. A lot of classes in a variety of things.

Sheriff Hennessy: I worked mostly with men at the time but,

our family. And I think we were very fortunate with the jobs

easy to me. For me, it’s about the San Francisco Sheriff’s De-

So, when you ask me how I ended up in Law Enforcement, it

you know, I was one of the first women to work in the men’s

that we have had.

partment more than it is about me. This is something, I think,

was a fluke really. I was at loose ends; I needed a job. I needed

jails … and then I became one of the first women to become

SFL: You had retired earlier, why and what brought you out of

you need to know about me.

money coming in and a friend told me about this opportuni-

a firearms instructor. I had a lot of opportunities and I enjoyed

retirement? How pleased are you with your decision?

First of all, I was born and raised in San Francisco. I went to

ty. It was a non-traditional job for women. Women were just

them. Because we had such forward thinking Sheriffs, like

Sheriff Hennessy: Sometimes I ask myself this question. But I

public elementary and junior high schools, 3 or 4 of them

getting in … this was the first recruitment for men and wom-

Richard Hongisto and Michael Hennessey (who, particularly, I

saw the need for leadership in the Department and I thought

around The City, and then Lowell High School in San Francis-

en, and people of color, and lesbians and gays. So, this was an

worked with for a good many years), I think we were support-

that it was failing. I thought the Department was having a

co. I have been to college a number of times. I have probably

interesting time in San Francisco, about 1973-1974, when they

ed as women in the Department.

lot of problems and realized when I came back as the interim

around 135 units, but I have never graduated, because I kept

were doing this. I liked the idea of a non-traditional job and I

The first thing we did, because the City and County of San Fran-

Sheriff, that I had the ability, and I had the name, to run for of-

changing my majors.

had always been very athletic, so I loved this opportunity.

cisco are one entity, the Sheriff’s Department and the Police

fice – It was not something I thought I would ever do. I don’t

er family, sometimes people would ask if he liked his horse better than


MEET

Vicki Hennessy

Neighborhood mobilization in support of Sheriff Hennessy prior to her election in November 2015. Volunteers went door-to-door in the neighborhood.

SAN FR A N C I S CO ’S F I RS T EL E C T E D WO MA N S H E RIF F

Q: Who and what inspired you to go into Law Enforcement?

Department are separate – so the Sheriff’s Department does

When and how did you come up with this idea for a career …

not do general patrol. We basically would do the running of

and what ultimately inspired you to run for Sheriff?

the county courts, providing bailiffs for the jails, and also pro-

Sheriff Hennessy: Like I said, it was rather a fluke. There was

viding for the civil process. So, what I did was I worked in a

On November 3rd, 2015,Vicki Hennessy was elected by a large 61%

for a six-month period. This prepared her for her campaign to run

a test, I took the test and I got in. My first day on the job was

county jail, on the swing shift, night shift, any shift; when I

of the vote and on January 8th, 2016, she was sworn in to become San

for and be elected to the Office of Sheriff … and it also earned for her

Christmas Eve, 1975. At the time, the Department had newly

was new, I worked every shift, in a women’s jail to begin with.

Francisco’s first-ever elected woman sheriff. Since joining the San

practically everyone’s strong endorsement.

turned over to a new sheriff, S heriff Ri chard Ho ngisto. U n til

Q: Your husband is a retired San Francisco Mounted Police

then, the Sheriff’s Department was pretty much left to its own

Officer, what was that like meeting, dating, marrying a police

Francisco Sheriff’s Department in 1975, Sheriff Hennessy has had a truly distinguished, storied career.

Upon her winning the election, Sheriff Hennessy said, “I had so

devices for years and so I came in at

officer … and then also raising a

In 1983, in what was just seven years, she reached the rank of Cap-

much good support and people have been so good to me and I

the cusp of customizing and build-

family?

tain, becoming the youngest in California to do so. Then, in 1997, she

appreciate their confidence in me. It’s a daunting journey I will

ing the department into a profes-

Sheriff Hennessy: I met him when

became the Chief Deputy Sheriff. In 2006, she became the Deputy

be on now, working for the people of San Francisco, but I believe

sional, well-considered Sheriff’s

he was riding on the horses for the

Director of the San Francisco Department of Emergency Manage-

I am up to it.”

Department, first u nder R ichard

San Francisco Police Department

ment, and from 2008 to 2011, she became San Francisco’s Director of

Up to it, indeed, she is. I hope you will enjoy this conversation

Hongisto and then Michael Hen-

and I was not yet in the Sheriff’s

Emergency Management. In 2011, she retired, but was brought out of

with her as much as I have. Meet Sheriff Vicki Hennessy, the

nessey (no relation) and I just loved

Department when I first met him.

retirement in 2012 when Mayor Ed Lee appointed her interim sheriff

Sheriff of San Francisco

it. It was such a great time to be

I got to know him and he encour-

there. Q: When you joined the San

Sheriff Hennessy at an Alice B Toklas event before the Pride Parade. The two people are candidates from the 2011 Sheriff’s race supporting the Sheriff for her race in 2015.

aged me to join the Sheriff’s Department. And, I think like any oth-

SFL: What prepared you for this very special path to become

I enjoyed quite a few majors in college - I majored in Art His-

Francisco Sheriff’s D epartment,

Sheriff and how special is it becoming Sheriff of your Home-

tory and then Art (because I love to draw and paint); another

what was it like then, early on, in

town?

was Business, and I did a major in Administrative Justice (after I

the 1970’s being a woman in what was a truly male dominated

me … but we had relatives who assisted us and we were able

Sheriff Hennessy: The first thing you should know about me

joined the Department) and then a major also in Management,

career path?

to arrange our schedules so we could support each other and

is that I really don’t like talking about myself. It does not come

as well. A lot of classes in a variety of things.

Sheriff Hennessy: I worked mostly with men at the time but,

our family. And I think we were very fortunate with the jobs

easy to me. For me, it’s about the San Francisco Sheriff’s De-

So, when you ask me how I ended up in Law Enforcement, it

you know, I was one of the first women to work in the men’s

that we have had.

partment more than it is about me. This is something, I think,

was a fluke really. I was at loose ends; I needed a job. I needed

jails … and then I became one of the first women to become

Q: You had retired earlier, why and what brought you out of

you need to know about me.

money coming in and a friend told me about this opportuni-

a firearms instructor. I had a lot of opportunities and I enjoyed

retirement? How pleased are you with your decision?

First of all, I was born and raised in San Francisco. I went to

ty. It was a non-traditional job for women. Women were just

them. Because we had such forward thinking Sheriffs, like

Sheriff Hennessy: Sometimes I ask myself this question. But I

public elementary and junior high schools, 3 or 4 of them

getting in … this was the first recruitment for men and wom-

Richard Hongisto and Michael Hennessey (who, particularly, I

saw the need for leadership in the Department and I thought

around The City, and then Lowell High School in San Francis-

en, and people of color, and lesbians and gays. So, this was an

worked with for a good many years), I think we were support-

that it was failing. I thought the Department was having a

co. I have been to college a number of times. I have probably

interesting time in San Francisco, about 1973-1974, when they

ed as women in the Department.

lot of problems and realized when I came back as the interim

around 135 units, but I have never graduated, because I kept

were doing this. I liked the idea of a non-traditional job and I

The first thing we did, because the City and County of San Fran-

Sheriff, that I had the ability, and I had the name, to run for of-

changing my majors.

had always been very athletic, so I loved this opportunity.

cisco are one entity, the Sheriff’s Department and the Police

fice – It was not something I thought I would ever do. I don’t

er family, sometimes people would ask if he liked his horse better than


see myself as a politician. I see myself as a practitioner in the

with command staff, program staff, school staff. I have been

issues sit with your values. I also think that you have to have

Sheriff’s Department, somebody who knows it pretty well and

meeting with different entities from around the City – and be-

some humility. You can’t be arrogant. I heard somewhere that

who wants to make it the best Department that I can. And, so,

cause I came in when there’s a lot going on, I have to turn my

arrogance is the selfish pig in the room, basically. I don’t know

because I have lived in San Francisco my entire life, and that I

attention to that. Instead of sitting back, I need to access these

if that’s true, but I have not responded well to arrogance in my

owed a great career to the Sheriff’s Department, I looked at it

things, before I make a lot of changes. So, that’s what I am do-

career.

as giving back.

ing right now.

SFL: Throughout your life, and then throughout your career,

Q: If you could wave a magic wand, what would you like

Q: You have been honored by the San Francisco Commission

who are some of your heroes and positive role models? And

to see short range and long range for San Francisco? Now

on the Status of Women for your leadership in protecting

how about today?

as Sheriff, do you have a Top 5 list or agenda that you like to

vic-tims and survivors of domestic violence; please share

Sheriff Hennessy: My heroes and positive role models have

refer to?

with us more about this important issue.

probably been more about people that I know than people

Sheriff H ennessy: I f I c ould w ave a m agic w and, I c ertainly

Sheriff Hennessy: This occurred when I was the Executive Di-

I don’t know. And so I would say, many women who I have

would like to see affordable housing. And to work together to

rector of Emergency Management, which includes 911, in San

known in my life, particularly my grandmother, who was a

make it happen in every area, in every neighborhood, in every

Francisco. And I give a lot of the credit for this to the 911 staff

nurse here in San Francisco, who was kind of a strong wom-

aspect in San Francisco. I would love to see better transporta-

and 911 supervisors who worked with the community in cre-

an and very successful. And I would also say my great aunt

tion in terms of parking and driving. And I think we are work-

ating specific codes for Domestic Violence calls. These codes

who, when most women weren’t working, was a bookkeep-

ing on that. I think that the Mayor is also working on Afford-

helped the police identify what kind of call it was promptly.

er in Berkeley at a department store – these are two people I

able Housing with a number of people.

And, so, that’s why they honored me; but I have always pointed

probably looked up to the most. And, nowadays, my positive

I think of divisiveness. I would like to see people working to-

to my Deputy Director and others because they were the ones

role models are people who do the right things for the right

who actually did all the work around this … and certainly I sup-

reasons.

each other. And I’d like to see diminishing gaps between peo-

ported that work. Currently, we have the Survivors Program, a

SFL: What advice did you appreciate most that you were giv-

ple with jobs and people without jobs and flight from The City.

robust program, that works with victims of Domestic Violence

en when growing up and then professionally? What advice do

I think about all that. I have a grown son and a grown daugh-

either who have been to jail or whose abusers are in jail. So

you like to give today to aspiring young men and women wish-

we do a lot with that community and I am really proud to sup-

ing to go into Law Enforcement … and also in general?

to buy a home here much like I did when I was growing up. So

port that, as well. Again, it’s the people with the boots on the

Sheriff Hennessy: The advice I appreciated most was to put

these things are missing from The City.

ground that are making these things happen.

things into perspective - personally and professionally. When

Now, this List of a Top 5 you are talking about, a lot of peo-

Q: What is your definition of Leadership?

you are new and eager, and you want to get things done,

Sheriff Hennessy: You know, there are a lot of things I can say

sometimes you take things personally. And to not take things

but now that I am here, for what is a week and two days, I’m

about this … about different parts of Leadership … I think one

personally … and to take the high road … is what I would do.

finding that it really behooves me to kind of take a step back

of the main things I can say from my experience is setting an

I believe for young men and women looking at going into the

and meet with people, work with people. I have been meeting

example and holding myself accountable. I think it’s one of

field of Law Enforcement, you need to look at the code of eth-

the main things in leadership, you have to be a good listener,

ics in terms of how to treat people. I think that’s the first thing.

you have to have openness, be approachable, and you have to

You have to understand you have to put things in perspective.

listen more than talk, and you can’t be afraid to take other peo-

You cannot take things personally. And you have to act in a

ple’s ideas – if they’re good ideas – and not always just push

way that is ethically and, in some way, a higher way than what

your ideas on people. I also think you have to have a demon-

is expected from a normal person.

strated competence in whatever field you are leading in. And

SFL: Are there some Non Profits in particular that you love,

your perspective – having a good perspective, to be able to see

support and/or like to recommend?

both sides of an issue is, I think, very important. As well as, you

Sheriff Hennessy: I believe many of the nonprofits we work

know you have power … not to abuse the power, but to use

with at the Sheriff’s Department are all wonderful. The Garden

it only when it’s necessary. And I think having values that you

Project is a great project. I would also say the Five Keys Charter

can depend upon to come to your rescue when all else fails.

School is another great one, too. There are wonderful ones,

You have to go back and see those values, to see where the

such as the Salvation Army and Goodwill … some may be well

gether a little bit better. Not deliberately misunderstanding

ter. They grew up in San Francisco and don’t have the ability

ple have asked me. I have had a few different answers before,

Members of the Alice B. Toklas Democratic Club supporting Sheriff Hennessy during her campaign at the Castro Street Fair.

known, and others may not be as well known. For example,

Sheriff Hennessy filling out her ballot designation worksheet for the November 2015 Election. Glide Memorial Church, St. Anthony’s Dining Room … and also Lava Mae (Google supported, meaning “Wash Me” in Spanish, helps turn San Francisco buses into showers for the homeless) … Yes, these are some of the many great causes doing many great things. SFL: If you could host a dinner party and could invite anyone (living or not), who would you like to invite and what would you like to talk about? Sheriff Hennessy: You know who I would really like to invite? Oprah Winfrey, Merv Griffin and David Niven. I know that sounds weird, but I think I’d really like to have a dinner party with people who can tell good stories and offer such insight about what’s going on in the world. From different viewpoints … I would lik e that. Oprah Winfrey is so amazing. She has done so much. She is so intelligent and such a thoughtful person. I would like to have dinner with her. Merv Griffin, too, I remember growing up and enjoying watching him on TV. He was such a clever person and such a good host. And David Niven seems like he would be a lot fun … what can I say. In closing, I am honored to be in this position and I take it seriously. I am the kind of person who is about doing the work and getting the job done. Stepping out in front like this is not my druthers, shall I say, and I am happy to have talked with you today. SFL: Thank you very much, Sheriff. We are very happy to have talked with you.


see myself as a politician. I see myself as a practitioner in the

with command staff, program staff, school staff. I have been

issues sit with your values. I also think that you have to have

Sheriff’s Department, somebody who knows it pretty well and

meeting with different entities from around the City – and be-

some humility. You can’t be arrogant. I heard somewhere that

who wants to make it the best Department that I can. And, so,

cause I came in when there’s a lot going on, I have to turn my

arrogance is the selfish pig in the room, basically. I don’t know

because I have lived in San Francisco my entire life, and that I

attention to that. Instead of sitting back, I need to access these

if that’s true, but I have not responded well to arrogance in my

owed a great career to the Sheriff’s Department, I looked at it

things, before I make a lot of changes. So, that’s what I am do-

career.

as giving back.

ing right now.

Q: Throughout your life, and then throughout your career,

SFL: If you could wave a magic wand, what would you like

SFL: You have been honored by the San Francisco Commission

who are some of your heroes and positive role models? And

to see short range and long range for San Francisco? Now as

on the Status of Women for your leadership in protecting vic-

how about today?

Sheriff, do you have a Top 5 list or agenda that you like to refer

tims and survivors of domestic violence; please share with us

Sheriff Hennessy: M y heroes and positive role models have

to?

more about this important issue.

probably been more about people that I know than people

Sheriff Hennessy: If I could wave a magic wand, I certainly

Sheriff Hennessy: This occurred when I was the Executive Di-

I don’t know. And so I would say, many women who I have

would like to see affordable housing. And to work together to

rector of Emergency Management, which includes 911, in San

known in my life, particularly my grandmother, who was a

make it happen in every area, in every neighborhood, in every

Francisco. And I give a lot of the credit for this to the 911 staff

nurse here in San Francisco, who was kind of a strong wom-

aspect in San Francisco. I would love to see better transporta-

and 911 supervisors who worked with the community in cre-

an and very successful. And I would also say my great aunt

tion in terms of parking and driving. And I think we are work-

ating specific codes for Domestic Violence calls. These codes

who, when most women weren’t working, was a bookkeep-

ing on that. I think that the Mayor is also working on Afford-

helped the police identify what kind of call it was promptly.

er in Berkeley at a department store – these are two people I

able Housing with a number of people.

And, so, that’s why they honored me; but I have always pointed

probably looked up to the most. And, nowadays, my positive

I think of divisiveness. I would like to see people working to-

to my Deputy Director and others because they were the ones

role models are people who do the right things for the right

who actually did all the work around this … and certainly I sup-

reasons.

each other. And I’d like to see diminishing gaps between peo-

ported that work. Currently, we have the Survivors Program, a

Q: What advice did you appreciate most that you were giv-

ple with jobs and people without jobs and flight from The City.

robust program, that works with victims of Domestic Violence

en when growing up and then professionally? What advice

I think about all that. I have a grown son and a grown daugh-

either who have been to jail or whose abusers are in jail. So

do you like to give today to aspiring young men and women

we do a lot with that community and I am really proud to sup-

wish-ing to go into Law Enforcement … and also in general?

to buy a home here much like I did when I was growing up. So

port that, as well. Again, it’s the people with the boots on the

Sheriff Hennessy: The advice I appreciated most was to put

these things are missing from The City.

ground that are making these things happen.

things into perspective - personally and professionally. When

Now, this List of a Top 5 you are talking about, a lot of peo-

SFL: What is your definition of Leadership?

you are new and eager, and you want to get things done,

Sheriff Hennessy: You know, there are a lot of things I can say

sometimes you take things personally. And to not take things

but now that I am here, for what is a week and two days, I’m

about this … about different parts of Leadership … I think one

personally … and to take the high road … is what I would do.

finding that it really behooves me to kind of take a step back

of the main things I can say from my experience is setting an

I believe for young men and women looking at going into the

and meet with people, work with people. I have been meeting

example and holding myself accountable. I think it’s one of

field of Law Enforcement, you need to look at the code of eth-

the main things in leadership, you have to be a good listener,

ics in terms of how to treat people. I think that’s the first thing.

you have to have openness, be approachable, and you have to

You have to understand you have to put things in perspective.

listen more than talk, and you can’t be afraid to take other peo-

You cannot take things personally. And you have to act in a

ple’s ideas – if they’re good ideas – and not always just push

way that is ethically and, in some way, a higher way than what

your ideas on people. I also think you have to have a demon-

is expected from a normal person.

strated competence in whatever field you are leading in. And

Q: Are there some Non Profits in particular that you love,

your perspective – having a good perspective, to be able to see

support and/or like to recommend?

both sides of an issue is, I think, very important. As well as, you

Sheriff Hennessy: I believe many of the nonprofits we work

know you have power … not to abuse the power, but to use

with at the Sheriff’s Department are all wonderful. The Garden

it only when it’s necessary. And I think having values that you

Project is a great project. I would also say the Five Keys Charter

can depend upon to come to your rescue when all else fails.

School is another great one, too. There are wonderful ones,

You have to go back and see those values, to see where the

such as the Salvation Army and Goodwill … some may be well

gether a little bit better. Not deliberately misunderstanding

ter. They grew up in San Francisco and don’t have the ability

ple have asked me. I have had a few different answers before,

Members of the Alice B. Toklas Democratic Club supporting Sheriff Hennessy during her campaign at the Castro Street Fair.

known, and others may not be as well known. For example,

Sheriff Hennessy filling out her ballot designation worksheet for the November 2015 Election. Glide Memorial Church, St. Anthony’s Dining Room … and also Lava Mae (Google supported, meaning “Wash Me” in Spanish, helps turn San Francisco buses into showers for the homeless) … Yes, these are some of the many great causes doing many great things. Q: If you could host a dinner party and could invite anyone (living or not), who would you like to invite and what would you like to talk about? Sheriff Hennessy: You know who I would really like to invite? Oprah Winfrey, Merv Griffin and David Niven. I know that sounds weird, but I think I’d really like to have a dinner party with people who can tell good stories and offer such insight about what’s going on in the world. From different viewpoints … I would lik e that. Oprah Winfrey is so amazing. She has done so much. She is so intelligent and such a thoughtful person. I would like to have dinner with her. Merv Griffin, too, I remember growing up and enjoying watching him on TV. He was such a clever person and such a good host. And David Niven seems like he would be a lot fun … what can I say. In closing, I am honored to be in this position and I take it seriously. I am the kind of person who is about doing the work and getting the job done. Stepping out in front like this is not my druthers, shall I say, and I am happy to have talked with you today. BAWM: Thank you very much, Sheriff. We are very happy to have talked with you.


Marina Gavric

Marina Gavric Health & Fitness Training www.marinagavric.com

Commit to Balance, to Your Fitness Success and to Yourself S

taying committed to an exercise and health plan is not always the simplest task. Breaking bad habits is never easy. “I have tried and tried!” … Yes, I know, I hear this, everyone’s story, all the time! Regardless of what age you may be or at what point you are in your life, men and women, boys and girls … a corporate executive, a student, an employee, a stay-at-home parent … we’re all busy all the time. Please recognize that health & wellness, as well as fitness & nutrition, are interrelated. It’s all a good thing and it’s a choice we make in our busy lives. Once you have resolved a priority to yourself of “health & fitness” in your life … make “finding balance” a key component. You can stay genuinely dedicated, enjoying your commitment, while not falling victim to excuses. What a positive difference in our lives and how we feel (the energy alone, perhaps meaning better sleep) we all seem to know it would make. It’s a matter of doing. For example, Jane is a busy executive and, although Jane is a fictitious character, she represents a good number of men and women. She is up at 5am, by 5:15am has her coffee in hand and for the next hour, before she rounds up the kids for school, she reviews her yesterday and prepares for today. In no time, she then packs up her home team, briefcase in hand and is out the door. Finally, she’s at the office and sits with another cup of coffee, with breakfast in hand … whatever pastries there may be. The sodas come later. Day in and day out, Jane reflects on making life changes to improve her well-being and feel good about herself, inside and out. Yet, day after

day, Jane’s willpower gives in and she seems to repeat the same old routine, a cycle, she wishes she could break. When? She feels too busy. She feels not up to it”. She believes there is no other way. She speaks for many, many people. No matter the phase of the health cycle one is in, we all struggle with this … to get in that workout in or say no to an extra helping of our favorite foods. The first step is to find your balance … and to commit to change. It starts with that commitment … even if one step at a time to begin with and to win. Regularly reflect on all your priorities … then decide on the commitments you can realistically make and stick with them. Whether this week it’s a 30 minutes for 3 days-a-week commitment or next week a 40 minutes 6 days-a-week commitment. A key is to write your commitments down. As you would keep your word to your boss or loved ones, keep your word to yourself. Stay Hydrated, Stay Focused, Stay Fit


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ways been a great working-class city, which gives us an authenticity that people are really being drawn to now. And, our progressive values. We’re a place of social movements and social innovation. That’s what makes Oakland Oakland. To understand and appreciate those past strengths I think is what is going to allow us to continue to be the unique city that we are. It’s finally becoming noticed and appreciated and people are being drawn to that incredible urban energy. But, we don’t want to ever disrespect our legacy if we are to realize our full potential as a great, unique city.

EBL: Where did you go to school and what did you study? Mayor Schaaf: It’s funny, I was born and raised in Oakland, but my parents thought it was important that I go to college in another part of the country to experience diverse opportunities ad leave my comfort zone. In its own way, Oakland can be a sheltered environment. I went to a small liberal arts school in central Florida called Rollins College. It really was an eye-opener to how the rest of the country thinks- particularly politically. I then went to Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. The truth is I have always been an appreciator of the arts, but without enough talent to be an artist myself, I was interested in getting into the entertainment industry. So, in that spirit, I went to a law school with a great Entertainment Law program.

meet mayor libby schaaf

the bay area’s highly esteemed mayor of oakland There are cities that have gone through big transformations when it was said it could never be done. Oakland is one of those cities on that cusp and Mayor Libby Schaaf is a great leader and inspiring Mayor who is determined to see that happen. She is dedicated to public service, community work and is devoted to restoring people’s faith and belief in government and how it can work for them while, energizing and engaging a proud community. After the Warriors, if there is someone who could unite and inspire the community and bring great transformation for the City of Oakland, Mayor Libby Schaaf is a shining example of someone, who can and is helping lead the way for Oakland, the East Bay and the greater Bay Area. Meet Mayor Libby Schaaf and enjoy this wonderful conversation with her, as we did:

Q: What was it like being born and raised as you were in Oakland? Mayor Schaaf: I come to the job as Mayor from a place of just passionate love for my City. And I have been in love with Oakland all my life, since I was a child. Those experiences and that depth of emotion is really what fuels me. But I also believe that for any city to become great, it has to be itself well. It cannot try and imitate another city. And, so, to really appreciate Oakland’s past, I believe, is the key to its great future. I always talk about Oakland’s “Secret Sauce”. For me, it has to do with our legacy of diversity, an inclusive diversity, of artists and this incredible creative energy that we have. What’s more is our gritty industrial flavor, w hich i s w hy w e’ve a l-

But, as it turned out, I didn’t really like entertainment law. Actually, I did really well in Law School; I really enjoyed law school. I worked for a short time as a lawyer at a very large law firm in Oakland. But I very quickly found that my real passion was for community service since that’s where I came from.

in particular, I loved volunteering at the West Oakland Boys and Girls Club. There, I just really connected with this one young man named Nathan. The day that I walked in, really tired, having just come from work at Oakland’s largest law firm, seeing 9-year-old Nathan struggling in school motivated me and when I helped him with his homework, he just got it. I could just see the light bulb come on. When I walked into the gym that night, and he spotted me from across the way, he just sprinted from all across the way and just threw his arms around me. This, I thought, is what I want to do. This is what I want to make happen. This is so much more who I am. Nathan is 30 years old now and he is still very much part of my life. He’s doing very well. He was working for H&R Block and has stopped that. He is now working with troubled youth. Funny, how something great like this has come full circle, where he is now helping and inspiring many others.

EBL: How did the transition to politics and city government come about? Mayor Schaaf: I have not always had a love of politics. I grew up in a family that was very committed to community service and community volunteerism, but not to politics. I got my first job in politics by accident. I had studied Political Science in college, that is true, and had also been an attorney. But I was working with non-profits and education. It was thanks to a good friend, who knew of my love for Oakland, who suggested that I interview for this particular job. It was to be Chief of Staff to then-President of the City Council, Oscar De La Fuente. We hadn’t met until the interview. I was hired and loved the job. It was the perfect job for me. Local government is your chance to fly at the perfect altitude and this was such a perfect fit. (Mayor Schaaf would later become an aide to then-Mayor, Jerry Brown).

EBL: What inspired you for this journey of Public Service you were soon to embark on? Mayor Schaaf: It was in 1995, I left practicing law. I took a job to start a sunshine volunteer program for the Oakland’s public schools. As a lawyer, my Mom and I co-founded a non-profit in Oakland called “Oakland Cares”. We created a calendar of one-shop volunteer opportunities to try and get even busy people out giving back in their community. And,

EBL: What are some of the challenges Oakland faces? Mayor Schaaf: Oakland has both the challenges and the beautiful potential of urban America. We are consistently considered one of, if


ways been a great working-class city, which gives us an authenticity that people are really being drawn to now. And, our progressive values. We’re a place of social movements and social innovation. That’s what makes Oakland Oakland. To understand and appreciate those past strengths I think is what is going to allow us to continue to be the unique city that we are. It’s finally becoming noticed and appreciated and people are being drawn to that incredible urban energy. But, we don’t want to ever disrespect our legacy if we are to realize our full potential as a great, unique city.

Q: Where did you go to school and what did you study? Mayor Schaaf: It’s funny, I was born and raised in Oakland, but my parents thought it was important that I go to college in another part of the country to experience diverse opportunities ad leave my comfort zone. In its own way, Oakland can be a sheltered environment. I went to a small liberal arts school in central Florida called Rollins College. It really was an eye-opener to how the rest of the country thinks- particularly politically. I then went to Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. The truth is I have always been an appreciator of the arts, but without enough talent to be an artist myself, I was interested in getting into the entertainment industry. So, in that spirit, I went to a law school with a great Entertainment Law program.

meet mayor libby schaaf

the bay area’s highly esteemed mayor of oakland There are cities that have gone through big transformations when it was said it could never be done. Oakland is one of those cities on that cusp and Mayor Libby Schaaf is a great leader and inspiring Mayor who is determined to see that happen. She is dedicated to public service, community work and is devoted to restoring people’s faith and belief in government and how it can work for them while, energizing and engaging a proud community. After the Warriors, if there is someone who could unite and inspire the community and bring great transformation for the City of Oakland, Mayor Libby Schaaf is a shining example of someone, who can and is helping lead the way for Oakland, the East Bay and the greater Bay Area. Meet Mayor Libby Schaaf and enjoy this wonderful conversation with her, as we did:

EBL: What was it like being born and raised as you were in Oakland? Mayor Schaaf: I come to the job as Mayor from a place of just passionate love for my City. And I have been in love with Oakland all my life, since I was a child. Those experiences and that depth of emotion is really what fuels me. But I also believe that for any city to become great, it has to be itself well. It cannot try and imitate another city. And, so, to really appreciate Oakland’s past, I believe, is the key to its great future. I always talk about Oakland’s “Secret Sauce”. For me, it has to do with our legacy of diversity, an inclusive diversity, of artists and this incredible creative energy that we have. What’s more is our gritty industrial flavor, which is why we’ve al-

But, as it turned out, I didn’t really like entertainment law. Actually, I did really well in Law School; I really enjoyed law school. I worked for a short time as a lawyer at a very large law firm in Oakland. But I very quickly found that my real passion was for community service since that’s where I came from.

in particular, I loved volunteering at the West Oakland Boys and Girls Club. There, I just really connected with this one young man named Nathan. The day that I walked in, really tired, having just come from work at Oakland’s largest law firm, s eeing 9 -year-old N athan s truggling i n school motivated me and when I helped him with his homework, he just got it. I could just see the light bulb come on. When I walked into the gym that night, and he spotted me from across the way, he just sprinted from all across the way and just threw his arms around me. This, I thought, is what I want to do. This is what I want to make happen. This is so much more who I am. Nathan is 30 years old now and he is still very much part of my life. He’s doing very well. He was working for H&R Block and has stopped that. He is now working with troubled youth. Funny, how something great like this has come full circle, where he is now helping and inspiring many others.

Q: How did the transition to politics and city government come about? Mayor Schaaf: I have not always had a love of politics. I grew up in a family that was very committed to community service and community volunteerism, but not to politics. I got my first job in politics by accident. I had studied Political Science in college, that is true, and had also been an attorney. But I was working with non-profits and education. It was thanks to a good friend, who knew of my love for Oakland, who suggested that I interview for this particular job. It was to be Chief of Staff to then-President of the City Council, Oscar De La Fuente. We hadn’t met until the interview. I was hired and loved the job. It was the perfect job for me. Local government is your chance to fly at the perfect altitude and this was such a perfect fit. (Mayor Schaaf would later become an aide to then-Mayor, Jerry Brown).

Q: What inspired you for this journey of Public Service you were soon to embark on? Mayor Schaaf: It was in 1995, I left practicing law. I took a job to start a sunshine volunteer program for the Oakland’s public schools. As a lawyer, my Mom and I co-founded a non-profit in Oakland called “Oakland Cares”. We created a calendar of one-shop volunteer opportunities to try and get even busy people out giving back in their community. And,

Q: What are some of the challenges Oakland faces? Mayor Schaaf: Oakland has both the challenges and the beautiful potential of urban America. We are consistently considered one of, if


not the most, diverse cities in America. And that is a beautiful thing. But the disparities that we see in this city, and across America, are very shameful. Disparities in educational outcomes, health and income, are very real and Oakland, like all cities, is grappling with them.

Mayor Schaaf: People are going to hear a lot about “The Oakland Promise”. That is this idea that all of our children deserve the opportunity to go to college. And that we have a “cradle-to-career” plan for how we, as an entire city, can wrap our arms around these young people and help them in that journey. A major partner in that is the East Bay College Fund. That is an organization that the Superintendent and I are going to be working very closely with to create the support and scholarship money. So, it’s not just getting our kids into college, it’s making sure they finish college, to really make sure that we change the trajectory for young people in Oakland. If I can give you one cause, that would be it.

We have many challenges and, yet, a lower level of public revenue than wealthier cities that don’t have the same challenges. And, so, we can’t do it alone. Government cannot do it alone. We have to be smarter. We have to engage in good partnerships. And, we have to not settle. We have to not just present opportunities, but hold ourselves accountable for the actual outcomes. Those are three areas I am very focused on: being healthy, wealthy and wise.

orative spirit that got them that championship. And I really appreciate the Warriors. They were very generous. We had two appreciation events for our employees. Everyone had worked very long and hard. To show our appreciation, we put on a big barbeque for the employees. The Warriors let us actually bring the trophy - the actual Laurence O’Brien Trophy! - to the employee picnic and then the next day to the police line ups - so that our employees also got to be recognized as part of that championship team. And that’s how we still feel.

Q: If you could wave a magic wand …? Mayor Schaaf: If I could wave a magic wand and do just one thing for Oakland, to address those challenges, it would be that every child graduates from high school with the skills and the hope to be successful in the college and career of their choice. I think if you can do that, it would address many of the other challenges. This is such a clear passion of mine. Oakland is still recovering from recession and now is not the time to add positions to the Mayor’s office. So, local philanthropies got together and they actually have funded two positions in my office – a Director of Education and a Director of Equity and Strategic Partnerships.

educational excellence will be a challenge, that are succeeding. And not just on the individual student basis - whole schools are figuring out how to reverse those trends. And, so, I am absolutely an optimist, but I am an optimist that analyzes data. I am always optimistic with data.

I am actually “a geek policy wok at heart”. This is great, but I understand creating a position does not solve the problem. I am not stopping until we see the actual outcomes with the kids. It is a step in the right direction.

Q: Winning the election … Winning the championship … The beginning of a new era?

Q: You bring youth, energy and charisma to the Mayor’s office. Are you optimistic with what you have seen so far? Mayor Schaaf: I am absolutely optimistic! I am an optimistic realist. And, there is a lot to be optimistic about. We have seen that cities can do this. Cities can go from dangerous to safe. New York. Los Angeles. Those big cities have reduced every major category of crime by 80%. That is a different city. If they can do it, Oakland can do it. I used to feel like urban crime was one of those intractable problems, but we’ve seen that it can be done. The same goes with education. You have schools where kids that have every kind of social stressor, despite every demographic that suggests

Mayor Schaaf: It was wonderful to be elected with a very healthy mandate, and particularly running against an incumbent. And, yes, it has been a magic carpet ride of a year with the Golden State Warriors winning the championship. (It had been 40 years of waiting). The Warriors win and celebrating their victory in Oakland has meant so much for this city. First, it was great to show the world that this city celebrates with class. We had no negative incidents at all. Not a piece of property was damaged the night the Warriors won the Championship or during the world class parade that attracted nearly 1 million people to celebrate. To see those helicopter shots of a million people wrapped around this glittering jewel of a lake nestled against our downtown with the beautiful forested hills of Oakland in the background and the majestic skyline of San Francisco across the Bay was beautiful. Grown men cried in the streets that day because they grew up and waited 40 years for a day they optimistically held out hope for but never actually thought would be realized. It truly was beautiful. This city turned out every race, economic status and age. Everyone together in a positive sea of blue and gold - and it wasn’t just the confetti - everybody there had their Warriors shirts on. (Very nice! Very nice!) To celebrate a team that stands for a little bit more than just athletic excellence. A team that was known for working as a team. Not depending on a single superstar, but having discipline, persistence and that collab-

That win happened right before we passed my first budget as Mayor. This two-year budget for the city, a very positive budget, and our new city administrators started; and, so, it really is this feeling of a beautiful new era, a golden era for Oakland, maybe a blue and golden era for Oakland.

EBL: What advice do you offer for young people? Mayor Schaaf: Recognize the power that you have. Love yourself. Respect yourself. Worry less about what you think others think of you and realize your power. Our young people are so brilliant and I am convinced that many of the solutions to empowering and improving the lives of young people need to come from young people themselves. Their power to implement those ideas is so much greater than they

EBL: What is your definition of Leadership? Mayor Schaaf: I certainly believe in the idea of the “servant leader”. And, I come to this position very humbled and that I have to lead with this sense of service. And I hope that everyone, and expect everyone, in this organization to come from that same place of believing in service. And also service to those who often are left behind, our most vulnerable residents - the neighborhoods that aren’t always seen on TV. That is something that I believe is part of leadership … is not just doing what’s urgent but also what’s important.

EBL: What do you hear most from the people of Oakland? Mayor Schaaf: People who grew up here feel like there’s nothing for kids to do anymore. That, when we were kids, there were a lot of free activities and positive places for kids to go that just aren’t available anymore. That just breaks my heart. That is something I hear a lot. But I also hear that people love this city and they’re really proud to be Oaklanders. There’s a certain kind of scrappy pride that Oaklanders have that I don’t think you can find anywhere else. That’s something else I hear.

EBL: Is there a great cause in particular you’d like to share that people can learn more about and possibly be supportive of?

ever realized. And I am excited about trying to unleash that because I love Oakland young people. Oakland young people, in particular, have a wisdom and power that you don’t find everywhere and it deserves to be nourished.

EBL: What is your vision for Oakland? Mayor Schaaf: I see this vibrant, equitable city that it’s growing, but growing responsibly. Where we see prosperity and investment and development, but that it’s coming to the city in a way that lifts up the long-term residents. All that proud Oakland legacy, that you know I’m so passionate about, I want to be sure that the change that is coming to Oakland – and it’s coming – lifts up what makes Oakland Oakland and doesn’t push it out. Lifts up our long-term residents, our vulnerable residents, and doesn’t push them out. That is something I am very excited about … Because I haven’t seen other cities be as successful as they should be. At doing both those things - seeing prosperity and transformation, but in a way that lifts up not just the long-term residents but the culture, the identity, the “Secret Sauce” of the city - and that’s what I want for Oakland.


not the most, diverse cities in America. And that is a beautiful thing. But the disparities that we see in this city, and across America, are very shameful. Disparities in educational outcomes, health and income, are very real and Oakland, like all cities, is grappling with them.

Mayor Schaaf: People are going to hear a lot about “The Oakland Promise”. That is this idea that all of our children deserve the opportunity to go to college. And that we have a “cradle-to-career” plan for how we, as an entire city, can wrap our arms around these young people and help them in that journey. A major partner in that is the East Bay College Fund. That is an organization that the Superintendent and I are going to be working very closely with to create the support and scholarship money. So, it’s not just getting our kids into college, it’s making sure they finish college, to really make sure that we change the trajectory for young people in Oakland. If I can give you one cause, that would be it.

We have many challenges and, yet, a lower level of public revenue than wealthier cities that don’t have the same challenges. And, so, we can’t do it alone. Government cannot do it alone. We have to be smarter. We have to engage in good partnerships. And, we have to not settle. We have to not just present opportunities, but hold ourselves accountable for the actual outcomes. Those are three areas I am very focused on: being healthy, wealthy and wise.

orative spirit that got them that championship. And I really appreciate the Warriors. They were very generous. We had two appreciation events for our employees. Everyone had worked very long and hard. To show our appreciation, we put on a big barbeque for the employees. The Warriors let us actually bring the trophy - the actual Laurence O’Brien Trophy! - to the employee picnic and then the next day to the police line ups - so that our employees also got to be recognized as part of that championship team. And that’s how we still feel.

EBL: If you could wave a magic wand …? Mayor Schaaf: If I could wave a magic wand and do just one thing for Oakland, to address those challenges, it would be that every child graduates from high school with the skills and the hope to be successful in the college and career of their choice. I think if you can do that, it would address many of the other challenges. This is such a clear passion of mine. Oakland is still recovering from recession and now is not the time to add positions to the Mayor’s office. So, local philanthropies got together and they actually have funded two positions in my office – a Director of Education and a Director of Equity and Strategic Partnerships.

educational excellence will be a challenge, that are succeeding. And not just on the individual student basis - whole schools are figuring out how to reverse those trends. And, so, I am absolutely an optimist, but I am an optimist that analyzes data. I am always optimistic with data.

I am actually “a geek policy wok at heart”. This is great, but I understand creating a position does not solve the problem. I am not stopping until we see the actual outcomes with the kids. It is a step in the right direction.

EBL: Winning the election … Winning the championship … The beginning of a new era?

EBL: You bring youth, energy and charisma to the Mayor’s office. Are you optimistic with what you have seen so far? Mayor Schaaf: I am absolutely optimistic! I am an optimistic realist. And, there is a lot to be optimistic about. We have seen that cities can do this. Cities can go from dangerous to safe. New York. Los Angeles. Those big cities have reduced every major category of crime by 80%. That is a different city. If they can do it, Oakland can do it. I used to feel like urban crime was one of those intractable problems, but we’ve seen that it can be done. The same goes with education. You have schools where kids that have every kind of social stressor, despite every demographic that suggests

Mayor Schaaf: It was wonderful to be elected with a very healthy mandate, and particularly running against an incumbent. And, yes, it has been a magic carpet ride of a year with the Golden State Warriors winning the championship. (It had been 40 years of waiting). The Warriors win and celebrating their victory in Oakland has meant so much for this city. First, it was great to show the world that this city celebrates with class. We had no negative incidents at all. Not a piece of property was damaged the night the Warriors won the Championship or during the world class parade that attracted nearly 1 million people to celebrate. To see those helicopter shots of a million people wrapped around this glittering jewel of a lake nestled against our downtown with the beautiful forested hills of Oakland in the background and the majestic skyline of San Francisco across the Bay was beautiful. Grown men cried in the streets that day because they grew up and waited 40 years for a day they optimistically held out hope for but never actually thought would be realized. It truly was beautiful. This city turned out every race, economic status and age. Everyone together in a positive sea of blue and gold - and it wasn’t just the confetti - everybody there had their Warriors shirts on. (Very nice! Very nice!) To celebrate a team that stands for a little bit more than just athletic excellence. A team that was known for working as a team. Not depending on a single superstar, but having discipline, persistence and that collab-

Q: What advice do you offer for young people? Mayor Schaaf: Recognize the power that you have. Love yourself. Respect yourself. Worry less about what you think others think of you and realize your power. Our young people are so brilliant and I am convinced that many of the solutions to empowering and improving the lives of young people need to come from young people themselves. Their power to implement those ideas is so much greater than they

That win happened right before we passed my first budget as Mayor. This two-year budget for the city, a very positive budget, and our new city administrators started; and, so, it really is this feeling of a beautiful new era, a golden era for Oakland, maybe a blue and golden era for Oakland.

Q: What is your definition of Leadership? Mayor Schaaf: I certainly believe in the idea of the “servant leader”. And, I come to this position very humbled and that I have to lead with this sense of service. And I hope that everyone, and expect everyone, in this organization to come from that same place of believing in service. And also service to those who often are left behind, our most vulnerable residents - the neighborhoods that aren’t always seen on TV. That is something that I believe is part of leadership … is not just doing what’s urgent but also what’s important.

Q: What do you hear most from the people of Oakland? Mayor Schaaf: People who grew up here feel like there’s nothing for kids to do anymore. That, when we were kids, there were a lot of free activities and positive places for kids to go that just aren’t available anymore. That just breaks my heart. That is something I hear a lot. But I also hear that people love this city and they’re really proud to be Oaklanders. There’s a certain kind of scrappy pride that Oaklanders have that I don’t think you can find anywhere else. That’s something else I hear.

Q: Is there a great cause in particular you’d like to share that people can learn more about and possibly be supportive of?

ever realized. And I am excited about trying to unleash that because I love Oakland young people. Oakland young people, in particular, have a wisdom and power that you don’t find everywhere and it deserves to be nourished.

Q: What is your vision for Oakland? Mayor Schaaf: I see this vibrant, equitable city that it’s growing, but growing responsibly. Where we see prosperity and investment and development, but that it’s coming to the city in a way that lifts up the long-term residents. All that proud Oakland legacy, that you know I’m so passionate about, I want to be sure that the change that is coming to Oakland – and it’s coming – lifts up what makes Oakland Oakland and doesn’t push it out. Lifts up our long-term residents, our vulnerable residents, and doesn’t push them out. That is something I am very excited about … Because I haven’t seen other cities be as successful as they should be. At doing both those things - seeing prosperity and transformation, but in a way that lifts up not just the long-term residents but the culture, the identity, the“Secret Sauce” of the city - and that’s what I want for Oakland.


Are Live Conversations Making a Comeback? By Caroline Moriarity Sacks Director of INFORUM

I

n the technology capital of the world, San Franciscans know better than most about the latest messaging or communication apps. In a city turning conversations more virtual by the minute, a phenomenon is also developing: its citizens are wanting more interactions offline, with real people. At INFORUM, The Commonwealth Club’s Innovation Lab, we’re constantly seeing the benefits that come from live interactions. While some may argue that social media, forums, podcasts or live video streams are just as useful as the real deal, you miss the events that aren’t captured by film or social media. These are the experiences that can only be seen or heard firsthand. Notice the facial expressions on the executives on stage? Or, the way a panelist lights up because he/she noticed their family in an audience? These cues provide more color and context that can

add to a person’s individual experience. Let’s not forget the benefits of making real human connections. Sometimes the best part of an event is simply hearing the commentary from attendees. Conversations that happen before and after a program is just as impactful, if not more rewarding. Plus, these conversations often open up doors to meeting new people who can become a connection in the future. There’s also a difference between witnessing it online vs. in-person. Yes, we can listen to audio from a conversation between Marissa Mayer of Yahoo! and Marc Benioff of salesforce.com, but being there to laugh with the audience, feel the tension or witness history is something that you can always look back on. That experience is one of a kind. There are more benefits and we encourage you to see for yourself at our next INFORUM event. Check out our site for the next program; we hope to see you there: inforumsf.org

Salesforce Chairman and CEO Marc Benioff and Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer photo by Ed Ritger


Photo by Amy Sullivan


Meet Kristin Connelly East Bay Leader

BRINGING COMMUNITIES TOGETHER & MAKING A BIG DIFFERENCE

I

recently had the pleasure of talking with Kristin Connelly, the President and CEO of the East Bay Leadership Council. It was a delightful conversation that covered so much about the East Bay. We shared insights about the past and present. Kristin’s view of the future is certainly full of energy, enthusiasm and optimism. Kristin works to bring people and organizations together to foster a better future for the East Bay, where businesses, nonprofits, government and individuals work collaboratively to create positive solutions to our region’s economic and social challenges. A policy advisor, strategist and former attorney, Kristin assumed leadership of the East Bay Leadership Council (EBLC) in June, 2014. A private-sector-driven public policy and advocacy organization with more than 250 members, EBLC represents some of the most important employers in the region. Its mission is to improve the economic vitality and quality of life for the East Bay region, specifically Contra Costa County and the Tri-Valley. Kristin also serves as executive director of the Contra Costa Economic Partnership, the Council’s non-profit (and non-advocacy) arm, providing outcome-based programs that create jobs, develop infrastructure and offer workforce training through STEM-related initiatives. The Partnership conducts public-policy research to authenticate the initiatives that the Partnership and the Council support. Kristin was born and raised in the East Bay. It is home for her and her family, and she loves it dearly. She attended College Park High School in Pleasant Hill before she went on to UCLA and graduated with a bachelor’s in political science. Before a career in non-profit fundraising, she went to Georgetown University, acquiring a master’s in

Kristin at the 2014 East Bay Leadership Council Installation and Awards Dinner. Photo by Basil Glew-Galloway

Kristin with East Bay Leadership Council Chair Keith Archuleta. Photo by Amy Sullivan

education policy. She earned her law degree at Fordham University, and practiced employment law at Sidley Austin in New York. It took her 18 years after finishing high


school to return full-time to the Bay Area, but it It’s funny how things come full circle. Kristin was Kristin’s goal. “I was very fortunate to have has never forgotten the spirit conveyed by been mentored throughout my education and in the scholarship, and the appreciation she felt my career by so many great people,” she said. receiving it. So she was particularly moved “Somehow, I have often managed to be in the when in November, as President and CEO of right place at the right time.” Kristin worked for the East Bay Leadership Council, along with coCalifornia Forward and was the executive director presenting sponsors Wells Fargo Bank and the of the California Forward Action Fund before East Bay Community Foundation, her organization serving as chief of staff to Contra Costa County presented the 4th Annual East Bay Philanthropy Supervisor Karen Mitchoff, the post she held just Awards. Some 250 people gathered at the prior to her current Blackhawk Automotive position with the Museum to honor this Council. year’s award recipients Who inspired Kristin and nominees across as she was growing nine categories, and up? Who were her role to be inspired by their models? “There have generous contributions been so many,” she to their communities. said. Growing up in the “I feel so privileged Bay Area, she recalled to have my job,” she being inspired by said. “There are so California’s U.S. Senator many people who have Dianne Feinstein while terrific ideas, energy she served as mayor of and optimism in this Kristin with Kristi Conner, honored as the Next GenSan Francisco. Kristin organization. I value eration Philanthropist at the 2014 East Bay Leadership remembered watching the breadth and depth Geraldine Ferraro on TV Council Philanthropy Awards event, and Awards Com- of the many business become the Democratic mittee Chair Mark Hughes. and community leaders Photo by Amy Sullivan Party’s first woman I work with to help U.S. Vice-Presidential companies thrive in candidate in 1984 during the convention held in the East Bay,” she said. “I also value being able San Francisco. It was a defining moment for her, to work with employers of all sizes, to identify seeing history, and progress, being made close to barriers to their success, so that we can advocate home. for policy that breaks down these barriers.” Kristin’s family was also a model for her. “We How does her past work and life experience always had lively conversations at the dinner table affect her current work? Kristin spent nine years as a family. We talked about the news of the day, living in New York City where she attended and it was common to discuss world events. It law school and briefly practiced at a large law was a positive household growing up, and there firm. The experience made her appreciate that were high expectations for all three of us, my two the top people from nearly every industry were brothers and me. My childhood memories are in New York. “It was very exciting, as the city really wonderful,” she said. encompasses all walks of life. The experience Upon graduating from high school, Kristin raised my consciousness, and I became very received a major scholarship from a private aware of the many challenges people face in family foundation based in Vacaville. This has business and in their communities,” she said. always meant a great deal to her because of “This is also true of people in the East Bay. Our the extraordinary opportunities the scholarship communities are very diverse. I believe most provided. The generosity of this family foundation people have little understanding of the diversity of further inspired her to excel, and fueled her the East Bay’s economy —and the importance of interest in a career in public service. advocating for the people, the businesses and the


organizations that make up our communities. “There are key challenges and issues facing our region, related to water policy, health care, transportation, education and housing,” she added. “An important area of concern is increasing our awareness of income inequality — recognizing that the East Bay is both an affluent area and also one with much poverty. Affordability of housing and transportation is an issue we will face for years to come. There is a lot of work to be done.” This is an exciting time to be thinking strategically about how to help our region thrive economically. The East Bay Leadership Council intends to pursue an ambitious agenda through its various task forces that consider the most pressing issues facing the region and the state. EBLC members with a presence here include Shell, Wells Fargo, Kaiser Permanente, John Muir Health, Chevron, CSAA Insurance, AT&T, Comcast, John F. Kennedy University and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland, to name a few who care deeply about this community and are willing to work on some of the region’s biggest challenges. “I’m very optimistic about our future,” Kristin said. “It’s important to confront challenges so we can make things better. Addressing rising income inequality is the right thing to do and it’s good business. “It is essential to increase economic development and to promote the extraordinary assets of the East Bay to potential employers at every turn,” she noted. When asked about her definition of leadership, Kristin eloquently responded, “Identifying the right thing to do and having the courage to do it.” One last question, if she could have a fantasy

dinner party, and could invite anyone, living or not, whom would she like to invite, what would she ask them and what would they talk about? She would invite Nelson Mandela, she said, recalling how impactful it was to study his life and see him speak at the Oakland Coliseum upon his release from prison. What would be his past and present perspectives about his life in South Africa, and also for the United States today and for the world? What would he like to see happen? She would also include President Obama and the First Family, Eleanor Roosevelt, the Grimké sisters (Sarah Moore Grimké and Angelina Emily Grimké), who were some of the nation’s first southern abolitionists, and women’s rights advocate, Elizabeth Cady Stanton. She would like to discuss Photo by Amy Sullivan with Stanton the process by which women were finally able to vote, nearly 100 years ago. “I would want my husband and children at the table to share in the fascinating conversation,” added Kristin. “This is an impossible question to answer because there are so many others I would want to join us, yet I would want this dinner party to be small so that we would be able to really listen to one another and enjoy each other’s company.” There have been many “pioneers” doing great things for great causes in our community. Kristin is one of these leaders. She recently made Diablo Magazine’s “40 Under 40” list … meaning, fortunately for the East Bay, yes, there is already so much good she has done, and she is just getting started. For more information about the East Bay Leadership Council, visit www.eastbayleadershipcouncil.com. EBLC is also active on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.


Marina Gavric

Marina Gavric Health & Fitness Training www.marinagavric.com

Age is Nothing But a Number Y

ou don’t spend 20 years in the fitness industry without learning a few things about numbers. A valuable term I learned early on, and attest to, is the age old adage that “Age is nothing but a number”. Each of us has a calendar age and a biological age. We’ve all seen this … Often I will see a 30 or 40 year-old who may look and feel considerably older than his or her actual age … or a 60 or 70 year-old who may look and feel considerably younger. How and why is that? Good health and well-being, so much of it is in our mind. Also our diet and exercise. It includes an attitude, our habits, our way of life. Healthy and vibrant, the good news is we don’t have to be stuck, where we might not be happy. The choice is ours and there are things we can do to improve. We should control our health rather our health control us. Health, fitness and wellness, no matter what our age, is a great recipe that works … and is everyone’s best reward. When and how did those years get stuck within layers of unhealthy fat, lining our frames? Can you pinpoint the time you became older than you really are? Think back. Was it when you were 12 trying to get out of gym class? Maybe in college when all your time was spent studying and socializing over noodles

and cocktails? Perhaps your fitness years were lost when the children began ruling your world or work sucked you in to the career abyss? Is it possible you just haven’t found your way out. Resolving when you began losing those years is key to getting them back. No matter what your current age or fitness level, taking action in changing your fitness age, to grow younger as you age, to become a fitter and wiser you, begins with some simple, clean life choices we can all make. Ask yourself: How old am I? How old do I feel? What is my fitness age? If I have lost years of vibrant life, when did I lose them? How can I get them back? And when do I begin taking action in the fight to take them back? Don’t let your “real” age rule or get the better of you. You can do it ... let your fitness age take the spotlight! … Stay Hydrated, Stay Focused, Stay Fit!


bayar eawomenmag. com

Ourgoali st oI ns pi r e,Empower& Suppor tWomeni nt heBayAr ea


A Special Conversation with Senator Dianne Feinstein on Developing Groundbreaking Skills As California’s senior Senator, Dianne Feinstein has built a reputation as an independent voice, working hard to find commonsense solutions to problems facing California and the nation. Since her election to the Senate in 1992, Senator Feinstein has built a significant record of legislative achievement across a wide range of issues including the environment, health, criminal justice and national security. Senator Feinstein’s career has been one of firsts. She was the first woman president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, the first woman mayor of San Francisco, the first woman elected Senator of California, the first woman member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, the first woman to chair the Senate Rules and Administration Committee, the first woman to chair the Senate Intelligence Committee and the first woman to serve as ranking member on the Senate Judiciary Committee. Q: What advice do you have for young women who want to pursue a career in politics? Senator Feinstein: I really think a woman must do her apprenticeship in this arena. Find out if you have the motivation and the staying power, because it truly is a difficult path. Become active in politics. Become an advocate. Speak out. Earn yourself those credentials. Work as a staffer in Washington or in state or local government. It’s very important that you know whether you’re suited for this job because it really does take commitment. Q: What is one skill you believe that women should have to facilitate a successful career in politics? Senator Feinstein: I think it’s vital for a woman to develop a portfolio of expertise that makes you stand out. Show that you can be effective, that you can be a constructive thinker. If you’re interested in government, get a job in government. Become a staffer or pick out an area of interest, commerce, environment, agriculture, whatever it is. Become an expert in an area that interests you and build up your reputation. That’s how you develop name recognition. Q: When will women in politics become the norm?? Senator Feinstein: A good friend of mine passed away a few years back by the name of Bob McCa-

rthy. When I was mayor, he told me a story about his children. He walked into his home and found his kids playing the game of mayor, with his young daughter sitting in a big chair with others around her. He asked the children why their sister was mayor, and one of his sons responded, “Dad, you know only a woman can be a mayor.” Things have changed. Women in politics IS the norm. Yes, we have a long way to go to get our numbers up to parity, but we’re here to stay. Q: What has been your greatest achievement? Senator Feinstein: I’ve had a lot of bills I’ve been proud of. I’d say the victory that will probably be around the longest is the 10-in-10 fuel economy bill to raise average gas mileage by 10 miles per gallon in 10 years. It was the first big climate change bill and directly responsible for President Obama’s move to raise gas mileage to above 50 mpg. The assault weapons ban early in my Senate career was also groundbreaking. Unfortunately, we had to include a sunset clause to get it passed, and by the time it came up for renewal, the NRA was well on its way to the behemoth it is today. And I’m also very proud of the report on CIA torture and the bill to ban the U.S. use of torture. Our investigation and study took six years, and that last year was a constant battle with the CIA and the White House, but we persisted and got it done.

If there’s one wish you could be granted to change the way congress works ... what would that be? Senator Feinstein: At this moment, I’m more worried about the White House than I am Congress. Donald Trump frightens me. He has access to the nuclear codes, and draws us closer to nuclear war. He has the power to embrace young people protected by DACA, but he turns his back on them. He has the bully pulpit to make a real difference on climate change,

but he pulls us out of the Paris climate agreement. He could help lead us to universal health coverage, but he supports bills that would make 30 million Americans uninsured. If there’s one thing I wish Congress would do, it’s stand up to Donald Trump and tell him, “No. This is not what America is all about. It’s not about lining your pockets, it’s about lifting all of us up.” That’s my wish.


A Special Conversation with Senator Dianne Feinstein on Developing Groundbreaking Skills As California’s senior Senator, Dianne Feinstein has built a reputation as an independent voice, working hard to find commonsense solutions to problems facing California and the nation. Since her election to the Senate in 1992, Senator Feinstein has built a significant record of legislative achievement across a wide range of issues including the environment, health, criminal justice and national security. Senator Feinstein’s career has been one of firsts. She was the first woman president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, the first woman mayor of San Francisco, the first woman elected Senator of California, the first woman member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, the first woman to chair the Senate Rules and Administration Committee, the first woman to chair the Senate Intelligence Committee and the first woman to serve as ranking member on the Senate Judiciary Committee. Q: What advice do you have for young women who want to pursue a career in politics? Senator Feinstein: I really think a woman must do her apprenticeship in this arena. Find out if you have the motivation and the staying power, because it truly is a difficult path. Become active in politics. Become an advocate. Speak out. Earn yourself those credentials. Work as a staffer in Washington or in state or local government. It’s very important that you know whether you’re suited for this job because it really does take commitment. Q: What is one skill you believe that women should have to facilitate a successful career in politics? Senator Feinstein: I think it’s vital for a woman to develop a portfolio of expertise that makes you stand out. Show that you can be effective, that you can be a constructive thinker. If you’re interested in government, get a job in government. Become a staffer or pick out an area of interest, commerce, environment, agriculture, whatever it is. Become an expert in an area that interests you and build up your reputation. That’s how you develop name recognition. Q: When will women in politics become the norm?? Senator Feinstein: A good friend of mine passed away a few years back by the name of Bob McCa-

rthy. When I was mayor, he told me a story about his children. He walked into his home and found his kids playing the game of mayor, with his young daughter sitting in a big chair with others around her. He asked the children why their sister was mayor, and one of his sons responded, “Dad, you know only a woman can be a mayor.” Things have changed. Women in politics IS the norm. Yes, we have a long way to go to get our numbers up to parity, but we’re here to stay. Q: What has been your greatest achievement? Senator Feinstein: I’ve had a lot of bills I’ve been proud of. I’d say the victory that will probably be around the longest is the 10-in-10 fuel economy bill to raise average gas mileage by 10 miles per gallon in 10 years. It was the first big climate change bill and directly responsible for President Obama’s move to raise gas mileage to above 50 mpg. The assault weapons ban early in my Senate career was also groundbreaking. Unfortunately, we had to include a sunset clause to get it passed, and by the time it came up for renewal, the NRA was well on its way to the behemoth it is today. And I’m also very proud of the report on CIA torture and the bill to ban the U.S. use of torture. Our investigation and study took six years, and that last year was a constant battle with the CIA and the White House, but we persisted and got it done.

If there’s one wish you could be granted to change the way congress works ... what would that be? Senator Feinstein: At this moment, I’m more worried about the White House than I am Congress. Donald Trump frightens me. He has access to the nuclear codes, and draws us closer to nuclear war. He has the power to embrace young people protected by DACA, but he turns his back on them. He has the bully pulpit to make a real difference on climate change,

but he pulls us out of the Paris climate agreement. He could help lead us to universal health coverage, but he supports bills that would make 30 million Americans uninsured. If there’s one thing I wish Congress would do, it’s stand up to Donald Trump and tell him, “No. This is not what America is all about. It’s not about lining your pockets, it’s about lifting all of us up.” That’s my wish.


The

Beautiful Wedding

By Julie Hart Conde

M

y passion is bringing peace, joy and beauty into people’s lives. I especially enjoy doing this for brides and grooms, who often find it overwhelming when planning their wedding. If the multitude of details involved in planning your wedding is starting to get you stressed, below are 8 ways to keep you at peace as you plan one of the most important days in your life. 1. Breathe: When things start to get overwhelming, breathe deep, take a look at your options and focus on the most pressing one.

2. Focus: Keep a notebook near you or use your notebook app to jot down the myriad of thoughts that distract you from the task at hand. This will help you to focus and give you reassurance that you won’t be forgetting something important. 3. Hit List: While the long list of details can be overwhelming, the key is to break your list down into smaller bites. Find a wedding timeline online and use that to break down your list into separate monthly plans. Then focus on just one month at a time. 4. Stress Reducer: If you find yourself getting stressed, talk with a friend or call your wedding planner. It’s great to get a different perspective and encouragement from those who love you and those who have the expertise.

Similar to the point above, keep focused on the positive and the possibilities. Look to your future and keep people around you who want your true happiness. 6. Vendors: When considering working with any vendor, read their contract thoroughly. Make note of the specifics and ask questions if anything isn’t clear. If something doesn’t fit in with what you originally had in mind, decide now if it is a deal breaker or if you are willing to compromise. 7. Possibilities: You don’t have to do a wedding a specific way, anything is possible. This day should be all about the two of you coming together and your guests should leave feeling like they saw who you are and what you like. 8. Wedding Style: Pinterest is a great tool that can help define your style. Once you have pinned a set of pictures that you love of the various elements of your wedding, look for common themes among your selections. Next, pick 3 to 5 words that describe your style. Moving forward, if you have a question about whether something is right for your wedding, you can go back to these words and decide if it fits in.

Remember, at the end of the day you will be married to the one that you love and the one who loves you: deeply, completely and unconditionally. No matter what elements you put into your day … take joy in this and savor the moments that bring you the most joy during the planning process.

Julie Hart Conde, Wedding and Event Planner, is the owner of Celebrations by Heart. www.celebrationsbyheart.com 5. Positivity: Surround yourself with positive people.


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