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Best of Kenya

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Best of Kenya

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Best of Kenya

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Best of Kenya

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Rejoice, Reflect, Rejuvenate

We did not plan it, but everything has worked wonderfully for us. In Best of Kenya Volume I, we introduced the country to the world. As we were doing this, the government’s Vision 2030 was being introduced. We admired the idea of transforming Kenya into a middle income country by 2030 and thought it deserves support all round. It is why we dedicated Best of Kenya Volume II to the Vision and to explaining what transforming Kenya into a newly industrialising nation portends for the people in terms of Information Technology, infrastructure, industry, education, investment and employment, to name but six areas of interest. It was a brilliant volume we put out. And then in 2011, amid the cacophony of the lead-up to the General Election that most thought would be held in 2012, it dawned on us that 2013 would be Kenya’s Golden Jubilee year. It is a once in a lifetime celebration; a milestone against which a people and their government can reflect on the past, present and future prospects. And that is what we do in Best of Kenya Volume III. We open with an alphabetical journey through Kenya’s political, economic and social landscapes. It is a light,

fast-paced and happy read. It is in part nostalgic, in part hilarious and in part just a plain record of what happened, why, when and where, and, with what results.

Publisher: Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited

And then as always we profile some of Kenya’s best institutions, with a view to taking a thriving, land-of-opportunity, openfor-business and investor-friendly Kenya to the world. It is a brave Kenya that is celebrating 50 years of independence. It is armed with a progressive three-year-old Constitution; it is fresh from a troublefree 2013 General Election with a lean and trim Cabinet to pursue its ambitious development plan.

Commercial Director: Simon Mugo

Former President Mwai Kibaki, speaking about the achievements of his tenure at one of his last functions, said the country was ready for takeoff. His successor, Mr Uhuru Kenyatta, is the launch pilot of Kenya’s flight into the prosperity envisioned in Vision 2030. His flight path is clearly marked out as Kenya embarks on its 51st year of existence. Welcome on board and fasten your seat belts. Please join the celebration and enjoy Kenya’s 50th birthday. And, to mark this occasion, Best of Kenya Volume III is your keepsake. Keep it!

BEST OF

KENYA Best of Kenya

4

International Group Publisher: Sven Boermeester

Business Manager: James Ombima Business Executives: Derrick Wanjawa, Joseph Ngina, Titus Omondi, Kabura Kimunya Accounts: Christine Wambui Editorial Director: Kwendo Opanga Editorial Team: Mohammed Warsama, Carol Kiiru, Ronald Bera, John Nyogot, Judy Kunyiha Photography: Yahya Mohammed, Kenya Tourism Board, Participating Firms Creative Direction: Raphael Mokora Administration: Josephine Wambui, Charles Kimakwa Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this volume. Neither Best of Kenya nor Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited can take responsibility for ant errors or omissions. All rights reserved. Copyright 2014. No part of this publication shall be reproduced, copied, transmitted, adopted or modified in any form or by any means. This publication shall not be stored in whole or in part or in any form in any retrieval system.

Contact details: Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited Vision Plaza, Ground Floor, Suite 19, Mombasa Road Telephone: +254 20 2525253/4/5 Cellphone: + 254 722401739, +254 722787345 Website: www.gvpedia.com, www.gvp.co.ke E-mail: info@gvp.co.ke

Best of Kenya

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Rejoice, Reflect, Rejuvenate

We did not plan it, but everything has worked wonderfully for us. In Best of Kenya Volume I, we introduced the country to the world. As we were doing this, the government’s Vision 2030 was being introduced. We admired the idea of transforming Kenya into a middle income country by 2030 and thought it deserves support all round. It is why we dedicated Best of Kenya Volume II to the Vision and to explaining what transforming Kenya into a newly industrialising nation portends for the people in terms of Information Technology, infrastructure, industry, education, investment and employment, to name but six areas of interest. It was a brilliant volume we put out. And then in 2011, amid the cacophony of the lead-up to the General Election that most thought would be held in 2012, it dawned on us that 2013 would be Kenya’s Golden Jubilee year. It is a once in a lifetime celebration; a milestone against which a people and their government can reflect on the past, present and future prospects. And that is what we do in Best of Kenya Volume III. We open with an alphabetical journey through Kenya’s political, economic and social landscapes. It is a light,

fast-paced and happy read. It is in part nostalgic, in part hilarious and in part just a plain record of what happened, why, when and where, and, with what results.

Publisher: Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited

And then as always we profile some of Kenya’s best institutions, with a view to taking a thriving, land-of-opportunity, openfor-business and investor-friendly Kenya to the world. It is a brave Kenya that is celebrating 50 years of independence. It is armed with a progressive three-year-old Constitution; it is fresh from a troublefree 2013 General Election with a lean and trim Cabinet to pursue its ambitious development plan.

Commercial Director: Simon Mugo

Former President Mwai Kibaki, speaking about the achievements of his tenure at one of his last functions, said the country was ready for takeoff. His successor, Mr Uhuru Kenyatta, is the launch pilot of Kenya’s flight into the prosperity envisioned in Vision 2030. His flight path is clearly marked out as Kenya embarks on its 51st year of existence. Welcome on board and fasten your seat belts. Please join the celebration and enjoy Kenya’s 50th birthday. And, to mark this occasion, Best of Kenya Volume III is your keepsake. Keep it!

BEST OF

KENYA Best of Kenya

4

International Group Publisher: Sven Boermeester

Business Manager: James Ombima Business Executives: Derrick Wanjawa, Joseph Ngina, Titus Omondi, Kabura Kimunya Accounts: Christine Wambui Editorial Director: Kwendo Opanga Editorial Team: Mohammed Warsama, Carol Kiiru, Ronald Bera, John Nyogot, Judy Kunyiha Photography: Yahya Mohammed, Kenya Tourism Board, Participating Firms Creative Direction: Raphael Mokora Administration: Josephine Wambui, Charles Kimakwa Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this volume. Neither Best of Kenya nor Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited can take responsibility for ant errors or omissions. All rights reserved. Copyright 2014. No part of this publication shall be reproduced, copied, transmitted, adopted or modified in any form or by any means. This publication shall not be stored in whole or in part or in any form in any retrieval system.

Contact details: Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited Vision Plaza, Ground Floor, Suite 19, Mombasa Road Telephone: +254 20 2525253/4/5 Cellphone: + 254 722401739, +254 722787345 Website: www.gvpedia.com, www.gvp.co.ke E-mail: info@gvp.co.ke

Best of Kenya

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Foreword from the Cabinet Secretary for East African Affairs, Commerce and Tourism The first volume of Best of Kenya, published in 2010, stood out for showcasing our country as a visitor and investor destination of repute. It celebrated Kenya as a country in which businesses thrive. Best of Kenya Vol. II, published a year later was dedicated to Vision 2030. The book examined Vision 2030 as the vehicle to transform Kenya into a middle income country. The first volume was inspired by the publishers, Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited, desire to play a role in hauling Kenya out of the gloom and despair occasioned by the post-election violence of 2007 and 2008. That was achieved. The second volume sought to not only lend support to Vision 2030, but also highlight the achievements of the Vision’s secretariat and, therefore, inspire the people of Kenya to have confidence in the brilliance of the blueprint. Best of Kenya Vol. III is, naturally, dedicated to our Golden Jubilee. It asks us to celebrate for this once in a lifetime occasion; to reflect because history has lessons and to rejuvenate in order to meet new struggles and challenges. It is an interesting read which captures the spirit of the nation at this time and still manages to set the right tone going forward. I find the alphabetical rendition of Kenya’s history quite innovative and friendly. For instance, in the alphabet of Kenya’s Golden Jubilee, A is for agriculture, athletics and our national anthem. The writers then explain the historical significance of the three and their importance going forward. In this unique rendition, T stands for our timeless tourism, our world class tea and trade and their significant contribution to the national development. The writers unpack all these themes in the book to great effect. The best aspect of this book is that it analyses the economy and highlights the link between the day to day activities of Kenyans and the larger economy. Investors are invited to come to Kenya not because businesses survive here, but because they thrive. The book contains stories of businesses and entrepreneurs who are living proof that Kenya is indeed one of the best investment destinations in the region. Kenya remains open for business as we embark on our next half century of existence. This openness is possible because Kenyans are hospitable, hard-working, driven, entrepreneurial and resilient people. I agree with the comment that Kenyans have reason to celebrate; but as we do, we must reflect carefully on the road we have travelled and learn the lessons we must and then recharge for the journey ahead. Lastly I must challenge the publisher to work on a Best of East Africa edition, integration is after all a big part of our future. Enjoy the book.

Phylis J Kandie (Mrs.) Cabinet Secretary for East African Affairs, Commerce and Tourism Republic of Kenya

Best of Kenya

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Best of Kenya

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Foreword from the Cabinet Secretary for East African Affairs, Commerce and Tourism The first volume of Best of Kenya, published in 2010, stood out for showcasing our country as a visitor and investor destination of repute. It celebrated Kenya as a country in which businesses thrive. Best of Kenya Vol. II, published a year later was dedicated to Vision 2030. The book examined Vision 2030 as the vehicle to transform Kenya into a middle income country. The first volume was inspired by the publishers, Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited, desire to play a role in hauling Kenya out of the gloom and despair occasioned by the post-election violence of 2007 and 2008. That was achieved. The second volume sought to not only lend support to Vision 2030, but also highlight the achievements of the Vision’s secretariat and, therefore, inspire the people of Kenya to have confidence in the brilliance of the blueprint. Best of Kenya Vol. III is, naturally, dedicated to our Golden Jubilee. It asks us to celebrate for this once in a lifetime occasion; to reflect because history has lessons and to rejuvenate in order to meet new struggles and challenges. It is an interesting read which captures the spirit of the nation at this time and still manages to set the right tone going forward. I find the alphabetical rendition of Kenya’s history quite innovative and friendly. For instance, in the alphabet of Kenya’s Golden Jubilee, A is for agriculture, athletics and our national anthem. The writers then explain the historical significance of the three and their importance going forward. In this unique rendition, T stands for our timeless tourism, our world class tea and trade and their significant contribution to the national development. The writers unpack all these themes in the book to great effect. The best aspect of this book is that it analyses the economy and highlights the link between the day to day activities of Kenyans and the larger economy. Investors are invited to come to Kenya not because businesses survive here, but because they thrive. The book contains stories of businesses and entrepreneurs who are living proof that Kenya is indeed one of the best investment destinations in the region. Kenya remains open for business as we embark on our next half century of existence. This openness is possible because Kenyans are hospitable, hard-working, driven, entrepreneurial and resilient people. I agree with the comment that Kenyans have reason to celebrate; but as we do, we must reflect carefully on the road we have travelled and learn the lessons we must and then recharge for the journey ahead. Lastly I must challenge the publisher to work on a Best of East Africa edition, integration is after all a big part of our future. Enjoy the book.

Phylis J Kandie (Mrs.) Cabinet Secretary for East African Affairs, Commerce and Tourism Republic of Kenya

Best of Kenya

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Best of Kenya

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Proudly African Boosting Trade, Development and Cultural relations across Africa.

and best practice in order to fi nd the right customers, partnerships and joint ventures - in order to grow alongside the continent’s indisputable economic potential. The initiative has an unstoppable magnetic presence with its ever growing country and sectoral window already in over 20 African states. We invite all leaders in business and government across Africa to showcase and integrate their visions and activities so as to promote inter-Africa trade, investment and technology transfer from around the globe. We also invite all Africa’s media, trade exhibitions, conferences and business chambers to use the platform to gain mutually benefi cial exposure. Fully unlocking Africa’s promise requires greater continentwide economic integration and inter-trade; such as in Europe, where integration has enabled the continent to become the world’s single biggest market. Integration and inter-trade is not only urgent, but also indispensable to unlock economies of scale and propel Africa’s competitiveness in the global economy, thus aligning the continent with the global fl ows of trade and fi nance as an equal partner.

Proudly African is an initiative of Global Village Africa which is a marketing and business platform geared towards showcasing and harmonising Africa’s development, trade and cultural diversity to a global audience. This is where the BEST OF AFRICA in business, government and non-profi t organisations unite, promoting their vision

Best of Kenya

8

Africa’s massive economic potential still lies largely untapped - but not for much longer. The world is coming and so is the dream of a more united Africa. We need to make sure we maximise on the growth for the benefi t of all of Africa and its people.

www.ProudlyAfrican.info


Proudly African Boosting Trade, Development and Cultural relations across Africa.

and best practice in order to fi nd the right customers, partnerships and joint ventures - in order to grow alongside the continent’s indisputable economic potential. The initiative has an unstoppable magnetic presence with its ever growing country and sectoral window already in over 20 African states. We invite all leaders in business and government across Africa to showcase and integrate their visions and activities so as to promote inter-Africa trade, investment and technology transfer from around the globe. We also invite all Africa’s media, trade exhibitions, conferences and business chambers to use the platform to gain mutually benefi cial exposure. Fully unlocking Africa’s promise requires greater continentwide economic integration and inter-trade; such as in Europe, where integration has enabled the continent to become the world’s single biggest market. Integration and inter-trade is not only urgent, but also indispensable to unlock economies of scale and propel Africa’s competitiveness in the global economy, thus aligning the continent with the global fl ows of trade and fi nance as an equal partner.

Proudly African is an initiative of Global Village Africa which is a marketing and business platform geared towards showcasing and harmonising Africa’s development, trade and cultural diversity to a global audience. This is where the BEST OF AFRICA in business, government and non-profi t organisations unite, promoting their vision

Best of Kenya

8

Africa’s massive economic potential still lies largely untapped - but not for much longer. The world is coming and so is the dream of a more united Africa. We need to make sure we maximise on the growth for the benefi t of all of Africa and its people.

www.ProudlyAfrican.info


THE BEST OF

AFRICA We brand and build the image of the world’s most exciting economic regions to affect a change in the perception of a continent, a nation, a city and its people by the rest of the world.

Global Village Africa is Africa’s premier platform for showcasing and networking governments, leading companies and entrepreneurs in business, tourism and lifestyle. The ‘Best of seriesmCPPLTDSJTQMZQSPÙMFMFBEJOH companies and innovators, as leaders within their genre. We celebrate the success of countries, individuals and companies with ‘the good news’ editorial and pictorial imagery in the highest quality print format available.

BRANDING A CONTINENT, A NATION, A CITY AND ITS PEOPLE

Best of Kenya

10

All books now available for download on your iPad with the new VIPedia app.

GVPedia.com Success, Sustainability and Culture


THE BEST OF

AFRICA We brand and build the image of the world’s most exciting economic regions to affect a change in the perception of a continent, a nation, a city and its people by the rest of the world.

Global Village Africa is Africa’s premier platform for showcasing and networking governments, leading companies and entrepreneurs in business, tourism and lifestyle. The ‘Best of seriesmCPPLTDSJTQMZQSPÙMFMFBEJOH companies and innovators, as leaders within their genre. We celebrate the success of countries, individuals and companies with ‘the good news’ editorial and pictorial imagery in the highest quality print format available.

BRANDING A CONTINENT, A NATION, A CITY AND ITS PEOPLE

Best of Kenya

10

All books now available for download on your iPad with the new VIPedia app.

GVPedia.com Success, Sustainability and Culture


Chapters 86 138 Chapter 12

166

Media and Marketing

210

University Education

Chapter 16

194

Education and Training

Chapter 15

188

Farming

Chapter 14

Chapter 8

132 156 Chapter 11

152 Chapter 10

Chapter 9 180 Chapter 13

Banking and Finance

Information and Communications Technology (ICT)

Water Management

Transport and Logistics

12

Health

Chapter 7

120 Chapter 6

96 Chapter 5 148

Energy

Shopping and Retail

Chapter 4

70

Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

Corporate Profiles

Best of Kenya

Hotels and Resorts

Chapter 3

64

Tourism

Chapter 2

Chapter 1

14

Kenya at a Glance

Best of Kenya

13


Chapters 86 138 Chapter 12

166

Media and Marketing

210

University Education

Chapter 16

194

Education and Training

Chapter 15

188

Farming

Chapter 14

Chapter 8

132 156 Chapter 11

152 Chapter 10

Chapter 9 180 Chapter 13

Banking and Finance

Information and Communications Technology (ICT)

Water Management

Transport and Logistics

12

Health

Chapter 7

120 Chapter 6

96 Chapter 5 148

Energy

Shopping and Retail

Chapter 4

70

Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

Corporate Profiles

Best of Kenya

Hotels and Resorts

Chapter 3

64

Tourism

Chapter 2

Chapter 1

14

Kenya at a Glance

Best of Kenya

13


CHAPTER 1 Kenya at a Glance

Best of Kenya

14

Best of Kenya

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CHAPTER 1 Kenya at a Glance

Best of Kenya

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Best of Kenya

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Kenya at a Glance Name

Republic of Kenya

Surface Area

582,646 km2

Population

39.5 million (2011 est.) with a population growth rate of 2.67 per cent Urban rate 32.3 per cent for 2000-2009 0-14 years: 43.1 per cent 15-64 years: 53.8 per cent 65 years and over: 3.1 per cent Life expectancy at birth: 57 years

Density

66.8 people per km2

Country Code

KE

Languages

Swahili is the national language. Swahili and English are official languages. In addition, Kenya’s 42 communities have their own languages.

Climate

Kenya lies on both sides of the Equator and enjoys a varied climate, ranging from tropical to temperate.

Religion

Christian (78 per cent), Muslim (10 per cent), indigenous African and other (12 per cent).

Time Zone

GMT +3

Administration

47 counties

Currency

1 Kenyan Shilling (KES) is equal to 100 cents KES 83: US$ 1 (February 2012)

GDP at current US$

US$ 32.2 billion (2011)

GDP per capita US$

US$ 794 (2011)

Standard & Poor’s Rating

B+

Legislature

Bicameral parliament comprising a National Assembly with 290 members, most elected by direct suffrage and a Senate with 68 members, most elected by counties for five-year terms.

Political system

Unitary State with multiparty democracy

Sources: UNCTAD, UNICEF, UNDP, World Bank, Government of Kenya, Standard & Poor’s.

Best of Kenya

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Best of Kenya

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Kenya at a Glance Name

Republic of Kenya

Surface Area

582,646 km2

Population

39.5 million (2011 est.) with a population growth rate of 2.67 per cent Urban rate 32.3 per cent for 2000-2009 0-14 years: 43.1 per cent 15-64 years: 53.8 per cent 65 years and over: 3.1 per cent Life expectancy at birth: 57 years

Density

66.8 people per km2

Country Code

KE

Languages

Swahili is the national language. Swahili and English are official languages. In addition, Kenya’s 42 communities have their own languages.

Climate

Kenya lies on both sides of the Equator and enjoys a varied climate, ranging from tropical to temperate.

Religion

Christian (78 per cent), Muslim (10 per cent), indigenous African and other (12 per cent).

Time Zone

GMT +3

Administration

47 counties

Currency

1 Kenyan Shilling (KES) is equal to 100 cents KES 83: US$ 1 (February 2012)

GDP at current US$

US$ 32.2 billion (2011)

GDP per capita US$

US$ 794 (2011)

Standard & Poor’s Rating

B+

Legislature

Bicameral parliament comprising a National Assembly with 290 members, most elected by direct suffrage and a Senate with 68 members, most elected by counties for five-year terms.

Political system

Unitary State with multiparty democracy

Sources: UNCTAD, UNICEF, UNDP, World Bank, Government of Kenya, Standard & Poor’s.

Best of Kenya

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Best of Kenya

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Jomo Kenyatta – 1963 to 1978 – the founding president and father of the nation

Daniel arap Moi – 1978 to 2002 – the longest serving president Kenya has had. He was Vice President from 1966 - 1978

Oginga Odinga – 1963 to 1966 Joseph Murumbi – 1967

Mwai Kibaki – 2002 to 2013 - bequeathed Kenya a new, progressive constitution. He was Vice President from 1978 - 1988

Josephat Karanja – 1988 to 1989

Uhuru Kenyatta – reigning – son of founding president and youngest holder of office

Prof George Saitoti – 1989 to 1998 and 1999 to 2001

Musalia Mudavadi - 2002

The constitution promulgated on August 27, 2010 introduced the office of Deputy President whose first holder became Mr William Ruto in 2013. Michael Wamalwa – 2003 to 2004

Moody Awori – 2004 to 2007

Kalonzo Musyoka – 2007 to 2013

Humphrey Slade – 1967 to 1969

Fred Mati – 1970 to 1987

Moses Keino – 1988 to 1991

(Slade served previously as Speaker of the Legislative Council (1963 to 1966) and Speaker of the House of Representatives (1963 to 1966).

18

Francis Kaparo – 1993 to 2008

The constitution of 2010 reintroduced the twin houses of Parliament which came into force in 2013. Mr Ekwe Ethuro is the first Speaker of the Senate. Kenneth Marende – 2008 to 2013

Best of Kenya

Jonathan Ng’eno – 1991 to 1992

Justin Muturi – current

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Jomo Kenyatta – 1963 to 1978 – the founding president and father of the nation

Daniel arap Moi – 1978 to 2002 – the longest serving president Kenya has had. He was Vice President from 1966 - 1978

Oginga Odinga – 1963 to 1966 Joseph Murumbi – 1967

Mwai Kibaki – 2002 to 2013 - bequeathed Kenya a new, progressive constitution. He was Vice President from 1978 - 1988

Josephat Karanja – 1988 to 1989

Uhuru Kenyatta – reigning – son of founding president and youngest holder of office

Prof George Saitoti – 1989 to 1998 and 1999 to 2001

Musalia Mudavadi - 2002

The constitution promulgated on August 27, 2010 introduced the office of Deputy President whose first holder became Mr William Ruto in 2013. Michael Wamalwa – 2003 to 2004

Moody Awori – 2004 to 2007

Kalonzo Musyoka – 2007 to 2013

Humphrey Slade – 1967 to 1969

Fred Mati – 1970 to 1987

Moses Keino – 1988 to 1991

(Slade served previously as Speaker of the Legislative Council (1963 to 1966) and Speaker of the House of Representatives (1963 to 1966).

18

Francis Kaparo – 1993 to 2008

The constitution of 2010 reintroduced the twin houses of Parliament which came into force in 2013. Mr Ekwe Ethuro is the first Speaker of the Senate. Kenneth Marende – 2008 to 2013

Best of Kenya

Jonathan Ng’eno – 1991 to 1992

Justin Muturi – current

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19


Action-filled Journey To Kenya’s Golden Jubilee

SMELL THE COFFEE: Kenya’s coffee is the best in the world and has been a leading foreign exchange earner for the country since 1963

Come with us on an alphabetical journey of introduction to Kenya as it celebrates its 50th anniversary. See the sights, experience the history, hear the sounds, take in the political economy and open your mind to the uniqueness of the heritage of splendour

A

is for agriculture, athletics and the National Anthem. All occupy important places in Kenya’s history and economy. Agriculture has since independence been the mainstay of the economy. Agriculture directly accounts for 26 per cent of the Gross Domestic Product and for 27 per cent indirectly through linkages with manufacturing, distribution and servicerelated sectors. Agriculture also accounts for 67 per cent of Kenya’s exports. Since independence in 1963, the government has always been committed to the development of agriculture, a trend that was set and made famous by founding President Jomo Kenyatta, with his 1964

Best of Kenya

20

clarion call to fellow Kenyans to return home and till the land. Kenya’s athletes have dominated the distance races since the 1960s, when they ran for the honour and pride of country and today, when they chase handsome monetary rewards. From 1968, Kipchoge Keino, the 1,500 metres sensation, was synonymous with Kenya. Kip, to one and all, beat the great American Jim Ryan by a considerable distance in 1,500 metres in the Mexico City Olympics to stun the world. He became the face of the young Kenyan nation. In the 1960s and 1970s mention of the name Kipchoge Keino invariably brought up the name Kenya. Kip blazed the trail and set the pace for the world-beating men and women who have since put the name of Kenya firmly on the global map of spectacular track performances in all regional, continental and global competitions, including the Olympics.

Through the years tea and coffee were Kenya’s leading foreign exchange earners before they were overtaken by tourism and horticulture has recently staked a claim to the accolade. Fruits and vegetables accounted for US$490 million of the export earnings in 2010, while fruits and vegetables brought in US$670 million in the same year. Kenya’s tea, coffee and cut flowers are the best in the world. But A would be incomplete without the National Anthem. It typifies Kenya as a heritage of splendour and Kenyans as aspiring to peace and unity. It wants plenty to be found within Kenya’s borders and justice to be the shield and defender of Kenyans. Similarly, it would be remiss not to point out that while Kenya is world-famous for the prowess of its athletes, the country’s leading spectator sport is football, which, however, is yet to reach the level where it

Best of Kenya

21


Action-filled Journey To Kenya’s Golden Jubilee

SMELL THE COFFEE: Kenya’s coffee is the best in the world and has been a leading foreign exchange earner for the country since 1963

Come with us on an alphabetical journey of introduction to Kenya as it celebrates its 50th anniversary. See the sights, experience the history, hear the sounds, take in the political economy and open your mind to the uniqueness of the heritage of splendour

A

is for agriculture, athletics and the National Anthem. All occupy important places in Kenya’s history and economy. Agriculture has since independence been the mainstay of the economy. Agriculture directly accounts for 26 per cent of the Gross Domestic Product and for 27 per cent indirectly through linkages with manufacturing, distribution and servicerelated sectors. Agriculture also accounts for 67 per cent of Kenya’s exports. Since independence in 1963, the government has always been committed to the development of agriculture, a trend that was set and made famous by founding President Jomo Kenyatta, with his 1964

Best of Kenya

20

clarion call to fellow Kenyans to return home and till the land. Kenya’s athletes have dominated the distance races since the 1960s, when they ran for the honour and pride of country and today, when they chase handsome monetary rewards. From 1968, Kipchoge Keino, the 1,500 metres sensation, was synonymous with Kenya. Kip, to one and all, beat the great American Jim Ryan by a considerable distance in 1,500 metres in the Mexico City Olympics to stun the world. He became the face of the young Kenyan nation. In the 1960s and 1970s mention of the name Kipchoge Keino invariably brought up the name Kenya. Kip blazed the trail and set the pace for the world-beating men and women who have since put the name of Kenya firmly on the global map of spectacular track performances in all regional, continental and global competitions, including the Olympics.

Through the years tea and coffee were Kenya’s leading foreign exchange earners before they were overtaken by tourism and horticulture has recently staked a claim to the accolade. Fruits and vegetables accounted for US$490 million of the export earnings in 2010, while fruits and vegetables brought in US$670 million in the same year. Kenya’s tea, coffee and cut flowers are the best in the world. But A would be incomplete without the National Anthem. It typifies Kenya as a heritage of splendour and Kenyans as aspiring to peace and unity. It wants plenty to be found within Kenya’s borders and justice to be the shield and defender of Kenyans. Similarly, it would be remiss not to point out that while Kenya is world-famous for the prowess of its athletes, the country’s leading spectator sport is football, which, however, is yet to reach the level where it

Best of Kenya

21


can rival athletics for local, let alone global recognition.

B

is for budget, otherwise known as the Financial Statement, which has since independence been presented to the Parliament by the Minister for Finance every June. The new basic law has changed that and now it is presented by the un-elected Cabinet Secretary for the National Treasury. The Finance docket is regarded as a plum posting and the holder is often envied by Cabinet colleagues. Independence Kenya’s first Minister for Finance was the late James Gichuru. Former President Mwai Kibaki and President Uhuru Kenyatta are also former Finance ministers. Two former Finance ministers, Musalia Mudavadi (1993 to 1997) and Simeon Nyachae (1988 to 1999) unsuccessfully ran for the presidency in 2002 (Nyachae) and 2013 (Mudavadi).

LANCASTER CONFERENCES: The result of the Lancaster House negotiations of 1960, 1962 and 1963 was a federal-style or regional constitution favoured by the Kenya African Democratic Union. In power in 1963, the centralist Kenya African National Union changed the constitution

The Budget has always been followed closely. All Kenyans want to know about taxes, monetary allocations to government ministries and counties and, the prices of essential commodities. Gichuru’s (independent Kenya’s first) Budget for 1964 to 1965, delivered on June 16, sought to raise Sh298 million (Kenya pounds14.9 million) for development expenditure and Sh464 million (Kenya pounds23.2 million) in recurrent expenditure. That totaled Sh762 million. The Jubilee year (2013) Budget hit the Sh1 trillion mark. But back then a bottle of soda cost 5 cents and a copy of the Daily Nation, 30 cents. Of course, the population of Kenya was just above 9 million.

The supreme law, an absolute reminder of Kenya’s commitment to the rule of law, also has a much-acclaimed Bill of Rights. And it also changed the way the government is structured, limiting Cabinet positions to 22 and requiring that they be non-politicians. The history of constitution making in Kenya goes back to the pre-independence days when politicians converged on London for the Lancaster conference in 1960 under the aegis of the Kenya African National Union (Kanu) and the Kenya African Democratic

Best of Kenya

22

Every Kenyan wants his or her child to have the best education possible. When it comes to the education of their children, Kenyans draw the line at quality. Primary school education was made free in 2003.

Develop, Kenya absolutely must. But Kenyans agree that it is only an expanding and steadily growing economy that will guarantee all-round development and look to the government to put in place policies and measures to ensure that the GDP grows at an average seven per cent per year to make this goal attainable.

At independence, President Jomo Kenyatta made it clear that the new government was committed to eradicating ignorance and illiteracy. The children in school were told they were the leaders of tomorrow. Among the aims of education was the development of manpower for the young nation.

It is a commitment the Jubilee government has made because a growing economy will create jobs, especially for the young people, who are hardest hit by unemployment. A Sh6 billion fund set up in 2013 is aimed at creating jobs for youth and women and helping expand the economy.

C

is for the popular progressive Constitution, which was promulgated in August, 2010 as the supreme law of the land. The Constitution ushered in devolution of governance to give local people a chance to participate in decision-making regarding the way they are governed and how their resources are put to use for their development.

won or lost on the theme of development. In the one-party era the terms development conscious and enemies of development made and killed political careers in the twinkling of an eye.

Union (Kadu), which were formed in the same year. The former advocated a centralised administration and was dominated by the numerically stronger Kikuyu and Luo. Kadu emerged principally because its leading lights feared that a centralised administration and the dominance of the Kikuyu and Luo in Kanu would marginalise the country’s smaller communities. Kadu pitched for a federalist or devolved administration then known as majimbo (regionalism). At the dawn of independence, however, Kanu systematically neutered and killed

THE SUPREME LAW: Kenya promulgated a new, popular and progressive constitution in 2010. Devolution and the Bill of Rights have been lauded as its stars

the federalist element in the independence Constitution and through cajoling and arm-twisting saw Kadu dissolve itself in 1964. The result was Kenya became a de facto single-party state, with power concentrated, and entrenched in the presidency. The imperial presidency was completed in 1982, when, thanks to a failed military coup, Parliament changed the Constitution

and turned Kenya into a de jure one party state. A string of amendments left the independence Constitution a completely tattered patchwork and, ushered in a 20year-long campaign for a new one. Devolution, representing political participation and inclusion in decisionmaking regarding governance and use of resources, at the local level and the Bill of Rights, are considered the stars of the Constitution.

D

is for development for it is what every individual, county government and, indeed, the country, as a whole, craves. Elections are fought and

E

stands for economy and education. Kenya’s is the largest economy in eastern Africa, with a GDP of Sh2.6 trillion (US$32.5 billion) but that may be the case of a giant standing among dwarfs. And, the oft-repeated question is for how long Kenya will be the giant because Uganda and Rwanda, for example, are rising fast and Tanzania is challenging Kenya’s claim to being the gateway to the region. Kenya grew by about six per cent between 1964 and 1980, and by 4.1 per cent between 1980 and 1990, followed by a period of decline to about 1.9 per cent between 1990 and 2002. From 2003, the scenario changed dramatically to record a 7.1 per cent growth in 2007.

Attainment of elimu (education) and the growth of it always was a pet topic for the founding President. His successor, President Daniel arap Moi, started the great expansion of university education. President Kibaki introduced free primary school education. In the digital age, Kenya’s primary school pupils will have laptops in 2014, thanks to a Jubilee government edict. Kenya has a well-educated pool of employable young people, equipped with varied skills and training that qualify them to work anywhere in the world. In 2013, some 50,000 freshmen and women joined the public universities. Kenya had 27 universities in 2012, but this figure went up towards the end of the year when outgoing President Kibaki commissioned 15 more. Kenya’s premier university, the University of Nairobi (UoN), opened in 1970, and in 2013, had an undergraduate student population of 63,846, an annual research kitty of Sh3 billion and 2,052 academic staff. In the July, 2013 Webometric ranking, UoN was in the14th position in Africa.

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can rival athletics for local, let alone global recognition.

B

is for budget, otherwise known as the Financial Statement, which has since independence been presented to the Parliament by the Minister for Finance every June. The new basic law has changed that and now it is presented by the un-elected Cabinet Secretary for the National Treasury. The Finance docket is regarded as a plum posting and the holder is often envied by Cabinet colleagues. Independence Kenya’s first Minister for Finance was the late James Gichuru. Former President Mwai Kibaki and President Uhuru Kenyatta are also former Finance ministers. Two former Finance ministers, Musalia Mudavadi (1993 to 1997) and Simeon Nyachae (1988 to 1999) unsuccessfully ran for the presidency in 2002 (Nyachae) and 2013 (Mudavadi).

LANCASTER CONFERENCES: The result of the Lancaster House negotiations of 1960, 1962 and 1963 was a federal-style or regional constitution favoured by the Kenya African Democratic Union. In power in 1963, the centralist Kenya African National Union changed the constitution

The Budget has always been followed closely. All Kenyans want to know about taxes, monetary allocations to government ministries and counties and, the prices of essential commodities. Gichuru’s (independent Kenya’s first) Budget for 1964 to 1965, delivered on June 16, sought to raise Sh298 million (Kenya pounds14.9 million) for development expenditure and Sh464 million (Kenya pounds23.2 million) in recurrent expenditure. That totaled Sh762 million. The Jubilee year (2013) Budget hit the Sh1 trillion mark. But back then a bottle of soda cost 5 cents and a copy of the Daily Nation, 30 cents. Of course, the population of Kenya was just above 9 million.

The supreme law, an absolute reminder of Kenya’s commitment to the rule of law, also has a much-acclaimed Bill of Rights. And it also changed the way the government is structured, limiting Cabinet positions to 22 and requiring that they be non-politicians. The history of constitution making in Kenya goes back to the pre-independence days when politicians converged on London for the Lancaster conference in 1960 under the aegis of the Kenya African National Union (Kanu) and the Kenya African Democratic

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Every Kenyan wants his or her child to have the best education possible. When it comes to the education of their children, Kenyans draw the line at quality. Primary school education was made free in 2003.

Develop, Kenya absolutely must. But Kenyans agree that it is only an expanding and steadily growing economy that will guarantee all-round development and look to the government to put in place policies and measures to ensure that the GDP grows at an average seven per cent per year to make this goal attainable.

At independence, President Jomo Kenyatta made it clear that the new government was committed to eradicating ignorance and illiteracy. The children in school were told they were the leaders of tomorrow. Among the aims of education was the development of manpower for the young nation.

It is a commitment the Jubilee government has made because a growing economy will create jobs, especially for the young people, who are hardest hit by unemployment. A Sh6 billion fund set up in 2013 is aimed at creating jobs for youth and women and helping expand the economy.

C

is for the popular progressive Constitution, which was promulgated in August, 2010 as the supreme law of the land. The Constitution ushered in devolution of governance to give local people a chance to participate in decision-making regarding the way they are governed and how their resources are put to use for their development.

won or lost on the theme of development. In the one-party era the terms development conscious and enemies of development made and killed political careers in the twinkling of an eye.

Union (Kadu), which were formed in the same year. The former advocated a centralised administration and was dominated by the numerically stronger Kikuyu and Luo. Kadu emerged principally because its leading lights feared that a centralised administration and the dominance of the Kikuyu and Luo in Kanu would marginalise the country’s smaller communities. Kadu pitched for a federalist or devolved administration then known as majimbo (regionalism). At the dawn of independence, however, Kanu systematically neutered and killed

THE SUPREME LAW: Kenya promulgated a new, popular and progressive constitution in 2010. Devolution and the Bill of Rights have been lauded as its stars

the federalist element in the independence Constitution and through cajoling and arm-twisting saw Kadu dissolve itself in 1964. The result was Kenya became a de facto single-party state, with power concentrated, and entrenched in the presidency. The imperial presidency was completed in 1982, when, thanks to a failed military coup, Parliament changed the Constitution

and turned Kenya into a de jure one party state. A string of amendments left the independence Constitution a completely tattered patchwork and, ushered in a 20year-long campaign for a new one. Devolution, representing political participation and inclusion in decisionmaking regarding governance and use of resources, at the local level and the Bill of Rights, are considered the stars of the Constitution.

D

is for development for it is what every individual, county government and, indeed, the country, as a whole, craves. Elections are fought and

E

stands for economy and education. Kenya’s is the largest economy in eastern Africa, with a GDP of Sh2.6 trillion (US$32.5 billion) but that may be the case of a giant standing among dwarfs. And, the oft-repeated question is for how long Kenya will be the giant because Uganda and Rwanda, for example, are rising fast and Tanzania is challenging Kenya’s claim to being the gateway to the region. Kenya grew by about six per cent between 1964 and 1980, and by 4.1 per cent between 1980 and 1990, followed by a period of decline to about 1.9 per cent between 1990 and 2002. From 2003, the scenario changed dramatically to record a 7.1 per cent growth in 2007.

Attainment of elimu (education) and the growth of it always was a pet topic for the founding President. His successor, President Daniel arap Moi, started the great expansion of university education. President Kibaki introduced free primary school education. In the digital age, Kenya’s primary school pupils will have laptops in 2014, thanks to a Jubilee government edict. Kenya has a well-educated pool of employable young people, equipped with varied skills and training that qualify them to work anywhere in the world. In 2013, some 50,000 freshmen and women joined the public universities. Kenya had 27 universities in 2012, but this figure went up towards the end of the year when outgoing President Kibaki commissioned 15 more. Kenya’s premier university, the University of Nairobi (UoN), opened in 1970, and in 2013, had an undergraduate student population of 63,846, an annual research kitty of Sh3 billion and 2,052 academic staff. In the July, 2013 Webometric ranking, UoN was in the14th position in Africa.

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Kenya has since independence pursued a mixed and free market economy. In the 1960s, the economy was the political background against which competing interests represented by Mzee Kenyatta (capitalist) and his first Vice-President Jaramogi Oginga Odinga (socialist) fought their political wars. The socialists were effectively killed off in 1969 when the government proscribed Odinga’s Kenya People’s Union (KPU) and detained its top brass.

F

is for foreign affairs (diplomacy) and that hackneyed phrase, foreign ideology. The latter is an expression and idea so beloved of Kenya’s political class that it was uttered by a newly elected MP in the middle of the Golden Jubilee year. Though Kenya’s politics in the 1960s was characterised by the East versus West ideological divide and epitomised by the tussles between Kenyatta and Odinga, officially, Nairobi’s foreign policy was predicated on non-alignment. Indeed, Kenya was a member of the Non-Aligned Movement.

LIFE’S GOOD THINGS ARE FREE: In 2003, the government introduced universal free primary school education (FPE), which saw enrolment go up by 1 million. Pupils and students were at independence told they were leaders of tomorrow

The UN brings the world to Nairobi and Kenya’s 51 missions overseas, with their multiple accreditations bring the total to 100, taking Nairobi’s diplomacy to the world. Kenya plays host to 73 embassies and high commissions and two consulates in Mombasa.

THE WORLD IN NAIROBI: Officially, it is called the UN office in Nairobi, but local people know it simply as the UN. The UN brings the world’s diplomats to Kenya’s capital which is proud to host the only such facility of the global body outside the developed world

Kenya’s first woman Cabinet minister was Mrs Nyiva Mwendwa, widow of Kenya’s first African Chief Justice Kitili Mwendwa. She was appointed to the Cabinet by President Moi in his government of 1993 to 1997.

The following are the guiding principles of Kenya’s foreign policy:

• Peaceful co-existence with neighbours; • Resolution of conflicts by peaceful

The first Kenyan woman to vie for the presidency was Mrs Charity Ngilu, in 1997, and the second was Ms Martha Karua, in 2013. Mrs Margaret Kenyatta was Nairobi’s first woman mayor between 1970 and 1976.

means;

• Promotion of regionalism; • Respect for equality; • Sovereignty and territorial integrity of

THE GREAT COURT: The University of Nairobi, Kenya’s premier university, opened its doors to students in 1970. At independence, a key objective of the education system was the development of manpower for the young Kenyan nation

states;

• Respect for international norms, • •

customs and law; Adherence to the principle of nonalignment; and Justice and equity in conduct of international relations.

Kenyatta used to excoriate individuals he said wanalambalamba matako ya wabeberu (licking the backsides of the worst colonialists). President Moi was famous for asking Kenyans to look to themselves for homegrown solutions to their challenges and not invest trust in wazungu (Europeans) or watu weupe (white people). Kibaki was not left out in dishing out presidential fiat, calling somebody pumbavu (foolish),

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mavi ya kuku (excrement of chicken) and bure kabisa (completely useless) at public functions. Throughout the 1970s whenever University of Nairobi students boycotted classes, rioted or made demands of the political or educational establishment, the retort would be predictable: they should desist from foreign ideologies and concentrate on their studies because they were being educated at a great cost to taxpayers. The same was the case in the political arena in the 80s. Those who would air views contrary to Kanu’s, which was run by a clique, would be typified as pandering to foreign ideologies.

Were it not often used to profile those with dissenting views as unpatriotic, one would easily have thought it was a call to fidelity to Kenya and things Kenyan.

The late Prof Wangare Maathai was Kenya’s first woman holder of a PhD and, of course, remains so far the only Kenyan to win a Nobel price, largely because of her work in conservation of the environment. She was in 2002 elected MP for Tetu in Nyeri County.

G

is for gender, women, in particular, and the government. The Constitution of Kenya has been hailed as recognising, entrenching and protecting the rights of women as equal citizens, rights to property and inheritance, leadership and employment. The Constitution has entrenched affirmative action for women, especially in leadership, where Kenyans elect 47 women representatives to Parliament. However, no woman was elected Governor or Senator in the General Election of 2013.

ACCREDITED: Kenya’s heads of state from Kenyatta, Moi, Kibaki and now Uhuru, have always been on hand to welcome newly-appointed envoys to Kenya and offer a word of advice to them individually or in a group

The Constitution is also clear that no single gender shall hold two thirds of the positions or membership of commissions, Parliament or jobs in parastatals. However, the increased number of women

MPs are following in the footsteps of pioneering Grace Onyango, who was Kenya’s first elected woman MP in 1969. She was the MP for Kisumu Town whose mayor she also was in 1965.

Kenyans loathed the colonial government because it took away their every freedom and right and dehumanised them. They warmly welcomed the independence government, but soon came to hate politics, especially revolving around tribe and unequal distribution of what came to be called matunda ya uhuru (fruits of freedom). Straight from independence it became clear

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Kenya has since independence pursued a mixed and free market economy. In the 1960s, the economy was the political background against which competing interests represented by Mzee Kenyatta (capitalist) and his first Vice-President Jaramogi Oginga Odinga (socialist) fought their political wars. The socialists were effectively killed off in 1969 when the government proscribed Odinga’s Kenya People’s Union (KPU) and detained its top brass.

F

is for foreign affairs (diplomacy) and that hackneyed phrase, foreign ideology. The latter is an expression and idea so beloved of Kenya’s political class that it was uttered by a newly elected MP in the middle of the Golden Jubilee year. Though Kenya’s politics in the 1960s was characterised by the East versus West ideological divide and epitomised by the tussles between Kenyatta and Odinga, officially, Nairobi’s foreign policy was predicated on non-alignment. Indeed, Kenya was a member of the Non-Aligned Movement.

LIFE’S GOOD THINGS ARE FREE: In 2003, the government introduced universal free primary school education (FPE), which saw enrolment go up by 1 million. Pupils and students were at independence told they were leaders of tomorrow

The UN brings the world to Nairobi and Kenya’s 51 missions overseas, with their multiple accreditations bring the total to 100, taking Nairobi’s diplomacy to the world. Kenya plays host to 73 embassies and high commissions and two consulates in Mombasa.

THE WORLD IN NAIROBI: Officially, it is called the UN office in Nairobi, but local people know it simply as the UN. The UN brings the world’s diplomats to Kenya’s capital which is proud to host the only such facility of the global body outside the developed world

Kenya’s first woman Cabinet minister was Mrs Nyiva Mwendwa, widow of Kenya’s first African Chief Justice Kitili Mwendwa. She was appointed to the Cabinet by President Moi in his government of 1993 to 1997.

The following are the guiding principles of Kenya’s foreign policy:

• Peaceful co-existence with neighbours; • Resolution of conflicts by peaceful

The first Kenyan woman to vie for the presidency was Mrs Charity Ngilu, in 1997, and the second was Ms Martha Karua, in 2013. Mrs Margaret Kenyatta was Nairobi’s first woman mayor between 1970 and 1976.

means;

• Promotion of regionalism; • Respect for equality; • Sovereignty and territorial integrity of

THE GREAT COURT: The University of Nairobi, Kenya’s premier university, opened its doors to students in 1970. At independence, a key objective of the education system was the development of manpower for the young Kenyan nation

states;

• Respect for international norms, • •

customs and law; Adherence to the principle of nonalignment; and Justice and equity in conduct of international relations.

Kenyatta used to excoriate individuals he said wanalambalamba matako ya wabeberu (licking the backsides of the worst colonialists). President Moi was famous for asking Kenyans to look to themselves for homegrown solutions to their challenges and not invest trust in wazungu (Europeans) or watu weupe (white people). Kibaki was not left out in dishing out presidential fiat, calling somebody pumbavu (foolish),

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mavi ya kuku (excrement of chicken) and bure kabisa (completely useless) at public functions. Throughout the 1970s whenever University of Nairobi students boycotted classes, rioted or made demands of the political or educational establishment, the retort would be predictable: they should desist from foreign ideologies and concentrate on their studies because they were being educated at a great cost to taxpayers. The same was the case in the political arena in the 80s. Those who would air views contrary to Kanu’s, which was run by a clique, would be typified as pandering to foreign ideologies.

Were it not often used to profile those with dissenting views as unpatriotic, one would easily have thought it was a call to fidelity to Kenya and things Kenyan.

The late Prof Wangare Maathai was Kenya’s first woman holder of a PhD and, of course, remains so far the only Kenyan to win a Nobel price, largely because of her work in conservation of the environment. She was in 2002 elected MP for Tetu in Nyeri County.

G

is for gender, women, in particular, and the government. The Constitution of Kenya has been hailed as recognising, entrenching and protecting the rights of women as equal citizens, rights to property and inheritance, leadership and employment. The Constitution has entrenched affirmative action for women, especially in leadership, where Kenyans elect 47 women representatives to Parliament. However, no woman was elected Governor or Senator in the General Election of 2013.

ACCREDITED: Kenya’s heads of state from Kenyatta, Moi, Kibaki and now Uhuru, have always been on hand to welcome newly-appointed envoys to Kenya and offer a word of advice to them individually or in a group

The Constitution is also clear that no single gender shall hold two thirds of the positions or membership of commissions, Parliament or jobs in parastatals. However, the increased number of women

MPs are following in the footsteps of pioneering Grace Onyango, who was Kenya’s first elected woman MP in 1969. She was the MP for Kisumu Town whose mayor she also was in 1965.

Kenyans loathed the colonial government because it took away their every freedom and right and dehumanised them. They warmly welcomed the independence government, but soon came to hate politics, especially revolving around tribe and unequal distribution of what came to be called matunda ya uhuru (fruits of freedom). Straight from independence it became clear

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NYIVA MWENDWA: Kenya’s first woman cabinet minister, she was appointed by President Moi in his 1993 to 1997 government

CHARITY NGILU: After serving as MP for five years, she became the first Kenyan woman to run for the presidency in 1997

that the centre, the state, in a word, serikali (government) was the place to be in order to get maendeleo (progress) for self, region and tribe. Those who fell out with Kenyatta and Moi were hounded out of the political mainstream and government. Government has always been ubiquitous, which is why when he joined the opposition in 1992, Kibaki would accuse Kanu of turning government into a big club with which to beat up opponents. It is why the ordinary people always look to the government to assist them (itusaidie) in the face of any and all natural or man-made misfortunes. But, of course, it was Kenyatta, who famously said that the word was not serikali (government), but siri kali (top secret). So, ordinary people were not even supposed to know what it was doing. Moi warned all and sundry not to ever cheza (play around or trifle with) serikali. Kenyatta’s first Cabinet was the result of a delicate balancing act between regional, tribal and economic demands. It was made up of 17 ministers, he excluded. Moi had large cabinets and the Grand Coalition Government of 2007 to 2013 was made up 43 ministers cobbled together to address two competing sides that both claimed to have won the December 2007 presidential election. The Constitution has since fixed the number of Cabinet Secretaries at 22.

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WANGARI MAATHAI: Kenya’s first woman holder of a PhD and the first and so far only Nobel laureate

H

is health and harambee. Health was one of the three urgent areas the Kanu government that founded the nation set out to address. The politicians of those days, popularising the government across the country, said it was committed to eradicating ugonjwa na maradhi (disease and or ill health), umasikini (poverty) and ujinga (illiteracy).

GRACE ONYANGO: She was the first woman mayor of her native Kisumu town and then became its first elected woman MP in 1969

MARGARET KENYATTA: The founding president’s daughter was first woman mayor of Nairobi

AMINA MOHAMMED: The first Kenyan woman to head the Ministry of Foreign Affairs as Cabinet Secretary in 2013

SALLY KOSGEI: Was Kenya’s first woman High Commissioner to the Court of Saint James in London in 1986. She was also the first woman head of the Public Service from 2001 to 2003

EFFIE OWUOR: A graduate of the University of Dar-es-Salaam, she became Kenya’s first woman judge in 1981. She was also the first woman prosecutor, magistrate and Court of Appeal judge. She was the first Kenyan member of the International Criminal Court

BIGGER IS BETTER: The Kenyatta National Hospital is the biggest referral hospital in eastern Africa. As the name suggests it was named after the founding president whose government committed itself to eradicating, disease, ignorance and poverty

Kenya’s public health facilities attract large numbers of people because they charge relatively lower fees that their private counterparts. The Kenyatta National Hospital in Nairobi is the biggest referral facility in eastern Africa. The Rift Valley region, also the most expansive, boasts 1,732 health facilities, Central region with 1,251 comes second followed by Eastern with 1,106, Nyanza 773, Coast 770, Western 426, Nairobi 406 and North Eastern 232. The previous eight provinces have been replaced by 47 counties as administrative units. Private hospitals have been growing in number and, like The Nairobi Hospital, positioning themselves for what has come to be called medical tourism. The first popular declaration of the Jubilee government made maternal care in public hospitals free. Harambee is to pull together or pool your resources for co-operative growth. It is an enduring legacy Kenyatta bequeathed Kenyans. It has been at the heart of many a

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NYIVA MWENDWA: Kenya’s first woman cabinet minister, she was appointed by President Moi in his 1993 to 1997 government

CHARITY NGILU: After serving as MP for five years, she became the first Kenyan woman to run for the presidency in 1997

that the centre, the state, in a word, serikali (government) was the place to be in order to get maendeleo (progress) for self, region and tribe. Those who fell out with Kenyatta and Moi were hounded out of the political mainstream and government. Government has always been ubiquitous, which is why when he joined the opposition in 1992, Kibaki would accuse Kanu of turning government into a big club with which to beat up opponents. It is why the ordinary people always look to the government to assist them (itusaidie) in the face of any and all natural or man-made misfortunes. But, of course, it was Kenyatta, who famously said that the word was not serikali (government), but siri kali (top secret). So, ordinary people were not even supposed to know what it was doing. Moi warned all and sundry not to ever cheza (play around or trifle with) serikali. Kenyatta’s first Cabinet was the result of a delicate balancing act between regional, tribal and economic demands. It was made up of 17 ministers, he excluded. Moi had large cabinets and the Grand Coalition Government of 2007 to 2013 was made up 43 ministers cobbled together to address two competing sides that both claimed to have won the December 2007 presidential election. The Constitution has since fixed the number of Cabinet Secretaries at 22.

Best of Kenya

26

WANGARI MAATHAI: Kenya’s first woman holder of a PhD and the first and so far only Nobel laureate

H

is health and harambee. Health was one of the three urgent areas the Kanu government that founded the nation set out to address. The politicians of those days, popularising the government across the country, said it was committed to eradicating ugonjwa na maradhi (disease and or ill health), umasikini (poverty) and ujinga (illiteracy).

GRACE ONYANGO: She was the first woman mayor of her native Kisumu town and then became its first elected woman MP in 1969

MARGARET KENYATTA: The founding president’s daughter was first woman mayor of Nairobi

AMINA MOHAMMED: The first Kenyan woman to head the Ministry of Foreign Affairs as Cabinet Secretary in 2013

SALLY KOSGEI: Was Kenya’s first woman High Commissioner to the Court of Saint James in London in 1986. She was also the first woman head of the Public Service from 2001 to 2003

EFFIE OWUOR: A graduate of the University of Dar-es-Salaam, she became Kenya’s first woman judge in 1981. She was also the first woman prosecutor, magistrate and Court of Appeal judge. She was the first Kenyan member of the International Criminal Court

BIGGER IS BETTER: The Kenyatta National Hospital is the biggest referral hospital in eastern Africa. As the name suggests it was named after the founding president whose government committed itself to eradicating, disease, ignorance and poverty

Kenya’s public health facilities attract large numbers of people because they charge relatively lower fees that their private counterparts. The Kenyatta National Hospital in Nairobi is the biggest referral facility in eastern Africa. The Rift Valley region, also the most expansive, boasts 1,732 health facilities, Central region with 1,251 comes second followed by Eastern with 1,106, Nyanza 773, Coast 770, Western 426, Nairobi 406 and North Eastern 232. The previous eight provinces have been replaced by 47 counties as administrative units. Private hospitals have been growing in number and, like The Nairobi Hospital, positioning themselves for what has come to be called medical tourism. The first popular declaration of the Jubilee government made maternal care in public hospitals free. Harambee is to pull together or pool your resources for co-operative growth. It is an enduring legacy Kenyatta bequeathed Kenyans. It has been at the heart of many a

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development project, drive to raise money to send Kenyans abroad to study, pay hospital fees or build a school or church.

they are part of Kenya because, for a long time, they have felt marginalised, neglected and isolated.

Harambee epitomises the belief that all is possible when Kenyans unite and pull together to realise a common cause. Harambee is volunteerism at its best. But in the 1980s and 1990s, especially, the spirit was abused as coercion set in and unscrupulous people used it for personal and political gain.

Infrastructural development is crucial in the opening up of northern Kenya through the development of the Lamu Port, and the road network to link it to South Sudan and Ethiopia, otherwise called the Northern Corridor.

A 1970s picture of Kenyatta urging on his security detail, government officials and ordinary people to push his limousine out of a muddy patch for a long time brought the word harambee to the mouths of many a newspaper reader.

I

is for investment, infrastructure and industry. All governments from 1963 have been keen to attract investment from overseas, with local investors teaming up with international capital. Kenyatta, in 1964, as the first president, bent over backwards and in an address in Nakuru set to persuade a fearful settler community not to leave Kenya but invest more in the country.

• • • • • •

Agriculture; Energy; Tourism; Mining; Manufacturing; and Health.

28

HARAMBEE!: The presidential limousine is stuck in the mud in Nakuru National Park and Kenyatta, invoking the Harambee pull-together-spirit urges on security detail and aides to push it out

It was aimed at boosting local industry. Those familiar with that era still remember the tune, “Nunua bidha za Kenya ujenge Kenya, ulifanye taifa letu liwe tajiri”, which translates as “Buy Kenyan goods, build Kenya and make our country rich.” Firms such East Africa Industries, now Unilever, makers of household products such as Omo, Kenya Breweries Limited, makers of Kenya’s popular tipples, CocaCola and Fanta and rival Pepsicola and many others saw the young Kenyan nation

Ocampo, for some time, became a household name in Kenya. Kenyatta and Ruto were elected in the March 4, 2013 General Election despite the charges against them in the ICC at The Hague. At first they were called the Ocampo Six, but the charges against Muthaura, Kosgey and Ali were dropped leaving the Ocampo Three.

J

is for Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) and for Justice. JKIA is East Africa’s busiest airport, currently undergoing a massive expansion to enable it to handle 20 million passengers per year. JKIA, as it is popularly known, is a key pillar to Nairobi’s claim to being a regional and continental transport hub. The world’s leading airlines, including, KQ, Emirates, South African, British Airways, Air France, Swiss Air, fly into JKIA.

One cannot, however, forget the fact that a great patriotic campaign launched in the 1970s failed. The campaign was called ‘Buy Kenyan, Build Kenya’.

FRED MATIANG’I: His appointment as Cabinet Secretary for Information, Communication and Technology signalled the commitment of the Kenyatta government to development of ICT

Best of Kenya

In the end, former Cabinet minister Henry Kosgey, former radio presenter Joshua Sang’, former Commissioner of Police Hussein Ali, former Public Service head Francis Muthaura, Uhuru Kenyatta and William Ruto were arraigned before the ICC by then Chief Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo.

M-Pesa, the award-winning money transfer service via the mobile phone firm Safaricom is an IT-based innovation many hope will spur more inventions.

The government is committed to leading the way by investing in irrigation, infrastructure and ICT (Information Communication Technology). Irrigation targets northern Kenya.

Many in northern Kenya cannot wait for the region to be opened up so that they feel

MPs embraced the slogan, “Don’t be Vague, Say Hague,” which acted as a rallying call for Parliament to vote against local tribunals and to endorse The Haguebased ICC process for trying the suspected masterminds of the violence.

The road to development is closely linked to ICT, which is why the government created a Ministry of Information, Communication and Technology, with Dr Fred Matiang’i, as the first Cabinet Secretary. ICT is one of the drivers of the bid for Kenya’s attainment of middle income country status by 2030, which vision is exemplified in the development of the Konza Techno City.

The government is determined to transform Kenya into a knowledge society and to be the leader in business process outsourcing (BPO) in Africa. Other areas of investment opportunities include:

The Jubilee government is committed to irrigating 1 million acres of land. The arid and semi-arid area accounts for about 80 per cent of the land mass, which means only 20 per cent of Kenya, feeds the rest of the country. Irrigation is expected to redress this imbalance and threat to Kenya’s food security and with it come opportunities for investment.

The ICC, (International Criminal Court), crept into Kenya’s everyday lexicon, when it became apparent in 2010 that Parliament was unwilling to set up a local tribunal to try those suspected of masterminding the post-election violence of 2007 and 2008.

Kenya’s road infrastructure, which received a great deal of attention under President Kibaki and is set to expand even more under devolved governance.

Their investments, he assured them, would be protected. Opportunities for investment abound because these are available at the national level and in the counties keen to exploit their potential.

From 2002 successive governments have pitched for irrigating the north of the country with the aim of increasing food production and, more importantly, in an attempt to ensure sufficient food for the drought and famine-ravaged region.

emerge. Then the Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM) became the umbrella lobby for industry. It still is the voice of industry today.

And, of course, JKIA is the home of Kenya Airways, the vastly improved national carrier better known as the “Pride of Africa”. Kenya’s other international airports are Moi in Mombasa, Eldoret and Kisumu. BANK IN YOUR PALM: M-Pesa is a home-grown mobile phone-based money transfer technology that has drastically changed the way Kenyans transact business and forced banks to link up with mobile telephony firms to benefit from the service

In 2007, the Orange Democratic Movement (ODM) party refused to go to court to challenge the presidential poll results. The party was adamant that the courts were not impartial arbiters, but sold favourable verdicts to the highest bidder. How times have changed! In 2013, ODM went to court to challenge the declared results for the presidential poll and swore to respect the verdict of the Supreme Court.

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development project, drive to raise money to send Kenyans abroad to study, pay hospital fees or build a school or church.

they are part of Kenya because, for a long time, they have felt marginalised, neglected and isolated.

Harambee epitomises the belief that all is possible when Kenyans unite and pull together to realise a common cause. Harambee is volunteerism at its best. But in the 1980s and 1990s, especially, the spirit was abused as coercion set in and unscrupulous people used it for personal and political gain.

Infrastructural development is crucial in the opening up of northern Kenya through the development of the Lamu Port, and the road network to link it to South Sudan and Ethiopia, otherwise called the Northern Corridor.

A 1970s picture of Kenyatta urging on his security detail, government officials and ordinary people to push his limousine out of a muddy patch for a long time brought the word harambee to the mouths of many a newspaper reader.

I

is for investment, infrastructure and industry. All governments from 1963 have been keen to attract investment from overseas, with local investors teaming up with international capital. Kenyatta, in 1964, as the first president, bent over backwards and in an address in Nakuru set to persuade a fearful settler community not to leave Kenya but invest more in the country.

• • • • • •

Agriculture; Energy; Tourism; Mining; Manufacturing; and Health.

28

HARAMBEE!: The presidential limousine is stuck in the mud in Nakuru National Park and Kenyatta, invoking the Harambee pull-together-spirit urges on security detail and aides to push it out

It was aimed at boosting local industry. Those familiar with that era still remember the tune, “Nunua bidha za Kenya ujenge Kenya, ulifanye taifa letu liwe tajiri”, which translates as “Buy Kenyan goods, build Kenya and make our country rich.” Firms such East Africa Industries, now Unilever, makers of household products such as Omo, Kenya Breweries Limited, makers of Kenya’s popular tipples, CocaCola and Fanta and rival Pepsicola and many others saw the young Kenyan nation

Ocampo, for some time, became a household name in Kenya. Kenyatta and Ruto were elected in the March 4, 2013 General Election despite the charges against them in the ICC at The Hague. At first they were called the Ocampo Six, but the charges against Muthaura, Kosgey and Ali were dropped leaving the Ocampo Three.

J

is for Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) and for Justice. JKIA is East Africa’s busiest airport, currently undergoing a massive expansion to enable it to handle 20 million passengers per year. JKIA, as it is popularly known, is a key pillar to Nairobi’s claim to being a regional and continental transport hub. The world’s leading airlines, including, KQ, Emirates, South African, British Airways, Air France, Swiss Air, fly into JKIA.

One cannot, however, forget the fact that a great patriotic campaign launched in the 1970s failed. The campaign was called ‘Buy Kenyan, Build Kenya’.

FRED MATIANG’I: His appointment as Cabinet Secretary for Information, Communication and Technology signalled the commitment of the Kenyatta government to development of ICT

Best of Kenya

In the end, former Cabinet minister Henry Kosgey, former radio presenter Joshua Sang’, former Commissioner of Police Hussein Ali, former Public Service head Francis Muthaura, Uhuru Kenyatta and William Ruto were arraigned before the ICC by then Chief Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo.

M-Pesa, the award-winning money transfer service via the mobile phone firm Safaricom is an IT-based innovation many hope will spur more inventions.

The government is committed to leading the way by investing in irrigation, infrastructure and ICT (Information Communication Technology). Irrigation targets northern Kenya.

Many in northern Kenya cannot wait for the region to be opened up so that they feel

MPs embraced the slogan, “Don’t be Vague, Say Hague,” which acted as a rallying call for Parliament to vote against local tribunals and to endorse The Haguebased ICC process for trying the suspected masterminds of the violence.

The road to development is closely linked to ICT, which is why the government created a Ministry of Information, Communication and Technology, with Dr Fred Matiang’i, as the first Cabinet Secretary. ICT is one of the drivers of the bid for Kenya’s attainment of middle income country status by 2030, which vision is exemplified in the development of the Konza Techno City.

The government is determined to transform Kenya into a knowledge society and to be the leader in business process outsourcing (BPO) in Africa. Other areas of investment opportunities include:

The Jubilee government is committed to irrigating 1 million acres of land. The arid and semi-arid area accounts for about 80 per cent of the land mass, which means only 20 per cent of Kenya, feeds the rest of the country. Irrigation is expected to redress this imbalance and threat to Kenya’s food security and with it come opportunities for investment.

The ICC, (International Criminal Court), crept into Kenya’s everyday lexicon, when it became apparent in 2010 that Parliament was unwilling to set up a local tribunal to try those suspected of masterminding the post-election violence of 2007 and 2008.

Kenya’s road infrastructure, which received a great deal of attention under President Kibaki and is set to expand even more under devolved governance.

Their investments, he assured them, would be protected. Opportunities for investment abound because these are available at the national level and in the counties keen to exploit their potential.

From 2002 successive governments have pitched for irrigating the north of the country with the aim of increasing food production and, more importantly, in an attempt to ensure sufficient food for the drought and famine-ravaged region.

emerge. Then the Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM) became the umbrella lobby for industry. It still is the voice of industry today.

And, of course, JKIA is the home of Kenya Airways, the vastly improved national carrier better known as the “Pride of Africa”. Kenya’s other international airports are Moi in Mombasa, Eldoret and Kisumu. BANK IN YOUR PALM: M-Pesa is a home-grown mobile phone-based money transfer technology that has drastically changed the way Kenyans transact business and forced banks to link up with mobile telephony firms to benefit from the service

In 2007, the Orange Democratic Movement (ODM) party refused to go to court to challenge the presidential poll results. The party was adamant that the courts were not impartial arbiters, but sold favourable verdicts to the highest bidder. How times have changed! In 2013, ODM went to court to challenge the declared results for the presidential poll and swore to respect the verdict of the Supreme Court.

Best of Kenya

29


DON’T BE VAGUE, SAY HAGUE: Kenyan MPs adopted this slogan in the campaign for The Haguebased International Criminal Court to try Kenya’s masterminds of the 2007/2008 post-election violence. Six Kenyans were previously arraigned before the court but these have since been reduced to three

JOMO KENYATTA INTERNATIONAL: The biggest and busiest airport in the region, JKIA, as it is popularly called, is being expanded to be able to handle 20 million passengers annually

TWIN PEAKS IN THE SKY: The snow on Mount Kenya’s twin peaks may be receding, but it is still a spectacular sight for locals and visitors alike. The mountain is one of Kenya’s six UNESCO World Heritage Sites. On Independence Day the late Kisoi Munyao hoisted the national flag on the mountain

MAU MAU FIGHTERS: The young men and women who, armed with rudimentary weaponry and hearts of lions, took on the might of the British military and won Kenya’s freedom

The party was disappointed in the verdict because it did not go its way, but accepted it. The biggest reform in Kenya since the tumultuous events of 2007 and early 2008 must be that of the Judiciary. With an independent and respected Judiciary, Kenyans are looking forward to swifter and impartial administration of justice and respect for rights and liberties.

K

is for Kenya the country and the mountain. Variety and diversity define the country. It is a unique country that offers sea, lake, land, forest, desert, and mountain appearances in one territory. Kenya has 42 different ethnic communities, each with its own language and culture. But notice also that all of Kenya’s first four heads of state have a name beginning with K. The founding President Jomo Kenyatta (1963 to 1978) was succeeded by Daniel Kapkarios Toroitich arap Moi (1978 to 2002), who handed over to Emilio Stanley Mwai Kibaki (2002 to 2012) and the incumbent, Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta, who was elected on March 4, 2013.

Best of Kenya

30

The founding president is credited with laying the foundations for Kenya’s future growth, uniting Kenya in its infancy and bequeathing Kenyans a strong economy that rivaled Malaysia’s. Moi ruled for 24 years, 19 of which the governing party was unopposed until heightened political agitation ushered in pluralism in 1991. Kibaki’s 10-year tenure was remarkable for economic growth and infrastructural development, which saw the GDP grow to seven per cent in 2007 only to be reduced to near zero in 2008. This was because of the political mayhem and violence brought about by the disputed December, 2007 presidential poll result. Kenyatta, at 52, became Kenya’s youngest president. Moi became the head of state at 54, Kibaki and the founding president ascended to the high office in their 70s. But there is something far more imposing about Kenya and the country’s name than past and present presidents. Kenya could stand solely for Mt Kenya, Africa’s second highest after Mt Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. The mountain is easily recognisable, given its snow-capped twin peaks of Lenana and

Batian. Standing at 5,199 metres (17,000 feet), Mt Kenya attracts climbers from around the world and is a tourist site.

in 1978 that he fell out with President Kenyatta because, the latter was a land grabber.

Kipchoge Keino reports in his forthcoming book that when Kenyatta was in detention at Kapenguria, he asked him one evening if he could see Mt Kenya to which Kipchoge replied it was possible at dawn.

To attract businesses to his Machakos County, Governor Alfred Mutua has offered potential investors free land. It is an idea that was sure to be emulated by other counties eager to attract investors and boost their economies.

The old man asked Kip, who was guarding him, to wake him up at dawn so that he could admire the mountain. He did and he reports that Kenyatta was filled with joy on seeing the mountain. Little wonder Kenyatta’s book is titled Facing Mount Kenya. Kenya’s other mountains include Elgon, Longonot, Suswa and the Aberdare ranges.

L

stands for land because this, as academic Christopher Leo says, is to Kenyans what security is to Israel. Land is a means of production and also a hot political potato. It was central to the freedom struggle and was a major issue in the 2013 General Election campaign. Independent Kenya’s first Vice-President, Oginga Odinga, said

However, the post-election mayhem of late 2007 and early 2008 was also anchored in land, with the leading protagonists accusing each other of stealing land. The violence triggered the formation of constitutional commissions to address what have been called historical injustices with a view to ensuring that Kenyans of all shades live amicably together.

has been synonymous with the Provincial Commissioner, District Commissioner, District Officer and government departments and other officers.

dominated Kenya’s public transport so much as to create its own culture more than the matatu, which can be anything from the 14 to 29-seater minibus.

During the first Kibaki administration then Internal Security Minister Chris Murungaru claimed the British High Commissioner was being overly critical of Nairobi because it had turned to Toyota at the expense of the Land Rover and British auto industry.

is for Mombasa and the Maasai Mara National Reserve. Mombasa is Kenya’s chief port, whose strategic location makes it the gateway to East Africa, the Great Lakes and beyond. It is the biggest and busiest port in the region.

But, of course, the vehicle of choice for Cabinet ministers and the presidency has always been Mercedes Benz. Indeed when Uhuru Kenyatta as Minister for Finance in 2010, decreed that ministers use the Volkswagen Passats, he met resistance from colleagues who wondered aloud if he was out to promote the German brand and its local dealer.

But there is a vehicle which has always reminded many a Kenyan of land, mobility and government. It is the Land Rover, which since before independence, has always been the government’s vehicle of choice, built to take on the tough and rough terrain and deliver officials and services to the remotest of outposts.

Over 50 years a lot has changed on Kenya’s roads. The Isuzus, MAN and Nissan UD buses and trucks now rule the roost of Kenya’s transport system. But in years gone by Bedford, Leyland and Fiat 682 were the iconic workhorses for ferrying people and goods across East Africa.

For more than 50 years, the Land Rover

However from the 1970s nothing has

M

Mombasa Town, however, is better known throughout the world as the Indian Ocean tourist resort famous for its sunny and sandy beaches of fun and laughter and the historic and iconic Fort Jesus. But one cannot talk about the Mara without mentioning the Maasai. The Maasai are Kenya’s colourful and proud and standyour-ground pastoralists. Many are the postcards that Maasai morans have adorned. The Maasai have always lived in close proximity to wildlife, which has given them the reputation of being fearless. The Maasai Mara is Kenya’s best-known wildlife sanctuary because of the variety of animals found in it and the annual migration

Best of Kenya

31


DON’T BE VAGUE, SAY HAGUE: Kenyan MPs adopted this slogan in the campaign for The Haguebased International Criminal Court to try Kenya’s masterminds of the 2007/2008 post-election violence. Six Kenyans were previously arraigned before the court but these have since been reduced to three

JOMO KENYATTA INTERNATIONAL: The biggest and busiest airport in the region, JKIA, as it is popularly called, is being expanded to be able to handle 20 million passengers annually

TWIN PEAKS IN THE SKY: The snow on Mount Kenya’s twin peaks may be receding, but it is still a spectacular sight for locals and visitors alike. The mountain is one of Kenya’s six UNESCO World Heritage Sites. On Independence Day the late Kisoi Munyao hoisted the national flag on the mountain

MAU MAU FIGHTERS: The young men and women who, armed with rudimentary weaponry and hearts of lions, took on the might of the British military and won Kenya’s freedom

The party was disappointed in the verdict because it did not go its way, but accepted it. The biggest reform in Kenya since the tumultuous events of 2007 and early 2008 must be that of the Judiciary. With an independent and respected Judiciary, Kenyans are looking forward to swifter and impartial administration of justice and respect for rights and liberties.

K

is for Kenya the country and the mountain. Variety and diversity define the country. It is a unique country that offers sea, lake, land, forest, desert, and mountain appearances in one territory. Kenya has 42 different ethnic communities, each with its own language and culture. But notice also that all of Kenya’s first four heads of state have a name beginning with K. The founding President Jomo Kenyatta (1963 to 1978) was succeeded by Daniel Kapkarios Toroitich arap Moi (1978 to 2002), who handed over to Emilio Stanley Mwai Kibaki (2002 to 2012) and the incumbent, Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta, who was elected on March 4, 2013.

Best of Kenya

30

The founding president is credited with laying the foundations for Kenya’s future growth, uniting Kenya in its infancy and bequeathing Kenyans a strong economy that rivaled Malaysia’s. Moi ruled for 24 years, 19 of which the governing party was unopposed until heightened political agitation ushered in pluralism in 1991. Kibaki’s 10-year tenure was remarkable for economic growth and infrastructural development, which saw the GDP grow to seven per cent in 2007 only to be reduced to near zero in 2008. This was because of the political mayhem and violence brought about by the disputed December, 2007 presidential poll result. Kenyatta, at 52, became Kenya’s youngest president. Moi became the head of state at 54, Kibaki and the founding president ascended to the high office in their 70s. But there is something far more imposing about Kenya and the country’s name than past and present presidents. Kenya could stand solely for Mt Kenya, Africa’s second highest after Mt Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. The mountain is easily recognisable, given its snow-capped twin peaks of Lenana and

Batian. Standing at 5,199 metres (17,000 feet), Mt Kenya attracts climbers from around the world and is a tourist site.

in 1978 that he fell out with President Kenyatta because, the latter was a land grabber.

Kipchoge Keino reports in his forthcoming book that when Kenyatta was in detention at Kapenguria, he asked him one evening if he could see Mt Kenya to which Kipchoge replied it was possible at dawn.

To attract businesses to his Machakos County, Governor Alfred Mutua has offered potential investors free land. It is an idea that was sure to be emulated by other counties eager to attract investors and boost their economies.

The old man asked Kip, who was guarding him, to wake him up at dawn so that he could admire the mountain. He did and he reports that Kenyatta was filled with joy on seeing the mountain. Little wonder Kenyatta’s book is titled Facing Mount Kenya. Kenya’s other mountains include Elgon, Longonot, Suswa and the Aberdare ranges.

L

stands for land because this, as academic Christopher Leo says, is to Kenyans what security is to Israel. Land is a means of production and also a hot political potato. It was central to the freedom struggle and was a major issue in the 2013 General Election campaign. Independent Kenya’s first Vice-President, Oginga Odinga, said

However, the post-election mayhem of late 2007 and early 2008 was also anchored in land, with the leading protagonists accusing each other of stealing land. The violence triggered the formation of constitutional commissions to address what have been called historical injustices with a view to ensuring that Kenyans of all shades live amicably together.

has been synonymous with the Provincial Commissioner, District Commissioner, District Officer and government departments and other officers.

dominated Kenya’s public transport so much as to create its own culture more than the matatu, which can be anything from the 14 to 29-seater minibus.

During the first Kibaki administration then Internal Security Minister Chris Murungaru claimed the British High Commissioner was being overly critical of Nairobi because it had turned to Toyota at the expense of the Land Rover and British auto industry.

is for Mombasa and the Maasai Mara National Reserve. Mombasa is Kenya’s chief port, whose strategic location makes it the gateway to East Africa, the Great Lakes and beyond. It is the biggest and busiest port in the region.

But, of course, the vehicle of choice for Cabinet ministers and the presidency has always been Mercedes Benz. Indeed when Uhuru Kenyatta as Minister for Finance in 2010, decreed that ministers use the Volkswagen Passats, he met resistance from colleagues who wondered aloud if he was out to promote the German brand and its local dealer.

But there is a vehicle which has always reminded many a Kenyan of land, mobility and government. It is the Land Rover, which since before independence, has always been the government’s vehicle of choice, built to take on the tough and rough terrain and deliver officials and services to the remotest of outposts.

Over 50 years a lot has changed on Kenya’s roads. The Isuzus, MAN and Nissan UD buses and trucks now rule the roost of Kenya’s transport system. But in years gone by Bedford, Leyland and Fiat 682 were the iconic workhorses for ferrying people and goods across East Africa.

For more than 50 years, the Land Rover

However from the 1970s nothing has

M

Mombasa Town, however, is better known throughout the world as the Indian Ocean tourist resort famous for its sunny and sandy beaches of fun and laughter and the historic and iconic Fort Jesus. But one cannot talk about the Mara without mentioning the Maasai. The Maasai are Kenya’s colourful and proud and standyour-ground pastoralists. Many are the postcards that Maasai morans have adorned. The Maasai have always lived in close proximity to wildlife, which has given them the reputation of being fearless. The Maasai Mara is Kenya’s best-known wildlife sanctuary because of the variety of animals found in it and the annual migration

Best of Kenya

31


of the wildebeest and zebras into the reserve from Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park. The spectacle of a million animals on the move into the reserve, the dangers they brave and the breeding that takes place is what leads many to call it the Eighth Wonder of the World. The migration of the wildebeest is also considered the world’s most spectacular and breathtaking natural event. Most tourists want to visit the Maasai Mara before seeing any other park or part of the country. The Jubilee government is committed to increasing the number of tourists to Kenya to 3 million annually. That number, up from under 2 million, would trigger corresponding increases in hotels, supplies to the hotels, tour operators and guides and jobs along the chain. That will create opportunities for investment. Kenya’s music cannot be left out of M. Music has always reflected the times, cultures and the inspirations and aspirations of the country. In the early days of independence some may have looked askance at music and musicians but not anymore; it is part and parcel of society. One bard eulogised independence thus: Mzee Kenyatta alisema: Uhuru wetu wa Kenya Uwe na amani Uhuru wetu wa Kenya Uwe na umoja Uhuru wetu wa Kenya Uwe na mapenzi Nchi yetu ya Kenya Kweli ni mzuri. That translates literally as: The Old man Kenyatta said: Our Independence Be peaceful Our independence Be unifying Our independence Be of love Our country Kenya Truly is beautiful.

MAASAI MORAN: Many are the jumping, running and posing Maasai morans that adorn postcards, journals and internet sites promoting Kenya as a tourist and holiday destination

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32

The music has captured the ups and downs of independent Kenya; mourned the deaths of political giants, eulogised the exploits of Kip Keino, moaned the rising cost of living, veered into aping Lingala (Congolese) and Western hits and then eventually came of age with the music of the likes of Nameless and Wahu. Kenya is home to many Congolese musicians and a destination for many musicians from around the world who come

DAUDI KABAKA AND NAMELESS: Kabaka’s hit number Msichana wa sura nzuri (Beautiful woman) captured the cultural belief of the time – if a woman was educated and beautiful, she should be married. Nameless, a modern star, has a huge name and following in a different culture

and perform. But it was Daudi Kabaka who caught the spirit of love of those early days with that ageless, priceless and popular opening: Msichana wa sura nzuri, kitu gani kinakufanya usiolewe (beautiful woman, why don’t you get married)? In those days if you were beautiful and educated, marriage was a foregone conclusion. And, how about M standing for the media? Media are linked with colonial rule, the struggle for freedom and the on-going fight for increased democratic space. Mzee Kenyatta edited a Kikuyu paper called Muiguithania, whose title means arbiter. Politician John Keen agitated for the freedom of African peoples through the Alliance High School magazine! The Daily Nation, Eastern Africa’s best-selling newspaper, was significantly named in 1960 to rhyme with the overpowering sense of the birth of Kenya. Born in 1902, The Standard started off as a mouthpiece of the powerful colonial settler community. The Kenya Broadcasting Corporation, with that unmistakable echo of the British Broadcasting Corporation, took off as a tool of the colonial government. Today, Kenya has the biggest and most vibrant media in East and Central Africa and Nairobi hosts the world’s media, who use it as their base from which they cover other parts of Africa.

N

is reserved for Nairobi, East Africa’s largest metropolis and the region’s economic powerhouse. In the 1960s it was branded the City in the Sun and in the 1980s it became the Green City in The sun. The name Nairobi is derived from the Maasai phrase enkare nairobi, which means a place of cool waters.

It was the water that attracted the builders of the Kenya-Uganda Railway to set up camp in the swampy place that became a city in 1950. Many international firms, including General Electric, Google, CocaCola, IBM, Airtel and Cisco Systems have made Nairobi their African headquarters. Nairobi is also a leader in conferencing and stands out among the country’s towns that contributed to Kenya’s designation in 2011 as Africa’s top conference destination. Nairobi is the only city in the world that boasts a national park – the Nairobi National Park – in its borders. Established in 1946, the park is Kenya’s oldest. Nairobi also plays host to the United Nations agencies, UNEP and HABITAT, making it the only city in the developing world to play such a role. It is officially called the UN office in Nairobi (UNON) and is the source of great pride and honour for Kenya’s capital.

O

echoes opportunity. Listen to the Brand Kenya Board’s take on Kenyans:

“They are known for their ability to spot opportunities and turn them into commercial operations regardless of the circumstances. This trait is aptly demonstrated in the many successful Small and Micro Enterprises (SMEs) started by individual Kenyans.” The Tom Mboya-inspired airlifts to the United States in the 1960s were aimed at giving young Kenyans an opportunity to get an education and skills that would enable the newly independent country to advance itself. Through the 1970s and 1980s many Kenyans sought further education overseas. They were always advised to Best of Kenya

33


of the wildebeest and zebras into the reserve from Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park. The spectacle of a million animals on the move into the reserve, the dangers they brave and the breeding that takes place is what leads many to call it the Eighth Wonder of the World. The migration of the wildebeest is also considered the world’s most spectacular and breathtaking natural event. Most tourists want to visit the Maasai Mara before seeing any other park or part of the country. The Jubilee government is committed to increasing the number of tourists to Kenya to 3 million annually. That number, up from under 2 million, would trigger corresponding increases in hotels, supplies to the hotels, tour operators and guides and jobs along the chain. That will create opportunities for investment. Kenya’s music cannot be left out of M. Music has always reflected the times, cultures and the inspirations and aspirations of the country. In the early days of independence some may have looked askance at music and musicians but not anymore; it is part and parcel of society. One bard eulogised independence thus: Mzee Kenyatta alisema: Uhuru wetu wa Kenya Uwe na amani Uhuru wetu wa Kenya Uwe na umoja Uhuru wetu wa Kenya Uwe na mapenzi Nchi yetu ya Kenya Kweli ni mzuri. That translates literally as: The Old man Kenyatta said: Our Independence Be peaceful Our independence Be unifying Our independence Be of love Our country Kenya Truly is beautiful.

MAASAI MORAN: Many are the jumping, running and posing Maasai morans that adorn postcards, journals and internet sites promoting Kenya as a tourist and holiday destination

Best of Kenya

32

The music has captured the ups and downs of independent Kenya; mourned the deaths of political giants, eulogised the exploits of Kip Keino, moaned the rising cost of living, veered into aping Lingala (Congolese) and Western hits and then eventually came of age with the music of the likes of Nameless and Wahu. Kenya is home to many Congolese musicians and a destination for many musicians from around the world who come

DAUDI KABAKA AND NAMELESS: Kabaka’s hit number Msichana wa sura nzuri (Beautiful woman) captured the cultural belief of the time – if a woman was educated and beautiful, she should be married. Nameless, a modern star, has a huge name and following in a different culture

and perform. But it was Daudi Kabaka who caught the spirit of love of those early days with that ageless, priceless and popular opening: Msichana wa sura nzuri, kitu gani kinakufanya usiolewe (beautiful woman, why don’t you get married)? In those days if you were beautiful and educated, marriage was a foregone conclusion. And, how about M standing for the media? Media are linked with colonial rule, the struggle for freedom and the on-going fight for increased democratic space. Mzee Kenyatta edited a Kikuyu paper called Muiguithania, whose title means arbiter. Politician John Keen agitated for the freedom of African peoples through the Alliance High School magazine! The Daily Nation, Eastern Africa’s best-selling newspaper, was significantly named in 1960 to rhyme with the overpowering sense of the birth of Kenya. Born in 1902, The Standard started off as a mouthpiece of the powerful colonial settler community. The Kenya Broadcasting Corporation, with that unmistakable echo of the British Broadcasting Corporation, took off as a tool of the colonial government. Today, Kenya has the biggest and most vibrant media in East and Central Africa and Nairobi hosts the world’s media, who use it as their base from which they cover other parts of Africa.

N

is reserved for Nairobi, East Africa’s largest metropolis and the region’s economic powerhouse. In the 1960s it was branded the City in the Sun and in the 1980s it became the Green City in The sun. The name Nairobi is derived from the Maasai phrase enkare nairobi, which means a place of cool waters.

It was the water that attracted the builders of the Kenya-Uganda Railway to set up camp in the swampy place that became a city in 1950. Many international firms, including General Electric, Google, CocaCola, IBM, Airtel and Cisco Systems have made Nairobi their African headquarters. Nairobi is also a leader in conferencing and stands out among the country’s towns that contributed to Kenya’s designation in 2011 as Africa’s top conference destination. Nairobi is the only city in the world that boasts a national park – the Nairobi National Park – in its borders. Established in 1946, the park is Kenya’s oldest. Nairobi also plays host to the United Nations agencies, UNEP and HABITAT, making it the only city in the developing world to play such a role. It is officially called the UN office in Nairobi (UNON) and is the source of great pride and honour for Kenya’s capital.

O

echoes opportunity. Listen to the Brand Kenya Board’s take on Kenyans:

“They are known for their ability to spot opportunities and turn them into commercial operations regardless of the circumstances. This trait is aptly demonstrated in the many successful Small and Micro Enterprises (SMEs) started by individual Kenyans.” The Tom Mboya-inspired airlifts to the United States in the 1960s were aimed at giving young Kenyans an opportunity to get an education and skills that would enable the newly independent country to advance itself. Through the 1970s and 1980s many Kenyans sought further education overseas. They were always advised to Best of Kenya

33


return to the country because it needed their skills. Many are the Kenyans who have been going abroad since the 1990s to seek succor and lucre because they have the skills.

and when they deem fit, which raises the cudgels against them. But Kenyans also know that when confronted with a crisis they have to turn to Parliament for solutions and direction.

This has spawned a new term – Kenyans in the diaspora. They are an important constituency in several ways. Most presidential candidates in the March 4 elections visited the US and European capitals to seek diaspora votes. In the event, Kenyans living overseas, except those in Uganda, did not register as voters.

Mr Kenneth Marende, as Speaker of the Tenth Parliament (2008 to 2013), has gone down in history as a leader whose Solomonic wisdom saved the country from the abyss in the wake of the post-election violence and in ensuring the governing coalition remained on the straight and narrow from inception (2007) to its end (2013).

Second, Kenya’s foreign policy is anchored in five interlinked pillars of diplomacy, economy, peace, environment, culture and diaspora. The policy document says that diaspora diplomacy recognises the importance of harnessing the diverse aspects, dynamics and potential of not only Kenyans living abroad, but other Africans, too. Thirdly, Kenyans in the diaspora make financial remittances, which amounted to more than Sh70 billion in 2010. That is not all. The United States of America’s 44th President is called Obama and that is a Kenyan name. It is not surprising because his father, Barack Obama Snr, was a Kenyan from a village named Kogelo in Siaya County. O cannot be exhausted without mention of the Office of the President, better known by the abbreviation OP. It houses the nerve centre of the Public Service as the HQ of the edifice and where the head of the service sits. It is also houses the Ministry of Internal Security. During Moi’s reign when the presidential standard was aloft most expected changes in Cabinet or the Public Service and it usually came to pass. Kibaki spent most of his time at State House and Kenyatta, like his father before him, is also working from State House.

P

reminds one of Parliament, parties and people of Kenya. At independence Kenya had two houses of Parliament, but the Senate was killed by anti-federalists. The honour of Kenya’s most assertive House must belong to the Third Parliament (1974 to 1979) and the disgrace of the weakest and most sycophantic will forever belong to the Sixth (1988 to 1992), that creature of the rigged 1988 mlolongo (queue-voting) General Election. Kenyans have a love-hate relationship with their MPs and Parliament. MPs are known to raise their salaries and perks as

Best of Kenya

34

• • • • • • • • • •

Single licence Exemption from stamp duty Exemption from withholding tax 25 per cent corporate tax transfer after the first 10 years 100 per cent investment allowance Duty and VAT exemption on machinery, equipment and raw materials Liberal depreciation rate Loss-carry forward Businesses must recover previous losses before paying corporate tax Capital goods and basic raw materials are zero-rated.

Marende successfully led the reform of Parliament, which endeared him to Kenyans who thought he would throw his hat into the ring in the 2013 presidential election. Marende’s tenure reminded many of the late Jean Marie Seroney, who as Deputy Speaker, helped make the Third Parliament (1974 to 1979) Kenya’s most assertive.

What taxes are levied by the government? These include income tax; corporate tax at 30 per cent for local companies and 37.5 per cent for overseas branches of foreign firms; withholding tax at five per cent; pay as you earn graduated up to maximum of 30 per cent of income; customs duty in four bands from 0 to 35 per cent; excise duty; tax applicable to cigarettes, alcohol, petroleum and confectionaries, VAT at a standard rate of 16 per cent.

Kenya has more than 60 political parties, the oldest being Kanu, the former governing party, and among the youngest being The National Alliance (TNA), the one-year-old member of the governing Jubilee coalition. Most of the parties, even when they are in government, lie dormant between elections.

Since 2002 the government has made investing in Kenya simpler, faster, easier and more investor-friendly by drastically cutting red tape. It has done away with more than 400 licence prescriptions and simplified more than 600 regulations.

Kenyans, according to the Brand Kenya Board, are a resilient, hospitable, generous, optimistic, brave, open, respectful, warm entrepreneurial and hard-working people. This may explain why P may also stand for public, private partnerships (PPP), now a major driving force of development.

Q

is the cue for questions that are frequently asked about Kenya. These are usually asked by those who wish to visit, invest or stay in the country. They include: How are the living conditions? This question relates to security, which is adequate and better than what prevails in many other parts of the world. What are the procedures for starting a business in Kenya? Companies are registered with the Registrar of Companies as a branch office of an overseas firm, a locally incorporated company or under the Business Name.

LIFE IS A BEACH: Mombasa is a worldfamous holiday resort. Local and foreign tourists flock the city’s beaches to bask in the sun, enjoy the sea and lie in the sand

The government has also abolished export and import licensing, except for a few items listed in the Imports, Exports and Essential Supplies Act. Similarly, all export duties have been revoked and import tariffs rationalised and reduced.

R

is for the Rift Valley, the Great Rift Valley. It is a breathtaking, picturesque depression that runs the length of Kenya. It has great variation in width and depth, narrowest in the south and widest in the north, whose floor, far from being flat, features several depressions and the salty lakes Nakuru, Naivasha, Bogoria, Baringo, Magadi and Elementeita. Lake Nakuru is home to the famous flamingos, the birds with the long and pink legs that cause delight and heartache when they appear and disappear from the lake that they have made world-famous. The lake itself worries many a conservationist because it appears to be shrinking.

Does the Government of Kenya grant incentives to investors? The government is committed to attracting investors to enable it to achieve the Vision 2030 blueprint, and therefore, grants incentives through: -

The Lake System of the Rift Valley, which is made up of lakes Nakuru, Elementeita and Bogoria, has been recognised as UNESCO World Heritage Site. Between them the lakes have the highest bird diversity in the world.

• A 10-year tax holiday

Kenya’s other UNESCO World Heritage

Best of Kenya

35


return to the country because it needed their skills. Many are the Kenyans who have been going abroad since the 1990s to seek succor and lucre because they have the skills.

and when they deem fit, which raises the cudgels against them. But Kenyans also know that when confronted with a crisis they have to turn to Parliament for solutions and direction.

This has spawned a new term – Kenyans in the diaspora. They are an important constituency in several ways. Most presidential candidates in the March 4 elections visited the US and European capitals to seek diaspora votes. In the event, Kenyans living overseas, except those in Uganda, did not register as voters.

Mr Kenneth Marende, as Speaker of the Tenth Parliament (2008 to 2013), has gone down in history as a leader whose Solomonic wisdom saved the country from the abyss in the wake of the post-election violence and in ensuring the governing coalition remained on the straight and narrow from inception (2007) to its end (2013).

Second, Kenya’s foreign policy is anchored in five interlinked pillars of diplomacy, economy, peace, environment, culture and diaspora. The policy document says that diaspora diplomacy recognises the importance of harnessing the diverse aspects, dynamics and potential of not only Kenyans living abroad, but other Africans, too. Thirdly, Kenyans in the diaspora make financial remittances, which amounted to more than Sh70 billion in 2010. That is not all. The United States of America’s 44th President is called Obama and that is a Kenyan name. It is not surprising because his father, Barack Obama Snr, was a Kenyan from a village named Kogelo in Siaya County. O cannot be exhausted without mention of the Office of the President, better known by the abbreviation OP. It houses the nerve centre of the Public Service as the HQ of the edifice and where the head of the service sits. It is also houses the Ministry of Internal Security. During Moi’s reign when the presidential standard was aloft most expected changes in Cabinet or the Public Service and it usually came to pass. Kibaki spent most of his time at State House and Kenyatta, like his father before him, is also working from State House.

P

reminds one of Parliament, parties and people of Kenya. At independence Kenya had two houses of Parliament, but the Senate was killed by anti-federalists. The honour of Kenya’s most assertive House must belong to the Third Parliament (1974 to 1979) and the disgrace of the weakest and most sycophantic will forever belong to the Sixth (1988 to 1992), that creature of the rigged 1988 mlolongo (queue-voting) General Election. Kenyans have a love-hate relationship with their MPs and Parliament. MPs are known to raise their salaries and perks as

Best of Kenya

34

• • • • • • • • • •

Single licence Exemption from stamp duty Exemption from withholding tax 25 per cent corporate tax transfer after the first 10 years 100 per cent investment allowance Duty and VAT exemption on machinery, equipment and raw materials Liberal depreciation rate Loss-carry forward Businesses must recover previous losses before paying corporate tax Capital goods and basic raw materials are zero-rated.

Marende successfully led the reform of Parliament, which endeared him to Kenyans who thought he would throw his hat into the ring in the 2013 presidential election. Marende’s tenure reminded many of the late Jean Marie Seroney, who as Deputy Speaker, helped make the Third Parliament (1974 to 1979) Kenya’s most assertive.

What taxes are levied by the government? These include income tax; corporate tax at 30 per cent for local companies and 37.5 per cent for overseas branches of foreign firms; withholding tax at five per cent; pay as you earn graduated up to maximum of 30 per cent of income; customs duty in four bands from 0 to 35 per cent; excise duty; tax applicable to cigarettes, alcohol, petroleum and confectionaries, VAT at a standard rate of 16 per cent.

Kenya has more than 60 political parties, the oldest being Kanu, the former governing party, and among the youngest being The National Alliance (TNA), the one-year-old member of the governing Jubilee coalition. Most of the parties, even when they are in government, lie dormant between elections.

Since 2002 the government has made investing in Kenya simpler, faster, easier and more investor-friendly by drastically cutting red tape. It has done away with more than 400 licence prescriptions and simplified more than 600 regulations.

Kenyans, according to the Brand Kenya Board, are a resilient, hospitable, generous, optimistic, brave, open, respectful, warm entrepreneurial and hard-working people. This may explain why P may also stand for public, private partnerships (PPP), now a major driving force of development.

Q

is the cue for questions that are frequently asked about Kenya. These are usually asked by those who wish to visit, invest or stay in the country. They include: How are the living conditions? This question relates to security, which is adequate and better than what prevails in many other parts of the world. What are the procedures for starting a business in Kenya? Companies are registered with the Registrar of Companies as a branch office of an overseas firm, a locally incorporated company or under the Business Name.

LIFE IS A BEACH: Mombasa is a worldfamous holiday resort. Local and foreign tourists flock the city’s beaches to bask in the sun, enjoy the sea and lie in the sand

The government has also abolished export and import licensing, except for a few items listed in the Imports, Exports and Essential Supplies Act. Similarly, all export duties have been revoked and import tariffs rationalised and reduced.

R

is for the Rift Valley, the Great Rift Valley. It is a breathtaking, picturesque depression that runs the length of Kenya. It has great variation in width and depth, narrowest in the south and widest in the north, whose floor, far from being flat, features several depressions and the salty lakes Nakuru, Naivasha, Bogoria, Baringo, Magadi and Elementeita. Lake Nakuru is home to the famous flamingos, the birds with the long and pink legs that cause delight and heartache when they appear and disappear from the lake that they have made world-famous. The lake itself worries many a conservationist because it appears to be shrinking.

Does the Government of Kenya grant incentives to investors? The government is committed to attracting investors to enable it to achieve the Vision 2030 blueprint, and therefore, grants incentives through: -

The Lake System of the Rift Valley, which is made up of lakes Nakuru, Elementeita and Bogoria, has been recognised as UNESCO World Heritage Site. Between them the lakes have the highest bird diversity in the world.

• A 10-year tax holiday

Kenya’s other UNESCO World Heritage

Best of Kenya

35


Sites include: • The Lake Turkana ecosystem; • The Mt Kenya National Park; • Lamu Old Town, which is renowned for its narrow streets and donkeys, as beasts of burden; • The Miji Kenda Kaya Forests, also at the Coast, which house shrines of the Mijikenda and wildlife; • Fort Jesus in Mombasa, which was built between 1593 and 1590 by the Portuguese and remains one of their most commanding military fortifications of the time.

S UHURU PARK: That translates as Freedom Park or Park of Freedom, which name celebrates Kenya’s freedom (independence) from colonial rule. The park’s terraces offer a commanding view of the Nairobi skyline from close range

is for security. Virtually nothing is possible or achievable if Kenyans, visitors and investors alike, are not assured of their security and that of their livelihoods and property. It is the prime responsibility of the government to ensure no single Kenyan lives in fear of his surroundings, for his life or property.

FLAMINGOS IN FLIGHT: The birds with the long and pink legs delight many a tourist and have made Lake Nakuru world-famous

Joginder Singh

The government is keen to protect all Kenyans, visitors, investors and their investments, livelihoods and property. Kenya’s GDP grew at seven per cent in 2007 and then towards the end of the year and first month of the next, post-election violence rocked the country. The country’s GDP slumped to under one per cent in 2008. Locally and globally S will remind many of safari, which means journey or travel. Many Kenyans travel to different parts of the country during school holidays, public holidays or long weekends such as Easter. These are times when families come together because schools and colleges close or parents have time off from their daily routines. DON’T JUMP THE QUEUE: The infamous queue-voting of the 1988 General Election was dubbed open air democracy by Kanu stalwarts

But for a long time, indeed since 1952, the word safari has had a different meaning for East Africans. In 1952 it was launched and christened the Coronation Rally. Then it was renamed the East African Safari Rally and as the economic realities hit home it became the Safari Rally and was confined to Kenya’s borders.

THE GREAT RIFT VALLEY: Whether you fly over it, admire it from a vantage position or be on its floor, its beauty, uniqueness, the height of its peaks or the lakes on its floor, make the valley great indeed

Shekhar Mehta

It was synonymous with the Easter weekend and gave many plenty to cheer about. Some of the greatest safari rally drivers include Joginder Singh, Shekhar Mehta, Bjorn Waldegaard, Juha Kankunen, Ian Duncan, Patrick Njiru. The Safari always brought the world’s greatest rally drivers to East Africa. After the rally crews and families also went on safari to take in Kenya’s scenery, sun and sandy beaches. TOWER OF POWER: The tower that is synonymous with the power and importance of Parliament. At independence Kenya had two houses of Parliament, but the Senate was abolished. The 2010 constitution re-introduced a two-tier Parliament

Best of Kenya

36

Another dark hour in the history of Kenya

Bjorn Waldegaard

TULLOW OIL FIND: British mining company Tullow announced in 2012 that it had struck oil in Turkana. In 2013 it announced that the find was commercially viable

Best of Kenya

37


Sites include: • The Lake Turkana ecosystem; • The Mt Kenya National Park; • Lamu Old Town, which is renowned for its narrow streets and donkeys, as beasts of burden; • The Miji Kenda Kaya Forests, also at the Coast, which house shrines of the Mijikenda and wildlife; • Fort Jesus in Mombasa, which was built between 1593 and 1590 by the Portuguese and remains one of their most commanding military fortifications of the time.

S UHURU PARK: That translates as Freedom Park or Park of Freedom, which name celebrates Kenya’s freedom (independence) from colonial rule. The park’s terraces offer a commanding view of the Nairobi skyline from close range

is for security. Virtually nothing is possible or achievable if Kenyans, visitors and investors alike, are not assured of their security and that of their livelihoods and property. It is the prime responsibility of the government to ensure no single Kenyan lives in fear of his surroundings, for his life or property.

FLAMINGOS IN FLIGHT: The birds with the long and pink legs delight many a tourist and have made Lake Nakuru world-famous

Joginder Singh

The government is keen to protect all Kenyans, visitors, investors and their investments, livelihoods and property. Kenya’s GDP grew at seven per cent in 2007 and then towards the end of the year and first month of the next, post-election violence rocked the country. The country’s GDP slumped to under one per cent in 2008. Locally and globally S will remind many of safari, which means journey or travel. Many Kenyans travel to different parts of the country during school holidays, public holidays or long weekends such as Easter. These are times when families come together because schools and colleges close or parents have time off from their daily routines. DON’T JUMP THE QUEUE: The infamous queue-voting of the 1988 General Election was dubbed open air democracy by Kanu stalwarts

But for a long time, indeed since 1952, the word safari has had a different meaning for East Africans. In 1952 it was launched and christened the Coronation Rally. Then it was renamed the East African Safari Rally and as the economic realities hit home it became the Safari Rally and was confined to Kenya’s borders.

THE GREAT RIFT VALLEY: Whether you fly over it, admire it from a vantage position or be on its floor, its beauty, uniqueness, the height of its peaks or the lakes on its floor, make the valley great indeed

Shekhar Mehta

It was synonymous with the Easter weekend and gave many plenty to cheer about. Some of the greatest safari rally drivers include Joginder Singh, Shekhar Mehta, Bjorn Waldegaard, Juha Kankunen, Ian Duncan, Patrick Njiru. The Safari always brought the world’s greatest rally drivers to East Africa. After the rally crews and families also went on safari to take in Kenya’s scenery, sun and sandy beaches. TOWER OF POWER: The tower that is synonymous with the power and importance of Parliament. At independence Kenya had two houses of Parliament, but the Senate was abolished. The 2010 constitution re-introduced a two-tier Parliament

Best of Kenya

36

Another dark hour in the history of Kenya

Bjorn Waldegaard

TULLOW OIL FIND: British mining company Tullow announced in 2012 that it had struck oil in Turkana. In 2013 it announced that the find was commercially viable

Best of Kenya

37


And then there were the trade unionists such as Fred Kubai, Aggrey Minya, Tom Mboya and nationalists such as Paul Ngei, Ronald Gideon Ngala, Bildad Kaggia, Jaramogi Oginga Odinga and Masinde Muliro. The culmination of the struggle was the declaration of the state of emergency in 1952 and the imprisonment of Kenyatta, Kaggia, Ngei, Achieng’ Oneko, Kungu Karumba and Kubai, also referred to as the Kapenguria Six. But the advent of independence did not mean the end of the fight for freedom; the struggle continues to this day. It is epitomised by the clamour for political pluralism against Kanu’s constitutional monopoly of power of the 1980s and 1990s and for the new constitutional dispensation realised in 2010 and defence of it.

THE KAPENGURIA SIX: Arrested in the wake of the declaration of the State of Emergency in 1952 they were blamed by the colonial authorities for masterminding the Mau Mau and detained in Kapenguria. Bildad Kaggia, Kung’u Karumba, Achieng’ Oneko, Jomo Kenyatta, Paul Ngei and Fred Kubai became known as the Kapenguria Six. Daniel Moi (third from right) had visited the detainees

was on August 1, 1982, when elements of the military, specifically the air men attempted to overthrow the government. The coup failed but in its aftermath businesses were looted, forcing would-be investors to put their plans on hold. On the political front, there followed a huge purge that culminated in the snap1983 General Election. S must also stand for State House from where presidents have always worked, which the media have nicknamed the house on the hill. In the colonial days, it was called Government House, but was renamed State “House with the” advent of independence. It is the most famous and coveted address in Kenya.

T

would have turned up trade. But this has been covered under investment. So T is for Turkana, the county, lake, people and the land of the recently discovered oil. Turkana is Kenya’s largest county in which sits Lake Turkana, the world’s largest, permanent and alkaline body of water. Rivers Omo, Turkwel and Kerio flow into the lake, but lacking an outflow, its only water loss is by evaporation. Kenya lays claim to being the cradle of

Best of Kenya

38

mankind chiefly because the Lake Turkana ecosystem has the world’s largest collection of human pre-history, which is why it is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

generations of actors and playwrights, publishers and film makers such as David Mulwa, Jimmi Makotsi and Ingolo wa Keya, among a host of others.

It is in Turkana that the most complete skeleton of an early human ancestor was found in 1985. Called Turkana Boy, it was found by Mr Kamoya Kimeu for which he received the LeGorge medal from President Ronald Reagan in the same year.

Of course, Kenya not only has its homegrown film-makers but has also emerged as a major filming destination where many films have been shot. They include Joy Adamson’s Born Free and the blockbuster, Out of Africa. Nigeria has Nollywood, where India has Bollywood and the USA Hollywood.

In 2012, British mining company Tullow brought smiles to the faces of Kenya’s leadership and people when it announced that it had discovered oil in Turkana. In 2013, the company declared that the oil find was commercially viable. But we cannot forget theatre; not with the late Prof Francis Imbuga dominating the scene with his own Betrayal in the City, among many other titles, dominating the scene as actor and playwright. And, the great writer, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, too, had a Kikuyu play Ngaahika ndenda (I will marry when I want) in the 1970s that so enraged the government he was detained without trial. What with the exploits of the hugely popular Free Travelling Theatre of the University of Nairobi of the 1970s that inspired

Who under T or any other letter, remembers the typewriter? What did the US cigarette commercial say about women and smoke? We have come a long way.

U

is for uhuru, which is Kiswahili for freedom. This calls attention to and respect for the young men and women who, armed with rudimentary weaponry and with hearts of lions and backed by pride in their humanity, took on the might of the British colonial empire. That was the Mau Mau, among the combatants was the late Josiah Mwangi Kariuki, but before them the likes of Elijah Masinde, of the Dini Ya Musambwa fame, was calling for the expulsion of the white man from Kenya as early as 1942.

Among those who fought for what has been called the Second Liberation was a mix of the old guard such as Odinga, Muliro, Martin Shikuku, Nthenge and what the media christened Young Turks, who included James Orengo, Paul Muite, Gitobu Imanyara, Mukhisa Kituyi and Prof Rashid Mzee and Prof Peter Anyang’ Nyong’o. Kenyans are and continue to be what they are because of those who since the preindependence days have stood up for their rights. These are the men and women the Constitution commands Kenyans to celebrate and appreciate on Mashujaa (Heroes) Day on October 20, when, in 1952, the colonial government declared a state of emergency. Previously, the day was called Kenyatta Day; to still mark that dark day in October 1952 when he was carted off into detention.

V

must remind all and sundry of Vision 2030, the government’s blueprint for transforming Kenya into a middle income or newly industrialising country, and guarantee Kenyans a high quality standard of life. The implementing secretariat says all the enablers for the vision will be in place in 2015. The vision targets six priority sectors that make up the larger part (57 per cent) of Kenya’s GDP and provide nearly half of the country’s total formal employment. These are:

• • • • • •

Tourism; Agriculture; Manufacturing; Wholesale and retail trade; IT-enabled services; and Financial services.

LAKE VICTORIA: The world’s second largest fresh water lake after Lake Superior. Lake Victoria is the source of the River Nile and is divided between Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania

Lake Victoria could also lay claim to the letter V. It is the second largest fresh water lake in the world, the source of the River Nile, on whose shores sits Kisumu, Kenya’s fourth largest city. The Kenya-Uganda Railway reached Kisumu, then called Port Florence, in 1901. Lake Victoria is shared between Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Most of Kenya’s fish exports come from Lake Victoria and comprise tilapia and Nile perch.

W

must surely stand for wildlife. Tourism is the goose that lays the golden egg. Kenya is a top tourist destination because of its wildlife. Tourism is a top foreign exchange earner because of the abundant wildlife in the country. Tourism accounts for 10 per cent of the GDP, making it the largest contributor after agriculture and manufacturing. It is Kenya’s leading foreign exchange earner, having generated about KSh21.7 billion in 2012. Kenya is famous for the Big Five that both local and foreign tourists want to see most. These are the stately elephant, temperamental buffalo, powerful lion, stealthy leopard and the endangered rhinoceros. Kenya is also home to the cheetah, the fastest animal on the planet, and a myriad of other beautiful, exotic and intriguing plant and animal species. Kenya has 17 national parks, 12 national reserves and 6 marine parks and reserves. The government and the Kenya Wildlife Service have come under increasing pressure to stem the rising tide of poaching of the elephant and rhino. County governments are also under pressure to stop encroachment on the Mara and others by humans and their livestock and by the increasing developments in the reserves.

THE BEGINNING OF THE END: At the infamous Kanu conference of Limuru of 1966, Kenyatta moved to isolate his Vice-President by creating seven regional party vice-presidents. Odinga (in cap) quit in a huff and his career went on a downward trend thereafter

X

is for X-ray, which draws attention to the health of Kenyans and the health of their health facilities. Newly admitted university students carry X-ray pictures of their chests to their colleges; Kenyans seeking medical cover must be x-rayed, most of those in the A&E sections of the country’s health facilities will be x-rayed.

Y

is for year. The government has annual plans and publishes its year-on-year achievements. It has an annual budget and allocates resources on a yearly basis. It publishes an annual Economic Survey. It also has five-year plans. Private and public firms have annual plans and targets as have individuals. Kenya has had a myriad of documents that have defined its planning over the years, the most famous being the Sessional Paper No 10 on African Socialism and Best of Kenya

39


And then there were the trade unionists such as Fred Kubai, Aggrey Minya, Tom Mboya and nationalists such as Paul Ngei, Ronald Gideon Ngala, Bildad Kaggia, Jaramogi Oginga Odinga and Masinde Muliro. The culmination of the struggle was the declaration of the state of emergency in 1952 and the imprisonment of Kenyatta, Kaggia, Ngei, Achieng’ Oneko, Kungu Karumba and Kubai, also referred to as the Kapenguria Six. But the advent of independence did not mean the end of the fight for freedom; the struggle continues to this day. It is epitomised by the clamour for political pluralism against Kanu’s constitutional monopoly of power of the 1980s and 1990s and for the new constitutional dispensation realised in 2010 and defence of it.

THE KAPENGURIA SIX: Arrested in the wake of the declaration of the State of Emergency in 1952 they were blamed by the colonial authorities for masterminding the Mau Mau and detained in Kapenguria. Bildad Kaggia, Kung’u Karumba, Achieng’ Oneko, Jomo Kenyatta, Paul Ngei and Fred Kubai became known as the Kapenguria Six. Daniel Moi (third from right) had visited the detainees

was on August 1, 1982, when elements of the military, specifically the air men attempted to overthrow the government. The coup failed but in its aftermath businesses were looted, forcing would-be investors to put their plans on hold. On the political front, there followed a huge purge that culminated in the snap1983 General Election. S must also stand for State House from where presidents have always worked, which the media have nicknamed the house on the hill. In the colonial days, it was called Government House, but was renamed State “House with the” advent of independence. It is the most famous and coveted address in Kenya.

T

would have turned up trade. But this has been covered under investment. So T is for Turkana, the county, lake, people and the land of the recently discovered oil. Turkana is Kenya’s largest county in which sits Lake Turkana, the world’s largest, permanent and alkaline body of water. Rivers Omo, Turkwel and Kerio flow into the lake, but lacking an outflow, its only water loss is by evaporation. Kenya lays claim to being the cradle of

Best of Kenya

38

mankind chiefly because the Lake Turkana ecosystem has the world’s largest collection of human pre-history, which is why it is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

generations of actors and playwrights, publishers and film makers such as David Mulwa, Jimmi Makotsi and Ingolo wa Keya, among a host of others.

It is in Turkana that the most complete skeleton of an early human ancestor was found in 1985. Called Turkana Boy, it was found by Mr Kamoya Kimeu for which he received the LeGorge medal from President Ronald Reagan in the same year.

Of course, Kenya not only has its homegrown film-makers but has also emerged as a major filming destination where many films have been shot. They include Joy Adamson’s Born Free and the blockbuster, Out of Africa. Nigeria has Nollywood, where India has Bollywood and the USA Hollywood.

In 2012, British mining company Tullow brought smiles to the faces of Kenya’s leadership and people when it announced that it had discovered oil in Turkana. In 2013, the company declared that the oil find was commercially viable. But we cannot forget theatre; not with the late Prof Francis Imbuga dominating the scene with his own Betrayal in the City, among many other titles, dominating the scene as actor and playwright. And, the great writer, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, too, had a Kikuyu play Ngaahika ndenda (I will marry when I want) in the 1970s that so enraged the government he was detained without trial. What with the exploits of the hugely popular Free Travelling Theatre of the University of Nairobi of the 1970s that inspired

Who under T or any other letter, remembers the typewriter? What did the US cigarette commercial say about women and smoke? We have come a long way.

U

is for uhuru, which is Kiswahili for freedom. This calls attention to and respect for the young men and women who, armed with rudimentary weaponry and with hearts of lions and backed by pride in their humanity, took on the might of the British colonial empire. That was the Mau Mau, among the combatants was the late Josiah Mwangi Kariuki, but before them the likes of Elijah Masinde, of the Dini Ya Musambwa fame, was calling for the expulsion of the white man from Kenya as early as 1942.

Among those who fought for what has been called the Second Liberation was a mix of the old guard such as Odinga, Muliro, Martin Shikuku, Nthenge and what the media christened Young Turks, who included James Orengo, Paul Muite, Gitobu Imanyara, Mukhisa Kituyi and Prof Rashid Mzee and Prof Peter Anyang’ Nyong’o. Kenyans are and continue to be what they are because of those who since the preindependence days have stood up for their rights. These are the men and women the Constitution commands Kenyans to celebrate and appreciate on Mashujaa (Heroes) Day on October 20, when, in 1952, the colonial government declared a state of emergency. Previously, the day was called Kenyatta Day; to still mark that dark day in October 1952 when he was carted off into detention.

V

must remind all and sundry of Vision 2030, the government’s blueprint for transforming Kenya into a middle income or newly industrialising country, and guarantee Kenyans a high quality standard of life. The implementing secretariat says all the enablers for the vision will be in place in 2015. The vision targets six priority sectors that make up the larger part (57 per cent) of Kenya’s GDP and provide nearly half of the country’s total formal employment. These are:

• • • • • •

Tourism; Agriculture; Manufacturing; Wholesale and retail trade; IT-enabled services; and Financial services.

LAKE VICTORIA: The world’s second largest fresh water lake after Lake Superior. Lake Victoria is the source of the River Nile and is divided between Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania

Lake Victoria could also lay claim to the letter V. It is the second largest fresh water lake in the world, the source of the River Nile, on whose shores sits Kisumu, Kenya’s fourth largest city. The Kenya-Uganda Railway reached Kisumu, then called Port Florence, in 1901. Lake Victoria is shared between Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Most of Kenya’s fish exports come from Lake Victoria and comprise tilapia and Nile perch.

W

must surely stand for wildlife. Tourism is the goose that lays the golden egg. Kenya is a top tourist destination because of its wildlife. Tourism is a top foreign exchange earner because of the abundant wildlife in the country. Tourism accounts for 10 per cent of the GDP, making it the largest contributor after agriculture and manufacturing. It is Kenya’s leading foreign exchange earner, having generated about KSh21.7 billion in 2012. Kenya is famous for the Big Five that both local and foreign tourists want to see most. These are the stately elephant, temperamental buffalo, powerful lion, stealthy leopard and the endangered rhinoceros. Kenya is also home to the cheetah, the fastest animal on the planet, and a myriad of other beautiful, exotic and intriguing plant and animal species. Kenya has 17 national parks, 12 national reserves and 6 marine parks and reserves. The government and the Kenya Wildlife Service have come under increasing pressure to stem the rising tide of poaching of the elephant and rhino. County governments are also under pressure to stop encroachment on the Mara and others by humans and their livestock and by the increasing developments in the reserves.

THE BEGINNING OF THE END: At the infamous Kanu conference of Limuru of 1966, Kenyatta moved to isolate his Vice-President by creating seven regional party vice-presidents. Odinga (in cap) quit in a huff and his career went on a downward trend thereafter

X

is for X-ray, which draws attention to the health of Kenyans and the health of their health facilities. Newly admitted university students carry X-ray pictures of their chests to their colleges; Kenyans seeking medical cover must be x-rayed, most of those in the A&E sections of the country’s health facilities will be x-rayed.

Y

is for year. The government has annual plans and publishes its year-on-year achievements. It has an annual budget and allocates resources on a yearly basis. It publishes an annual Economic Survey. It also has five-year plans. Private and public firms have annual plans and targets as have individuals. Kenya has had a myriad of documents that have defined its planning over the years, the most famous being the Sessional Paper No 10 on African Socialism and Best of Kenya

39


Its Application to Planning in Kenya of 1965. It was crafted by Tom Mboya, the political sungura mjanja (cunning hare) and amounted to a capitalist policy paper with a socialist label. But Kenyans also remember events by the year in which they occurred; when they were promised something would happen or an anniversary. Here are some important events in Kenya’s political history: 1963: The year of independence from colonial rule, with Jomo Kenyatta as the Prime Minister. 1964: Kenya becomes a republic with Kenyatta as the founding president or father of the nation. 1965: At the infamous Kanu conference in Limuru, Odinga had his wings clipped when the party changed its constitution and introduced seven new regional vicepresidents. Odinga quit in a huff and founded the Kenya People’s Union, a socialist party, in 1966. 1969: Thomas Joseph Mboya, the Minister for Planning, is shot dead outside a Nairobi pharmacy on July 5. Mboya, many believed, had his sights firmly on becoming the president. In the same year, Kenyatta visited Kisumu on Odinga’s turf and was stoned in a fracas that followed an altercation between Kanu and KPU supporters. KPU was proscribed and its top brass detained. Kenyatta never set foot in Luoland again. 1973: Kenya celebrates what was dubbed 10 Great Years of Uhuru. Kenya’s economy was strong. 1975: Mau Mau freedom hero Josiah Mwangi Kariuki is killed and his body dumped in Ngong Forest. 1976: The advent of the change-theConstitution group, a clique of politicians who sought to prevent Vice-President Daniel arap Moi from succeeding Kenyatta. The group failed when Attorney-General Charles Njonjo warned that it was an offence to imagine the death of the president. This is also the year when the late Seroney, Shikuku and George Anyona were brazenly plucked from the precincts of Parliament and thrown into detention. 1977: The original East African Community, then made up of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania, breaks up, leading to a plethora of attacks and counter-attacks between Nairobi and Dar es Salaam.

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The latter was persuaded it was the former’s capitalistic greed that broke up the community. Dar was to typify Nairobi as a man-eat-man society to which Njonjo retorted that Tanzania was a man-eatnothing society.

1992: The first multi-party General Election in a generation is held on December 27. A splintered opposition loses to Kanu and Moi, who at one stage looked vulnerable. The struggle for the reform of the constitution begins in earnest.

1978: Kenyatta dies in August, and is succeeded by Moi.

1997: Moi and Kanu win the General Election again.

1982: On August 1, elements of the military tried to seize power in a coup. That marked a dark hour in Kenya’s politics. There was mass looting in Nairobi, the Kenya Air Force was disbanded and there was huge purge on the political front, as Kenya became a de jure single-party state.

1998: Terror comes to Kenya when an alqaeda bomb explodes at the US embassy then based in downtown Nairobi. More than 200 people were killed and Kenya was plunged into days of mourning and soulsearching. Why us? That was the question on everybody’s mind.

This is also the year when Parliament, in a debate that lasted under an hour, turned Kenya into a single-party state by law. At the time Odinga and Anyona were planning to launch the Kenya Socialist Alliance as the law did not outlaw other parties.

2002: Moi names Mr Uhuru Kenyatta his preferred successor and he is nominated by Kanu as its presidential candidate. Mr Raila Odinga, who had been named Kanu Secretary-General after dissolving his National Development Party to join Kanu in the same year, led a mass walkout from the party into a new outfit called the Liberal Democratic Party.

1983: A snap General Election is called chiefly to eject Njonjo and his allies from the political mainstream following allegations that he was being groomed by foreign powers to take over power through unconstitutional means. 1987: Kenya hosts the Fourth All Africa Games amid heightened tensions occasioned by dubious trials and imprisonment of several individuals alleged to belong to an underground movement called Mwakenya. This is also the year Kenya celebrated its Silver Jubilee. The strong economy of its first independence decade was not in evidence. 1988: The infamous and massively rigged General Election is held. It saddles the country with the weakest Parliament it has ever had. 1990: Political heavyweights Kenneth Matiba and Charles Rubia emerge to lead the growing countrywide movement of dissenters calling for a return to multi-party politics. The struggle for plural politics is on in earnest even as Matiba and Rubia are thrown into detention – without trial. Earlier in the year, the burnt body of Foreign Affairs Minister Robert John Ouko was found in thickets not far away from his rural home in Kisumu. It was never ascertained how the man died or in whose hands. 1991: Under increasing local and international pressure, Kanu’s National Delegates’ Conference agrees to amend the Constitution and usher in political pluralism, ending 26 years of single party politics.

Towards the end of the year at a rally in Nairobi, Odinga rallied the opposition around Kibaki, who went on to trounce Kenyatta in the General Election, to hand Kanu its first defeat in 39 years. The victorious outfit was the National Rainbow Coalition (Narc) in which Kibaki and Odinga were the key figures. 2005: Kenya holds a referendum on a draft constitution. The referendum split the ruling coalition, with Odinga opposing and Kibaki supporting the draft. The Kibaki side lost but soon the president sacked the LDP politicians from the Cabinet. On January 9, Sudan’s government and the rebel Sudan People’s Liberation Movement signed the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) brokered by Nairobi and which led to the independence and eventual breakaway of South Sudan. 2007: The General Election in December went on without a hitch, with Odinga leading ODM and Kibaki fronting the Party of National Unity (PNU). The announcement of the presidential result was disputed by ODM and unprecedented post-poll mayhem followed. More than 1,000 people were killed and half a million displaced. 2008: Normalcy returns to the country in February when former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan brokered a peace deal between ODM and PNU, with Odinga and Kibaki as Prime Minister and President, respectively, in a Grand Coalition Government.

The coalition government stumbled from one crisis to another and fumbled from one disagreement to another, managed to stay together until to the end of its term in 2012 2010: A referendum is held on the new draft constitution on August 4, which resulted in its endorsement. The basic law was promulgated on August 27 2013: Kenyans were back to the polls a little later than they had expected but under the new Constitution, to vote for president, governor, senator, MP, women’s

representative and county representative in a six-in-one election. Despite facing crimes against humanity charges at the International Criminal Court at The Hague, the Uhuru Kenyatta/ William Ruto ticket triumphed over the rival Odinga/Kalonzo Musyoka team to become President and Deputy President, respectively. This (2013) is, of course, the year of independent Kenya’s Golden Jubilee.

Z

is for zero. Kenyans do not want to be zeroes; they want to be heroes. It is why they have been winning gold medals in athletics and awards around the world in various fields and top jobs in international NGOs, including the UN. But Z would be incomplete without mention of Zephyr, the stylish car that wowed many in the early days of independence, before it was challenged by the Peugeots, Datsuns and Fords and then disappeared altogether.

Best of Kenya

41


Its Application to Planning in Kenya of 1965. It was crafted by Tom Mboya, the political sungura mjanja (cunning hare) and amounted to a capitalist policy paper with a socialist label. But Kenyans also remember events by the year in which they occurred; when they were promised something would happen or an anniversary. Here are some important events in Kenya’s political history: 1963: The year of independence from colonial rule, with Jomo Kenyatta as the Prime Minister. 1964: Kenya becomes a republic with Kenyatta as the founding president or father of the nation. 1965: At the infamous Kanu conference in Limuru, Odinga had his wings clipped when the party changed its constitution and introduced seven new regional vicepresidents. Odinga quit in a huff and founded the Kenya People’s Union, a socialist party, in 1966. 1969: Thomas Joseph Mboya, the Minister for Planning, is shot dead outside a Nairobi pharmacy on July 5. Mboya, many believed, had his sights firmly on becoming the president. In the same year, Kenyatta visited Kisumu on Odinga’s turf and was stoned in a fracas that followed an altercation between Kanu and KPU supporters. KPU was proscribed and its top brass detained. Kenyatta never set foot in Luoland again. 1973: Kenya celebrates what was dubbed 10 Great Years of Uhuru. Kenya’s economy was strong. 1975: Mau Mau freedom hero Josiah Mwangi Kariuki is killed and his body dumped in Ngong Forest. 1976: The advent of the change-theConstitution group, a clique of politicians who sought to prevent Vice-President Daniel arap Moi from succeeding Kenyatta. The group failed when Attorney-General Charles Njonjo warned that it was an offence to imagine the death of the president. This is also the year when the late Seroney, Shikuku and George Anyona were brazenly plucked from the precincts of Parliament and thrown into detention. 1977: The original East African Community, then made up of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania, breaks up, leading to a plethora of attacks and counter-attacks between Nairobi and Dar es Salaam.

Best of Kenya

40

The latter was persuaded it was the former’s capitalistic greed that broke up the community. Dar was to typify Nairobi as a man-eat-man society to which Njonjo retorted that Tanzania was a man-eatnothing society.

1992: The first multi-party General Election in a generation is held on December 27. A splintered opposition loses to Kanu and Moi, who at one stage looked vulnerable. The struggle for the reform of the constitution begins in earnest.

1978: Kenyatta dies in August, and is succeeded by Moi.

1997: Moi and Kanu win the General Election again.

1982: On August 1, elements of the military tried to seize power in a coup. That marked a dark hour in Kenya’s politics. There was mass looting in Nairobi, the Kenya Air Force was disbanded and there was huge purge on the political front, as Kenya became a de jure single-party state.

1998: Terror comes to Kenya when an alqaeda bomb explodes at the US embassy then based in downtown Nairobi. More than 200 people were killed and Kenya was plunged into days of mourning and soulsearching. Why us? That was the question on everybody’s mind.

This is also the year when Parliament, in a debate that lasted under an hour, turned Kenya into a single-party state by law. At the time Odinga and Anyona were planning to launch the Kenya Socialist Alliance as the law did not outlaw other parties.

2002: Moi names Mr Uhuru Kenyatta his preferred successor and he is nominated by Kanu as its presidential candidate. Mr Raila Odinga, who had been named Kanu Secretary-General after dissolving his National Development Party to join Kanu in the same year, led a mass walkout from the party into a new outfit called the Liberal Democratic Party.

1983: A snap General Election is called chiefly to eject Njonjo and his allies from the political mainstream following allegations that he was being groomed by foreign powers to take over power through unconstitutional means. 1987: Kenya hosts the Fourth All Africa Games amid heightened tensions occasioned by dubious trials and imprisonment of several individuals alleged to belong to an underground movement called Mwakenya. This is also the year Kenya celebrated its Silver Jubilee. The strong economy of its first independence decade was not in evidence. 1988: The infamous and massively rigged General Election is held. It saddles the country with the weakest Parliament it has ever had. 1990: Political heavyweights Kenneth Matiba and Charles Rubia emerge to lead the growing countrywide movement of dissenters calling for a return to multi-party politics. The struggle for plural politics is on in earnest even as Matiba and Rubia are thrown into detention – without trial. Earlier in the year, the burnt body of Foreign Affairs Minister Robert John Ouko was found in thickets not far away from his rural home in Kisumu. It was never ascertained how the man died or in whose hands. 1991: Under increasing local and international pressure, Kanu’s National Delegates’ Conference agrees to amend the Constitution and usher in political pluralism, ending 26 years of single party politics.

Towards the end of the year at a rally in Nairobi, Odinga rallied the opposition around Kibaki, who went on to trounce Kenyatta in the General Election, to hand Kanu its first defeat in 39 years. The victorious outfit was the National Rainbow Coalition (Narc) in which Kibaki and Odinga were the key figures. 2005: Kenya holds a referendum on a draft constitution. The referendum split the ruling coalition, with Odinga opposing and Kibaki supporting the draft. The Kibaki side lost but soon the president sacked the LDP politicians from the Cabinet. On January 9, Sudan’s government and the rebel Sudan People’s Liberation Movement signed the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) brokered by Nairobi and which led to the independence and eventual breakaway of South Sudan. 2007: The General Election in December went on without a hitch, with Odinga leading ODM and Kibaki fronting the Party of National Unity (PNU). The announcement of the presidential result was disputed by ODM and unprecedented post-poll mayhem followed. More than 1,000 people were killed and half a million displaced. 2008: Normalcy returns to the country in February when former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan brokered a peace deal between ODM and PNU, with Odinga and Kibaki as Prime Minister and President, respectively, in a Grand Coalition Government.

The coalition government stumbled from one crisis to another and fumbled from one disagreement to another, managed to stay together until to the end of its term in 2012 2010: A referendum is held on the new draft constitution on August 4, which resulted in its endorsement. The basic law was promulgated on August 27 2013: Kenyans were back to the polls a little later than they had expected but under the new Constitution, to vote for president, governor, senator, MP, women’s

representative and county representative in a six-in-one election. Despite facing crimes against humanity charges at the International Criminal Court at The Hague, the Uhuru Kenyatta/ William Ruto ticket triumphed over the rival Odinga/Kalonzo Musyoka team to become President and Deputy President, respectively. This (2013) is, of course, the year of independent Kenya’s Golden Jubilee.

Z

is for zero. Kenyans do not want to be zeroes; they want to be heroes. It is why they have been winning gold medals in athletics and awards around the world in various fields and top jobs in international NGOs, including the UN. But Z would be incomplete without mention of Zephyr, the stylish car that wowed many in the early days of independence, before it was challenged by the Peugeots, Datsuns and Fords and then disappeared altogether.

Best of Kenya

41


Kimathi Street, renamed after freedom fighter Dedan Kimathi was previously Herding Street after Sir Arthur Herding, the first British administrator of Kenya at the close of 19th century.

What is in a Name? Plenty

Koinange Street, renamed after Mzee Kenyatta’s close ally Mbiyu Koinange was known as Sadler Street, named after Sir J Hayes Sadler an early 20th century commissioner (governor) of the Kenya Protectorate. The neighbouring Muindi Mbingu Street, renamed after an Akamba resistence movement leader, was known as Stewart Street, after Sir Donald Stewart, also an early governor. University Way, home to the premier University of Nairobi, was known as Kings Way and echoes Queen’s Way. Bazzar Street, where Asian businessmen initially opened shops, was renamed Biashara Street.

Uhuru Highway

Whitehouse Road, named after Engineer George Whitehouse, who ran the Uganda Railway, became the Haile Selassie Avenue in honour of Emperor Selassie of Ethiopia. Uhuru Highway, signifying the attainment of independence, was previously called Princess Elizabeth, named after Queen Elizabeth II, before she ascended to the throne. She visited Kenya in 1952 and on her trip to Nyeri went up the Treetops Hotel as a princess and descended as the Queen. He father died when she was upstairs. Moi Avenue, named after the second President of the Republic, Daniel Kapkarios Toroitich Moi, (after his ascension to power) was until 1978 called Government Road.

University Way

Kenyatta Avenue

Nearly all streets in Nairobi, then as now, had colonial names, which were changed at independence. The task of re-naming the roads immediately after independence was undertaken by Charles Wanyoike Rubia, the first African Mayor at City Hall since 1937, with his team of councillors. It continued under the late Isaac Lugonzo and Margaret Kenyatta, who were Nairobi’s second and third mayors, with the latter as the only woman to have occupied the office. Roads in Nairobi’s Central Business District had names of British royalty, aristocrats and former administrators of the then East Africa Protectorate. Fewer roads have remained unchanged

Best of Kenya

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after independence. They are River Road, named after the Nairobi River, Outer Ring Road, meaning the road on the then city border, City Hall Way, on which City Hall is situated and Parliament Road, where the Legislative Council (Legco) was based and the National Assembly is. Ngong Road, the longest road leading to Karen area and into Rift Valley, Langata Road from Nyayo National Stadium to Langata, Karen and Ongata Rongai to Rift Valley, Karen, Naivasha and Dagoretti Roads have also retained their names. Kenyatta Avenue, renamed after founding President Jomo Kenyatta, was called Delamere Avenue. It had been named after the influential aristocrat settler Hugh Cholmondeley, the 3rd Baron Lord

Delamere. Before he died in 1931, he had acquired vast chunks of land in the Rift Valley, especially around Naivasha, where his descendants still reside.

Tom Mboya Street was renamed following the assassination of the flamboyant politician on July 5, 1969. Until then, it was called Victoria Street, named after 19th century Queen Victoria, who reigned between 1836 and 1901, when she died.

Harambee Avenue, the seat of power after independence was called Coronation Avenue, where royal ceremonies were held. It is on this street that Kenyatta received the instruments of power in front of the present Foreign Office, whose official name is Treasury Building before the one housing the Finance Ministry (Treasury) was built.

Ronald Ngala Street was renamed after the Coast politician’s death on Christmas Day 1972. It was previously Duke Street in honour of British dukes. Duke House still stands on the same road, which is the present Hotel Gloria.

Mama Ngina Street, renamed after Kenya’s first First Lady, was previously known as Queen’s Way. The plural royalty was aimed at emphasising the collective honour to the queens of all generations of the British monarchy.

Kirinyaga Road was previously Grogan Road, named after Colonel E.S. Grogan. On Chiromo Campus of the University of Nairobi stand the imposing and expansive Grogan Mansions. The mansions, which belonged to Col E.S. Grogan and his wife

Tom Mboya Street

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Kimathi Street, renamed after freedom fighter Dedan Kimathi was previously Herding Street after Sir Arthur Herding, the first British administrator of Kenya at the close of 19th century.

What is in a Name? Plenty

Koinange Street, renamed after Mzee Kenyatta’s close ally Mbiyu Koinange was known as Sadler Street, named after Sir J Hayes Sadler an early 20th century commissioner (governor) of the Kenya Protectorate. The neighbouring Muindi Mbingu Street, renamed after an Akamba resistence movement leader, was known as Stewart Street, after Sir Donald Stewart, also an early governor. University Way, home to the premier University of Nairobi, was known as Kings Way and echoes Queen’s Way. Bazzar Street, where Asian businessmen initially opened shops, was renamed Biashara Street.

Uhuru Highway

Whitehouse Road, named after Engineer George Whitehouse, who ran the Uganda Railway, became the Haile Selassie Avenue in honour of Emperor Selassie of Ethiopia. Uhuru Highway, signifying the attainment of independence, was previously called Princess Elizabeth, named after Queen Elizabeth II, before she ascended to the throne. She visited Kenya in 1952 and on her trip to Nyeri went up the Treetops Hotel as a princess and descended as the Queen. He father died when she was upstairs. Moi Avenue, named after the second President of the Republic, Daniel Kapkarios Toroitich Moi, (after his ascension to power) was until 1978 called Government Road.

University Way

Kenyatta Avenue

Nearly all streets in Nairobi, then as now, had colonial names, which were changed at independence. The task of re-naming the roads immediately after independence was undertaken by Charles Wanyoike Rubia, the first African Mayor at City Hall since 1937, with his team of councillors. It continued under the late Isaac Lugonzo and Margaret Kenyatta, who were Nairobi’s second and third mayors, with the latter as the only woman to have occupied the office. Roads in Nairobi’s Central Business District had names of British royalty, aristocrats and former administrators of the then East Africa Protectorate. Fewer roads have remained unchanged

Best of Kenya

42

after independence. They are River Road, named after the Nairobi River, Outer Ring Road, meaning the road on the then city border, City Hall Way, on which City Hall is situated and Parliament Road, where the Legislative Council (Legco) was based and the National Assembly is. Ngong Road, the longest road leading to Karen area and into Rift Valley, Langata Road from Nyayo National Stadium to Langata, Karen and Ongata Rongai to Rift Valley, Karen, Naivasha and Dagoretti Roads have also retained their names. Kenyatta Avenue, renamed after founding President Jomo Kenyatta, was called Delamere Avenue. It had been named after the influential aristocrat settler Hugh Cholmondeley, the 3rd Baron Lord

Delamere. Before he died in 1931, he had acquired vast chunks of land in the Rift Valley, especially around Naivasha, where his descendants still reside.

Tom Mboya Street was renamed following the assassination of the flamboyant politician on July 5, 1969. Until then, it was called Victoria Street, named after 19th century Queen Victoria, who reigned between 1836 and 1901, when she died.

Harambee Avenue, the seat of power after independence was called Coronation Avenue, where royal ceremonies were held. It is on this street that Kenyatta received the instruments of power in front of the present Foreign Office, whose official name is Treasury Building before the one housing the Finance Ministry (Treasury) was built.

Ronald Ngala Street was renamed after the Coast politician’s death on Christmas Day 1972. It was previously Duke Street in honour of British dukes. Duke House still stands on the same road, which is the present Hotel Gloria.

Mama Ngina Street, renamed after Kenya’s first First Lady, was previously known as Queen’s Way. The plural royalty was aimed at emphasising the collective honour to the queens of all generations of the British monarchy.

Kirinyaga Road was previously Grogan Road, named after Colonel E.S. Grogan. On Chiromo Campus of the University of Nairobi stand the imposing and expansive Grogan Mansions. The mansions, which belonged to Col E.S. Grogan and his wife

Tom Mboya Street

Best of Kenya

43


When Government House was built at the Hill, the present State House, MacMillan remained the library it is today.

Gertrude (of Gertrude Children’s Hospital), are gazetted as national monuments protected under law. The Chiromo mansions house offices for the College of Sciences Principal and the Institute of Social Studies and Anthropology.

Westminster House, today housing PanAfrican Insurance and Standard Bank on Kenyatta, Avenue was briefly occupied by the governor in early 20th century prior to the two – MacMillan and State House.

Museum Hill Road was previously called Ainsworth Road, while Parklands Road was known as Sclaters Road Waiyaki Way, renamed after Chief Waiyaki, was Salisbury Way, named after Lord Salisbury arguably the greatest 19th century British Prime Minister in the Victorian age.

Kipande House on Kenyatta Avenue was an office where Kenyans, then called natives, were issued with Identity cards, which they hang around their necks and which bore one’s name, tribe, location and chief. Thereafter, the ID became a booklet similar to the present day Driver’s licence.

The famous Jogoo Road to Eastlands, was renamed after the cockerel insignia on the Coat-of-Arms was called Donholm Road. Donholm was a British settler who owned a big sisal plantation in Nairobi, which was at the time outside the city.

Across the road was the Old Provincial Commissioner’s office, which housed early District Commissioners and was later used a court.

Most of the roads in the industrial district were given names of cities in the United Kingdom or British businessmen of the colonial times.

The Nairobi Railway Station was built in 1896, when Indian coolies who built the Uganda Railway reached Nairobi. That was the midway point en-route to Kisumu, then called Port Florence and which the railway reached in 1901

Just as all roads branching off Enterprise Road are presently named in alphabetical order, the colonial names were similarly alphabetically named.

The City Hall was built when Nairobi became a Municipal Council in 1937. The capital became a city in 1950. The present National Archives in Moi Avenue was built by the National Grindlays Bank before it was bought by the Kenya Commercial Bank – hence the famous

Enterprise Road was Edinburgh, while the first road Addis Ababa was Aberdeen Road; Bamburi Road was Birmingham, Changamwe Cliford and Dakar, Dublin Road. Lusaka Road was called London Road, while Likoni was Liverpool Road. Some of Nairobi’s, and, indeed, Kenya’s very famous schools had equally revealing names. Nairobi School, which is situated on Waiyaki Way, was previously Prince of Wales, while Lenana School on Ngong Road was called Duke of York. Jamhuri High School was called Duke of Gloucester, while Ngara Girls High School was Duchess of Gloucester. Did you know? That where the Hilton Hotel stands tobay was the city’s bus station. It was called Herding Bus Station before it was moved to the present Kenya Bus location to pave the way for the five-star hotel. The first Parliament was a mabati structure, which opened in 1907. It was situated next to a public toilet at the intersection of Uhuru Highway/Haile Selassie Avenue. The first Bill European MPs passed was Abolition of Slave Trade in East Africa.

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Kenya National Archives

The present Bank of India Building on Kenyatta Avenue was the second home of Parliament. MPs used to sit here or in Mombasa in the present Law Court building. Landmark beacons The colonial government administered Kenya from offices on Moi Avenue and the surroundings, which formed the nucleus of the CBD. At first, it was from the 19th century company’s property, the mosaic IBEA

Co Building (Imperial British East Africa Company) built in 1919 that still exists today. It was a private British company, which initially owned the Kenyan territory and sold it to His Majesty’s government that then declared the country a colony. The famous MacMillan Library was built in 1929 to serve as the governor’s office and residence. The building had the dual purpose of housing the governor and a library. City Hall

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When Government House was built at the Hill, the present State House, MacMillan remained the library it is today.

Gertrude (of Gertrude Children’s Hospital), are gazetted as national monuments protected under law. The Chiromo mansions house offices for the College of Sciences Principal and the Institute of Social Studies and Anthropology.

Westminster House, today housing PanAfrican Insurance and Standard Bank on Kenyatta, Avenue was briefly occupied by the governor in early 20th century prior to the two – MacMillan and State House.

Museum Hill Road was previously called Ainsworth Road, while Parklands Road was known as Sclaters Road Waiyaki Way, renamed after Chief Waiyaki, was Salisbury Way, named after Lord Salisbury arguably the greatest 19th century British Prime Minister in the Victorian age.

Kipande House on Kenyatta Avenue was an office where Kenyans, then called natives, were issued with Identity cards, which they hang around their necks and which bore one’s name, tribe, location and chief. Thereafter, the ID became a booklet similar to the present day Driver’s licence.

The famous Jogoo Road to Eastlands, was renamed after the cockerel insignia on the Coat-of-Arms was called Donholm Road. Donholm was a British settler who owned a big sisal plantation in Nairobi, which was at the time outside the city.

Across the road was the Old Provincial Commissioner’s office, which housed early District Commissioners and was later used a court.

Most of the roads in the industrial district were given names of cities in the United Kingdom or British businessmen of the colonial times.

The Nairobi Railway Station was built in 1896, when Indian coolies who built the Uganda Railway reached Nairobi. That was the midway point en-route to Kisumu, then called Port Florence and which the railway reached in 1901

Just as all roads branching off Enterprise Road are presently named in alphabetical order, the colonial names were similarly alphabetically named.

The City Hall was built when Nairobi became a Municipal Council in 1937. The capital became a city in 1950. The present National Archives in Moi Avenue was built by the National Grindlays Bank before it was bought by the Kenya Commercial Bank – hence the famous

Enterprise Road was Edinburgh, while the first road Addis Ababa was Aberdeen Road; Bamburi Road was Birmingham, Changamwe Cliford and Dakar, Dublin Road. Lusaka Road was called London Road, while Likoni was Liverpool Road. Some of Nairobi’s, and, indeed, Kenya’s very famous schools had equally revealing names. Nairobi School, which is situated on Waiyaki Way, was previously Prince of Wales, while Lenana School on Ngong Road was called Duke of York. Jamhuri High School was called Duke of Gloucester, while Ngara Girls High School was Duchess of Gloucester. Did you know? That where the Hilton Hotel stands tobay was the city’s bus station. It was called Herding Bus Station before it was moved to the present Kenya Bus location to pave the way for the five-star hotel. The first Parliament was a mabati structure, which opened in 1907. It was situated next to a public toilet at the intersection of Uhuru Highway/Haile Selassie Avenue. The first Bill European MPs passed was Abolition of Slave Trade in East Africa.

Best of Kenya

44

Kenya National Archives

The present Bank of India Building on Kenyatta Avenue was the second home of Parliament. MPs used to sit here or in Mombasa in the present Law Court building. Landmark beacons The colonial government administered Kenya from offices on Moi Avenue and the surroundings, which formed the nucleus of the CBD. At first, it was from the 19th century company’s property, the mosaic IBEA

Co Building (Imperial British East Africa Company) built in 1919 that still exists today. It was a private British company, which initially owned the Kenyan territory and sold it to His Majesty’s government that then declared the country a colony. The famous MacMillan Library was built in 1929 to serve as the governor’s office and residence. The building had the dual purpose of housing the governor and a library. City Hall

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Commercial matatu stage. The Kenya National Theatre and its cultural centre is the first such venture to be built in the Commonwealth using British taxpayer’s money – 50,000 British Pounds grant – from the Exchequer. Other funds came from local cultural groups before it was officially opened by Sir Ralph Richardson, famous British actor in November 1952. The United Kenya Club has shifted homes since the 1940s. Founded to bring together all races, it was first in a dilapidated wooden house in Haile Selassie Avenue, where the Railway Golf Club house now stands. Elite Africans would attend weekly luncheons with Europeans, Asians and Arabs, but would leave before lunch was served because they could not afford it as it was equivalent to their weekly salary. It moved to Parklands near Hospital Hill, where budding politicians like Tom Mboya, Argwings Kodhek and Ronald Ngala would address luncheons. Then, it was allocated five acres at its present location next to Royal College, now the University of Nairobi. Unlike UKC, the Nairobi Club was exclusively a European facility frequented by rich settlers, who came from as far as Naivasha, Nakuru, Nyahururu, Uasin Gishu and Trans Nzoia. The Norfolk Hotel, one of the oldest European hotels in the city, is famed for having hosted the 25th US President, Theodore Roosevelt. He was in his retirement when he was on a hunting expedition in Africa during World War 1. The Roosevelt Room remains a coveted conferencing facility at the hotel. The Stanley Hotel is another old European hotel, which was exclusive to white people. Gill House, on Moi Avenue, became the tallest building in the city in the 1950s housing government departments.

The Stanley Hotel

Best of Kenya

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Best of Kenya

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Commercial matatu stage. The Kenya National Theatre and its cultural centre is the first such venture to be built in the Commonwealth using British taxpayer’s money – 50,000 British Pounds grant – from the Exchequer. Other funds came from local cultural groups before it was officially opened by Sir Ralph Richardson, famous British actor in November 1952. The United Kenya Club has shifted homes since the 1940s. Founded to bring together all races, it was first in a dilapidated wooden house in Haile Selassie Avenue, where the Railway Golf Club house now stands. Elite Africans would attend weekly luncheons with Europeans, Asians and Arabs, but would leave before lunch was served because they could not afford it as it was equivalent to their weekly salary. It moved to Parklands near Hospital Hill, where budding politicians like Tom Mboya, Argwings Kodhek and Ronald Ngala would address luncheons. Then, it was allocated five acres at its present location next to Royal College, now the University of Nairobi. Unlike UKC, the Nairobi Club was exclusively a European facility frequented by rich settlers, who came from as far as Naivasha, Nakuru, Nyahururu, Uasin Gishu and Trans Nzoia. The Norfolk Hotel, one of the oldest European hotels in the city, is famed for having hosted the 25th US President, Theodore Roosevelt. He was in his retirement when he was on a hunting expedition in Africa during World War 1. The Roosevelt Room remains a coveted conferencing facility at the hotel. The Stanley Hotel is another old European hotel, which was exclusive to white people. Gill House, on Moi Avenue, became the tallest building in the city in the 1950s housing government departments.

The Stanley Hotel

Best of Kenya

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Best of Kenya

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From Great Trek to Matatu

The early mode of transport (late 19th and early 20th centuries) when the whiteman arrived was walking.

after independence. Individual Africans and Asians continued riding to work on the improved Amber model bicycles.

They were two types; trekking on foot and carting on mkokoteni. Mail was transported by Africans in envelopes safely stuck between twigs. The whiteman was carted seated in equivalent of mkokoteni around the city by Africans pulling it.

The KBS had exclusive rights on city roads before and after independence to the exclusion of other vehicles, which annoyed African entrepreneurs.

Then came the chariot with steel wheels pulled by horses. Pictures and the actual chariot are preserved at the National Archives and at the Norfolk Hotel as monuments. Canon Insurance Building on Haile Selassie Avenue still retains a replica of a chariot and a launch pad for firing defence missile. The train came in when the railway reached Nairobi in 1896. They (whitemen) introduced Halts. The Steamship Train (powered by water steam) could stop in various designated places from Machakos and Athi River picking up passengers, usually white people going to work in the city. And when the railway passed Nairobi, likewise the steamships came from Kijabe to the city doing the same. The third tier of transport, which was universal to both whites and Africans was the bicycle. It was a rudimentary bicycle with heavy wheels and photographs can be found at the archives. The present bicycle commonly called boda boda has evolved over a century.

Around 1970, Africans started ferrying passengers in illegal in ramshackle Ford vehicles which plied from Makadara, Gikomba, Ngara and Starehe into the city centre. They charged 30 mang’otole (30 cents), which was cheaper than KBS fares around the city. They could also, like today, stop anywhere unlike KBS which had strictly designated bus stops with sheds. They were harassed by police all the time, prompting the late Joseph Gatuguta, then MP for Kikuyu, to organise a delegation to Mzee Jomo Kenyatta at State House in 1973. He sought to know why Africans had been locked out of city transport eight years after independence. He petitioned Mzee Kenyatta to allow Africans to operate matatu (from 30 mang’otole). That is how Kenyatta allowed matatu in the city, a powerful industry that has spread all over the country.

The motorcycle (scooter), powered by petrol, was fourth coming in late 1950s. Like the bicycle, it was also shared by whites and Africans. AtIts arrival coincided with colonial government vehicles, Ford and Anglia with number plates HMS. Prior to 1952, it meant His Majesty’s Service and thereafter when Queen Elizabeth II took the throne, Her Majesty’s Service. These were the present day GK (Government of Kenya) vehicles, which like today, carried government officials or workers. For the public came the double-decker Kenya Bus Service vehicles– before and

Best of Kenya

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Best of Kenya

49


From Great Trek to Matatu

The early mode of transport (late 19th and early 20th centuries) when the whiteman arrived was walking.

after independence. Individual Africans and Asians continued riding to work on the improved Amber model bicycles.

They were two types; trekking on foot and carting on mkokoteni. Mail was transported by Africans in envelopes safely stuck between twigs. The whiteman was carted seated in equivalent of mkokoteni around the city by Africans pulling it.

The KBS had exclusive rights on city roads before and after independence to the exclusion of other vehicles, which annoyed African entrepreneurs.

Then came the chariot with steel wheels pulled by horses. Pictures and the actual chariot are preserved at the National Archives and at the Norfolk Hotel as monuments. Canon Insurance Building on Haile Selassie Avenue still retains a replica of a chariot and a launch pad for firing defence missile. The train came in when the railway reached Nairobi in 1896. They (whitemen) introduced Halts. The Steamship Train (powered by water steam) could stop in various designated places from Machakos and Athi River picking up passengers, usually white people going to work in the city. And when the railway passed Nairobi, likewise the steamships came from Kijabe to the city doing the same. The third tier of transport, which was universal to both whites and Africans was the bicycle. It was a rudimentary bicycle with heavy wheels and photographs can be found at the archives. The present bicycle commonly called boda boda has evolved over a century.

Around 1970, Africans started ferrying passengers in illegal in ramshackle Ford vehicles which plied from Makadara, Gikomba, Ngara and Starehe into the city centre. They charged 30 mang’otole (30 cents), which was cheaper than KBS fares around the city. They could also, like today, stop anywhere unlike KBS which had strictly designated bus stops with sheds. They were harassed by police all the time, prompting the late Joseph Gatuguta, then MP for Kikuyu, to organise a delegation to Mzee Jomo Kenyatta at State House in 1973. He sought to know why Africans had been locked out of city transport eight years after independence. He petitioned Mzee Kenyatta to allow Africans to operate matatu (from 30 mang’otole). That is how Kenyatta allowed matatu in the city, a powerful industry that has spread all over the country.

The motorcycle (scooter), powered by petrol, was fourth coming in late 1950s. Like the bicycle, it was also shared by whites and Africans. AtIts arrival coincided with colonial government vehicles, Ford and Anglia with number plates HMS. Prior to 1952, it meant His Majesty’s Service and thereafter when Queen Elizabeth II took the throne, Her Majesty’s Service. These were the present day GK (Government of Kenya) vehicles, which like today, carried government officials or workers. For the public came the double-decker Kenya Bus Service vehicles– before and

Best of Kenya

48

Best of Kenya

49


Constitution and Judiciary as Forces of Change On March 4, 2013, Kenya witnessed a new dawn, as the country prepared to celebrate its Golden Jubilee Independence anniversary on December 12. Kenyans trooped to the polls to cast their ballots for a great six offices of the President, Governor, Senator, Women’s Representative, County Representative, and Member of Parliament. It was like having six elections in one, a feat that was achieved without the kind of mayhem and killings that followed the declaration of results of the December 27, 2007 presidential election. The General Election of 2013, the first under the 2010 Constitution, itself described variously as liberal and progressive, ushered in a new era, in which Kenya has:

• A two-tier parliament comprising the

is tasked with the important role of interpreting the Constitution.

Transformation Framework, creates the basic architecture for transformation.

The Judiciary is also charged with finding and giving the Constitution meaning where there is contestation and patrolling its boundaries whenever there are threats. This is happening because the Constitution lays the foundation for the transformation of the Judiciary.

This architecture, the Constitution says, includes:

National Assembly and the Senate;

• A lean Cabinet of 22, and, which is not • •

made up of MPs; A people-centred Judiciary, at whose apex is the Supreme Court, whose president is the Chief Justice; and Devolved governments led by governors, whose mandate is to involve local people in decision-making on governance and distribution of resources.

The Judiciary is also transforming. Its mandate, according to the Judiciary Transformation Framework 2012-2016, is now strategically placed at the helm of the National Council on the Administration of Justice.

The Constitution states that it is the fundamental duty of the State and all its organs to observe, respect, protect, promote and fulfil the rights and freedoms in the Bill of Rights. The supreme law of the land is designed to entrench democratic values and governance and end ethnic tensions. It clearly demarcates power between the Executive, Legislature and the Judiciary. The basic law is a delight to the campaigners for human rights. It is categorical that the rights and fundamental freedoms belong to each and any individual and are not granted by the State. They are inalienable. With the promulgation of the Constitution in August 2010, all facets of public and private life are governed by national principles and values founded on human dignity, equality and the rule of law.

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Lastly, the Judiciary is changing because under the leadership of Chief Justice Willy Mutunga it is: Demanded by Kenyans over a 20-yearperiod characterised by grand corruption, the new Constitution requires that officers of the State be persons of integrity. It gives the following as the guiding principles of leadership and integrity: Selection on the basis of personal integrity, competence and suitability, or election in free and fair elections; Objectivity and impartiality in decisionmaking, and in ensuring that decisions are not influenced by nepotism, favouritism, or other improper motives or corrupt practices;

Selfless service based solely on the public interest and demonstrated by honesty in the execution of public duties and declaration of any personal interest that may conflict with pubic duties; and Accountability to the public for decisions and actions; and discipline and commitment in service to the people. The Constitution makes it clear that on public finances there shall be openness and accountability, including public participation, and that the public finance system shall promote an equitable society.

It is why the basic law provides that:

• The burden of taxation shall be shared fairly;

shared equitably among national and county governments; and Expenditure shall promote the equitable development of the country, including making special provisions for marginalised groups and regions.

• •

• Revenue raised nationally shall be •

• Hauling itself out of decades of serving

However, great as the Constitution may be, the Judiciary must perform at the very top of its ability if the rule of law is to be entrenched. This is because the Judiciary

and pandering to the whims of the Executive; Finding financial security and independence; Ridding itself of widespread corruption; Charting institutional autonomy for itself; and Winning back public confidence and peer respect.

Because judicial authority derives from the people, the Judiciary exists to fulfil the aspirations of the people of Kenya, as enshrined in the constitution. The Constitution, therefore, says the Judiciary

• Doing justice to all irrespective of status;

• Not delay justice but provide it expeditiously;

• Promote alternative forms of dispute resolution;

• Administer justice without undue regard to procedural technicalities; and

• Protect and promote the purpose and principles of the Constitution.

The Judiciary is transforming itself in order to lead the change in Kenyan society, as declared in the Constitution. By winning back public confidence and peer respect, the Judiciary is also emerging as a coequal arm of the State that does not serve the Executive or Legislature for their selfish ends. The first stanza of the National Anthem invokes the name of God, justice, unity and liberty admirably, justifiably: O God of all Creation, Bless this our land and nation. Justice be our shield and defender, May we dwell in unity, Peace and liberty, Plenty be found within our borders

Best of Kenya

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Constitution and Judiciary as Forces of Change On March 4, 2013, Kenya witnessed a new dawn, as the country prepared to celebrate its Golden Jubilee Independence anniversary on December 12. Kenyans trooped to the polls to cast their ballots for a great six offices of the President, Governor, Senator, Women’s Representative, County Representative, and Member of Parliament. It was like having six elections in one, a feat that was achieved without the kind of mayhem and killings that followed the declaration of results of the December 27, 2007 presidential election. The General Election of 2013, the first under the 2010 Constitution, itself described variously as liberal and progressive, ushered in a new era, in which Kenya has:

• A two-tier parliament comprising the

is tasked with the important role of interpreting the Constitution.

Transformation Framework, creates the basic architecture for transformation.

The Judiciary is also charged with finding and giving the Constitution meaning where there is contestation and patrolling its boundaries whenever there are threats. This is happening because the Constitution lays the foundation for the transformation of the Judiciary.

This architecture, the Constitution says, includes:

National Assembly and the Senate;

• A lean Cabinet of 22, and, which is not • •

made up of MPs; A people-centred Judiciary, at whose apex is the Supreme Court, whose president is the Chief Justice; and Devolved governments led by governors, whose mandate is to involve local people in decision-making on governance and distribution of resources.

The Judiciary is also transforming. Its mandate, according to the Judiciary Transformation Framework 2012-2016, is now strategically placed at the helm of the National Council on the Administration of Justice.

The Constitution states that it is the fundamental duty of the State and all its organs to observe, respect, protect, promote and fulfil the rights and freedoms in the Bill of Rights. The supreme law of the land is designed to entrench democratic values and governance and end ethnic tensions. It clearly demarcates power between the Executive, Legislature and the Judiciary. The basic law is a delight to the campaigners for human rights. It is categorical that the rights and fundamental freedoms belong to each and any individual and are not granted by the State. They are inalienable. With the promulgation of the Constitution in August 2010, all facets of public and private life are governed by national principles and values founded on human dignity, equality and the rule of law.

Best of Kenya

50

Lastly, the Judiciary is changing because under the leadership of Chief Justice Willy Mutunga it is: Demanded by Kenyans over a 20-yearperiod characterised by grand corruption, the new Constitution requires that officers of the State be persons of integrity. It gives the following as the guiding principles of leadership and integrity: Selection on the basis of personal integrity, competence and suitability, or election in free and fair elections; Objectivity and impartiality in decisionmaking, and in ensuring that decisions are not influenced by nepotism, favouritism, or other improper motives or corrupt practices;

Selfless service based solely on the public interest and demonstrated by honesty in the execution of public duties and declaration of any personal interest that may conflict with pubic duties; and Accountability to the public for decisions and actions; and discipline and commitment in service to the people. The Constitution makes it clear that on public finances there shall be openness and accountability, including public participation, and that the public finance system shall promote an equitable society.

It is why the basic law provides that:

• The burden of taxation shall be shared fairly;

shared equitably among national and county governments; and Expenditure shall promote the equitable development of the country, including making special provisions for marginalised groups and regions.

• •

• Revenue raised nationally shall be •

• Hauling itself out of decades of serving

However, great as the Constitution may be, the Judiciary must perform at the very top of its ability if the rule of law is to be entrenched. This is because the Judiciary

and pandering to the whims of the Executive; Finding financial security and independence; Ridding itself of widespread corruption; Charting institutional autonomy for itself; and Winning back public confidence and peer respect.

Because judicial authority derives from the people, the Judiciary exists to fulfil the aspirations of the people of Kenya, as enshrined in the constitution. The Constitution, therefore, says the Judiciary

• Doing justice to all irrespective of status;

• Not delay justice but provide it expeditiously;

• Promote alternative forms of dispute resolution;

• Administer justice without undue regard to procedural technicalities; and

• Protect and promote the purpose and principles of the Constitution.

The Judiciary is transforming itself in order to lead the change in Kenyan society, as declared in the Constitution. By winning back public confidence and peer respect, the Judiciary is also emerging as a coequal arm of the State that does not serve the Executive or Legislature for their selfish ends. The first stanza of the National Anthem invokes the name of God, justice, unity and liberty admirably, justifiably: O God of all Creation, Bless this our land and nation. Justice be our shield and defender, May we dwell in unity, Peace and liberty, Plenty be found within our borders

Best of Kenya

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Vision 2030 Powers Optimism and Growth Vision 2030, the government’s blueprint for transforming Kenya into a middle -income country, continues to anchor the economy into a steady trajectory towards becoming a prosperous, stable and democratic regional hub. The milestones strengthening the leading economy in East and Central Africa flow from the key pillars of Vision 2030: Tourism, agriculture, wholesale and retail trade, manufacturing, enabled and financial services. Kenyan banks have made significant inroads into Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, and South Sudan. In the media and communications sector, citizens of Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, South Sudan and even Malawi can enjoy the best of Kenyan television, anditsnewspapers and electronic publications from the comfort of their own homes. Within the country, the massive investment in infrastructure is paying off, with the most dramatic manifestation being the smooth artery of highways, of which the Thika Superhighway is the flagship. Not so well known is another infrastructure venture earmarked under the aegis of Vision 2030 - the construction of the Dongo Kundu Free Port in Mombasa County. The building of the Southern bypass for this project kicked off in February 2013, as a public/private partnership (PPP) between the Kenya Government and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The objective of the Dongo Kundu project is: “To bring mini-‘Dubai’ to the country and open up the development of the region and country through commercial, industrial and value-addition activities.” With more visitors from China, South East Asia, Latin America and other African countries, the tourism industry has had more and more people vote with their passports, return air tickets and feet to endorse Kenya as a viable business, tourist and vacation destination. Plans to upgrade Diani, Kilifi and Isiolo into full-fledged resort cities are ongoing. Boundaries and development of land use plans are at advanced stages, with the aerial mapping of the two proposed resort cities already taking place. Vipingo, Takaungu/Mazrui are the proposed sites for the Kilifi Resort City, while Galu/Kinondo-

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Msambweni, Waa/Tiwi and Vanga will propel the growth of Diani. In Isiolo, the Kipsing Gap area has been identified and preliminary designs completed. In agriculture, Vision 2030 focuses on the implementation of the consolidated agricultural reform legislation; fertiliser cost-reduction initiative; setting up of five livestock disease-free zones in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASAL) and initiating ASAL development through irrigation. The Agricultural Sector Reform Bill was drafted in line with the new Constitution in order to review the Agricultural Act Cap 318. The following three pieces of legislation are now in place: The Crop Development Act 2012; The Agriculture and Livestock Research Act, 2012; and The Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Authority Act, 2012; In addition the Kenya Agricultural Sector Development Strategy 2010-2020 was launched and signed by 10 sector ministers. Kenya has also signed the Comprehensive African Agricultural Development Programme (CAADP). On trade, the Vision 2030 priority areas include the creation of producer business groups; building ‘Tier 1’ markets and creating wholesale hubs. In manufacturing, the flagship projects are the development of Special Economic Zones and SME parks; the development of mini and integrated iron and steel mills and further skills development for technical human resource for the manufacturing sector. Against the backdrop of the passage of 2010 Constitution and the consolidation of the new Jubilee government with its commitment to digital innovation and the opening up of new business opportunities to global investors; the maintenance and deepening of business, technology, bilateral and multilateral ties with the UK, US, Germany, Japan and the European Union, it appears Vision 2030 is becoming Reality 2030, with every passing year.

Best of Kenya

53


Vision 2030 Powers Optimism and Growth Vision 2030, the government’s blueprint for transforming Kenya into a middle -income country, continues to anchor the economy into a steady trajectory towards becoming a prosperous, stable and democratic regional hub. The milestones strengthening the leading economy in East and Central Africa flow from the key pillars of Vision 2030: Tourism, agriculture, wholesale and retail trade, manufacturing, enabled and financial services. Kenyan banks have made significant inroads into Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, and South Sudan. In the media and communications sector, citizens of Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, South Sudan and even Malawi can enjoy the best of Kenyan television, anditsnewspapers and electronic publications from the comfort of their own homes. Within the country, the massive investment in infrastructure is paying off, with the most dramatic manifestation being the smooth artery of highways, of which the Thika Superhighway is the flagship. Not so well known is another infrastructure venture earmarked under the aegis of Vision 2030 - the construction of the Dongo Kundu Free Port in Mombasa County. The building of the Southern bypass for this project kicked off in February 2013, as a public/private partnership (PPP) between the Kenya Government and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The objective of the Dongo Kundu project is: “To bring mini-‘Dubai’ to the country and open up the development of the region and country through commercial, industrial and value-addition activities.” With more visitors from China, South East Asia, Latin America and other African countries, the tourism industry has had more and more people vote with their passports, return air tickets and feet to endorse Kenya as a viable business, tourist and vacation destination. Plans to upgrade Diani, Kilifi and Isiolo into full-fledged resort cities are ongoing. Boundaries and development of land use plans are at advanced stages, with the aerial mapping of the two proposed resort cities already taking place. Vipingo, Takaungu/Mazrui are the proposed sites for the Kilifi Resort City, while Galu/Kinondo-

Best of Kenya

52

Msambweni, Waa/Tiwi and Vanga will propel the growth of Diani. In Isiolo, the Kipsing Gap area has been identified and preliminary designs completed. In agriculture, Vision 2030 focuses on the implementation of the consolidated agricultural reform legislation; fertiliser cost-reduction initiative; setting up of five livestock disease-free zones in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASAL) and initiating ASAL development through irrigation. The Agricultural Sector Reform Bill was drafted in line with the new Constitution in order to review the Agricultural Act Cap 318. The following three pieces of legislation are now in place: The Crop Development Act 2012; The Agriculture and Livestock Research Act, 2012; and The Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Authority Act, 2012; In addition the Kenya Agricultural Sector Development Strategy 2010-2020 was launched and signed by 10 sector ministers. Kenya has also signed the Comprehensive African Agricultural Development Programme (CAADP). On trade, the Vision 2030 priority areas include the creation of producer business groups; building ‘Tier 1’ markets and creating wholesale hubs. In manufacturing, the flagship projects are the development of Special Economic Zones and SME parks; the development of mini and integrated iron and steel mills and further skills development for technical human resource for the manufacturing sector. Against the backdrop of the passage of 2010 Constitution and the consolidation of the new Jubilee government with its commitment to digital innovation and the opening up of new business opportunities to global investors; the maintenance and deepening of business, technology, bilateral and multilateral ties with the UK, US, Germany, Japan and the European Union, it appears Vision 2030 is becoming Reality 2030, with every passing year.

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Infrastructure Complements Strategic Location

Kenya’s envisioned infrastructure would rival that of any developed country. Growth of the sector gained momentum in 2011, when the government started a massive construction and improvement of the road network. The fruits can be seen in the completion of the East African region’s first superhighway – Thika Superhighway. Kenya is determined to deliver on its Vision 2030, and continue to build the nation’s infrastructure - roads, railways, seaports, as well as airports. Through projects such as the Lamu Port South Sudan-Ethiopia Transport (LAPSSET), the country hopes to drive economic growth, and job creation and deepen its links with regional partners. The LAPPSET project has several components. They include a port at Manda Bay in Lamu, a standard gauge railway line to Juba and Addis Ababa, a road network, ooil pipelines to South Sudan and Ethiopia, an oil refinery at Bargoni, three airports and three resort cities in Lamu, Isiolo, and on the shores of Lake Turkana. The Cabinet Secretary for Transport and Infrastructure, Mr Michael Kamau has the onerous task of overseeing this planned expansion and modernisation of the road

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network. The engineer is categorical that infrastructure is one of the foundations for economic transformation towards the attainment of Vision 2030. Road network Kenya has a total road network of 150,000 kilometres, which constitutes roads that are over nine metres in width. An inventory of roads of less than nine metres in width is yet to be done. Out of the total, 64,000 kilometres is the classified road network. Kenya has 14,000 kilometres of bitumen roads, one of which is the superhighway. Port services Kenya has one of the busiest ports in the region. Last year, the Port of Mombasa handled 903, 000 of 20-foot Equivalent Units (EUs). This is close to a million EUs that the world’s big ports handle in a year. Mombasa also serves Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi. The tonnage of cargo the port handles is growing at 9.5 per cent. Last year, it handled 22 million tons of inbound cargo. With the recent launch of Berth 19, the port’s capacity increased by another 200,000 EUs.

The government is working on a second terminal at the port with the assistance of the Japanese Government. When the terminal is completed, the port’s capacity will increase by another 450,000EUs. The port’s throughput rose by 9.9 per cent from 19,953 thousand tonnes in 2011 to 21,920 thousand tonnes in 2012. The port is n its able to handle huge – Panama – ships after the successful drenching of the depth for docking, which was increased by 15 metres. The aim is to make Mombasa a shipping hub. Lamu Port The government has also earmarked Lamu for the construction of an international port. Indeed, the tender for the construction of the first three berths has already been awarded. The ground in Lamu is fairly flat for container handling and other logistics. With time, Lamu could become an even bigger port than Mombasa. The Lamu port will serve Kenya, the East African Community, South Sudan, Ethiopia, the Central African Republic, DR Congo, CongoBrazzaville, and Chad. Its importance stems from its ability to handle super post-Panamax

vessels because of its natural 18-metre deep channel. The new port will be the largest on the continent and serve as a trans-Africa port. The regions to be served will be connected by a standard railway gauge to run from Lamu with a capacity to handle trains travelling at 160 kilometres per hour. Airport services Although a section of the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) was destroyed recently by fire, normal operations resumed soonthere. Indeed, preparations for the reconstruction of the damaged section are in top gear. The government has, however, procured for construction of a temporary terminal with a capacity of handling 2.5 million passengers per annum. This has completely separated incoming and outgoing passengers, which the government had always wanted to do. In a bid to attract more airlines, the government is constructing modern lounges are being built on top of JKIA’s Unit 3. To tackle the challenge of inadequate parking space, the construction of 16 more remote aircraft parking spaces away from the terminal is

underway. It is should be ready for use by March, 2014. Currently, JKIA handles over 7 million passengers a year. With the construction of Terminal 4 underway, the airport will add another 2.5 million passengers a year. The government has also awarded a tender for a new terminal called Greenfield, when completed will handle 22 million passengers. Negotiations are on for funding and terms of operation. Similarly, the building of the second runway is on course. National carrier Kenya Airways, the national carrier, is also doing well with its recent acquisition of two Boeing 777 300er series that carry 400 passengers each. The airline is also scheduled to receive four Dreamliner 787 series to replace the 767 Boeings. Kenya Airways’ fleet stands at 45 aircraft, which the airline is looking to increase to 88 by 2015. In 2012, Kenya Airways carried the biggest tonnage of cargo in Africa.

having recorded an increase of 22.4 per cent in earnings from freight in 2012. Rail accounted for 900,000 tonnes out of 22 million tonnes delivered to the pPort of Mombasa last year. This indicates that most of the cargo is still transported by road. Railway lines link Nairobi with ofMombasa, Kisumu and Taveta, on the Tanzanian border. Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda have signed a tripartite agreement to construct a standard gauge railway from Mombasa to Kigali through Nairobi, Malaba and Kampala. A contract has been signed for work to begin from Mombasa to Nairobi at a cost of US$2.75 billion. This railway will branch off at Rongai, with 200 kilometres heading to Kisumu. The aim is to develop Kisumu as an export centre through Lake Victoria’s waterway to Kigali. The government intends to also rehabilitate the current railway line and in orderincrease cargo that is moved by rail.

Railway services The railway sub-sector, too, is picking up,

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Infrastructure Complements Strategic Location

Kenya’s envisioned infrastructure would rival that of any developed country. Growth of the sector gained momentum in 2011, when the government started a massive construction and improvement of the road network. The fruits can be seen in the completion of the East African region’s first superhighway – Thika Superhighway. Kenya is determined to deliver on its Vision 2030, and continue to build the nation’s infrastructure - roads, railways, seaports, as well as airports. Through projects such as the Lamu Port South Sudan-Ethiopia Transport (LAPSSET), the country hopes to drive economic growth, and job creation and deepen its links with regional partners. The LAPPSET project has several components. They include a port at Manda Bay in Lamu, a standard gauge railway line to Juba and Addis Ababa, a road network, ooil pipelines to South Sudan and Ethiopia, an oil refinery at Bargoni, three airports and three resort cities in Lamu, Isiolo, and on the shores of Lake Turkana. The Cabinet Secretary for Transport and Infrastructure, Mr Michael Kamau has the onerous task of overseeing this planned expansion and modernisation of the road

Best of Kenya

54

network. The engineer is categorical that infrastructure is one of the foundations for economic transformation towards the attainment of Vision 2030. Road network Kenya has a total road network of 150,000 kilometres, which constitutes roads that are over nine metres in width. An inventory of roads of less than nine metres in width is yet to be done. Out of the total, 64,000 kilometres is the classified road network. Kenya has 14,000 kilometres of bitumen roads, one of which is the superhighway. Port services Kenya has one of the busiest ports in the region. Last year, the Port of Mombasa handled 903, 000 of 20-foot Equivalent Units (EUs). This is close to a million EUs that the world’s big ports handle in a year. Mombasa also serves Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi. The tonnage of cargo the port handles is growing at 9.5 per cent. Last year, it handled 22 million tons of inbound cargo. With the recent launch of Berth 19, the port’s capacity increased by another 200,000 EUs.

The government is working on a second terminal at the port with the assistance of the Japanese Government. When the terminal is completed, the port’s capacity will increase by another 450,000EUs. The port’s throughput rose by 9.9 per cent from 19,953 thousand tonnes in 2011 to 21,920 thousand tonnes in 2012. The port is n its able to handle huge – Panama – ships after the successful drenching of the depth for docking, which was increased by 15 metres. The aim is to make Mombasa a shipping hub. Lamu Port The government has also earmarked Lamu for the construction of an international port. Indeed, the tender for the construction of the first three berths has already been awarded. The ground in Lamu is fairly flat for container handling and other logistics. With time, Lamu could become an even bigger port than Mombasa. The Lamu port will serve Kenya, the East African Community, South Sudan, Ethiopia, the Central African Republic, DR Congo, CongoBrazzaville, and Chad. Its importance stems from its ability to handle super post-Panamax

vessels because of its natural 18-metre deep channel. The new port will be the largest on the continent and serve as a trans-Africa port. The regions to be served will be connected by a standard railway gauge to run from Lamu with a capacity to handle trains travelling at 160 kilometres per hour. Airport services Although a section of the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) was destroyed recently by fire, normal operations resumed soonthere. Indeed, preparations for the reconstruction of the damaged section are in top gear. The government has, however, procured for construction of a temporary terminal with a capacity of handling 2.5 million passengers per annum. This has completely separated incoming and outgoing passengers, which the government had always wanted to do. In a bid to attract more airlines, the government is constructing modern lounges are being built on top of JKIA’s Unit 3. To tackle the challenge of inadequate parking space, the construction of 16 more remote aircraft parking spaces away from the terminal is

underway. It is should be ready for use by March, 2014. Currently, JKIA handles over 7 million passengers a year. With the construction of Terminal 4 underway, the airport will add another 2.5 million passengers a year. The government has also awarded a tender for a new terminal called Greenfield, when completed will handle 22 million passengers. Negotiations are on for funding and terms of operation. Similarly, the building of the second runway is on course. National carrier Kenya Airways, the national carrier, is also doing well with its recent acquisition of two Boeing 777 300er series that carry 400 passengers each. The airline is also scheduled to receive four Dreamliner 787 series to replace the 767 Boeings. Kenya Airways’ fleet stands at 45 aircraft, which the airline is looking to increase to 88 by 2015. In 2012, Kenya Airways carried the biggest tonnage of cargo in Africa.

having recorded an increase of 22.4 per cent in earnings from freight in 2012. Rail accounted for 900,000 tonnes out of 22 million tonnes delivered to the pPort of Mombasa last year. This indicates that most of the cargo is still transported by road. Railway lines link Nairobi with ofMombasa, Kisumu and Taveta, on the Tanzanian border. Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda have signed a tripartite agreement to construct a standard gauge railway from Mombasa to Kigali through Nairobi, Malaba and Kampala. A contract has been signed for work to begin from Mombasa to Nairobi at a cost of US$2.75 billion. This railway will branch off at Rongai, with 200 kilometres heading to Kisumu. The aim is to develop Kisumu as an export centre through Lake Victoria’s waterway to Kigali. The government intends to also rehabilitate the current railway line and in orderincrease cargo that is moved by rail.

Railway services The railway sub-sector, too, is picking up,

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CORPORATE ICONS Dr Chris Kirubi, MBS Chairman – HACO Tiger Brands

Dr Chris Kirubi at work

Luckily, I excelled in school and managed to get scholarships which enabled me pursue my education in other leading institutions around the world. Initially, I undertook my training through correspondence. Later, I got a Commonwealth scholarship to Australia and thereafter, one from the Swedish government.

Dr Chris Kirubi in his office, International House, Nairobi

Dr. Chris Kirubi, MBS is a leading Kenyan entrepreneur who has vast investments in the manufacturing, property management, media, ICT, insurance and investment sectors of the Kenyan economy. An alumnus of INSEAD Institute in France, Handles University in Sweden and Harvard Business School USA, Dr. Kirubi is also chairman of HACO Industries, the Capital Group, International House Limited, Kiruma International Limited, DHL Worldwide Express Limited, Nairobi Bottlers Limited, and Smart Applications International Limited. He also holds non-executive directorships in Centum Investments Company Limited, Bayer East Africa Limited and UAP Provincial Insurance Limited.

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He has previously worked with two African governments as a member of the National Economic and Social Council, Kenya and as a board member of the Investors’ Advisory Council, Ghana. He has a close working relationship with Ghana and served as the Ghanaian Honorary Consul General in Kenya from 2000 to 2008. Outside of business, Dr. Kirubi is passionate about making a difference in the lives of the youth and disenfranchised groups and is involved in a number of social causes. He sits on the Board of Friends of the Global Fund, Africa (the fundraising arm of The Global Fund) and is an Advisory board member to the Global Business Coalition on HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis & Malaria and Friends of the Global Fund, Africa.

Locally, he collaborates very closely with the American Government as a founding Trustee of the August 7th Memorial and is now wearing a new hat in promoting the Film Industry locally, having just completed producing a movie called ‘Leo’. In recognition of his exemplary contributions to positive change in society, he has received two awards; the: Elder of the Burning Spear of the Republic of Kenya (1999), and the National Order of Merit by the French Government (2004). Best of Kenya spoke to Dr. Kirubi on his early childhood, his entrepreneurial success and his pursuit of the Kenyan dream. Herewith, excerpts.

Best of Kenya: Kindly give us a brief insight of your early life: Dr. Chris Kirubi: I was born from a very humble family in the Rift Valley. My parents were working folks, but unfortunately, passed on when we were very young. With nothing to inherit from them, we were forced to look for support from well-wishers who managed to help us gain education. Personally, my early education was supported by an English family. I used the financial support they gave me to also educate the rest of the family. As you can see, responsibilities for me started at a very early age. It was not by choice, but by circumstance.

My formal employment was marked with a rapid change of employers because I realised that as the only way for me to excel, move up the corporate ladder and afford to take care of my education. This strategy enabled me to enroll myself in the Harvard Business School. Q: What inspired you to pursue business in the first place? A: While working for one of the local companies, I discovered that there were ideas that I had and goals that I wanted to accomplish, but which did not fit into the overall company strategy. Although I was inspired to take the company to greater heights, my hands were bound. This formed the basis of my decision to venture out on my own. I believed in my ideas and was passionate about implementing them and realised that I could not accomplish them in the context of that work environment.

Q: How did you get started in business? A: Like most entrepreneurs, I started out quite small. When you are going out on your own, you want to make sure that your overhead costs are minimal. This will allow you to break even and recoup your initial investment much sooner than a business that is top heavy. In my case, I started out in a tiny office in KCB building with only a secretary. When my business began to improve, I then moved to a better location. Q: Your business interests are in diverse sectors including ICT, media; manufacturing, insurance etc. How have you managed to do this successfully? A: I do not believe in routine work. I trained myself many years back to be a jack of all trades and maybe, a master of none by opening up my eyes and skills to performing more than one task. That enabled me to look out for unique opportunities and values in diverse businesses and sectors which are economically-driven and have a sound future. That way, my interests’ portfolio is a true reflection of an encompassed business model. Q: A notable feature of your business empire is that they are all located in Kenya. What informed this strategic decision? A: For me, living and investing in Kenya, was

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CORPORATE ICONS Dr Chris Kirubi, MBS Chairman – HACO Tiger Brands

Dr Chris Kirubi at work

Luckily, I excelled in school and managed to get scholarships which enabled me pursue my education in other leading institutions around the world. Initially, I undertook my training through correspondence. Later, I got a Commonwealth scholarship to Australia and thereafter, one from the Swedish government.

Dr Chris Kirubi in his office, International House, Nairobi

Dr. Chris Kirubi, MBS is a leading Kenyan entrepreneur who has vast investments in the manufacturing, property management, media, ICT, insurance and investment sectors of the Kenyan economy. An alumnus of INSEAD Institute in France, Handles University in Sweden and Harvard Business School USA, Dr. Kirubi is also chairman of HACO Industries, the Capital Group, International House Limited, Kiruma International Limited, DHL Worldwide Express Limited, Nairobi Bottlers Limited, and Smart Applications International Limited. He also holds non-executive directorships in Centum Investments Company Limited, Bayer East Africa Limited and UAP Provincial Insurance Limited.

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He has previously worked with two African governments as a member of the National Economic and Social Council, Kenya and as a board member of the Investors’ Advisory Council, Ghana. He has a close working relationship with Ghana and served as the Ghanaian Honorary Consul General in Kenya from 2000 to 2008. Outside of business, Dr. Kirubi is passionate about making a difference in the lives of the youth and disenfranchised groups and is involved in a number of social causes. He sits on the Board of Friends of the Global Fund, Africa (the fundraising arm of The Global Fund) and is an Advisory board member to the Global Business Coalition on HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis & Malaria and Friends of the Global Fund, Africa.

Locally, he collaborates very closely with the American Government as a founding Trustee of the August 7th Memorial and is now wearing a new hat in promoting the Film Industry locally, having just completed producing a movie called ‘Leo’. In recognition of his exemplary contributions to positive change in society, he has received two awards; the: Elder of the Burning Spear of the Republic of Kenya (1999), and the National Order of Merit by the French Government (2004). Best of Kenya spoke to Dr. Kirubi on his early childhood, his entrepreneurial success and his pursuit of the Kenyan dream. Herewith, excerpts.

Best of Kenya: Kindly give us a brief insight of your early life: Dr. Chris Kirubi: I was born from a very humble family in the Rift Valley. My parents were working folks, but unfortunately, passed on when we were very young. With nothing to inherit from them, we were forced to look for support from well-wishers who managed to help us gain education. Personally, my early education was supported by an English family. I used the financial support they gave me to also educate the rest of the family. As you can see, responsibilities for me started at a very early age. It was not by choice, but by circumstance.

My formal employment was marked with a rapid change of employers because I realised that as the only way for me to excel, move up the corporate ladder and afford to take care of my education. This strategy enabled me to enroll myself in the Harvard Business School. Q: What inspired you to pursue business in the first place? A: While working for one of the local companies, I discovered that there were ideas that I had and goals that I wanted to accomplish, but which did not fit into the overall company strategy. Although I was inspired to take the company to greater heights, my hands were bound. This formed the basis of my decision to venture out on my own. I believed in my ideas and was passionate about implementing them and realised that I could not accomplish them in the context of that work environment.

Q: How did you get started in business? A: Like most entrepreneurs, I started out quite small. When you are going out on your own, you want to make sure that your overhead costs are minimal. This will allow you to break even and recoup your initial investment much sooner than a business that is top heavy. In my case, I started out in a tiny office in KCB building with only a secretary. When my business began to improve, I then moved to a better location. Q: Your business interests are in diverse sectors including ICT, media; manufacturing, insurance etc. How have you managed to do this successfully? A: I do not believe in routine work. I trained myself many years back to be a jack of all trades and maybe, a master of none by opening up my eyes and skills to performing more than one task. That enabled me to look out for unique opportunities and values in diverse businesses and sectors which are economically-driven and have a sound future. That way, my interests’ portfolio is a true reflection of an encompassed business model. Q: A notable feature of your business empire is that they are all located in Kenya. What informed this strategic decision? A: For me, living and investing in Kenya, was

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that the government must continue to fuel demand for our goods and services. How do they do so? They will do so by enabling our businesses to become more competitive and our goods more affordable to the end consumer. Obviously, this means that we must continue to improve infrastructure and to lower the cost of production. We must also embrace innovation and use of modern technologies especially in the area of farming and value addition of food products. Most importantly, our leaders must increase accountability of public resources and curb corruption and wastage. Our government must also continue to remove red tape and improve the ease of doing business in Kenya, with Kenya and the EAC market.

Dr Chris Kirubi at a Coca-Cola launch

a conscious decision. This is my home and my birthright and investing here is a choice I continue to make daily. My passion in life has been to create a larger middle class or widen the existing base. This meant uplifting more people from below the poverty line and empowering them with the capacity to buy and live in a higher social status. Of course, doing so would also translate into a larger market for our goods. This strategy has a spiraling effect for the development of our economy. More people with a higher spending power translates into a larger market for our goods, but it also translates into an improved quality of living for our people. It is a win-win situation. From a strategic angle, Africa has been the place to invest in this decade. While foreign investors are just making this decision now, we have always known the same because it makes business sense to go where the need is greatest. As a Kenyan, I know our comparative advantages and I believe in what we can accomplish as the leading economy as well as gateway to the East African region. Our decisions are being re-affirmed daily, by the number of multi-nationals choosing to come here; that there is no better place to invest than in Kenya today.

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Q: Specifically, how have your business interests contributed to the development of Kenya? A: One of the things that gives me great joy is that HACO enabled me to trail-blaze and to open the way for many others. As an indigenous Kenyan, I was venturing into a manufacturing space that was dominated by foreign players. Of course there was resistance, but in the end I was able to infiltrate that market and to establish a business strong enough to attract the attention of global partners.

delivering value to your customers… then it better show. If you say you will be there, you better show up on time and in person.

Aside from that, my businesses are present in virtually every sector of our economy. This means that apart from building infrastructure and providing employment, we are supporting the livelihoods of many Kenyan families and allowing them to achieve their aspirations.

Q: Looking back, what key lessons did you learn in your early life that have shaped your business future? A: That self-worth is innate in every human being. You and your ideas are just as good, if not better, than the next person’s regardless of their colour and social status. Do not allow anyone to put you down because you grew up on the ‘wrong’ side of town or did not attend the ‘right’ schools.

Most importantly, day by day we are providing improved access to goods and services for the ordinary Kenyan. We are setting standards, providing for healthy competition and generally, improving the lives of the general population. Q: Which key business ethos would you accredit your successful business stewardship to? A: One of the most important philosophies for any entrepreneur is that ‘your word must be good for something.’ If you say you are

Whatever you promise, make sure you deliver. This leads to credibility and of course requires you to be disciplined, persistent, hardworking, dependable etc. But once you create a credible brand, people will confidently come to you because they know that they are managing their risks by choosing to invest in and with you.

Secondly, that I had the power to change my future. I may not have had control of my past but I damn well can do something about my today going forward. Q: What factors do you see playing a pivotal role in shaping the country’s postJubilee economic future? A: We must continue to grow especially around what our country needs. This means

Q: Away from business, you are very passionate about the youth in the Kenyan society. How best can we as a country help mold and mainstream them in the development agenda of this great nation? A: We need to make funds accessible to the youth and I am glad that government has begun doing this. Many young people are struggling to venture into business and make a livelihood for themselves because of the lack of capital. The financial institutions have made it impossible to access funds due to their regulations and it’s also not easy to get angel investors. I wish we can get more institutions willing to support youth ventures because if we elevate them then we will definitely elevate the economy of this nation. I think it’s also time we helped the youth focus on agribusiness because this is the future. Government needs to jump in, use technology to make the life of farmers simpler so that together we can grow our economy. All said, I would wish to commend the ongoing efforts by the current government, especially in ensuring that 30 per cent of the government tenders available are allocated to the youth, besides other previously fringeactors in the Kenyan society. Q: Personally, how would you consider supporting the youth in this regard? A: I would highly recommend mentorship programmes. I wish many business leaders would take this seriously because many young people are eager to have mentors who will steer them in the right direction. If you have someone successful to look up to, one who will encourage you when times are tough then you will definitely work harder. As an ‘experienced’ statesman, I took it upon myself to come out and personally mentor the younger generation. There was a

DJ CK at the Capital FM Station

huge vacuum in this area and I realized that young people were hungry for information and advice regarding entrepreneurship. I decided to go to where they (young people) were which is on Social Media. Each day I would share quotes and life lessons with my followers and friends. Recently, I started #Askkirubi on Twitter to make it easier for young people to speak to me and ask questions concerning business and entrepreneurship. Using my Twitter handle @CKirubi, I respond to these questions, write blogs and do short videos based on different topics in business. I also use my Facebook page (https://www. facebook.com/chriskirubi) to advice the young people and give tips on how to succeed in business and in life. It is my desire to see the young people of this country flourish and I will do what I can to enhance this. Q: What would be your key advice to them, especially from your early life in regard to the famous quote “There is no shortcut to success’’? A: My life is not a shortcut. I had to work very hard and very smart to get to where I am and nowadays many things have been simplified. There are many opportunities out there but people are used to getting things on a silver platter. You don’t go to sleep and wake up rich or successful unless you are an heir to some throne. You need to work your way up just like all the successful people we read and hear about. Everyone has the freedom to decide what they want to become, so it’s up to you to

Dr Chris Kirubi poses with Sir Richard Branson, Founder Virgin Airlines

build your confidence and work hard to get to where you want to be. Q: In conclusion: What would you like to be most remembered for? A: I would like to be remembered as a man who came from very humble beginnings and managed to turn the fortunes of, and helped many other people gain quality life. I believe my work with the youth is one of the most satisfying; creating opportunities for them; mentoring them; and employing them is for me, one of the biggest pleasures and achievements that I would like to treasure and be remembered for. That I did make some peoples’ lives much better than they could ever think of. Twitter handle @CKirubi Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/ chriskirubi)

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that the government must continue to fuel demand for our goods and services. How do they do so? They will do so by enabling our businesses to become more competitive and our goods more affordable to the end consumer. Obviously, this means that we must continue to improve infrastructure and to lower the cost of production. We must also embrace innovation and use of modern technologies especially in the area of farming and value addition of food products. Most importantly, our leaders must increase accountability of public resources and curb corruption and wastage. Our government must also continue to remove red tape and improve the ease of doing business in Kenya, with Kenya and the EAC market.

Dr Chris Kirubi at a Coca-Cola launch

a conscious decision. This is my home and my birthright and investing here is a choice I continue to make daily. My passion in life has been to create a larger middle class or widen the existing base. This meant uplifting more people from below the poverty line and empowering them with the capacity to buy and live in a higher social status. Of course, doing so would also translate into a larger market for our goods. This strategy has a spiraling effect for the development of our economy. More people with a higher spending power translates into a larger market for our goods, but it also translates into an improved quality of living for our people. It is a win-win situation. From a strategic angle, Africa has been the place to invest in this decade. While foreign investors are just making this decision now, we have always known the same because it makes business sense to go where the need is greatest. As a Kenyan, I know our comparative advantages and I believe in what we can accomplish as the leading economy as well as gateway to the East African region. Our decisions are being re-affirmed daily, by the number of multi-nationals choosing to come here; that there is no better place to invest than in Kenya today.

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Q: Specifically, how have your business interests contributed to the development of Kenya? A: One of the things that gives me great joy is that HACO enabled me to trail-blaze and to open the way for many others. As an indigenous Kenyan, I was venturing into a manufacturing space that was dominated by foreign players. Of course there was resistance, but in the end I was able to infiltrate that market and to establish a business strong enough to attract the attention of global partners.

delivering value to your customers… then it better show. If you say you will be there, you better show up on time and in person.

Aside from that, my businesses are present in virtually every sector of our economy. This means that apart from building infrastructure and providing employment, we are supporting the livelihoods of many Kenyan families and allowing them to achieve their aspirations.

Q: Looking back, what key lessons did you learn in your early life that have shaped your business future? A: That self-worth is innate in every human being. You and your ideas are just as good, if not better, than the next person’s regardless of their colour and social status. Do not allow anyone to put you down because you grew up on the ‘wrong’ side of town or did not attend the ‘right’ schools.

Most importantly, day by day we are providing improved access to goods and services for the ordinary Kenyan. We are setting standards, providing for healthy competition and generally, improving the lives of the general population. Q: Which key business ethos would you accredit your successful business stewardship to? A: One of the most important philosophies for any entrepreneur is that ‘your word must be good for something.’ If you say you are

Whatever you promise, make sure you deliver. This leads to credibility and of course requires you to be disciplined, persistent, hardworking, dependable etc. But once you create a credible brand, people will confidently come to you because they know that they are managing their risks by choosing to invest in and with you.

Secondly, that I had the power to change my future. I may not have had control of my past but I damn well can do something about my today going forward. Q: What factors do you see playing a pivotal role in shaping the country’s postJubilee economic future? A: We must continue to grow especially around what our country needs. This means

Q: Away from business, you are very passionate about the youth in the Kenyan society. How best can we as a country help mold and mainstream them in the development agenda of this great nation? A: We need to make funds accessible to the youth and I am glad that government has begun doing this. Many young people are struggling to venture into business and make a livelihood for themselves because of the lack of capital. The financial institutions have made it impossible to access funds due to their regulations and it’s also not easy to get angel investors. I wish we can get more institutions willing to support youth ventures because if we elevate them then we will definitely elevate the economy of this nation. I think it’s also time we helped the youth focus on agribusiness because this is the future. Government needs to jump in, use technology to make the life of farmers simpler so that together we can grow our economy. All said, I would wish to commend the ongoing efforts by the current government, especially in ensuring that 30 per cent of the government tenders available are allocated to the youth, besides other previously fringeactors in the Kenyan society. Q: Personally, how would you consider supporting the youth in this regard? A: I would highly recommend mentorship programmes. I wish many business leaders would take this seriously because many young people are eager to have mentors who will steer them in the right direction. If you have someone successful to look up to, one who will encourage you when times are tough then you will definitely work harder. As an ‘experienced’ statesman, I took it upon myself to come out and personally mentor the younger generation. There was a

DJ CK at the Capital FM Station

huge vacuum in this area and I realized that young people were hungry for information and advice regarding entrepreneurship. I decided to go to where they (young people) were which is on Social Media. Each day I would share quotes and life lessons with my followers and friends. Recently, I started #Askkirubi on Twitter to make it easier for young people to speak to me and ask questions concerning business and entrepreneurship. Using my Twitter handle @CKirubi, I respond to these questions, write blogs and do short videos based on different topics in business. I also use my Facebook page (https://www. facebook.com/chriskirubi) to advice the young people and give tips on how to succeed in business and in life. It is my desire to see the young people of this country flourish and I will do what I can to enhance this. Q: What would be your key advice to them, especially from your early life in regard to the famous quote “There is no shortcut to success’’? A: My life is not a shortcut. I had to work very hard and very smart to get to where I am and nowadays many things have been simplified. There are many opportunities out there but people are used to getting things on a silver platter. You don’t go to sleep and wake up rich or successful unless you are an heir to some throne. You need to work your way up just like all the successful people we read and hear about. Everyone has the freedom to decide what they want to become, so it’s up to you to

Dr Chris Kirubi poses with Sir Richard Branson, Founder Virgin Airlines

build your confidence and work hard to get to where you want to be. Q: In conclusion: What would you like to be most remembered for? A: I would like to be remembered as a man who came from very humble beginnings and managed to turn the fortunes of, and helped many other people gain quality life. I believe my work with the youth is one of the most satisfying; creating opportunities for them; mentoring them; and employing them is for me, one of the biggest pleasures and achievements that I would like to treasure and be remembered for. That I did make some peoples’ lives much better than they could ever think of. Twitter handle @CKirubi Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/ chriskirubi)

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and everyone, including AKC, took notice.

CORPORATE ICONS

In 1968, Mitsubishi came to Kenya seeking a franchise holder. AKC quickly snapped up the opportunity which led to the establishment of Simba Colt Motors.

AKC Popat ‘’The Silent Philanthropist’’ Born on December 9, 1925, Abdul Karim Chatur Popat or AKC Popat, as he was fondly known, was destined for big things. Early Life The eldest of 10 children, AKC’s life started from extremely humble beginnings. After passing his Senior Cambridge Exams at Jamhuri High School (then known as Duke of Gloucester), AKC was not only compelled to drop out of school due to difficulties in raising his subsequent school fees, but also saw his dream of becoming a doctor fade away. At the tender age of 14, AKC took it upon himself to help his father in taking care of the family. In 1940 at the beginning of World War II, he was recruited into the British Army and earned his first salary of KShs100. His brother, Shamshudin Popat recalls this as the most memorable moment for AKC. Their father was so overwhelmed that tears of joy flowed freely down his cheeks. He worked with the Army for over three years during the war, simultaneously running small businesses in Nakuru town. Working on more than two jobs daily, he thereafter worked for J. G. Aronson Coffee Exporters as an Assistant Export Manager from 1950 and then its subsidiary Jayjee Products as the Chief Accountant. At this time, his entrepreneurial acumen developed, and he started buying and selling second hand cars. During his formative years, he set up a small bus company with one of his friends. The success of this motor engagement saw AKC eventually open Deluxe Motors - his first ever secondhand car dealership showroom on Nairobi’s Moktar Daddah Street in 1945 and which exists to this day. It was not long before the Japanese took notice of Kenya’s emerging motor industry. In 1967, Toyota Corporation came calling on AKC and offered him the Toyota franchise. At that time, Japanese cars were new in the Kenyan market and of limited popularity. Reluctant to accept that franchise, the offer was quickly snapped up by a Greek businessman who then set up Westlands Motors. Nissans were in the 1960s sold by the Motor Mart Group. Soon, the performance of the Toyota brand grew in popularity among Kenyan consumers

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‘’In those days, I was the Salesman, Manager, Accountant and MD – all in one. I opened the showroom at 7.30 am and stayed open up to 7.00 pm. We were even open on Saturdays and Sundays up to 1.00 pm. The first car I sold was a new Colt 1100 – 5 Door in 1969 for KShs10,500 less 10 per cent discount’’, recalled AKC in an interview with Global Village Publishers before his demise on March 2, 2013.

State-of-the-art AKC Popat Medical Clinic at Lions Eye Loresho Hospital

“The first few years were times of immense difficulties because of severe competition and non-availability of import licences. This forced my company to enter into a strategic partnership with CMC Motors in 1977, leading to the formation of Simba Cooper Motors (SCM). Unfortunately, that shortlived partnership did not work very well, and in 1978 we decided to buy out the entire business, and revert to Simba Colt Motors. “Soon after, we moved to a larger facility at Embassy House on Harambee Avenue. As the business grew, we relocated to our present spacious location on Mombasa Road in 1996. “During that period, we also acquired the Mitsubishi Truck franchise when Bruce Trucks (then a subsidiary of the Lonrho Group) lost it, and today, we handle the whole range of Mitsubishi vehicles in Kenya, and are a leading motor company both in terms of size, and number of units sold,’’, said AKC. Vision In 1997, Simba Colt Motors evolved into Simba Corporation, which has continued to grow and take forward the vision of AKC Popat of being a professionally run business that gives equal opportunities to all its employees to learn, grow and prosper. Simba Corporation’s Executive Director, Dinesh Kotecha, recalls: ‘’Under AKC Popat, we were like a university and learned every day on the job. He was a fair man; never said he did not have time for anybody; respected all regardless of position and valued hard work. In fact, his motto was: Hard work never killed anybody’’. AKC was the Executive Chairman of Simba Corporation at the time of his demise. His hard work of setting up a great business shows in the strategic diversification of the Group such as an assembly plant in Mombasa, ownership of strategic global franchises including AVIS Rent-A-Car,

Mrs. Gulzaar Popat and the late AKC Popat at the official opening of the AKC Popat Medical Clinic at Lions Eye Loresho Hospital

Mahindra, BMW and most recently, the establishment of a management agreement with Kempinski Hotels – the world’s oldest hotel chain with Simba Hospitality. One of AKC’s most remarkable attributes was that although he only had an elementary knowledge of accounting, he never studied accountancy in any school or college. Interestingly, he taught himself accounting from a small book titled ‘’Elementary Accounting’’. This helped him secure a decent knowledge of accounting – marked by his excellent book-keeping record, as would be attested to even by Kenya’s leading accounting firms today. Philanthropic work AKC Popat’s work did not stop at business. His family and friends applaud him for the great charity work he did. He was widely known as the ‘’Silent Philanthropist’’, and cared about giving quality health care to all in society, especially the underprivileged, notably the state-of-the-art AKC Medical Clinic at Lions Eye Loresho Hospital. AKC received one of the highest honours – the Vazir, bestowed by HH the Aga Khan, for outstanding service rendered to the

community which he cherished to his last day. Philosophy In all his life, AKC never forgot the two most important things in his life: his family and faith in God. He remarked once: ‘’I believe I owe my successful business life to the sum of acquired knowledge, experience and business strategy. My personal philosophy is to embrace fair play and good customer relationship. This has so far not failed me. Plus, I attribute everything to God’s will’’. Legacy AKC was happily married to Gulzar in 1948, and was blessed with three sons: Azim – MD of Plaza Hotel who lives in Vancouver, Canada; Alnashir – Chairman of Imperial Bank in Kenya; and Adil – Group CEO, Simba Corporation. AKC left behind a golden legacy, not rich due to his immense wealth from his corporate leadership excellence, but valued because of his personality, ideas, compassion, love, business acumen, charity, charisma and talent – all of which he was always freely willing to share to the benefit of the larger society.

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and everyone, including AKC, took notice.

CORPORATE ICONS

In 1968, Mitsubishi came to Kenya seeking a franchise holder. AKC quickly snapped up the opportunity which led to the establishment of Simba Colt Motors.

AKC Popat ‘’The Silent Philanthropist’’ Born on December 9, 1925, Abdul Karim Chatur Popat or AKC Popat, as he was fondly known, was destined for big things. Early Life The eldest of 10 children, AKC’s life started from extremely humble beginnings. After passing his Senior Cambridge Exams at Jamhuri High School (then known as Duke of Gloucester), AKC was not only compelled to drop out of school due to difficulties in raising his subsequent school fees, but also saw his dream of becoming a doctor fade away. At the tender age of 14, AKC took it upon himself to help his father in taking care of the family. In 1940 at the beginning of World War II, he was recruited into the British Army and earned his first salary of KShs100. His brother, Shamshudin Popat recalls this as the most memorable moment for AKC. Their father was so overwhelmed that tears of joy flowed freely down his cheeks. He worked with the Army for over three years during the war, simultaneously running small businesses in Nakuru town. Working on more than two jobs daily, he thereafter worked for J. G. Aronson Coffee Exporters as an Assistant Export Manager from 1950 and then its subsidiary Jayjee Products as the Chief Accountant. At this time, his entrepreneurial acumen developed, and he started buying and selling second hand cars. During his formative years, he set up a small bus company with one of his friends. The success of this motor engagement saw AKC eventually open Deluxe Motors - his first ever secondhand car dealership showroom on Nairobi’s Moktar Daddah Street in 1945 and which exists to this day. It was not long before the Japanese took notice of Kenya’s emerging motor industry. In 1967, Toyota Corporation came calling on AKC and offered him the Toyota franchise. At that time, Japanese cars were new in the Kenyan market and of limited popularity. Reluctant to accept that franchise, the offer was quickly snapped up by a Greek businessman who then set up Westlands Motors. Nissans were in the 1960s sold by the Motor Mart Group. Soon, the performance of the Toyota brand grew in popularity among Kenyan consumers

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‘’In those days, I was the Salesman, Manager, Accountant and MD – all in one. I opened the showroom at 7.30 am and stayed open up to 7.00 pm. We were even open on Saturdays and Sundays up to 1.00 pm. The first car I sold was a new Colt 1100 – 5 Door in 1969 for KShs10,500 less 10 per cent discount’’, recalled AKC in an interview with Global Village Publishers before his demise on March 2, 2013.

State-of-the-art AKC Popat Medical Clinic at Lions Eye Loresho Hospital

“The first few years were times of immense difficulties because of severe competition and non-availability of import licences. This forced my company to enter into a strategic partnership with CMC Motors in 1977, leading to the formation of Simba Cooper Motors (SCM). Unfortunately, that shortlived partnership did not work very well, and in 1978 we decided to buy out the entire business, and revert to Simba Colt Motors. “Soon after, we moved to a larger facility at Embassy House on Harambee Avenue. As the business grew, we relocated to our present spacious location on Mombasa Road in 1996. “During that period, we also acquired the Mitsubishi Truck franchise when Bruce Trucks (then a subsidiary of the Lonrho Group) lost it, and today, we handle the whole range of Mitsubishi vehicles in Kenya, and are a leading motor company both in terms of size, and number of units sold,’’, said AKC. Vision In 1997, Simba Colt Motors evolved into Simba Corporation, which has continued to grow and take forward the vision of AKC Popat of being a professionally run business that gives equal opportunities to all its employees to learn, grow and prosper. Simba Corporation’s Executive Director, Dinesh Kotecha, recalls: ‘’Under AKC Popat, we were like a university and learned every day on the job. He was a fair man; never said he did not have time for anybody; respected all regardless of position and valued hard work. In fact, his motto was: Hard work never killed anybody’’. AKC was the Executive Chairman of Simba Corporation at the time of his demise. His hard work of setting up a great business shows in the strategic diversification of the Group such as an assembly plant in Mombasa, ownership of strategic global franchises including AVIS Rent-A-Car,

Mrs. Gulzaar Popat and the late AKC Popat at the official opening of the AKC Popat Medical Clinic at Lions Eye Loresho Hospital

Mahindra, BMW and most recently, the establishment of a management agreement with Kempinski Hotels – the world’s oldest hotel chain with Simba Hospitality. One of AKC’s most remarkable attributes was that although he only had an elementary knowledge of accounting, he never studied accountancy in any school or college. Interestingly, he taught himself accounting from a small book titled ‘’Elementary Accounting’’. This helped him secure a decent knowledge of accounting – marked by his excellent book-keeping record, as would be attested to even by Kenya’s leading accounting firms today. Philanthropic work AKC Popat’s work did not stop at business. His family and friends applaud him for the great charity work he did. He was widely known as the ‘’Silent Philanthropist’’, and cared about giving quality health care to all in society, especially the underprivileged, notably the state-of-the-art AKC Medical Clinic at Lions Eye Loresho Hospital. AKC received one of the highest honours – the Vazir, bestowed by HH the Aga Khan, for outstanding service rendered to the

community which he cherished to his last day. Philosophy In all his life, AKC never forgot the two most important things in his life: his family and faith in God. He remarked once: ‘’I believe I owe my successful business life to the sum of acquired knowledge, experience and business strategy. My personal philosophy is to embrace fair play and good customer relationship. This has so far not failed me. Plus, I attribute everything to God’s will’’. Legacy AKC was happily married to Gulzar in 1948, and was blessed with three sons: Azim – MD of Plaza Hotel who lives in Vancouver, Canada; Alnashir – Chairman of Imperial Bank in Kenya; and Adil – Group CEO, Simba Corporation. AKC left behind a golden legacy, not rich due to his immense wealth from his corporate leadership excellence, but valued because of his personality, ideas, compassion, love, business acumen, charity, charisma and talent – all of which he was always freely willing to share to the benefit of the larger society.

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CORPORATE ICONS From TBC’s Humble Beginnings to ‘Much more than just a bookshop’

Kenya’s Independence 50 years ago was, for many Europeans and Indians, a time of despondency and frustration as they sold up, closed farms and businesses to leave the country.   

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by the emerging concept of harambee community schools, decided to concentrate on school supplies.

But two young Indians, S V “Bachubhai” Shah and the late Maneklal Rughani saw the opportunity it represented and joined together their family assets built up by their fathers in Murang’a and Karatina to start a new venture in Nairobi.

Text Book Centre (TBC) was born and over the next few decades grew into East Africa’s leading school book supplier before diversifying into general and Africana books, academic reference books, and supporting their slogan, “Much more than just a bookshop” by further diversification into IT, computers and, today, e-books. 

They already had some involvement in the book trade and recognising the African thirst for education, which was well defined

Out of TBC were to emerge other family holdings, specifically East Africa’s firstever enclosed shopping mall, The Sarit

Centre.    Opened in 1983, this shopping complex nicknamed “the City within a City” because of its diversified tenant mix providing everything under one roof, led the emergence of new shopping trends. Bachubhai Shah’s pre-eminence in the business world and innovative strategies was recognised in 2000 through the award of the Order of the Grand Warrior of Kenya. His lifetime friend and business partner, Maneklal Rughani, died in 1997 but the strong enduring bond between the two families and business partnership continues to this day.

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CORPORATE ICONS From TBC’s Humble Beginnings to ‘Much more than just a bookshop’

Kenya’s Independence 50 years ago was, for many Europeans and Indians, a time of despondency and frustration as they sold up, closed farms and businesses to leave the country.   

Best of Kenya

62

by the emerging concept of harambee community schools, decided to concentrate on school supplies.

But two young Indians, S V “Bachubhai” Shah and the late Maneklal Rughani saw the opportunity it represented and joined together their family assets built up by their fathers in Murang’a and Karatina to start a new venture in Nairobi.

Text Book Centre (TBC) was born and over the next few decades grew into East Africa’s leading school book supplier before diversifying into general and Africana books, academic reference books, and supporting their slogan, “Much more than just a bookshop” by further diversification into IT, computers and, today, e-books. 

They already had some involvement in the book trade and recognising the African thirst for education, which was well defined

Out of TBC were to emerge other family holdings, specifically East Africa’s firstever enclosed shopping mall, The Sarit

Centre.    Opened in 1983, this shopping complex nicknamed “the City within a City” because of its diversified tenant mix providing everything under one roof, led the emergence of new shopping trends. Bachubhai Shah’s pre-eminence in the business world and innovative strategies was recognised in 2000 through the award of the Order of the Grand Warrior of Kenya. His lifetime friend and business partner, Maneklal Rughani, died in 1997 but the strong enduring bond between the two families and business partnership continues to this day.

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CHAPTER 2 Tourism

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CHAPTER 2 Tourism

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Kenya Tourism Board Markets Kenya as Destination of Choice

Under the Tourism Act of 2011, it was renamed Kenya Tourism Board with the object and purpose of marketing Kenya as a tourist destination.

for which the Tourism Board was established. Tourism Performance Tourism is among the key economic pillars and contributes about 11 per cent of Kenya’s Gross Domestic Products (GDP). Tourist arrivals by air and sea have grown steadily since the inception of KTB.

Functions of KTB As per its establishment, KTB has the following obligations: • Develop, implement and co-ordinate a national tourism marketing strategy; • Market Kenya at local, national, regional and international levels as a premier tourist destination; • Identify tourism market needs and trends and advise tourism stakeholders accordingly; and • Perform any other functions that are ancillary to the object and purpose

The Performance for 2011 was outstanding and superseded the 2010 international arrivals by 15.4 per cent. This growth is attributable to a large extent to aggressive marketing by KTB in collaboration with other stakeholders. However, the slight drop in 2012 arrivals and revenues is attributed to uncertainty over the 2013 General Election, euro zone crisis and insecurity, among other factors. REVENUE Revenues from tourism have also grown steadily over the years to earn the much-

Kenya Tourist Board (KTB) was established in 1997 under the State Corporations Act of the Laws of Kenya.

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needed foreign currency for Kenya. The 2011 revenues were the best ever recorded at KShs97.9 Billion which surpassed the 2010 figures by about 33 per cent. Domestic Tourism Remarkable growth in domestic tourism has been witnessed in the past couple of years as a result of sustained and re-invigorated marketing campaigns. In terms of bed nights, domestic tourism contributed 15 per cent to tourism revenues in 2003 and in 2011 it contributed 37 per cent. (Source Kenya National Bureau of Statistics) In 2012, the contribution of domestic tourism to the national economy grew by 4 per cent thereby contributing 41 per cent to national tourism revenue. In the same year, the total number of bed nights by domestic tourists was 2,547,200

KTB Milestones ISO Re-Certification • KTB was in 2012 ISO re-certified owing to its continued improved service delivery. The institution was ISO 9001: 2008 certified in 2009. KTB can thus claim its position in the top league of best practices. Recruitment of marketing agencies abroad • KTB currently has established 15 offices in key source markets through a competitive recruitment process which Best of Kenya

67


Kenya Tourism Board Markets Kenya as Destination of Choice

Under the Tourism Act of 2011, it was renamed Kenya Tourism Board with the object and purpose of marketing Kenya as a tourist destination.

for which the Tourism Board was established. Tourism Performance Tourism is among the key economic pillars and contributes about 11 per cent of Kenya’s Gross Domestic Products (GDP). Tourist arrivals by air and sea have grown steadily since the inception of KTB.

Functions of KTB As per its establishment, KTB has the following obligations: • Develop, implement and co-ordinate a national tourism marketing strategy; • Market Kenya at local, national, regional and international levels as a premier tourist destination; • Identify tourism market needs and trends and advise tourism stakeholders accordingly; and • Perform any other functions that are ancillary to the object and purpose

The Performance for 2011 was outstanding and superseded the 2010 international arrivals by 15.4 per cent. This growth is attributable to a large extent to aggressive marketing by KTB in collaboration with other stakeholders. However, the slight drop in 2012 arrivals and revenues is attributed to uncertainty over the 2013 General Election, euro zone crisis and insecurity, among other factors. REVENUE Revenues from tourism have also grown steadily over the years to earn the much-

Kenya Tourist Board (KTB) was established in 1997 under the State Corporations Act of the Laws of Kenya.

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needed foreign currency for Kenya. The 2011 revenues were the best ever recorded at KShs97.9 Billion which surpassed the 2010 figures by about 33 per cent. Domestic Tourism Remarkable growth in domestic tourism has been witnessed in the past couple of years as a result of sustained and re-invigorated marketing campaigns. In terms of bed nights, domestic tourism contributed 15 per cent to tourism revenues in 2003 and in 2011 it contributed 37 per cent. (Source Kenya National Bureau of Statistics) In 2012, the contribution of domestic tourism to the national economy grew by 4 per cent thereby contributing 41 per cent to national tourism revenue. In the same year, the total number of bed nights by domestic tourists was 2,547,200

KTB Milestones ISO Re-Certification • KTB was in 2012 ISO re-certified owing to its continued improved service delivery. The institution was ISO 9001: 2008 certified in 2009. KTB can thus claim its position in the top league of best practices. Recruitment of marketing agencies abroad • KTB currently has established 15 offices in key source markets through a competitive recruitment process which Best of Kenya

67


has since expanded the marketing presence of Kenya as a destination in these key source markets manned by Market Development Representatives (MDRs). KTB’s Key awards and recognitions • In the past couple of years, KTB in partnership with stakeholders has recorded a number of milestones that have directly or indirectly contributed to the success of its mandate. a) World leading Safari destination 2013 In 2013, Kenya was voted world’s leading Safari destination for the year 2013, Africa category by the World Travel Awards (WTA) held in Doha, Qatar. b) Best Tourism Board in Africa 2013 In 2013, KTB was voted Africa’s leading Tourism Board for the year 2013, Africa category, by World Travel Awards (WTA) held in Kenya, thus positively propelling the country’s image globally as a tourism destination. c) Best Tourism Board in Africa 2012 In 2012, KTB was voted Africa’s leading Tourism Board for the year 2012 in the Africa category, by the World Travel Awards (WTA), thus positively propelling the country’s image globally as a tourism destination. d) Best destination for Eco-tourism In 2009 Kenya was voted the Best Destination for Eco-tourism in the world and the third best Overseas Destination. This is after a vote by both the public and travel trade in China. e) Best Undiscovered Golf Destination In 2009 Kenya was voted The Best Undiscovered Golf Destination, raising the country’s profile as a golfing destination. f) Best African Tourism Board In 2011, KTB was voted the Best African Tourism Board at the Good Safari Awards held in UK. g) Best exhibition stand In March 2013, Kenya was ranked the second best destination in the Africa Category for the creativity employed in designing its exhibition booth at the International Tourism Bourse (ITB) held in Berlin, Germany. The KTB booth stood out at the fair for its use of natural materials that gave it an authentic look which resonated well with the country’s fame as a destination for authentic safari.

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For example, in 2001 Kenya recorded combined international arrivals of 993,638, translating to KShs24.4 billion in revenue generation, to close to 1.8 million in our best performing year 2011.

Year

International arrivals

Cross borders

Total Arrivals

2001

492731

550907

1043638

2002

495751

505529

1001280

2003

547314

598788

1146102

2004

669134

692566

1361700

2005

832229

646771

1479000

2006

954335

646206

1600541

2007

1048732

768225

1816957

2008

729000

474224

1203224

2009

952481

537967

1490448

2010

1095842

513836

1609678

2011

1265136

520246

1785382

2012

1236024

544744

1780768

Note: The drop between 2007 and 2008 was due to post-election violence that broke out after 2007 presidential election.

And in the Indaba exhibition held in Durban, South Africa in May, 2013 Kenya got the second best tourism stand. Kenya got the award for her authentic safari stand even as she seeks to diversify her tourism products besides beach and wildlife safaris that she is known for. KTB Major Constraints The following are major constraints that have posed a major challenge to KTB in its drive to increase the number of tourists visiting Kenya and revenue generation. Safety and security The safety of travellers is important for a destination to thrive. Kenya’s tourism has suffered in the past due to incidences of insecurity and the perception thereof. Inadequate Funding Relatively low funding for the organisation hinders its competitiveness and efficiency and the facilitation of its mandate.

Bed Capacity and Utilization With the increase in visitor arrivals, bed occupancy levels during the peak season are close to full capacity and the reverse occurs during the low season. As a result, the country grapples with rapid growth in demand, principally due to limited investment in tourist accommodation and low occupancies during the low season. This presents seasonality challenges. Human Wildlife Conflict and Poaching Poaching remains the main threat to the continued survival of many endangered species and is thus a great threat to tourism. There are also challenges posed by humanwildlife conflicts thus threatening thrift in tourism.

Tel: +254-20-2711262 www.magicalkenya.com

Adequate funding for KTB’s marketing activities is required in order for Kenya to compete effectively with other countries in the global tourism arena.

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has since expanded the marketing presence of Kenya as a destination in these key source markets manned by Market Development Representatives (MDRs). KTB’s Key awards and recognitions • In the past couple of years, KTB in partnership with stakeholders has recorded a number of milestones that have directly or indirectly contributed to the success of its mandate. a) World leading Safari destination 2013 In 2013, Kenya was voted world’s leading Safari destination for the year 2013, Africa category by the World Travel Awards (WTA) held in Doha, Qatar. b) Best Tourism Board in Africa 2013 In 2013, KTB was voted Africa’s leading Tourism Board for the year 2013, Africa category, by World Travel Awards (WTA) held in Kenya, thus positively propelling the country’s image globally as a tourism destination. c) Best Tourism Board in Africa 2012 In 2012, KTB was voted Africa’s leading Tourism Board for the year 2012 in the Africa category, by the World Travel Awards (WTA), thus positively propelling the country’s image globally as a tourism destination. d) Best destination for Eco-tourism In 2009 Kenya was voted the Best Destination for Eco-tourism in the world and the third best Overseas Destination. This is after a vote by both the public and travel trade in China. e) Best Undiscovered Golf Destination In 2009 Kenya was voted The Best Undiscovered Golf Destination, raising the country’s profile as a golfing destination. f) Best African Tourism Board In 2011, KTB was voted the Best African Tourism Board at the Good Safari Awards held in UK. g) Best exhibition stand In March 2013, Kenya was ranked the second best destination in the Africa Category for the creativity employed in designing its exhibition booth at the International Tourism Bourse (ITB) held in Berlin, Germany. The KTB booth stood out at the fair for its use of natural materials that gave it an authentic look which resonated well with the country’s fame as a destination for authentic safari.

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For example, in 2001 Kenya recorded combined international arrivals of 993,638, translating to KShs24.4 billion in revenue generation, to close to 1.8 million in our best performing year 2011.

Year

International arrivals

Cross borders

Total Arrivals

2001

492731

550907

1043638

2002

495751

505529

1001280

2003

547314

598788

1146102

2004

669134

692566

1361700

2005

832229

646771

1479000

2006

954335

646206

1600541

2007

1048732

768225

1816957

2008

729000

474224

1203224

2009

952481

537967

1490448

2010

1095842

513836

1609678

2011

1265136

520246

1785382

2012

1236024

544744

1780768

Note: The drop between 2007 and 2008 was due to post-election violence that broke out after 2007 presidential election.

And in the Indaba exhibition held in Durban, South Africa in May, 2013 Kenya got the second best tourism stand. Kenya got the award for her authentic safari stand even as she seeks to diversify her tourism products besides beach and wildlife safaris that she is known for. KTB Major Constraints The following are major constraints that have posed a major challenge to KTB in its drive to increase the number of tourists visiting Kenya and revenue generation. Safety and security The safety of travellers is important for a destination to thrive. Kenya’s tourism has suffered in the past due to incidences of insecurity and the perception thereof. Inadequate Funding Relatively low funding for the organisation hinders its competitiveness and efficiency and the facilitation of its mandate.

Bed Capacity and Utilization With the increase in visitor arrivals, bed occupancy levels during the peak season are close to full capacity and the reverse occurs during the low season. As a result, the country grapples with rapid growth in demand, principally due to limited investment in tourist accommodation and low occupancies during the low season. This presents seasonality challenges. Human Wildlife Conflict and Poaching Poaching remains the main threat to the continued survival of many endangered species and is thus a great threat to tourism. There are also challenges posed by humanwildlife conflicts thus threatening thrift in tourism.

Tel: +254-20-2711262 www.magicalkenya.com

Adequate funding for KTB’s marketing activities is required in order for Kenya to compete effectively with other countries in the global tourism arena.

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CHAPTER 3 Hotels and Resorts

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CHAPTER 3 Hotels and Resorts

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Ole-Sereni The Only City Hotel by a Game Park Nairobi National Park. These rooms offer combination of shower and bathtub, 24-hour in-room dining and LCD flat screen TV. Club Rooms present scenic views of the Nairobi National Park and the city. The rooms are extremely well-done and a highlight of this is a small French balcony that offers our guests a great view of the surroundings. The suites are a favourite as they are a lavish one-bedroom with a spacious living room. Executive suites offer a modern decor and sweeping park views and pamper you with four post bed, spacious living room, separate dining area, conference table, guest private bathroom, Jacuzzi and many more amenities. Business amenities include a 24-hour business centre, technology support staff and audio- visual equipment, making the hotel a perfect venue for events and conferences. Giving our guests a peace of mind will also guarantee unrivalled security to all.  You can drum your body into shape at the state-of-the-art Duma health club or sit by the poolside bar whilst trying to spot your favourite game. The health club also offers guests aerobics, steam, sauna and massage facilities.  Sitting next to the Nairobi National Park, the allure and ambience resonating from this establishment is, indeed, the pride of Kenya. Nairobi is one of the most outstanding cities in Africa, both politically and financially.  It is home to thousands of businesses and over 100 major international companies and organisations, including the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the United Nations Office in Nairobi (UNON). Nairobi is an established hub for business and culture and for any tourist in East Africa, it is known as the ‘City in the Sun’.

The wild is so close one can taste it. It has for the last five years presented tranquillity and ensures that your stay is everything and memorable. The land where the hotel is situated was once the United States embassy and when they decided to relocate, the directors agreed that the spot was a perfect location as it was near the two airports, Jomo Kenyatta International Airpot (JKIA) and Wilson Airport, and not too far from the Central Business District.

The City in the Sun is home to many amenities and lifestyles in various aspects, which include fine dining and excursions With the many tourists visiting the capital, the attraction is a place that offers a bit of the city and wild scenarios.

Ole-Sereni is the only city hotel bordering a national park something they take pride in and, in fact, the location has been a key driver for success as it is the one selling point you cannot afford to miss. The ambience, exquisite food, large function space and excellent service are other success drivers.

Ole-Sereni is an aboard for this. The hotel offers what many tourists from across the globe look for when they come to Kenya.

As ‘The City Hotel by the Game Park’, Ole-Sereni merges the best features of a modern city hotel and a traditional wildlife

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lodge to present guests with a cocktail, of breathtaking fundamentals of natures serenity from a very close range. From the comfort of your own room the sight of zebras, gazelles, ostriches and giraffes grazing outside your window is breathtaking. It is fascinating waking up to the sight of zebras, giraffes, ostriches and gazelles grazing right outside your window and this is the kind of treat you can only enjoy at OleSereni, the city hotel by the game park. The essence and experience at Ole-Sereni lies in the 134 opulent rooms and suites, four food and beverage outlets and a health club combined into three elements of luxuries comfort, the wild and the wind. 

Discover the world of flavours at Ole-Sereni, where the palate may vary. It could be Thai Chicken Caesar Salad and a toasted Baguette or a signature Jack Daniels Steak. Ole Sereni serves the best of five different cuisines at the Big Five restaurant, the Waterhole and the fine dining Eagles’ Lounge. A stay at Ole-Sereni is always memorable, whether it’s for a day or a week. This is the ultimate urban safari in a stylish setting, and what’s not to love about that?

P.O. Box 18187 - 00500, Nairobi, Kenya Tel. +254 732 191 000, +254 20 3901 000 Email: info@ole-serenihotel.com

The superior rooms are 58 city facing rooms. The rooms are well-equipped and offer a range of amenities, including private shower, complimentary tea / coffee making facilities, WiFi / wired Internet and a mini bar. The 48 deluxe rooms overlook the

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Ole-Sereni The Only City Hotel by a Game Park Nairobi National Park. These rooms offer combination of shower and bathtub, 24-hour in-room dining and LCD flat screen TV. Club Rooms present scenic views of the Nairobi National Park and the city. The rooms are extremely well-done and a highlight of this is a small French balcony that offers our guests a great view of the surroundings. The suites are a favourite as they are a lavish one-bedroom with a spacious living room. Executive suites offer a modern decor and sweeping park views and pamper you with four post bed, spacious living room, separate dining area, conference table, guest private bathroom, Jacuzzi and many more amenities. Business amenities include a 24-hour business centre, technology support staff and audio- visual equipment, making the hotel a perfect venue for events and conferences. Giving our guests a peace of mind will also guarantee unrivalled security to all.  You can drum your body into shape at the state-of-the-art Duma health club or sit by the poolside bar whilst trying to spot your favourite game. The health club also offers guests aerobics, steam, sauna and massage facilities.  Sitting next to the Nairobi National Park, the allure and ambience resonating from this establishment is, indeed, the pride of Kenya. Nairobi is one of the most outstanding cities in Africa, both politically and financially.  It is home to thousands of businesses and over 100 major international companies and organisations, including the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the United Nations Office in Nairobi (UNON). Nairobi is an established hub for business and culture and for any tourist in East Africa, it is known as the ‘City in the Sun’.

The wild is so close one can taste it. It has for the last five years presented tranquillity and ensures that your stay is everything and memorable. The land where the hotel is situated was once the United States embassy and when they decided to relocate, the directors agreed that the spot was a perfect location as it was near the two airports, Jomo Kenyatta International Airpot (JKIA) and Wilson Airport, and not too far from the Central Business District.

The City in the Sun is home to many amenities and lifestyles in various aspects, which include fine dining and excursions With the many tourists visiting the capital, the attraction is a place that offers a bit of the city and wild scenarios.

Ole-Sereni is the only city hotel bordering a national park something they take pride in and, in fact, the location has been a key driver for success as it is the one selling point you cannot afford to miss. The ambience, exquisite food, large function space and excellent service are other success drivers.

Ole-Sereni is an aboard for this. The hotel offers what many tourists from across the globe look for when they come to Kenya.

As ‘The City Hotel by the Game Park’, Ole-Sereni merges the best features of a modern city hotel and a traditional wildlife

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lodge to present guests with a cocktail, of breathtaking fundamentals of natures serenity from a very close range. From the comfort of your own room the sight of zebras, gazelles, ostriches and giraffes grazing outside your window is breathtaking. It is fascinating waking up to the sight of zebras, giraffes, ostriches and gazelles grazing right outside your window and this is the kind of treat you can only enjoy at OleSereni, the city hotel by the game park. The essence and experience at Ole-Sereni lies in the 134 opulent rooms and suites, four food and beverage outlets and a health club combined into three elements of luxuries comfort, the wild and the wind. 

Discover the world of flavours at Ole-Sereni, where the palate may vary. It could be Thai Chicken Caesar Salad and a toasted Baguette or a signature Jack Daniels Steak. Ole Sereni serves the best of five different cuisines at the Big Five restaurant, the Waterhole and the fine dining Eagles’ Lounge. A stay at Ole-Sereni is always memorable, whether it’s for a day or a week. This is the ultimate urban safari in a stylish setting, and what’s not to love about that?

P.O. Box 18187 - 00500, Nairobi, Kenya Tel. +254 732 191 000, +254 20 3901 000 Email: info@ole-serenihotel.com

The superior rooms are 58 city facing rooms. The rooms are well-equipped and offer a range of amenities, including private shower, complimentary tea / coffee making facilities, WiFi / wired Internet and a mini bar. The 48 deluxe rooms overlook the

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Kempinski Hotels Two Distinct Experiences: One Unique Country

A Honeymoon Suite - Olare Mara Kempinski

comforts, Olare Mara Kempinski is hidden in a grove of riverine woodland on the banks of the Ntiakitiak River of the Olare Orok Conservancy.

Cafe Villa Rosa (all day dinning)

Kempinski was awarded the management contract by owners and developer Simba Hospitality, a division of Simba Corporation. The management handover is expected to bolster Simba Corporation’s presence in the Kenyan hospitality market by partnering with leading hotel brand Kempinski, known for their expertise in operating luxury hotels all over Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. Villa Rosa Kempinski and Olare Mara Kempinski will unite the best of Kempinski – the highest levels of service, unique location, and remarkable attention to detail with a keen admiration for Kenyan culture and traditions and will raise the bar in hospitality service delivery for both business and leisure travellers to Kenya.

Balcony Bar

Kempinski Hotels, Europe’s oldest luxury hotel group, recently made its entry into Kenya with the signing of a management contract for a new luxury hotel in the heart of Nairobi’s Westlands area and a luxury tented camp in the Maasai Mara.

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“We will continue our development strategy throughout the continent over the next few years, partnering with key players in Africa to secure the best locations for our luxury properties.

“There is a worldwide fascination with this region and we believe in the strength of Kenya as a destination. Our distinct brand of European luxury and operational know-how makes us a main player in all the markets we operate in, and we expect that our two new properties here will be no different,” noted Mr. Reto Witter, the President and CEO of Kempinski Hotels. Villa Rosa Kempinski Located on Chiromo Road, within the commercial centre of Nairobi, Villa Rosa Kempinski sprawls across 10 luxurious floors. The hotel features 200 rooms and suites including 3 presidential suites, an avant-garde conference centre and several concept restaurants besides a cigar lounge. Ideal for business and leisure travellers, it is a mere 20 km away from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport and within close proximity to many of the city’s attractions. Olare Mara Kempinski Bringing you closer to nature and the exotic savannah, yet offering a world of modern

Here, luxury meets the call of the wild where circles of trees, scrub and savannah form the habitat of some of the world’s most aweinspiring creatures. Retreat to serenity, watch wild cats hunt their prey, take in the sights of languid hippos and get a chance to witness the phenomenal migration of the wildebeest. The two distinct properties will offer the finest service and quality attributes associated with Kempinski’s long history in hospitality. Kempinski will bring the same brand of European luxury and a modern vision of classic hospitality to Kenya that can be found in their iconic properties such as the Emirates Palace in Abu Dhabi, Hotel Adlon in Berlin, and the Çira an Palace in Istanbul. The world-renowned Kempinski brand is a perfect addition to the Simba Hospitality portfolio,” said Mr Adil Popat, CEO of Simba Corporation. Popat added that “as one of Kenya’s strongest brands, the Simba Corporation understands the importance of partnering with premier brands like Kempinski to ensure that we deliver the highest quality products and services.

Inside the Luxury Tent

“We set a new standard of luxury in East Africa when we opened the first Kempinski Hotel in Nairobi, and brought Kempinski’s trademark luxury to our beautiful camp in the Maasai Mara.” Each property is strongly individual in product and style, setting Kempinski apart from any other luxury hotel Group in Kenya. Kempinski has also indicated its desire to expand its footprint in the African market. No stranger to Africa, Kempinski has a presence in five African countries and recently opened a hotel in Ghana.

T +254 703 049 000 F +254 202 308 819 reservations.nairobi@kempinski.com www.kempinski.com/nairobi

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Kempinski Hotels Two Distinct Experiences: One Unique Country

A Honeymoon Suite - Olare Mara Kempinski

comforts, Olare Mara Kempinski is hidden in a grove of riverine woodland on the banks of the Ntiakitiak River of the Olare Orok Conservancy.

Cafe Villa Rosa (all day dinning)

Kempinski was awarded the management contract by owners and developer Simba Hospitality, a division of Simba Corporation. The management handover is expected to bolster Simba Corporation’s presence in the Kenyan hospitality market by partnering with leading hotel brand Kempinski, known for their expertise in operating luxury hotels all over Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. Villa Rosa Kempinski and Olare Mara Kempinski will unite the best of Kempinski – the highest levels of service, unique location, and remarkable attention to detail with a keen admiration for Kenyan culture and traditions and will raise the bar in hospitality service delivery for both business and leisure travellers to Kenya.

Balcony Bar

Kempinski Hotels, Europe’s oldest luxury hotel group, recently made its entry into Kenya with the signing of a management contract for a new luxury hotel in the heart of Nairobi’s Westlands area and a luxury tented camp in the Maasai Mara.

Best of Kenya

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“We will continue our development strategy throughout the continent over the next few years, partnering with key players in Africa to secure the best locations for our luxury properties.

“There is a worldwide fascination with this region and we believe in the strength of Kenya as a destination. Our distinct brand of European luxury and operational know-how makes us a main player in all the markets we operate in, and we expect that our two new properties here will be no different,” noted Mr. Reto Witter, the President and CEO of Kempinski Hotels. Villa Rosa Kempinski Located on Chiromo Road, within the commercial centre of Nairobi, Villa Rosa Kempinski sprawls across 10 luxurious floors. The hotel features 200 rooms and suites including 3 presidential suites, an avant-garde conference centre and several concept restaurants besides a cigar lounge. Ideal for business and leisure travellers, it is a mere 20 km away from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport and within close proximity to many of the city’s attractions. Olare Mara Kempinski Bringing you closer to nature and the exotic savannah, yet offering a world of modern

Here, luxury meets the call of the wild where circles of trees, scrub and savannah form the habitat of some of the world’s most aweinspiring creatures. Retreat to serenity, watch wild cats hunt their prey, take in the sights of languid hippos and get a chance to witness the phenomenal migration of the wildebeest. The two distinct properties will offer the finest service and quality attributes associated with Kempinski’s long history in hospitality. Kempinski will bring the same brand of European luxury and a modern vision of classic hospitality to Kenya that can be found in their iconic properties such as the Emirates Palace in Abu Dhabi, Hotel Adlon in Berlin, and the Çira an Palace in Istanbul. The world-renowned Kempinski brand is a perfect addition to the Simba Hospitality portfolio,” said Mr Adil Popat, CEO of Simba Corporation. Popat added that “as one of Kenya’s strongest brands, the Simba Corporation understands the importance of partnering with premier brands like Kempinski to ensure that we deliver the highest quality products and services.

Inside the Luxury Tent

“We set a new standard of luxury in East Africa when we opened the first Kempinski Hotel in Nairobi, and brought Kempinski’s trademark luxury to our beautiful camp in the Maasai Mara.” Each property is strongly individual in product and style, setting Kempinski apart from any other luxury hotel Group in Kenya. Kempinski has also indicated its desire to expand its footprint in the African market. No stranger to Africa, Kempinski has a presence in five African countries and recently opened a hotel in Ghana.

T +254 703 049 000 F +254 202 308 819 reservations.nairobi@kempinski.com www.kempinski.com/nairobi

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Sarova Hotels, Resorts and Game Lodges… Half a Century Wiser!

The Grand opening of Sarova Panafric by Kenya’s First President His Excellency Mzee Jomo Kenyatta in 1965

Sarova Panafric 2013

Flying the flag Sarova Hotels is greatly humbled to be recognised in the domestic and global travel sector. Some of the awards received in various categories include the World Tourism Awards, Trip Advisor Travellers Choice Awards and Kenya Tourism Awards, among others. It is a great honour to fly the Kenyan flag high! Cherishing our heritage We are the proud custodians of Kenya’s leading heritage hotel, Sarova Stanley, which started life as a tin shack in 1902, grew alongside Nairobi, and now provides an unparalleled mirror to the vibrancy of Kenya’s history. It was at the Long Bar of The Stanley that Kenya’s stock exchange was born; at The Stanley that Ernest Hemingway wrote and Hollywood played. It was to The Stanley that royalty, aristocracy and the global glitterati flocked; at The Stanley that war campaigns were planned and at The Stanley were the flames of independence kindled.

Sarova Stanley 2013

We’re proud of where we’ve come from In the past 50 years, Kenya has built a vibrant economy, strong national unity, political stability, a dynamic tourism sector and an enviable global profile. Since our founding in 1974, we have built a portfolio of eight properties, which span the diversity of Kenya’s world-renowned landscape. We’ve come a long way together Kenya has earned her stripes… And each one of them is ooooh so beautiful! They say ‘Life begins at forty’, but whoever said that had no idea how ecstatic we would be at 50! Fifty exquisite years of independence, great achievement and fantastic stories! At Sarova we are proudly Kenyan and honoured to be established as the largest indigenous privately owned group of hotels.

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The Stanley in 1915

We know where we’re going Our brand of ‘refreshing African hospitality’ exudes the warmth of traditional Kenyan hospitality and the superlative standards of global tourism. Our values are guided by our vision to be the preferred hospitality company in the ownership and management of hotels, resorts and lodges in the key markets of Africa.

the market leader in innovative customer centric product development and we’re strategically aiming towards a Pan-African presence.

Taking the lead Kenya is the hub of African tourism. And while Kenya’s market share grows, our hospitality portfolio aims to complement its global reach. Sarova prides itself on being

At Sarova, we embrace our exceptional standards through the calibre of our people, the intuition of our management, the dynamism of our marketing, the thrust of our technology… and the depth of our client-care.

Keeping the edge Kenya obviously has a strong competitive edge; evident through her fascinating wildlife, her perceptible scenery and zestful culture.

Sarova Panafric, a beacon of African unity Sarova Panafric opened in 1965 with 100 rooms and was named in honour of the Pan African movement. In 1991 it was welcomed into the Sarova Group and has, since that time, been expanded to include 162 rooms and 42 furnished apartments; it has also been lavishly refurbished to become one of Kenya’s most popular business and conferencing venues. Sarova Whitesands Beach Resort & Spa, once a home, now a ‘home from home’ Sarova Whitesands began life in 1930 as the home of Mr H.G.Robertson, the Editor of the Mombasa Times, who chose to call it ‘Whitesands’. In 1941, Mrs Stocker bought the house and expanded it to include eight cottages. Five years later, now a small but busy hotel, it was sold to David Durwood

Sarova Whitesands Beach Resort & Spa 2013

Brown, who made it so popular that it became known as ‘the pub by the sea’. In 1960 the hotel was renovated and expanded to become the stylish 70-room 5-star Whitesands Hotel. In 1976 it became part of the Sarova Group and was expanded to its current 338-room style and elegance. Putting people first There is no greater investment than the invaluable asset of people. At Sarova, we promote our 1,500 staff members with carefully crafted health, education and training programmes that allow them to take off and fly. Seizing the future Just like Kenya, we believe in continuous growth and the ability to change. Tomorrow depends on the decisions we make today. As the most profitable hotel group in the region, we are developing a whole new revolution of hospitality management and dynamism in Africa. Giving back Kenya is striving to build a future based

on sustainability. In line with that vision, we formulated a far-sighted eco-policy that incorporates tree planting with waterconservation, bio-diversity promotion with marine conservation, and community health with education. We also believe in weaving Kenyan art, cuisine, music and theatre into the wider tapestry of all that we do. The Sarova Group, we’re looking forward to the next 50 years … Sarova Stanley and Sarova Panafric, Nairobi; Sarova Whitesands Beach Resort and Spa, Mombasa; Sarova Mara Game Camp, Maasai Mara National Reserve; Sarova Lion Hill Game Lodge, Lake Nakuru National Park; Sarova Shaba Game Lodge, Shaba National Reserve, Sarova Salt Lick & Sarova Taita Hills Game Lodges; Taita Hills Wildlife Sanctuary.

Tel: +254 20 2767000 Email: centralreservations@sarovahotels.com www.sarovahotels.com

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Sarova Hotels, Resorts and Game Lodges… Half a Century Wiser!

The Grand opening of Sarova Panafric by Kenya’s First President His Excellency Mzee Jomo Kenyatta in 1965

Sarova Panafric 2013

Flying the flag Sarova Hotels is greatly humbled to be recognised in the domestic and global travel sector. Some of the awards received in various categories include the World Tourism Awards, Trip Advisor Travellers Choice Awards and Kenya Tourism Awards, among others. It is a great honour to fly the Kenyan flag high! Cherishing our heritage We are the proud custodians of Kenya’s leading heritage hotel, Sarova Stanley, which started life as a tin shack in 1902, grew alongside Nairobi, and now provides an unparalleled mirror to the vibrancy of Kenya’s history. It was at the Long Bar of The Stanley that Kenya’s stock exchange was born; at The Stanley that Ernest Hemingway wrote and Hollywood played. It was to The Stanley that royalty, aristocracy and the global glitterati flocked; at The Stanley that war campaigns were planned and at The Stanley were the flames of independence kindled.

Sarova Stanley 2013

We’re proud of where we’ve come from In the past 50 years, Kenya has built a vibrant economy, strong national unity, political stability, a dynamic tourism sector and an enviable global profile. Since our founding in 1974, we have built a portfolio of eight properties, which span the diversity of Kenya’s world-renowned landscape. We’ve come a long way together Kenya has earned her stripes… And each one of them is ooooh so beautiful! They say ‘Life begins at forty’, but whoever said that had no idea how ecstatic we would be at 50! Fifty exquisite years of independence, great achievement and fantastic stories! At Sarova we are proudly Kenyan and honoured to be established as the largest indigenous privately owned group of hotels.

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The Stanley in 1915

We know where we’re going Our brand of ‘refreshing African hospitality’ exudes the warmth of traditional Kenyan hospitality and the superlative standards of global tourism. Our values are guided by our vision to be the preferred hospitality company in the ownership and management of hotels, resorts and lodges in the key markets of Africa.

the market leader in innovative customer centric product development and we’re strategically aiming towards a Pan-African presence.

Taking the lead Kenya is the hub of African tourism. And while Kenya’s market share grows, our hospitality portfolio aims to complement its global reach. Sarova prides itself on being

At Sarova, we embrace our exceptional standards through the calibre of our people, the intuition of our management, the dynamism of our marketing, the thrust of our technology… and the depth of our client-care.

Keeping the edge Kenya obviously has a strong competitive edge; evident through her fascinating wildlife, her perceptible scenery and zestful culture.

Sarova Panafric, a beacon of African unity Sarova Panafric opened in 1965 with 100 rooms and was named in honour of the Pan African movement. In 1991 it was welcomed into the Sarova Group and has, since that time, been expanded to include 162 rooms and 42 furnished apartments; it has also been lavishly refurbished to become one of Kenya’s most popular business and conferencing venues. Sarova Whitesands Beach Resort & Spa, once a home, now a ‘home from home’ Sarova Whitesands began life in 1930 as the home of Mr H.G.Robertson, the Editor of the Mombasa Times, who chose to call it ‘Whitesands’. In 1941, Mrs Stocker bought the house and expanded it to include eight cottages. Five years later, now a small but busy hotel, it was sold to David Durwood

Sarova Whitesands Beach Resort & Spa 2013

Brown, who made it so popular that it became known as ‘the pub by the sea’. In 1960 the hotel was renovated and expanded to become the stylish 70-room 5-star Whitesands Hotel. In 1976 it became part of the Sarova Group and was expanded to its current 338-room style and elegance. Putting people first There is no greater investment than the invaluable asset of people. At Sarova, we promote our 1,500 staff members with carefully crafted health, education and training programmes that allow them to take off and fly. Seizing the future Just like Kenya, we believe in continuous growth and the ability to change. Tomorrow depends on the decisions we make today. As the most profitable hotel group in the region, we are developing a whole new revolution of hospitality management and dynamism in Africa. Giving back Kenya is striving to build a future based

on sustainability. In line with that vision, we formulated a far-sighted eco-policy that incorporates tree planting with waterconservation, bio-diversity promotion with marine conservation, and community health with education. We also believe in weaving Kenyan art, cuisine, music and theatre into the wider tapestry of all that we do. The Sarova Group, we’re looking forward to the next 50 years … Sarova Stanley and Sarova Panafric, Nairobi; Sarova Whitesands Beach Resort and Spa, Mombasa; Sarova Mara Game Camp, Maasai Mara National Reserve; Sarova Lion Hill Game Lodge, Lake Nakuru National Park; Sarova Shaba Game Lodge, Shaba National Reserve, Sarova Salt Lick & Sarova Taita Hills Game Lodges; Taita Hills Wildlife Sanctuary.

Tel: +254 20 2767000 Email: centralreservations@sarovahotels.com www.sarovahotels.com

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The Northcoast Beach Hotel The Northcoast Beach Hotel is a 4-Star hotel set on the beautiful and breathtaking pure sandy beaches of Kikambala, facing the Indian Ocean

One of the executive conference rooms

The Lounge

Night View: The Northcoast Beach Hotel

The Northcoast Beach Hotel is set on the beautiful and breathtaking pure sandy beaches of Kikambala, facing the Indian Ocean. Located along the Mombasa-Malindi Road about 25 kms from Mombasa Town, and approximately 27 kms from the Moi International Airport, the Hotel is easily accessible to all visitors to the region. The Hotel, previously operated as Le Soleil Beach Club and is owned and managed by Kenyatta University and aims at becoming a centre of excellence in the provision of upmarket hospitality services and facilities that are tastefully designed to meet the expectations of its clients in mind. These

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facilities also provide an invaluable platform as a training centre for practical hospitality and related programmes offered by the University’s School of Hospitality and Tourism. The University has invested significantly in major refurbishments and renovations, transforming the 4-star facility into a leading destination for holiday makers, business executives, conferences, team building and bonding retreats, high flier blue-chip board meetings, safari entourages, newly-weds’ get-away, and family anniversaries. The Hotel’s private location, structural design and spectacular interior décor are inspired by a passionate desire to offer the

best of hospitality in a homely and serene environment. The Hotel provides upmarket services and facilities which comprises 94 standard rooms, 17 suites, 12 deluxe rooms, 1 presidential suite, 3 big conference centres with all standard and en-suite facilities and as well as a state-of-the-art executive boardroom with a capacity for 25 people. Restaurant Facilities: The Hotel’s spectacular Restaurant guarantees a sleek and sophisticated contemporary dining experience. Designed over two floors and set around the crystal clear swimming pool area, the Restaurant presents stunning panoramic

views of the Indian Ocean, creating a cosy, intimate atmosphere mixing natural décor, woods, potted plants and soft tweeds with warm, earthly colours that contrast with the clean water rays against the backdrop of a cool ocean breeze. The Restaurant specialises in and serves a variety of both local and international cuisines, prepared in the most innovative ways.

Restaurant facilities

Conferencing & Banqueting Facilities: The Northcoast Beach Hotel is also renowned for its perfect setting for seminars and conferences in a relaxed country atmosphere. These facilities with seating capacity of 50-150 people are ideal for product launches, staff parties, wedding receptions and cocktails.

cast of highly skilled professional instructors offer personalised and professional services for a head-to-toe sensory revival.

Hot spot wireless internet connectivity is also available in the Conference Rooms as well as the Business Centre.

With fine meals, great entertainment and an abundance of animation activities, The Northcoast Beach Hotel offers a truly splendid blend of rare beauty, quality satisfaction and great memories.

Activities: Guests to the Hotel are also guaranteed of plenty of activities which include Animation and Team Building Activities; Corporate Events; Water Sports (outsourced); and Excursions. For guests seeking to enhance their overall well-being, the Hotel’s sauna/steam and massage parlour and gymnasium with topof-the-range equipment and a supporting

To enhance security at the Hotel, a roundthe-clock security surveillance boosted by in-based Administration Police service is available.

Kikambala, Mombasa – Malindi Road P.O.Box 89926,Mombasa Kenya (East Africa) Tel: +254 20-2037784/5 Cell: +254 722 209458, +254 733 409430 Fax +254 20 2023523 Email: gm@northcoastbeachhotel.co.ke www.northcoastbeachhotel.co.ke

Here, guests can be assured of a sizzling selection of mouth-watering buffets or a la-carte menus, a guarantee of unparalleled dining experiences.

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The Northcoast Beach Hotel The Northcoast Beach Hotel is a 4-Star hotel set on the beautiful and breathtaking pure sandy beaches of Kikambala, facing the Indian Ocean

One of the executive conference rooms

The Lounge

Night View: The Northcoast Beach Hotel

The Northcoast Beach Hotel is set on the beautiful and breathtaking pure sandy beaches of Kikambala, facing the Indian Ocean. Located along the Mombasa-Malindi Road about 25 kms from Mombasa Town, and approximately 27 kms from the Moi International Airport, the Hotel is easily accessible to all visitors to the region. The Hotel, previously operated as Le Soleil Beach Club and is owned and managed by Kenyatta University and aims at becoming a centre of excellence in the provision of upmarket hospitality services and facilities that are tastefully designed to meet the expectations of its clients in mind. These

Best of Kenya

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facilities also provide an invaluable platform as a training centre for practical hospitality and related programmes offered by the University’s School of Hospitality and Tourism. The University has invested significantly in major refurbishments and renovations, transforming the 4-star facility into a leading destination for holiday makers, business executives, conferences, team building and bonding retreats, high flier blue-chip board meetings, safari entourages, newly-weds’ get-away, and family anniversaries. The Hotel’s private location, structural design and spectacular interior décor are inspired by a passionate desire to offer the

best of hospitality in a homely and serene environment. The Hotel provides upmarket services and facilities which comprises 94 standard rooms, 17 suites, 12 deluxe rooms, 1 presidential suite, 3 big conference centres with all standard and en-suite facilities and as well as a state-of-the-art executive boardroom with a capacity for 25 people. Restaurant Facilities: The Hotel’s spectacular Restaurant guarantees a sleek and sophisticated contemporary dining experience. Designed over two floors and set around the crystal clear swimming pool area, the Restaurant presents stunning panoramic

views of the Indian Ocean, creating a cosy, intimate atmosphere mixing natural décor, woods, potted plants and soft tweeds with warm, earthly colours that contrast with the clean water rays against the backdrop of a cool ocean breeze. The Restaurant specialises in and serves a variety of both local and international cuisines, prepared in the most innovative ways.

Restaurant facilities

Conferencing & Banqueting Facilities: The Northcoast Beach Hotel is also renowned for its perfect setting for seminars and conferences in a relaxed country atmosphere. These facilities with seating capacity of 50-150 people are ideal for product launches, staff parties, wedding receptions and cocktails.

cast of highly skilled professional instructors offer personalised and professional services for a head-to-toe sensory revival.

Hot spot wireless internet connectivity is also available in the Conference Rooms as well as the Business Centre.

With fine meals, great entertainment and an abundance of animation activities, The Northcoast Beach Hotel offers a truly splendid blend of rare beauty, quality satisfaction and great memories.

Activities: Guests to the Hotel are also guaranteed of plenty of activities which include Animation and Team Building Activities; Corporate Events; Water Sports (outsourced); and Excursions. For guests seeking to enhance their overall well-being, the Hotel’s sauna/steam and massage parlour and gymnasium with topof-the-range equipment and a supporting

To enhance security at the Hotel, a roundthe-clock security surveillance boosted by in-based Administration Police service is available.

Kikambala, Mombasa – Malindi Road P.O.Box 89926,Mombasa Kenya (East Africa) Tel: +254 20-2037784/5 Cell: +254 722 209458, +254 733 409430 Fax +254 20 2023523 Email: gm@northcoastbeachhotel.co.ke www.northcoastbeachhotel.co.ke

Here, guests can be assured of a sizzling selection of mouth-watering buffets or a la-carte menus, a guarantee of unparalleled dining experiences.

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Heritage Hotels “An African Experience Beyond Your Wildest Dreams”

Luxury family tents - Mara Intrepids Camp, Maasai Mara

Close safari encounters - Samburu Intrepids Camp, Samburu Reserve

wildlife wandering through the fairways. The resort is an excellent wedding location and it also caters for a wide range of holiday makers looking for recreational, health and sports facilities, as well as corporates with its modern conference and meeting facilities.

Unbridled luxury in the wild, Mara Explorer

Heritage Hotels offers bespoke luxury beach-and-bush safaris in the country with over 30 years at the forefront of Kenya’s world-renowned safari industry. Headed by seasoned hotelier Mohammed Hersi as CEO and a team of professional safari organizers, Heritage Hotels hallmark is high-quality safaris with detail to attention. At a Glance Heritage Hotels has seven properties in three brands located in Kenya’s most celebrated holiday destinations; the Explorer Brand, the Intrepid Brand and the Voyager Brand The Explorer Brand Heritage’s five-star brand offers bespoke luxury on Lamu island and in the heart of the Maasai Mara National Reserve. Mara Explorer Camp With only ten bespoke tents, Mara Explorer camp is a most luxurious private camp in the world-famous Mara. Overlooking the banks of the Talek River, it caters for the ultimate discerning clientele.

Rustic simplicity - Kipungani Explorer, Lamu Island

Mara Explorer offers stunning, open-plan tented accommodation (all with private outdoor bathtubs), together with stylish personal hosting, game drives, lavish bush meals, cultural tours, and arrangements for balloon safaris. The camp’s location is the perfect venue for viewing the annual wildebeest migration – considered the world’s most magnificent wildlife spectacle. Kipungani Lamu The 26-bed Kipungani Lamu retreat blends privacy with luxury on a pristine stretch of beach on Lamu Island. It’s a perfect ‘hideaway’ for discerning visitors. Kipungani offers everything one could desire by the sea, from mouth-watering seafood cuisine to modern water sports, game fishing, diving with dolphins, historic excursions to Kinyika , Manda Toto and Lamu towns, and romantic trips aboard motorised and sailing dhows. The Intrepid Brand Mara Intrepids and Samburu Intrepids The two Intrepids camps, in Maasai Mara and Samburu are a famous feature on Kenya’s safari circuit, offering superb tented

accommodation in Kenya’s best-known national reserves. The 60-bed Mara Intrepids caters to fly-in clients and Samburu Intrepid’s 54-bed camp caters to a mix of drive-in and flying safaris. Both camps boast classic ‘luxury under canvas’ living with a huge array of safari activities, personally hosted game drives and walking safaris to interpretive cultural tours, educational kids’ clubs, astro-tourism, balloon rides, camel safaris, and overnight fly-camp expeditions. Great Rift Valley Lodge and Golf Resort From its panoramic perch above Lake Naivasha, the four-time World Travel Awards winning golf resort enjoys sweeping views of the Great Rift Valley, with 21 twin and nine double rooms, 40 modern three- bedroom split-level houses and a series of private cottages. The private villas overlook the 18hole championship golf course with resident

Golf and safari resort - Great Rift Valley Lodge and Golf Resort, Naivasha

The four-time World Travel Awards winning golf resort is a favourite retreat for Kenyan residents, international tourists, sports enthusiasts, corporates and location weddings. The Voyager Brand Voyager Beach Resort For travelers looking to enjoy and explore the liveliest location on Africa’s east coast, look no further than Voyager Beach Resort. Overlooking the sparkling white sands of Nyali Beach, the resort offers 236 spacious cabins with both garden and sea view options, swimming pools, bar lounges and a beauty parlour. Voyager Ziwani With 25 safari tents on luscious lawns and a dam with hippos and crocodiles basking, it’s reminiscent of the classic camping times. Each tent is furnished with safari-style furniture with a veranda for guests to relax and watch wildlife against the backdrop of Africa’s highest mountain – the snow-capped Kilimanjaro in the neighbouring Tanzania and bordering Tsavo West National Park.

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Affordable luxury - Voyager Ziwani Camp, Tsavo

Kids’ Clubs – Adventurers and Young Rangers Heritage has set a new standard for children’s safaris in East Africa, providing an exciting and growing selection of supervised safari activities, wildlife lessons, educational games and cultural exchanges at all the Voyager and Intrepids properties.

P.O. Box 74888 - 00200, Nairobi, Kenya Tel (Wireless): +254 (0)20 210 3454/ 210 3484 Mobile: + 254 (0) 722 205 894/(0) 733 411 105 Email: sales@heritagehotels.co.ke www.heritage-eastafrica.com Twitter: @HeritageKenya Facebook: HeritageHotelsKenyaOfficial

Best of Kenya

Coastal resort - Voyager Beach Resort, Mombasa

Family safaris - Intrepids and Voyager

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Heritage Hotels “An African Experience Beyond Your Wildest Dreams”

Luxury family tents - Mara Intrepids Camp, Maasai Mara

Close safari encounters - Samburu Intrepids Camp, Samburu Reserve

wildlife wandering through the fairways. The resort is an excellent wedding location and it also caters for a wide range of holiday makers looking for recreational, health and sports facilities, as well as corporates with its modern conference and meeting facilities.

Unbridled luxury in the wild, Mara Explorer

Heritage Hotels offers bespoke luxury beach-and-bush safaris in the country with over 30 years at the forefront of Kenya’s world-renowned safari industry. Headed by seasoned hotelier Mohammed Hersi as CEO and a team of professional safari organizers, Heritage Hotels hallmark is high-quality safaris with detail to attention. At a Glance Heritage Hotels has seven properties in three brands located in Kenya’s most celebrated holiday destinations; the Explorer Brand, the Intrepid Brand and the Voyager Brand The Explorer Brand Heritage’s five-star brand offers bespoke luxury on Lamu island and in the heart of the Maasai Mara National Reserve. Mara Explorer Camp With only ten bespoke tents, Mara Explorer camp is a most luxurious private camp in the world-famous Mara. Overlooking the banks of the Talek River, it caters for the ultimate discerning clientele.

Rustic simplicity - Kipungani Explorer, Lamu Island

Mara Explorer offers stunning, open-plan tented accommodation (all with private outdoor bathtubs), together with stylish personal hosting, game drives, lavish bush meals, cultural tours, and arrangements for balloon safaris. The camp’s location is the perfect venue for viewing the annual wildebeest migration – considered the world’s most magnificent wildlife spectacle. Kipungani Lamu The 26-bed Kipungani Lamu retreat blends privacy with luxury on a pristine stretch of beach on Lamu Island. It’s a perfect ‘hideaway’ for discerning visitors. Kipungani offers everything one could desire by the sea, from mouth-watering seafood cuisine to modern water sports, game fishing, diving with dolphins, historic excursions to Kinyika , Manda Toto and Lamu towns, and romantic trips aboard motorised and sailing dhows. The Intrepid Brand Mara Intrepids and Samburu Intrepids The two Intrepids camps, in Maasai Mara and Samburu are a famous feature on Kenya’s safari circuit, offering superb tented

accommodation in Kenya’s best-known national reserves. The 60-bed Mara Intrepids caters to fly-in clients and Samburu Intrepid’s 54-bed camp caters to a mix of drive-in and flying safaris. Both camps boast classic ‘luxury under canvas’ living with a huge array of safari activities, personally hosted game drives and walking safaris to interpretive cultural tours, educational kids’ clubs, astro-tourism, balloon rides, camel safaris, and overnight fly-camp expeditions. Great Rift Valley Lodge and Golf Resort From its panoramic perch above Lake Naivasha, the four-time World Travel Awards winning golf resort enjoys sweeping views of the Great Rift Valley, with 21 twin and nine double rooms, 40 modern three- bedroom split-level houses and a series of private cottages. The private villas overlook the 18hole championship golf course with resident

Golf and safari resort - Great Rift Valley Lodge and Golf Resort, Naivasha

The four-time World Travel Awards winning golf resort is a favourite retreat for Kenyan residents, international tourists, sports enthusiasts, corporates and location weddings. The Voyager Brand Voyager Beach Resort For travelers looking to enjoy and explore the liveliest location on Africa’s east coast, look no further than Voyager Beach Resort. Overlooking the sparkling white sands of Nyali Beach, the resort offers 236 spacious cabins with both garden and sea view options, swimming pools, bar lounges and a beauty parlour. Voyager Ziwani With 25 safari tents on luscious lawns and a dam with hippos and crocodiles basking, it’s reminiscent of the classic camping times. Each tent is furnished with safari-style furniture with a veranda for guests to relax and watch wildlife against the backdrop of Africa’s highest mountain – the snow-capped Kilimanjaro in the neighbouring Tanzania and bordering Tsavo West National Park.

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Affordable luxury - Voyager Ziwani Camp, Tsavo

Kids’ Clubs – Adventurers and Young Rangers Heritage has set a new standard for children’s safaris in East Africa, providing an exciting and growing selection of supervised safari activities, wildlife lessons, educational games and cultural exchanges at all the Voyager and Intrepids properties.

P.O. Box 74888 - 00200, Nairobi, Kenya Tel (Wireless): +254 (0)20 210 3454/ 210 3484 Mobile: + 254 (0) 722 205 894/(0) 733 411 105 Email: sales@heritagehotels.co.ke www.heritage-eastafrica.com Twitter: @HeritageKenya Facebook: HeritageHotelsKenyaOfficial

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Coastal resort - Voyager Beach Resort, Mombasa

Family safaris - Intrepids and Voyager

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Jacaranda Hotels Practising Hospitality at its Best

Jacaranda is the brand name of an impressive Group of Hotels that includes Jacaranda Hotel in Westlands, Nairobi, Indian Ocean Beach Resort in the Coastal City of Mombasa and Lake Elementaita Lodge in Great Rift Valley. Jacaranda Hotel Jacaranda Hotel is considered by many to be one of the deluxe hotels in Kenya. Since coming into the Kenyan hospitality business in 1964, jacaranda is one of the most handpicked hotels in Nairobi. Positioned in a four acre land, encircled with fine- looking gardens and jacaranda trees, the environment offers a haven of tranquility and harmony to anyone who visits. It was named jacaranda hotel because of the many jacaranda trees that were in that environment. In 1973 it had the honour to

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host that years’ World Bank Conference that was held in Nairobi. Jacaranda had only 40 rooms and that was barely enough for dignitaries and guests hence the exigency and the need for expansion. Forty nine years later, Jacaranda Hotel today comprises of 125 stylishly furnished all en suite rooms suitable for leisure travelers, safari groups, couples, families as well as newly- weds. This is due to the fact that the trend of the hospitality industry is not taking a keen interest in how many rooms a hotel has but how spacious they are and their uniqueness. Jacaranda Hotel has not left anything to chance as far as conferencing and business is concerned. Their conferencing centre facilities have expanded and can now play host to many guests and delegates.

A good epitome of the centres is the Wariara conference centre that can have capacity for up to 200 delegates besides four other conference settings that has the following capacities. Palm-room can host up to 70 people, Jacaranda Room 30, Jacaranda Conference Centre (JCC) 150, Conference Room 201 about 20 people and Board Room 1 (over fan) 10 people. Satellite televisions, electronic safes, and a mini bar are some of the sumptuous facilities that the rooms at Jacaranda have. One is capable of making tea or coffee in the morning with the provided tackle. Bathrooms have hair dryers and shaver sockets. The rooms are cooled by ceiling fans. The admirable hotel has 48 new business executive suites in order to take care of accommodation requirements of the many guests it receives daily.

Safari cafĂŠ an airy pavilion style is one of the restaurants at the hotel. It offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Its menu ranges from buffet to a la carte, depending on the meal. Guests also lounge in comfortable upholstered chairs, or linger at the Safari Bar which overlooks the pool and the gardens. The Pool Bar & Restaurant that is unrivalled in town- classy, fully stocked and to top it all, a barman eager to serve your drinks just the way you like them. From cocktails to shooters or just simple cold drinks all served poolside or at the bar, where one can watch news broadcasts on satellite television. Another eatery is the Pizza Garden that provides comfortable dining, with a playground during the day and a very energetic night club atmosphere in the evenings. The restaurant offers an African buffet during the week.

The Gym and The Spa The magnificent gym and spa is in a custom made new building neighboring jacaranda hotel. Featured with the latest edition of Fitness equipment and highly skilled professional instructors who help clients combine intensified workouts and nutritional counseling with the motivation needed to reach and maintain long-term personal goals. Every lesson is structured to build cardiovascular endurance, pick up strength and increase flexibility. With these, one will not fail to meet all his fitness goals. Next to it is an opulent pool bordered by good-looking garden. It offers a free parking space for anyone using the facilities around the gym. Designed and equipped to meet the perceptive expectations, the Jacaranda Gym & Spa can proudly be said to be the best in Nairobi’s Gym & Spa market.

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Jacaranda Hotels Practising Hospitality at its Best

Jacaranda is the brand name of an impressive Group of Hotels that includes Jacaranda Hotel in Westlands, Nairobi, Indian Ocean Beach Resort in the Coastal City of Mombasa and Lake Elementaita Lodge in Great Rift Valley. Jacaranda Hotel Jacaranda Hotel is considered by many to be one of the deluxe hotels in Kenya. Since coming into the Kenyan hospitality business in 1964, jacaranda is one of the most handpicked hotels in Nairobi. Positioned in a four acre land, encircled with fine- looking gardens and jacaranda trees, the environment offers a haven of tranquility and harmony to anyone who visits. It was named jacaranda hotel because of the many jacaranda trees that were in that environment. In 1973 it had the honour to

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host that years’ World Bank Conference that was held in Nairobi. Jacaranda had only 40 rooms and that was barely enough for dignitaries and guests hence the exigency and the need for expansion. Forty nine years later, Jacaranda Hotel today comprises of 125 stylishly furnished all en suite rooms suitable for leisure travelers, safari groups, couples, families as well as newly- weds. This is due to the fact that the trend of the hospitality industry is not taking a keen interest in how many rooms a hotel has but how spacious they are and their uniqueness. Jacaranda Hotel has not left anything to chance as far as conferencing and business is concerned. Their conferencing centre facilities have expanded and can now play host to many guests and delegates.

A good epitome of the centres is the Wariara conference centre that can have capacity for up to 200 delegates besides four other conference settings that has the following capacities. Palm-room can host up to 70 people, Jacaranda Room 30, Jacaranda Conference Centre (JCC) 150, Conference Room 201 about 20 people and Board Room 1 (over fan) 10 people. Satellite televisions, electronic safes, and a mini bar are some of the sumptuous facilities that the rooms at Jacaranda have. One is capable of making tea or coffee in the morning with the provided tackle. Bathrooms have hair dryers and shaver sockets. The rooms are cooled by ceiling fans. The admirable hotel has 48 new business executive suites in order to take care of accommodation requirements of the many guests it receives daily.

Safari cafĂŠ an airy pavilion style is one of the restaurants at the hotel. It offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Its menu ranges from buffet to a la carte, depending on the meal. Guests also lounge in comfortable upholstered chairs, or linger at the Safari Bar which overlooks the pool and the gardens. The Pool Bar & Restaurant that is unrivalled in town- classy, fully stocked and to top it all, a barman eager to serve your drinks just the way you like them. From cocktails to shooters or just simple cold drinks all served poolside or at the bar, where one can watch news broadcasts on satellite television. Another eatery is the Pizza Garden that provides comfortable dining, with a playground during the day and a very energetic night club atmosphere in the evenings. The restaurant offers an African buffet during the week.

The Gym and The Spa The magnificent gym and spa is in a custom made new building neighboring jacaranda hotel. Featured with the latest edition of Fitness equipment and highly skilled professional instructors who help clients combine intensified workouts and nutritional counseling with the motivation needed to reach and maintain long-term personal goals. Every lesson is structured to build cardiovascular endurance, pick up strength and increase flexibility. With these, one will not fail to meet all his fitness goals. Next to it is an opulent pool bordered by good-looking garden. It offers a free parking space for anyone using the facilities around the gym. Designed and equipped to meet the perceptive expectations, the Jacaranda Gym & Spa can proudly be said to be the best in Nairobi’s Gym & Spa market.

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Accommodation The resort offers well tastefully furnished with locally hand carved furniture , ensuite bathrooms , mini bar, direct dial telephone, air conditioning and a central ceiling fun and are continually refreshed with necessary amenities to provide guests with comfort and convenience. The personal valets provide 24- hour room service. Enjoy warm hospitality and superb cuisine from a brilliant range of restaurants in a relaxed atmosphere with a professional and a friendly service. A lavish breakfast and table d’hôte dinners are served at Spices restaurant. The new Bahari Cove Restaurant, moored on the southern shore of the hotel is there to offers all kind if seafood under the magical African sky. Leisure Some of the outdoor and indoor activities offered include volleyball, croquet, bird watching and golfing at the nearby golf course. Due to its proximity to the Indian ocean, there are also water sports on offer. They include: catamaran, Pedalo, boogie board, wind surfing, deep sea fishing trips and scuba diving.

Encouragement of the renewal of mind, body and soul to relive stressful thinking is another of the professional services obtainable by the spa to promote rest and restoration. This important treatment is used to achieve true serenity. One will not fail to notice the Kiswahili names given to the therapy rooms in the spa. For instance there is Tulia, this means ‘relax’ and Pambo meaning ‘beauty’. As adventure awaits, one has to lose himself in overalls and let the spell of relaxation delight to the senses. The tailored services and professional treatment are designed for a head to toe sensory revival; cultivate your strength and generate a healthier more balanced lifestyle. Some of the other benefits one could get from the spa include: massages, body treatments, facials and foot spas, manicure and pedicure and body treatments. For the mind and body the spa offers; stretch and relaxation activities, yoga and T’ai chi an ancient mind-body exercise. James Chege, the Group Sales and Marketing Manager as the leading light, they are not taking chance with the reputation they have and are working hard to retain and develop it by advancing, each day, their existing products with new features

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and services. A rebranding exercise for the Group. Caring for their customers is what they value most and with that they have hired skilled chefs led by only one master chef Mr Samuel Matekenya. The executive has had 25years of experience and discreetly leads other chefs in making sure guests eat good food.

• Jacaranda enjoys the monopoly of being the first hotel to introduce a purchase card. The jacaranda plus privilege card carries with it numerous advantages. Any card holder gets appealing discounts on breakfast, lunch and dinner in all jacaranda group restaurants. The card owner is also eligible to use it at the pool area. When it comes to accommodation, card holders get 15 per cent discount on published resident room rates at all jacaranda properties. Other privileges that the jacaranda privilege card has are as follows: • A 10 per cent discount on all beverages when dinning with jacaranda • 10 per cent off any outside catering bill. • 10 per cent off conferencing rates at Indian Ocean resort and Lake Elementaita lodge. And there is more: • Complimentary overnight bed and breakfast accommodation for two at

jacaranda hotel, jacaranda Indian Ocean beach resort and Lake Elementaita lodge. A complimentary birthday cake when four or more people dine at the Safari Café at jacaranda hotel, the Bahari Cove at Jacaranda Indian Ocean Beach resort or Lord Cole restaurant( Lake Elementaita Lodge) Complimentary use for one day and up to 10 delegates of a meeting room at jacaranda hotel, Indian Ocean Beach resort or Lake Elementaita.

Indian Ocean Beach Resort. Located on the pristine white sandy beach, accompanied by swaying coconut palm groves and magnificent old stoic baobabs, the resort is dubbed a home of tranquility and harmony. Established in 1992, the resort was meant to be an exclusive, luxurious resort built on the sites of a 16th century mosque. In ancient times the coast was ruled by the rich sultans of Zanzibar, consequently the architectures is Arabic and a lot of antics from the sultan’s Palace have been used as a décor. The main reception has an aged chandelier given to the Sultan by the British traders for landing rights.

Conferencing A comprehensive range of facilities are managed in a one-stop convention centre with a modern business centre , a fully equipped air conditioned conference hall with a capacity of 200 delegates and 300 cocktails reception guests. The centre’s experienced and dedicated event managers will ensure the success of all meetings and events. Lake Elementaita Lodge Widening its wings in the Kenyan region, Jacaranda group of hotels has set Lake Elementaita Lodge in over 100 acres piece of land. It lies magnificently on the contours of the primeval Lake Elementaita. Restaurant and bars With the warmest hospitality, Lord Cole Bar is there to offer a first-rate spot for bird watching as the sun set. This blends well as one enjoys drinks from international and local cuisine with a variety of a la carte, BBQ and buffet menus. Conferencing The atmosphere set by the lake offers a perfect setting for conferences providing an inevitable mellow mood. The conference room is fully equipped to meet the needs of cooperate meetings for up to 50 people. Tel: +254 (020) 4448713/4/5/6/7 Email: bookings@jacarandahotels.com www.jacarandahotels.com

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Accommodation The resort offers well tastefully furnished with locally hand carved furniture , ensuite bathrooms , mini bar, direct dial telephone, air conditioning and a central ceiling fun and are continually refreshed with necessary amenities to provide guests with comfort and convenience. The personal valets provide 24- hour room service. Enjoy warm hospitality and superb cuisine from a brilliant range of restaurants in a relaxed atmosphere with a professional and a friendly service. A lavish breakfast and table d’hôte dinners are served at Spices restaurant. The new Bahari Cove Restaurant, moored on the southern shore of the hotel is there to offers all kind if seafood under the magical African sky. Leisure Some of the outdoor and indoor activities offered include volleyball, croquet, bird watching and golfing at the nearby golf course. Due to its proximity to the Indian ocean, there are also water sports on offer. They include: catamaran, Pedalo, boogie board, wind surfing, deep sea fishing trips and scuba diving.

Encouragement of the renewal of mind, body and soul to relive stressful thinking is another of the professional services obtainable by the spa to promote rest and restoration. This important treatment is used to achieve true serenity. One will not fail to notice the Kiswahili names given to the therapy rooms in the spa. For instance there is Tulia, this means ‘relax’ and Pambo meaning ‘beauty’. As adventure awaits, one has to lose himself in overalls and let the spell of relaxation delight to the senses. The tailored services and professional treatment are designed for a head to toe sensory revival; cultivate your strength and generate a healthier more balanced lifestyle. Some of the other benefits one could get from the spa include: massages, body treatments, facials and foot spas, manicure and pedicure and body treatments. For the mind and body the spa offers; stretch and relaxation activities, yoga and T’ai chi an ancient mind-body exercise. James Chege, the Group Sales and Marketing Manager as the leading light, they are not taking chance with the reputation they have and are working hard to retain and develop it by advancing, each day, their existing products with new features

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and services. A rebranding exercise for the Group. Caring for their customers is what they value most and with that they have hired skilled chefs led by only one master chef Mr Samuel Matekenya. The executive has had 25years of experience and discreetly leads other chefs in making sure guests eat good food.

• Jacaranda enjoys the monopoly of being the first hotel to introduce a purchase card. The jacaranda plus privilege card carries with it numerous advantages. Any card holder gets appealing discounts on breakfast, lunch and dinner in all jacaranda group restaurants. The card owner is also eligible to use it at the pool area. When it comes to accommodation, card holders get 15 per cent discount on published resident room rates at all jacaranda properties. Other privileges that the jacaranda privilege card has are as follows: • A 10 per cent discount on all beverages when dinning with jacaranda • 10 per cent off any outside catering bill. • 10 per cent off conferencing rates at Indian Ocean resort and Lake Elementaita lodge. And there is more: • Complimentary overnight bed and breakfast accommodation for two at

jacaranda hotel, jacaranda Indian Ocean beach resort and Lake Elementaita lodge. A complimentary birthday cake when four or more people dine at the Safari Café at jacaranda hotel, the Bahari Cove at Jacaranda Indian Ocean Beach resort or Lord Cole restaurant( Lake Elementaita Lodge) Complimentary use for one day and up to 10 delegates of a meeting room at jacaranda hotel, Indian Ocean Beach resort or Lake Elementaita.

Indian Ocean Beach Resort. Located on the pristine white sandy beach, accompanied by swaying coconut palm groves and magnificent old stoic baobabs, the resort is dubbed a home of tranquility and harmony. Established in 1992, the resort was meant to be an exclusive, luxurious resort built on the sites of a 16th century mosque. In ancient times the coast was ruled by the rich sultans of Zanzibar, consequently the architectures is Arabic and a lot of antics from the sultan’s Palace have been used as a décor. The main reception has an aged chandelier given to the Sultan by the British traders for landing rights.

Conferencing A comprehensive range of facilities are managed in a one-stop convention centre with a modern business centre , a fully equipped air conditioned conference hall with a capacity of 200 delegates and 300 cocktails reception guests. The centre’s experienced and dedicated event managers will ensure the success of all meetings and events. Lake Elementaita Lodge Widening its wings in the Kenyan region, Jacaranda group of hotels has set Lake Elementaita Lodge in over 100 acres piece of land. It lies magnificently on the contours of the primeval Lake Elementaita. Restaurant and bars With the warmest hospitality, Lord Cole Bar is there to offer a first-rate spot for bird watching as the sun set. This blends well as one enjoys drinks from international and local cuisine with a variety of a la carte, BBQ and buffet menus. Conferencing The atmosphere set by the lake offers a perfect setting for conferences providing an inevitable mellow mood. The conference room is fully equipped to meet the needs of cooperate meetings for up to 50 people. Tel: +254 (020) 4448713/4/5/6/7 Email: bookings@jacarandahotels.com www.jacarandahotels.com

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CHAPTER 4 Shopping and Retail

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CHAPTER 4 Shopping and Retail

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Sarit Centre - ‘City Within a City’

The Sarit Centre has recorded a number of “firsts” in Kenya; being the first enclosed shopping mall in East Africa and being the leading superbrand in its category for many years, annual Christmas shopping promotions with internal and external lights, a loyalty programme since 1997 based on its increasingly popular value card, and the first to implement paid and pre-paid parking cards for shoppers.

Located in the Westlands suburb of Nairobi, The Sarit Centre is one of the largest and first-ever enclosed shopping malls in East Africa, boasting 500 000 square feet of builtup area on six levels. It was the vision of Murang’a-born Sobhagayachand Vidhu Shah (known to all as Bachubhai) and formerKaratina resident Maneklal Rughani already in business together in educational suppliers Text Book Centre. The centre, which opened in 1983, after construction of a much more ambitious architectural concept based on the UK Brent Cross mall, was thwarted by the coup attempt a few months earlier, it offers a

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modern and diverse shopping experience. It has 250,000 square feet of retail and office space with some 75 retail/service outlets and 50 other tenants. In the shopping centre industry, location is paramount and the Sarit Centre straddles an important road network to western Kenya and beyond. It is also the hub of the city’s high-income residential estates occupied by professionals, and businessmen and women of all races, the A-B market segment located in the west and north of Nairobi’s CBD. The centre prides itself on pioneering modern retailing in Nairobi and its “City

within a City” slogan indicates that virtually all retail and service needs can be found under one roof with good security and plenty of parking, providing a pleasant shopping ambience achieved by direct owner management of the complex and careful control of the tenant-mix. The centre is the workplace of some 1,700 men and women tenants, managers and staff of the various enterprises operating and outsourced services including, security, parking, cleaning and restaurant staff.    Average daily footfall is 25,000 with some 5,000 cars and other vehicles using its parking. 

The growing and changing needs of shoppers, an expanding and fast-paced African middle-class growth all indicate an excellent future for the Sarit Centre - so much so, that a master plan for further development of its 11 acres of land is being advanced with a Phase Three commencement planned for 2014. Eventually this will virtually double the centre’s retail and office space, add an international conference complex, business hotel and a residential component.

P.O.Box 14474-00800 Nairobi. Kenya Tel: +254-20-3747408/9 | 3748662 | 3740329 www.saritcentre.com

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Sarit Centre - ‘City Within a City’

The Sarit Centre has recorded a number of “firsts” in Kenya; being the first enclosed shopping mall in East Africa and being the leading superbrand in its category for many years, annual Christmas shopping promotions with internal and external lights, a loyalty programme since 1997 based on its increasingly popular value card, and the first to implement paid and pre-paid parking cards for shoppers.

Located in the Westlands suburb of Nairobi, The Sarit Centre is one of the largest and first-ever enclosed shopping malls in East Africa, boasting 500 000 square feet of builtup area on six levels. It was the vision of Murang’a-born Sobhagayachand Vidhu Shah (known to all as Bachubhai) and formerKaratina resident Maneklal Rughani already in business together in educational suppliers Text Book Centre. The centre, which opened in 1983, after construction of a much more ambitious architectural concept based on the UK Brent Cross mall, was thwarted by the coup attempt a few months earlier, it offers a

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modern and diverse shopping experience. It has 250,000 square feet of retail and office space with some 75 retail/service outlets and 50 other tenants. In the shopping centre industry, location is paramount and the Sarit Centre straddles an important road network to western Kenya and beyond. It is also the hub of the city’s high-income residential estates occupied by professionals, and businessmen and women of all races, the A-B market segment located in the west and north of Nairobi’s CBD. The centre prides itself on pioneering modern retailing in Nairobi and its “City

within a City” slogan indicates that virtually all retail and service needs can be found under one roof with good security and plenty of parking, providing a pleasant shopping ambience achieved by direct owner management of the complex and careful control of the tenant-mix. The centre is the workplace of some 1,700 men and women tenants, managers and staff of the various enterprises operating and outsourced services including, security, parking, cleaning and restaurant staff.    Average daily footfall is 25,000 with some 5,000 cars and other vehicles using its parking. 

The growing and changing needs of shoppers, an expanding and fast-paced African middle-class growth all indicate an excellent future for the Sarit Centre - so much so, that a master plan for further development of its 11 acres of land is being advanced with a Phase Three commencement planned for 2014. Eventually this will virtually double the centre’s retail and office space, add an international conference complex, business hotel and a residential component.

P.O.Box 14474-00800 Nairobi. Kenya Tel: +254-20-3747408/9 | 3748662 | 3740329 www.saritcentre.com

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SINCE 1967

Sir Henry’s on Kimathi Street

A man’s clothes speaks volumes about his image and at Sir Henry’s, the figure and image enhancing qualities of classic cuts and fabrics, portray an elegant man who has found himself. We are the benchmark store that stocks elegant apparel for men. Our extensive range consists of the latest styles, from smart casual to executive business suits.  After 48 years masterminding and understanding the revolutionary redevelopment of Kenya’s clothing industry, you can be sure that we have what you need. Sir Henry’s today is more than just the sum of its products - it’s a shopping experience that promises to surprise, amaze, amuse and ultimately satisfy its customers by delivering extraordinary customer experiences.

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Having formed a strong bond cultivated over years of working together, we import our products directly from manufacturers in Europe.

Take a slice of the Best and largest men’s wear designer shop in East Africa. We set the standards for up-to-the-minute style, lasting quality and exceptional customer service.

Our products are specifically made with the highest standards possible in mind and with such brand names such as Ungaro, Yves Saint Laurent, Pecorari, Baumler, Viyella, and Odermark - just to mention a few, you can be assured that we do not compromise when it comes to quality.

Our sales team live and breathe our products each in different ways, The team members combine expert brand knowledge, insight and enthusiasm to create the special experience our customers expect and which keeps them coming back for more.

As the oldest and largest men’s wear designer shop in East Africa, our Kimathi Street branch is a national institution with the most famous shop windows on the street. And the Thika Road mall and The Junction branches bring their own magic to those vibrant areas.

It’s all part of a 48-year tradition we’re proud to maintain. And as East Africa’s best, we’ve got a lot to be proud of.

Tel: +254-20-2248682, +254 713 619786 sirhenry@wananchi.com www.sirhenrys.co.ke

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SINCE 1967

Sir Henry’s on Kimathi Street

A man’s clothes speaks volumes about his image and at Sir Henry’s, the figure and image enhancing qualities of classic cuts and fabrics, portray an elegant man who has found himself. We are the benchmark store that stocks elegant apparel for men. Our extensive range consists of the latest styles, from smart casual to executive business suits.  After 48 years masterminding and understanding the revolutionary redevelopment of Kenya’s clothing industry, you can be sure that we have what you need. Sir Henry’s today is more than just the sum of its products - it’s a shopping experience that promises to surprise, amaze, amuse and ultimately satisfy its customers by delivering extraordinary customer experiences.

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Having formed a strong bond cultivated over years of working together, we import our products directly from manufacturers in Europe.

Take a slice of the Best and largest men’s wear designer shop in East Africa. We set the standards for up-to-the-minute style, lasting quality and exceptional customer service.

Our products are specifically made with the highest standards possible in mind and with such brand names such as Ungaro, Yves Saint Laurent, Pecorari, Baumler, Viyella, and Odermark - just to mention a few, you can be assured that we do not compromise when it comes to quality.

Our sales team live and breathe our products each in different ways, The team members combine expert brand knowledge, insight and enthusiasm to create the special experience our customers expect and which keeps them coming back for more.

As the oldest and largest men’s wear designer shop in East Africa, our Kimathi Street branch is a national institution with the most famous shop windows on the street. And the Thika Road mall and The Junction branches bring their own magic to those vibrant areas.

It’s all part of a 48-year tradition we’re proud to maintain. And as East Africa’s best, we’ve got a lot to be proud of.

Tel: +254-20-2248682, +254 713 619786 sirhenry@wananchi.com www.sirhenrys.co.ke

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Nakumatt Holdings Limited Raising the bar even higher

Atul Shah Nakumatt Holdings Managing Director

him to a point of no return. He landed a job in a major retail store and went on to gain invaluable Retail Management experience. After his hands-on training in America, Atul, returned to Kenya hell-bent on replicating the American retail model in Kenya. In 1991, after a brief stint in the family business, Atul started on a journey to establish a chain of super stores mirrored on the Wal-Mart model but customised to Kenyan demands.

Nakumatt Thika Road

Nakumatt tops the list of Africa’s homegrown corporate success stories in the retail sector. While investors around the world would recognise it as a typical supermarket chain, the people in the localities where it has presence in would call it a national iconic brand. The supermarket has its own loyalty card, credit card, an in-house magazine, employs more than 6000 staff to cater to the needs of the over 200,000 customers who shop there every day, and it offers 75,000 line items offered through its extended networks. In a word, it is East Africa’s top retailer by sales and revenue with more than 40 stores across Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda and Tanzania. In addition, plans are now in high gear to open more stores in Burundi and South Sudan.

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History Nakumatt, whose format includes convenience stores, supermarkets and hypermarkets, was established back in 1987. It was a brainchild of the late Mr Nemubhai (Maganlal) Shah, who established his first retail store in the late 40’s around present day Nandi town. From Nandi, Shah moved to Nakuru to join his brother and ended up picking the mantle to run the then Nakuru Mattresses which was a family-owned store dealing mainly in clothing materials, mattresses, bed sheets and beds. From these humble beginnings, Maganlal worked tirelessly alongside his two sons (The late Vimal Shah and Atul Shah) before passing on the mantle to the current Managing Director Atul Shah. Interestingly, Atul Shah – popularly known as ‘Haku,’ formally started his involvement in retail trade in 1971, at the tender age of

10 while still pursuing his education in the Rift Valley town of Nakuru. At that age, Shah worked part time in the family business acquiring hands-on experience in retail operations. The “Nakumatt Dream” was hatched from a modest retail store then known as Nakuru Mattresses to denote its specialty. In 1978, the late Haku’s father, armed with a vision to expand his business sealed a deal to buy off Nakuru Mattress from his brother and immediately embarked on a strategic process to expand its product offerings from mere mattresses and beddings to a full scale consumer retail store. Fuelled by the passion to excel in retail operations and gain first-hand experience in the early 80’s, his son Atul, travelled abroad to explore business opportunities in the US. While there, the magnificence, sheer size and variety of products in the superstores thrilled

The following year, Nakumatt Mega, the first Superstore retail outlet in Kenya, providing an all-under-one-roof solution was established along Nairobi’s Uhuru Highway, with Atul and his father among other family members on the driving seat. Twenty years on, Nakumatt Supermarkets have grown tremendously and now cover a selling space of more than one million square feet in four East African Countries. Nakumatt’s distinctive store set-up featuring wide aisles for a pleasurable shopping experience; well-defined and brightly lit product categories; ample parking and extended hours on weekends and public holidays make each outlet, is in many ways, the same as the world’s leading retail chains. Innovation “At Nakumatt, one thing you can always count on; is our commitment to enhance

Nakumatt Holdings Managing Director Atul Shah flanked by the retailer's Regional Director Thiagarajan Ramamurthy, Diamond Trust Bank CEO Nasim Devji and MasterCard East Africa Official James Wainaina displaying the new Nakumatt Global Prepaid MasterCard. Regional retailer Nakumatt Holdings, has embarked on a process to transform its current Smart Card to the new Nakumatt Global Prepaid MasterCard with enhanced security and value features

value for our customers in one way or the other,” says Atul Shah, Managing Director of Nakumatt Holdings. The business is actively advancing to the regional retail market through a variety of customer centered excellent services. For instance, they have now unveiled a major strategy that will see the stores developing fully-fledged departmental concept stores. The target is to have these departmental stores housing premium international brands such as footwear giants Clarks and Sketchers, toy giants Disney World among others. By proving quality, value, service, variety and lifestyle, Nakumatt is able to stay ahead of its competition. The retailer recently introduced a multicurrency Prepaid loyalty card to its one million plus Nakumatt Smart Card holders. The existing Smart cards were replaced with the new generation Nakumatt Global MasterCard Prepaid card and will allow customers to load money for purchases at POS terminals, cash withdrawals and online purchases at Nakumatt stores across East Africa and at any merchant outlet, which accepts MasterCard payment cards worldwide.

Nakumatt Global Card specimen

Additionally, plans are underway to unveil a portable retail store option dubbed Nakumatt on Wheels (NoW). Due to its unrivalled passion for retail excellence, Nakumatt has managed to carve a niche as the ideal shopping and entertainment center. Environmental conservation While at it, Nakumatt’s environment and quality policy ensures that customers are, afforded products and goods that meet global environmental and quality standards. The supermarket has remained steadfast as a proponent on the environmental conservation front. Last year it unveiled an initiative to reduce the use of plastic paper bags across its branches in East Africa through an elaborate behavioural

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Nakumatt Holdings Limited Raising the bar even higher

Atul Shah Nakumatt Holdings Managing Director

him to a point of no return. He landed a job in a major retail store and went on to gain invaluable Retail Management experience. After his hands-on training in America, Atul, returned to Kenya hell-bent on replicating the American retail model in Kenya. In 1991, after a brief stint in the family business, Atul started on a journey to establish a chain of super stores mirrored on the Wal-Mart model but customised to Kenyan demands.

Nakumatt Thika Road

Nakumatt tops the list of Africa’s homegrown corporate success stories in the retail sector. While investors around the world would recognise it as a typical supermarket chain, the people in the localities where it has presence in would call it a national iconic brand. The supermarket has its own loyalty card, credit card, an in-house magazine, employs more than 6000 staff to cater to the needs of the over 200,000 customers who shop there every day, and it offers 75,000 line items offered through its extended networks. In a word, it is East Africa’s top retailer by sales and revenue with more than 40 stores across Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda and Tanzania. In addition, plans are now in high gear to open more stores in Burundi and South Sudan.

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History Nakumatt, whose format includes convenience stores, supermarkets and hypermarkets, was established back in 1987. It was a brainchild of the late Mr Nemubhai (Maganlal) Shah, who established his first retail store in the late 40’s around present day Nandi town. From Nandi, Shah moved to Nakuru to join his brother and ended up picking the mantle to run the then Nakuru Mattresses which was a family-owned store dealing mainly in clothing materials, mattresses, bed sheets and beds. From these humble beginnings, Maganlal worked tirelessly alongside his two sons (The late Vimal Shah and Atul Shah) before passing on the mantle to the current Managing Director Atul Shah. Interestingly, Atul Shah – popularly known as ‘Haku,’ formally started his involvement in retail trade in 1971, at the tender age of

10 while still pursuing his education in the Rift Valley town of Nakuru. At that age, Shah worked part time in the family business acquiring hands-on experience in retail operations. The “Nakumatt Dream” was hatched from a modest retail store then known as Nakuru Mattresses to denote its specialty. In 1978, the late Haku’s father, armed with a vision to expand his business sealed a deal to buy off Nakuru Mattress from his brother and immediately embarked on a strategic process to expand its product offerings from mere mattresses and beddings to a full scale consumer retail store. Fuelled by the passion to excel in retail operations and gain first-hand experience in the early 80’s, his son Atul, travelled abroad to explore business opportunities in the US. While there, the magnificence, sheer size and variety of products in the superstores thrilled

The following year, Nakumatt Mega, the first Superstore retail outlet in Kenya, providing an all-under-one-roof solution was established along Nairobi’s Uhuru Highway, with Atul and his father among other family members on the driving seat. Twenty years on, Nakumatt Supermarkets have grown tremendously and now cover a selling space of more than one million square feet in four East African Countries. Nakumatt’s distinctive store set-up featuring wide aisles for a pleasurable shopping experience; well-defined and brightly lit product categories; ample parking and extended hours on weekends and public holidays make each outlet, is in many ways, the same as the world’s leading retail chains. Innovation “At Nakumatt, one thing you can always count on; is our commitment to enhance

Nakumatt Holdings Managing Director Atul Shah flanked by the retailer's Regional Director Thiagarajan Ramamurthy, Diamond Trust Bank CEO Nasim Devji and MasterCard East Africa Official James Wainaina displaying the new Nakumatt Global Prepaid MasterCard. Regional retailer Nakumatt Holdings, has embarked on a process to transform its current Smart Card to the new Nakumatt Global Prepaid MasterCard with enhanced security and value features

value for our customers in one way or the other,” says Atul Shah, Managing Director of Nakumatt Holdings. The business is actively advancing to the regional retail market through a variety of customer centered excellent services. For instance, they have now unveiled a major strategy that will see the stores developing fully-fledged departmental concept stores. The target is to have these departmental stores housing premium international brands such as footwear giants Clarks and Sketchers, toy giants Disney World among others. By proving quality, value, service, variety and lifestyle, Nakumatt is able to stay ahead of its competition. The retailer recently introduced a multicurrency Prepaid loyalty card to its one million plus Nakumatt Smart Card holders. The existing Smart cards were replaced with the new generation Nakumatt Global MasterCard Prepaid card and will allow customers to load money for purchases at POS terminals, cash withdrawals and online purchases at Nakumatt stores across East Africa and at any merchant outlet, which accepts MasterCard payment cards worldwide.

Nakumatt Global Card specimen

Additionally, plans are underway to unveil a portable retail store option dubbed Nakumatt on Wheels (NoW). Due to its unrivalled passion for retail excellence, Nakumatt has managed to carve a niche as the ideal shopping and entertainment center. Environmental conservation While at it, Nakumatt’s environment and quality policy ensures that customers are, afforded products and goods that meet global environmental and quality standards. The supermarket has remained steadfast as a proponent on the environmental conservation front. Last year it unveiled an initiative to reduce the use of plastic paper bags across its branches in East Africa through an elaborate behavioural

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change campaign. The campaign dubbed ‘Nakumatt: Think Green; Go Blue!’ was geared at encouraging shoppers to consider packing their shopping in reusable bags, used cartons and bales instead of plastic paper bags.

Nakumatt Holdings Regional Director Thiagarajan Ramamurthy (left) and the firm’s Managing Director Mr Atul Shah (centre) with British High Commissioner to Kenya Dr Christian Turner (right) at the new Thika Road Mall Clarks Footwear Concept Store. Local retailers are now tipped to play key role in efforts to double UK’s balance of trade with Kenya

Already, the campaign has bore fruit with an impressive 15 per cent reduction in plastic paper bags recorded in the last ten months. However, the hard part of ensuring project sustainability has just started. Thus, to encourage the uptake of the project, Nakumatt Smart shoppers now earn two extra smart points every time they come shopping with their reusable bags. All these are efforts geared at reducing the consumption of plastic bags. The consumers are the most effective avenue through which to reduce such usage through the behavioral change campaign, since their consumption cannot be radically reduced either by a surcharge, legislation or by higher taxes. “Besides shoppers, we are also engaged in a consultative process with keys suppliers to reduce unnecessary use of plastics in product packaging by seeking environmental friendly options. Shrink wrapping of consumer products’ such as tea bags, biscuits among others are as harmful to the environment as a paper bag,” explains Atul Shah. “Convincing consumers to; reduce, reuse and recycle bags, in that order is the only viable option to managing plastic waste from a retail perspective. Our Think Green; Go Blue! Project has also been informed by the uncertainty regarding the relative environmental benefits of different retail bag types.” Alongside the campaign and as part of its expansion strategy, Nakumatt has also adopted a policy to exclusively open

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Supermarket stores, featuring a variety of energy saving retail fittings and solutions imported from Italy. The energy saving solutions already installed and running at the new stores provide for significant efficiency with upto 25 per cent energy cost savings. “On one side, we want to save the costs, and on the other side we are also being friendly with the environment. Everything is innovation and caring for our surroundings.” Achievements The commitment to provide world-class service to its customers and conforming to local and international laws, policies and regulations governing its business and related operations has seen the retail chain under the stewardship of Atul Shah receive an impressive string of awards which includes prestigious and coveted local, regional and international accolades. •

Earned recognition as the Price Waterhouse Coopers (PwC) Most Respected Company in the Service Sector for three years in a row;

most innovative company worldwide by Planet Retail; •

Recognised by the Financial Times (FT) as one of the Top 50 Emerging Market Business Leaders; and

Appointed to the Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council for Eurasia and Africa.

Nakumatt on Wheels, Rhino charge

With a dynamic staff and management team, the company is committed to getting the best possible results so that the accumulated benefits can be, passed on to consumers via access to a broader range of quality, affordable products and excellent services. This, coupled with their popular mantra “You need it, we’ve got it,” customers are assured of the largest variety and highest quality of local and international brands at reasonable cost, always at the hands of warm, friendly and willing staff.

Tel: +254 - 20 - 650137 www.nakumatt.net

Achieved global recognition as the Nakumatt Malindi Best of Kenya 95


change campaign. The campaign dubbed ‘Nakumatt: Think Green; Go Blue!’ was geared at encouraging shoppers to consider packing their shopping in reusable bags, used cartons and bales instead of plastic paper bags.

Nakumatt Holdings Regional Director Thiagarajan Ramamurthy (left) and the firm’s Managing Director Mr Atul Shah (centre) with British High Commissioner to Kenya Dr Christian Turner (right) at the new Thika Road Mall Clarks Footwear Concept Store. Local retailers are now tipped to play key role in efforts to double UK’s balance of trade with Kenya

Already, the campaign has bore fruit with an impressive 15 per cent reduction in plastic paper bags recorded in the last ten months. However, the hard part of ensuring project sustainability has just started. Thus, to encourage the uptake of the project, Nakumatt Smart shoppers now earn two extra smart points every time they come shopping with their reusable bags. All these are efforts geared at reducing the consumption of plastic bags. The consumers are the most effective avenue through which to reduce such usage through the behavioral change campaign, since their consumption cannot be radically reduced either by a surcharge, legislation or by higher taxes. “Besides shoppers, we are also engaged in a consultative process with keys suppliers to reduce unnecessary use of plastics in product packaging by seeking environmental friendly options. Shrink wrapping of consumer products’ such as tea bags, biscuits among others are as harmful to the environment as a paper bag,” explains Atul Shah. “Convincing consumers to; reduce, reuse and recycle bags, in that order is the only viable option to managing plastic waste from a retail perspective. Our Think Green; Go Blue! Project has also been informed by the uncertainty regarding the relative environmental benefits of different retail bag types.” Alongside the campaign and as part of its expansion strategy, Nakumatt has also adopted a policy to exclusively open

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Supermarket stores, featuring a variety of energy saving retail fittings and solutions imported from Italy. The energy saving solutions already installed and running at the new stores provide for significant efficiency with upto 25 per cent energy cost savings. “On one side, we want to save the costs, and on the other side we are also being friendly with the environment. Everything is innovation and caring for our surroundings.” Achievements The commitment to provide world-class service to its customers and conforming to local and international laws, policies and regulations governing its business and related operations has seen the retail chain under the stewardship of Atul Shah receive an impressive string of awards which includes prestigious and coveted local, regional and international accolades. •

Earned recognition as the Price Waterhouse Coopers (PwC) Most Respected Company in the Service Sector for three years in a row;

most innovative company worldwide by Planet Retail; •

Recognised by the Financial Times (FT) as one of the Top 50 Emerging Market Business Leaders; and

Appointed to the Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council for Eurasia and Africa.

Nakumatt on Wheels, Rhino charge

With a dynamic staff and management team, the company is committed to getting the best possible results so that the accumulated benefits can be, passed on to consumers via access to a broader range of quality, affordable products and excellent services. This, coupled with their popular mantra “You need it, we’ve got it,” customers are assured of the largest variety and highest quality of local and international brands at reasonable cost, always at the hands of warm, friendly and willing staff.

Tel: +254 - 20 - 650137 www.nakumatt.net

Achieved global recognition as the Nakumatt Malindi Best of Kenya 95


CHAPTER 5 Corporate Profiles

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CHAPTER 5 Corporate Profiles

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business line to a more conglomerate and diversified organisation was born, out of a strategic decision to protect ourselves from business blips on two fronts.

Simba Corporation ‘’Working with the best is just good business’’

Firstly, we brought in extra franchises to beef up our motor division. We acquired the BMW franchise under the brand name Bavaria Motors about three-and-a-half years ago. This year, we started Xylon Motors, which is the franchise holder for Mahindra. Secondly, the business opted to increase its scope. Significantly, we acquired AVIS Kenya (and will be starting AVIS Uganda soon). We also diversified into fleet management services where we established the Africa Fleet Management Services, which is at the forefront of fleet management services in Kenya. Recently, through Simba Hospitality, we established a management agreement with Kempinski Hotels – the world’s oldest hotel chain, to manage our two hotels – Villa Rosa on Chiromo Road, Nairobi, and Mara Olare – an exclusive tented camp in the prestigious Maasai Mara Game Reserve. So, as you can see, there are a variety of businesses that we added so that we could diversify and create different business portfolios mainly looking at the economic environment in eastern Africa. The continent has great opportunities, but the risks are quite high. We wanted to mitigate those risks so that we are a company that uses our strong balance sheet to leverage our businesses. Our Business Strategy: Our approach is anchored in the theme, “Working with the best, is just good business’’.

Mr. Adil Popat, Group CEO, Simba Corporation inside the Bavaria Auto Showroom, Mombasa Road

Simba Corporation is one of Kenya’s most successful enterprise stories. Global Village Publishers spoke to the Group CEO, Mr. Adil Popat, on the history th company, its strategic business approach and future plans. Here are the excerpts. Our Heritage: Simba Corporation owes its rich heritage to the vision and entrepreneurial acumen of its founding chairman, the late Abdul Karim Chatur Popat, popularly known as AKC Popat, who started trading in second hand cars before eventually opening Deluxe Motors - his first ever second-hand car dealership showroom on today’s Moktar Daddah Street in Nairobi in 1945. He ran that dealership for about 20 years, and then in 1967, was approached by Toyota to be their franchise holder. Many at that time thought that Toyota, being a Japanese

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brand, did not exhibit good quality. So, he declined the offer to represent them. In those days, there was a Greek man, who was running Westlands Motors, who took up the offer. Immediately after, my father saw that the brand was performing well because it was giving an alternative product to the market – a cheaper but also, a reliable product, and that was something worth considering.

and non-availability of import licences. This forced Simba Colt Motors to enter into a strategic partnership with CMC Motors in 1977, leading to the formation of Simba Cooper Motors (SCM). Unfortunately, that short-lived partnership did not work very well, and in 1978, he decided to buy the entire business, and revert to Simba Colt Motors.

The very next year, in 1968, Mitsubishi came to Kenya. Mitsubishi was renowned for engineering and had excellent reliability. When they offered the franchise to my father, he took it up and established Simba Colt Motors.

About 13 years ago, we took over the Fuso franchise from an old Lonrho subsidiary called Bruce Trucks. Truck business is where we have been most successful. Today, we handle the whole range of Mitsubishi vehicles in Kenya, and are a leading motor company both in terms of size, and the number of units sold.

The first few years of trading under the Mitsubishi franchise were times of immense difficulties because of severe competition

Idea behind Simba Corporation: In 2007, the idea of transforming our business operations from a purely single

Right from the start, our business was anchored in internationally acclaimed and leading brands. This approach was borne out of a realisation that a sustainable portion of the Kenyan population was seeking quality accompanying brands in one area or another of their lives. In the motor division, we wanted our customers to come to us and find a solution for all their transport needs. If one wanted a 4-wheel drive or a 2-wheel drive, or a tractor, one would find it. Also, if our customers wanted these products along certain price points – whether cheaper or more expensive or luxurious ends, they would find them. Our strategy was premised on a one-stop shop with the same guarantee of service across all our brands. Of course, we also use best practices. All these brands have fantastic business practices that they use across their parent companies. We try and marry them so that we have very good service levels across the board.

The Indian High Commissioner to Kenya H.E. Mr. Sibabrata Tripathi, The late Chairman of Simba Corp Mr. AKC Popat, Simba Corporation’s Executive Director, Dinesh Kotecha, Senior General Manager Exports – Africa and Middle East Mr. Sanjay Jadhav and the former Government Spokesperson currently Machakos County Governor Dr. Alfred Mutua during the re-launch ceremony of Mahindra under Xylon Motors in 2012

Besides, our previous success in managing these brands gave us confidence in pursuing this particular approach. We are a technically sound organisation with competent staff, so it has been relatively easy for us to manage these brands. Success Factors: The first thing that we do is make sure that our business is anchored in quality personnel by employing the best skills available, whom we offer continuous training opportunities. After 2007, we made sure that we had a clear organisational chart showing what we wanted to do at every step of our business plan, and how we would go about it. We also employ an open-door management policy, with a very strong and inclusive management style, where our managers are able to sit down and hopefully, find solutions for our business. We believe combined brain power is important. Besides, prudent cash flow and treasury management are key to our operations. In all that we do, we simply make sure that we do not lose out on the ‘’Simba Spirit’’. Simba Foundation: The establishment of Simba Foundation - our Corporate Social Responsibility arm was premised on a firm belief that every successful business should consider giving back to the society around them.

Our aim is to create mentorship programmes not at the high, but the low-end of business for those who want to get started. Our plan is not to give out money, but loans to create a pool where start-ups can borrow some money, and return it within specific timeframes so that the next person benefits. The successful entrepreneurs would then be encouraged to offer mentorship to the new entrants into the programme. This is what we are working on currently. Our Future: At Simba Corp, we are looking to enhance our focus and strategy. In 2014, we will be launching another motor brand into the Kenyan market – Geely. On the hospitality side, we are looking at building a hotel in Kisumu, which will open soon. This will be our third unit. We will then embark on a programme to build three-Star hotels across East Africa. We have also established a real estate arm, where we have numerous projects that we will soon start developing. Our focus now is to build and establish our own brands locally. Simba Corporation Tel: +254 (020) 296 6000 Email: Website:

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business line to a more conglomerate and diversified organisation was born, out of a strategic decision to protect ourselves from business blips on two fronts.

Simba Corporation ‘’Working with the best is just good business’’

Firstly, we brought in extra franchises to beef up our motor division. We acquired the BMW franchise under the brand name Bavaria Motors about three-and-a-half years ago. This year, we started Xylon Motors, which is the franchise holder for Mahindra. Secondly, the business opted to increase its scope. Significantly, we acquired AVIS Kenya (and will be starting AVIS Uganda soon). We also diversified into fleet management services where we established the Africa Fleet Management Services, which is at the forefront of fleet management services in Kenya. Recently, through Simba Hospitality, we established a management agreement with Kempinski Hotels – the world’s oldest hotel chain, to manage our two hotels – Villa Rosa on Chiromo Road, Nairobi, and Mara Olare – an exclusive tented camp in the prestigious Maasai Mara Game Reserve. So, as you can see, there are a variety of businesses that we added so that we could diversify and create different business portfolios mainly looking at the economic environment in eastern Africa. The continent has great opportunities, but the risks are quite high. We wanted to mitigate those risks so that we are a company that uses our strong balance sheet to leverage our businesses. Our Business Strategy: Our approach is anchored in the theme, “Working with the best, is just good business’’.

Mr. Adil Popat, Group CEO, Simba Corporation inside the Bavaria Auto Showroom, Mombasa Road

Simba Corporation is one of Kenya’s most successful enterprise stories. Global Village Publishers spoke to the Group CEO, Mr. Adil Popat, on the history th company, its strategic business approach and future plans. Here are the excerpts. Our Heritage: Simba Corporation owes its rich heritage to the vision and entrepreneurial acumen of its founding chairman, the late Abdul Karim Chatur Popat, popularly known as AKC Popat, who started trading in second hand cars before eventually opening Deluxe Motors - his first ever second-hand car dealership showroom on today’s Moktar Daddah Street in Nairobi in 1945. He ran that dealership for about 20 years, and then in 1967, was approached by Toyota to be their franchise holder. Many at that time thought that Toyota, being a Japanese

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brand, did not exhibit good quality. So, he declined the offer to represent them. In those days, there was a Greek man, who was running Westlands Motors, who took up the offer. Immediately after, my father saw that the brand was performing well because it was giving an alternative product to the market – a cheaper but also, a reliable product, and that was something worth considering.

and non-availability of import licences. This forced Simba Colt Motors to enter into a strategic partnership with CMC Motors in 1977, leading to the formation of Simba Cooper Motors (SCM). Unfortunately, that short-lived partnership did not work very well, and in 1978, he decided to buy the entire business, and revert to Simba Colt Motors.

The very next year, in 1968, Mitsubishi came to Kenya. Mitsubishi was renowned for engineering and had excellent reliability. When they offered the franchise to my father, he took it up and established Simba Colt Motors.

About 13 years ago, we took over the Fuso franchise from an old Lonrho subsidiary called Bruce Trucks. Truck business is where we have been most successful. Today, we handle the whole range of Mitsubishi vehicles in Kenya, and are a leading motor company both in terms of size, and the number of units sold.

The first few years of trading under the Mitsubishi franchise were times of immense difficulties because of severe competition

Idea behind Simba Corporation: In 2007, the idea of transforming our business operations from a purely single

Right from the start, our business was anchored in internationally acclaimed and leading brands. This approach was borne out of a realisation that a sustainable portion of the Kenyan population was seeking quality accompanying brands in one area or another of their lives. In the motor division, we wanted our customers to come to us and find a solution for all their transport needs. If one wanted a 4-wheel drive or a 2-wheel drive, or a tractor, one would find it. Also, if our customers wanted these products along certain price points – whether cheaper or more expensive or luxurious ends, they would find them. Our strategy was premised on a one-stop shop with the same guarantee of service across all our brands. Of course, we also use best practices. All these brands have fantastic business practices that they use across their parent companies. We try and marry them so that we have very good service levels across the board.

The Indian High Commissioner to Kenya H.E. Mr. Sibabrata Tripathi, The late Chairman of Simba Corp Mr. AKC Popat, Simba Corporation’s Executive Director, Dinesh Kotecha, Senior General Manager Exports – Africa and Middle East Mr. Sanjay Jadhav and the former Government Spokesperson currently Machakos County Governor Dr. Alfred Mutua during the re-launch ceremony of Mahindra under Xylon Motors in 2012

Besides, our previous success in managing these brands gave us confidence in pursuing this particular approach. We are a technically sound organisation with competent staff, so it has been relatively easy for us to manage these brands. Success Factors: The first thing that we do is make sure that our business is anchored in quality personnel by employing the best skills available, whom we offer continuous training opportunities. After 2007, we made sure that we had a clear organisational chart showing what we wanted to do at every step of our business plan, and how we would go about it. We also employ an open-door management policy, with a very strong and inclusive management style, where our managers are able to sit down and hopefully, find solutions for our business. We believe combined brain power is important. Besides, prudent cash flow and treasury management are key to our operations. In all that we do, we simply make sure that we do not lose out on the ‘’Simba Spirit’’. Simba Foundation: The establishment of Simba Foundation - our Corporate Social Responsibility arm was premised on a firm belief that every successful business should consider giving back to the society around them.

Our aim is to create mentorship programmes not at the high, but the low-end of business for those who want to get started. Our plan is not to give out money, but loans to create a pool where start-ups can borrow some money, and return it within specific timeframes so that the next person benefits. The successful entrepreneurs would then be encouraged to offer mentorship to the new entrants into the programme. This is what we are working on currently. Our Future: At Simba Corp, we are looking to enhance our focus and strategy. In 2014, we will be launching another motor brand into the Kenyan market – Geely. On the hospitality side, we are looking at building a hotel in Kisumu, which will open soon. This will be our third unit. We will then embark on a programme to build three-Star hotels across East Africa. We have also established a real estate arm, where we have numerous projects that we will soon start developing. Our focus now is to build and establish our own brands locally. Simba Corporation Tel: +254 (020) 296 6000 Email: Website:

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the products launched by the company in 2013 are water-based.

Crown Paints Kenya Limited

Aquavar is considered the best non-toxic, water-based wood varnish in the Kenyan market today.

Kenya’s oldest and largest paint manufacturer prides itself on being an innovative and caring company, actively playing its role in national development and promoting the well-being of communities

In addition, Crown Paints’ production processes conform to global best practices by minimising air and water pollution. The company has installed a water recycling plant to curb the discharge of dangerous effluent. Communities

The Crown Paints CEO, Mr. Rakesh Rao (left) shows the new packaging for the Crown Matt Emulsion with Teflon to the Architectural Association of Kenya Chairman, Mr. Steven Oundo, during the launch of the new paint additive, Teflon. Crown paints has invested KSH35 million to train painters on the latest technology in a bid to professionalise the painters. Crown Matt Emulsion with Teflon will leave a surface that is easier to clean and resistant to stains, dirt and spillages, and requires minimum maintenance

driver of growth. The coating solutions market is very competitive. As the industry leader, Crown is cognisant of the rapid changes in consumer tastes and preferences necessitating constant change of tack. The company has entered into partnerships with leading global brands such as DuPont, Crown UK, HEMPEL and Armourcoat to launch unique products in the Kenyan market. Crown launched Teflon® surface protector, a coating solution in partnership with DuPont, thereby becoming the first company to bring this product to paint buyers in Africa. This is a paint that makes walls dirt and stainresistant and easy to clean.

Strong heritage Crown Paints Kenya Limited, previously known as Crown Berger, was established in 1958, and has since grown to be Kenya’s leading paint manufacturer. It is also one of the most recognisable brands in Kenya, and a blue-chip firm listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange. With its headquarters located on Likoni Road in Nairobi’s Industrial Area, the company is renowned for its premium quality and innovative products. The Crown Paints portfolio includes an array of coating solutions that cut across decorative, automotive, industrial, marine, intermediate (primers, undercoats and fillers), road marking paints, thinners and adhesives.

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The company, which in 2012, recorded a turnover of Ksh4.4 billion (approximately US$52,000,000), currently sells 2 million litres of paint a month. These figures are set to grow as it diversifies its product portfolio beyond the traditional decorative paints category. Mission Transforming lifestyles by providing world class coating solutions, whilst caring for the environment and community.

Recent achievements In August, 2013 Crown Paints was awarded the ISO 14001:2004 Environmental Certification by Bureau Veritas International for its environmentally-friendly methods of producing paint and resin products. The firm was recognised for putting in place solvent recovery and effluent water treatment plants. Crown Paints joins a select group of companies in the region that have fulfilled the stringent standards required to comply with ISO 14001:2004 in environmental protection.

Vision Innovation To be the most preferred innovative and colourful brand.

Crown Paints has firmly anchored its business model in innovation as the key

In 2013, Crown launched Medicryl, a paint designed to curb bacterial and fungal growth, and, therefore, suitable for hospitals, clinics, restaurants and schools. The firm also launched Metallica, Aquavar, Gyplast and Armourcoat products. These are designed to provide the increasingly discerning consumers with a variety of decorative paints and wall and ceiling plaster products to enhance the ambience of their homes and work spaces. The company is also home to Ruff N’ Tuff, dubbed “the toughest exteriors on the planet”. It is a designer texture featuring water resistance and is capable of breathing out trapped moisture. Ruff N’ Tuff is the ideal exterior paint for; inter alia, factories, commercial complexes and cinema theatres. Great products tend to be imitated or counterfeited, and Crown Paints’ have been no exception. In order to protect its brand, and to cushion clients against counterfeit paints, Crown has recently launched an SMS-based anti-counterfeit campaign. This solution offers clients an opportunity

to send a message to a short code, which then validates the genuineness of paint purchased. Centre of Knowledge

As a responsible corporate citizen, Crown Paints has been in the forefront in giving back to the communities where it does business. This commitment is pegged on the belief that social wellbeing is, in the long run, crucial to business sustainability. Crown Paints’ Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities target mostly health and education. Among the key CSR initiatives the firm has recently undertaken are:

Painters play an important role in the company’s business as key product specifiers. It is, therefore, necessary to enhance painters’ skills to ensure Crown’s customers continue to see value in quality from using the company’s products. It is also a way of investing in the community, considering that the skills imparted to painters go a long way in creating sustainable livelihoods for many families.

Crown Paints has so far trained over 6,000 painters and plans to raise this number to 10,000 by the end of 2013. In March, 2013 Crown Paints trained women painters in Nairobi’s Mathare slums and thus provided them with an opportunity to boost their livelihoods. In July, the firm signed a partnership with the Kenya Industrial Estates to train painters across the 47 counties.

Crown Paints is one of few companies in Kenya that operates a full-time call centre with dedicated help lines to assist clients with information on decorative coatings, from the comfort of their homes. What is more, with the Crown Decorator service customers are assured of hassle-free painting. Safety and environment Paint manufacture and use has potentially harmful impacts on human health and the environment if appropriate safeguards are not put in place. Crown Paints is aware of the environmental consequences of using ingredients such as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and has, therefore, shifted from oil to water-based products. All

Re-painting using Medicryl St Paul’s Children’s Home in Rongai, which is home to 54 destitute children; Paying school fees for a year for pupils of AMMA Children’s Primary School in Athi River, which caters for the poor; Partnered with Giants Group of Nairobi Twiga, a non-profit organisation seeking to empower and prepare the girl child for leadership in future through education; Collaboration with Rotary Club on various community-based programmes; and Application of Medicryl anti-bacterial paint in various hospitals across the country.

Promoting peace Crown Paints launched a Sh15 million (about US$180,000) peace campaign ahead of the March 2013 General Election. Dubbed ‘Uniting Colours of Kenya’, the initiative was launched in Nairobi’s Kibera area in February. The campaign was aimed at rallying Kenyans to uphold peace before, during and after the elections. On February 28, employees of Crown Paints held a special prayer session to commemorate the day peace returned to Kenya after the 2007/8 post-election violence.

Contact: Call Centre: 0703 333 777 www.crownpaints.co.ke

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the products launched by the company in 2013 are water-based.

Crown Paints Kenya Limited

Aquavar is considered the best non-toxic, water-based wood varnish in the Kenyan market today.

Kenya’s oldest and largest paint manufacturer prides itself on being an innovative and caring company, actively playing its role in national development and promoting the well-being of communities

In addition, Crown Paints’ production processes conform to global best practices by minimising air and water pollution. The company has installed a water recycling plant to curb the discharge of dangerous effluent. Communities

The Crown Paints CEO, Mr. Rakesh Rao (left) shows the new packaging for the Crown Matt Emulsion with Teflon to the Architectural Association of Kenya Chairman, Mr. Steven Oundo, during the launch of the new paint additive, Teflon. Crown paints has invested KSH35 million to train painters on the latest technology in a bid to professionalise the painters. Crown Matt Emulsion with Teflon will leave a surface that is easier to clean and resistant to stains, dirt and spillages, and requires minimum maintenance

driver of growth. The coating solutions market is very competitive. As the industry leader, Crown is cognisant of the rapid changes in consumer tastes and preferences necessitating constant change of tack. The company has entered into partnerships with leading global brands such as DuPont, Crown UK, HEMPEL and Armourcoat to launch unique products in the Kenyan market. Crown launched Teflon® surface protector, a coating solution in partnership with DuPont, thereby becoming the first company to bring this product to paint buyers in Africa. This is a paint that makes walls dirt and stainresistant and easy to clean.

Strong heritage Crown Paints Kenya Limited, previously known as Crown Berger, was established in 1958, and has since grown to be Kenya’s leading paint manufacturer. It is also one of the most recognisable brands in Kenya, and a blue-chip firm listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange. With its headquarters located on Likoni Road in Nairobi’s Industrial Area, the company is renowned for its premium quality and innovative products. The Crown Paints portfolio includes an array of coating solutions that cut across decorative, automotive, industrial, marine, intermediate (primers, undercoats and fillers), road marking paints, thinners and adhesives.

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The company, which in 2012, recorded a turnover of Ksh4.4 billion (approximately US$52,000,000), currently sells 2 million litres of paint a month. These figures are set to grow as it diversifies its product portfolio beyond the traditional decorative paints category. Mission Transforming lifestyles by providing world class coating solutions, whilst caring for the environment and community.

Recent achievements In August, 2013 Crown Paints was awarded the ISO 14001:2004 Environmental Certification by Bureau Veritas International for its environmentally-friendly methods of producing paint and resin products. The firm was recognised for putting in place solvent recovery and effluent water treatment plants. Crown Paints joins a select group of companies in the region that have fulfilled the stringent standards required to comply with ISO 14001:2004 in environmental protection.

Vision Innovation To be the most preferred innovative and colourful brand.

Crown Paints has firmly anchored its business model in innovation as the key

In 2013, Crown launched Medicryl, a paint designed to curb bacterial and fungal growth, and, therefore, suitable for hospitals, clinics, restaurants and schools. The firm also launched Metallica, Aquavar, Gyplast and Armourcoat products. These are designed to provide the increasingly discerning consumers with a variety of decorative paints and wall and ceiling plaster products to enhance the ambience of their homes and work spaces. The company is also home to Ruff N’ Tuff, dubbed “the toughest exteriors on the planet”. It is a designer texture featuring water resistance and is capable of breathing out trapped moisture. Ruff N’ Tuff is the ideal exterior paint for; inter alia, factories, commercial complexes and cinema theatres. Great products tend to be imitated or counterfeited, and Crown Paints’ have been no exception. In order to protect its brand, and to cushion clients against counterfeit paints, Crown has recently launched an SMS-based anti-counterfeit campaign. This solution offers clients an opportunity

to send a message to a short code, which then validates the genuineness of paint purchased. Centre of Knowledge

As a responsible corporate citizen, Crown Paints has been in the forefront in giving back to the communities where it does business. This commitment is pegged on the belief that social wellbeing is, in the long run, crucial to business sustainability. Crown Paints’ Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities target mostly health and education. Among the key CSR initiatives the firm has recently undertaken are:

Painters play an important role in the company’s business as key product specifiers. It is, therefore, necessary to enhance painters’ skills to ensure Crown’s customers continue to see value in quality from using the company’s products. It is also a way of investing in the community, considering that the skills imparted to painters go a long way in creating sustainable livelihoods for many families.

Crown Paints has so far trained over 6,000 painters and plans to raise this number to 10,000 by the end of 2013. In March, 2013 Crown Paints trained women painters in Nairobi’s Mathare slums and thus provided them with an opportunity to boost their livelihoods. In July, the firm signed a partnership with the Kenya Industrial Estates to train painters across the 47 counties.

Crown Paints is one of few companies in Kenya that operates a full-time call centre with dedicated help lines to assist clients with information on decorative coatings, from the comfort of their homes. What is more, with the Crown Decorator service customers are assured of hassle-free painting. Safety and environment Paint manufacture and use has potentially harmful impacts on human health and the environment if appropriate safeguards are not put in place. Crown Paints is aware of the environmental consequences of using ingredients such as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and has, therefore, shifted from oil to water-based products. All

Re-painting using Medicryl St Paul’s Children’s Home in Rongai, which is home to 54 destitute children; Paying school fees for a year for pupils of AMMA Children’s Primary School in Athi River, which caters for the poor; Partnered with Giants Group of Nairobi Twiga, a non-profit organisation seeking to empower and prepare the girl child for leadership in future through education; Collaboration with Rotary Club on various community-based programmes; and Application of Medicryl anti-bacterial paint in various hospitals across the country.

Promoting peace Crown Paints launched a Sh15 million (about US$180,000) peace campaign ahead of the March 2013 General Election. Dubbed ‘Uniting Colours of Kenya’, the initiative was launched in Nairobi’s Kibera area in February. The campaign was aimed at rallying Kenyans to uphold peace before, during and after the elections. On February 28, employees of Crown Paints held a special prayer session to commemorate the day peace returned to Kenya after the 2007/8 post-election violence.

Contact: Call Centre: 0703 333 777 www.crownpaints.co.ke

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Kenya Forest Service Trees for Better Lives

His Excellency the President of Kenya Hon. Uhuru Kenyatta presents an award for the best stand that demonstrated quality assurance to the KFS. Board Chairman Mr Peter Kirigua during the official opening of the 2013 Nairobi Trade fair

KFS Director Mr David Mbugua

practise farming in some designated parts of the forests, while planting trees to grow alongside the crops. Under the Forest Extension Services Programme, The service facilitated the raising of over 202 million tree seedlings for the periods planting programme from KFS, youth groups, women groups, CBOs, institutions such as schools and the private sector. A total of 139,853.4 hectares planted on farms and dry lands in addition 20,538.7 hectares of commercial were established in both schools and farmlands for economic and environmental protection.

Background Kenya Forest Service (KFS) is a State corporation established in February 2007 under the Forest Act 2005 to conserve, develop and sustainably manage forest resources for socio-economic development. The Constitution of Kenya Article 69 outlines the obligations of the government in respect to the environment, asserting that “The State shall ensure sustainable exploitation, utilisation, management and conservation of the environment and natural resources and ensure equitable sharing of the accruing benefits.” The Constitution also mandates that the State increase tree cover to 10 per cent of Kenya’s total land area, the minimum recommended for ecological sustainability. Key achievements During the financial year 2012/2013 the

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Over 5,037,500 seedlings were planted in 2,015 schools through the schools greening programme in collaboration with other stakeholders in the education sector.

service registered positive achievements in the programme, institutional, legislation and policy arenas.

An eco-tourism site in Marsabit Forest

Programme implementation Towards the fulfilling of the constitutional requirement of the minimum 10 per cent forest and tree cover of the country’s land and the Vision 2030 the following achievements have been made; KFS fixed wing aircraft

Increase forest cover through rehabilitation of 217,033.4 ha of degraded gazetted natural forests mainly in the five major water towers (Aberdares, Mt Kenya, Mau complex, Cherangani and Mt Elgon). During the period 2,516 new nature-based enterprises were identified and advertised as more are being assessed for consideration and implementation. The enterprises provided opportunities for the forest

communities to reap economic benefits. Under the Plantation and Enterprise Development Programme, 8,199ha of industrial plantations were established mainly using the Plantation Establishment and Livelihood Improvement Scheme (PELIS). The programme allows Community Forest Association (CFA) members to

The service won a FAO (Food and Agriculture Organisation) EDWARD SAOUMA award in Rome, this was in recognition of very successful implementation of the sustainable livelihood development project in the Mau Forest complex for the rehabilitation of Mau, a project which had been funded by FAO. This was a worldwide recognition, which was a great achievement not only for KFS but for Kenya and Africa, in general. The service initiated the review of the KFS Strategic Plan (2009 – 2014) to align it with the Constitution of Kenya 2010, Vision 2030 and linking it to 2nd MTP and other relevant government policies.

Alongside the award the service received a USD 25,000 cash award that would be used as seed money to “start off the Forest Management under Conservation Fund (FMCF) to be used as a resource mobilisation vehicle.

sets of regulations have been gazetted, to date - the farm forestry rules, participation in forest management rules, forest charcoal regulations, and forest harvesting rules.

Legislative Reform On devolution, the service has made recommendations of the forestry functions to be devolved to the county governments.

P.O.Box 30513-00100 Nairobi Tel: 020 2020285 Email: info@kenyaforestservice.org Website:www.kenyaforestservice.org

The subsidiary legislation and operating rules and regulations required to implement the Forest Act, 2005 effectively are currently at various stages of development. Four

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Kenya Forest Service Trees for Better Lives

His Excellency the President of Kenya Hon. Uhuru Kenyatta presents an award for the best stand that demonstrated quality assurance to the KFS. Board Chairman Mr Peter Kirigua during the official opening of the 2013 Nairobi Trade fair

KFS Director Mr David Mbugua

practise farming in some designated parts of the forests, while planting trees to grow alongside the crops. Under the Forest Extension Services Programme, The service facilitated the raising of over 202 million tree seedlings for the periods planting programme from KFS, youth groups, women groups, CBOs, institutions such as schools and the private sector. A total of 139,853.4 hectares planted on farms and dry lands in addition 20,538.7 hectares of commercial were established in both schools and farmlands for economic and environmental protection.

Background Kenya Forest Service (KFS) is a State corporation established in February 2007 under the Forest Act 2005 to conserve, develop and sustainably manage forest resources for socio-economic development. The Constitution of Kenya Article 69 outlines the obligations of the government in respect to the environment, asserting that “The State shall ensure sustainable exploitation, utilisation, management and conservation of the environment and natural resources and ensure equitable sharing of the accruing benefits.” The Constitution also mandates that the State increase tree cover to 10 per cent of Kenya’s total land area, the minimum recommended for ecological sustainability. Key achievements During the financial year 2012/2013 the

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102

Over 5,037,500 seedlings were planted in 2,015 schools through the schools greening programme in collaboration with other stakeholders in the education sector.

service registered positive achievements in the programme, institutional, legislation and policy arenas.

An eco-tourism site in Marsabit Forest

Programme implementation Towards the fulfilling of the constitutional requirement of the minimum 10 per cent forest and tree cover of the country’s land and the Vision 2030 the following achievements have been made; KFS fixed wing aircraft

Increase forest cover through rehabilitation of 217,033.4 ha of degraded gazetted natural forests mainly in the five major water towers (Aberdares, Mt Kenya, Mau complex, Cherangani and Mt Elgon). During the period 2,516 new nature-based enterprises were identified and advertised as more are being assessed for consideration and implementation. The enterprises provided opportunities for the forest

communities to reap economic benefits. Under the Plantation and Enterprise Development Programme, 8,199ha of industrial plantations were established mainly using the Plantation Establishment and Livelihood Improvement Scheme (PELIS). The programme allows Community Forest Association (CFA) members to

The service won a FAO (Food and Agriculture Organisation) EDWARD SAOUMA award in Rome, this was in recognition of very successful implementation of the sustainable livelihood development project in the Mau Forest complex for the rehabilitation of Mau, a project which had been funded by FAO. This was a worldwide recognition, which was a great achievement not only for KFS but for Kenya and Africa, in general. The service initiated the review of the KFS Strategic Plan (2009 – 2014) to align it with the Constitution of Kenya 2010, Vision 2030 and linking it to 2nd MTP and other relevant government policies.

Alongside the award the service received a USD 25,000 cash award that would be used as seed money to “start off the Forest Management under Conservation Fund (FMCF) to be used as a resource mobilisation vehicle.

sets of regulations have been gazetted, to date - the farm forestry rules, participation in forest management rules, forest charcoal regulations, and forest harvesting rules.

Legislative Reform On devolution, the service has made recommendations of the forestry functions to be devolved to the county governments.

P.O.Box 30513-00100 Nairobi Tel: 020 2020285 Email: info@kenyaforestservice.org Website:www.kenyaforestservice.org

The subsidiary legislation and operating rules and regulations required to implement the Forest Act, 2005 effectively are currently at various stages of development. Four

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Keroche Breweries Limited Truly Kenyan maker in Kenya with an overall market share of about 20 per cent. The brewer recently rebranded one of its flagship brands, Summit Malt, in what was interpreted as a strategy to face-off with current market leaders, East African Breweries Limited. According to Tabitha Karanja, CEO, Keroche Breweries has thrived to wipe of the common perception that ‘a beer is just a beer.’ “We confer to international standards and we produce naturally brewed beer that does not reduce or cripple our labor force. We are all about a healthy, drinking and working nation.” Supported by a rapidly expanding middle-class that enables individuals with considerable amounts of disposable income to spend on alcohol, Kenya’s alcoholic beverage industry has grown in leaps and bounds over the years. The growth of various sectors of the country’s economy too, such as wholesale and retail and the service industry, which has been unrelenting in the promotion of local sporting and entertainment events, has led to an explosion in the numbers of social drinkers.

Core Values • • • • •

High quality standards Customer value Professionalism Respect and Equality

Quality Statement & Hygiene Policy •

environment due to our activities. Rationalize the use of Natural resources such as water and energy. Incorporate new environmental friendly 21st century state of art technologies in line of production.

The exponential growth of Keroche Breweries Industries Limited – from a

manufacturer that started out with making fortified wines meant for the lower end of the market to what it currently is, is one of resilience and determination. The brewer, whose constant transformation over the years and aggressive run has shaken the country’s beer market, currently stakes a claim as the second largest beer

And as a result, during the course of 2012, key international companies sought to penetrate the Kenyan market in order to tap into the growing alcoholic beverage industry market. Heineken, Diageo, Distell, SABMiller all either opened bases locally or rolled out new key brands. However, Keroche Breweries Limited – the most notable local producer around, is yet to fall prey to this ‘multinational encroachment.’

“The more we are, the better the competition,” says Mrs Karanja. Local brewers need to wake up and take risks, she advises, as it would be great to see other locals in such positions. In her position as arguably the only woman who runs a brewer in Africa, Ventures Africa Magazine rated Tabitha as the second woman to watch in 2013. A prediction that for the most part, rings true. Keroche Breweries plans to expand its production line to 10 folds next year with an eye to increase the production from 60,000 bottles per day to 600,000 bottles per day. With a current growth rate of 5 per cent, the brewer has a target of hitting and cementing the 20 per cent stake in market share. Mrs Karanja has also been rated among 13 other iconic women in Africa and the state accorded her an honorary award – Moran of the Burning Spear, for being able to break the monotony in Kenya’s alcohol industry. In a field conventionally dominated by powerful a powerful multinational - and men, she was able to break the hold after nearly 80 years to become the country’s first homegrown beer manufacturer. It was a difficult road, she says. She had been dealing in the fortified wines industry for ten years before a sudden hike in tax on wine products made her reconsider. And in 2008, in a ceremony officiated by former Prime Minister Raila Odinga, Keroche Breweries announced the launch of its first beers, the Summit Lager and Malt. It was a major step as it represented a

Ms Tabitha Karanja, MBS, Chief Executive Officer

massive shift in the government’s attitude towards Kenyan-owned manufacturing companies. For that, Karanja has continually praised the now defunct coalition government, which supported local initiatives like Keroche Breweries. Keroche Breweries Limited traces its beginning back in 1997 as a small family business, when a market survey by founders Mr & Mrs Karanja revealed a gap in the liquor market. The gap later turned out to be a ‘jealously guarded’ market by a multinational. According to the research, there had been a unique trend that for well over 80 years, the lower end of the market had been overlooked. And so, it was decided that this rather large market would be the target. And the rest, was history.

+254 050 50325 www.kerochebreweries.com

To ensure production of High Quality and Healthy alcoholic products based on customer preference in line with all set legal framework, enhancing consistence to guarantee compliance with prescribed safety standards To facilitate a hygienic atmosphere in food production for outmost safe products safe for human consumption

• Environmental Policy •

Minimize any detrimental impact to the

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Keroche Breweries Limited Truly Kenyan maker in Kenya with an overall market share of about 20 per cent. The brewer recently rebranded one of its flagship brands, Summit Malt, in what was interpreted as a strategy to face-off with current market leaders, East African Breweries Limited. According to Tabitha Karanja, CEO, Keroche Breweries has thrived to wipe of the common perception that ‘a beer is just a beer.’ “We confer to international standards and we produce naturally brewed beer that does not reduce or cripple our labor force. We are all about a healthy, drinking and working nation.” Supported by a rapidly expanding middle-class that enables individuals with considerable amounts of disposable income to spend on alcohol, Kenya’s alcoholic beverage industry has grown in leaps and bounds over the years. The growth of various sectors of the country’s economy too, such as wholesale and retail and the service industry, which has been unrelenting in the promotion of local sporting and entertainment events, has led to an explosion in the numbers of social drinkers.

Core Values • • • • •

High quality standards Customer value Professionalism Respect and Equality

Quality Statement & Hygiene Policy •

environment due to our activities. Rationalize the use of Natural resources such as water and energy. Incorporate new environmental friendly 21st century state of art technologies in line of production.

The exponential growth of Keroche Breweries Industries Limited – from a

manufacturer that started out with making fortified wines meant for the lower end of the market to what it currently is, is one of resilience and determination. The brewer, whose constant transformation over the years and aggressive run has shaken the country’s beer market, currently stakes a claim as the second largest beer

And as a result, during the course of 2012, key international companies sought to penetrate the Kenyan market in order to tap into the growing alcoholic beverage industry market. Heineken, Diageo, Distell, SABMiller all either opened bases locally or rolled out new key brands. However, Keroche Breweries Limited – the most notable local producer around, is yet to fall prey to this ‘multinational encroachment.’

“The more we are, the better the competition,” says Mrs Karanja. Local brewers need to wake up and take risks, she advises, as it would be great to see other locals in such positions. In her position as arguably the only woman who runs a brewer in Africa, Ventures Africa Magazine rated Tabitha as the second woman to watch in 2013. A prediction that for the most part, rings true. Keroche Breweries plans to expand its production line to 10 folds next year with an eye to increase the production from 60,000 bottles per day to 600,000 bottles per day. With a current growth rate of 5 per cent, the brewer has a target of hitting and cementing the 20 per cent stake in market share. Mrs Karanja has also been rated among 13 other iconic women in Africa and the state accorded her an honorary award – Moran of the Burning Spear, for being able to break the monotony in Kenya’s alcohol industry. In a field conventionally dominated by powerful a powerful multinational - and men, she was able to break the hold after nearly 80 years to become the country’s first homegrown beer manufacturer. It was a difficult road, she says. She had been dealing in the fortified wines industry for ten years before a sudden hike in tax on wine products made her reconsider. And in 2008, in a ceremony officiated by former Prime Minister Raila Odinga, Keroche Breweries announced the launch of its first beers, the Summit Lager and Malt. It was a major step as it represented a

Ms Tabitha Karanja, MBS, Chief Executive Officer

massive shift in the government’s attitude towards Kenyan-owned manufacturing companies. For that, Karanja has continually praised the now defunct coalition government, which supported local initiatives like Keroche Breweries. Keroche Breweries Limited traces its beginning back in 1997 as a small family business, when a market survey by founders Mr & Mrs Karanja revealed a gap in the liquor market. The gap later turned out to be a ‘jealously guarded’ market by a multinational. According to the research, there had been a unique trend that for well over 80 years, the lower end of the market had been overlooked. And so, it was decided that this rather large market would be the target. And the rest, was history.

+254 050 50325 www.kerochebreweries.com

To ensure production of High Quality and Healthy alcoholic products based on customer preference in line with all set legal framework, enhancing consistence to guarantee compliance with prescribed safety standards To facilitate a hygienic atmosphere in food production for outmost safe products safe for human consumption

• Environmental Policy •

Minimize any detrimental impact to the

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Grain Bulk Handlers Limited Grain Bulk Handlers Limited is tasked with providing a cost effective handling solution for grain cargo in East and Central Africa

Grain House, the headquarters of GBHL in Mombasa

The history behind Grain Bulk Handlers Limited (GBHL) is a story of 30 years of dedication by a man known as Mohamed Jaffer who is the Chairman who saw the need to revolutionize the handling of bulk grain imports at the Port of Mombasa.   This ambitious project was conceived at a time when the handling of bulk grain imports at Mombasa involved the combined use of grabs, vacuvators and mobile bagging plants situated at the quayside. This mode of handling was characterized by: Low vessel discharge rates, heavy spillage

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during discharge operations, heavy dust emission and poor accounting for discharged quantities thus making the port very expensive for bulk grain importers as well as ship operators/owners.

has continued to be committed to providing efficient and cost effective handling solutions for grain cargo which are transported within East & Central Africa including Great Lakes, Southern Sudan and Somalia.

The building of GBHL’s state of the art dry bulk cargo handling facility was financed by various International lending agencies and venture capitalists at the tune of US$35 million. Project construction commenced in December 1998, completed in February 2000 and commissioned in March 2000.

The facility is recognized by the Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) as the specialized bulk grain handling terminal at the port. It is also gazetted by Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) to handle “unentered cargo”. GBHL is ISO certified (ISO 9001:2008) and ISPS Code compliant which is a member of the International Association of Ports & Harbours (IAPH).

Since its inception in the year 2000 GBHL

The facility handles commercial and relief consignments for clienteles such as millers, traders and NGOs among others in East & Central Africa including Great Lakes, Southern Sudan and Somalia GBHL has 250 permanent skilled staff and 1000 pax per day contracted labourers. It’s facilities comprises of a vessel handling facility, a bulk transit terminal, a bulk storage terminal, a rail siding, bagged warehousing and local transportation. The vessel handling facility comprises 3 Buhler ‘Portalino’ Ship Discharge machines with a combined capacity of 1,000mts per Best of Kenya

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Grain Bulk Handlers Limited Grain Bulk Handlers Limited is tasked with providing a cost effective handling solution for grain cargo in East and Central Africa

Grain House, the headquarters of GBHL in Mombasa

The history behind Grain Bulk Handlers Limited (GBHL) is a story of 30 years of dedication by a man known as Mohamed Jaffer who is the Chairman who saw the need to revolutionize the handling of bulk grain imports at the Port of Mombasa.   This ambitious project was conceived at a time when the handling of bulk grain imports at Mombasa involved the combined use of grabs, vacuvators and mobile bagging plants situated at the quayside. This mode of handling was characterized by: Low vessel discharge rates, heavy spillage

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during discharge operations, heavy dust emission and poor accounting for discharged quantities thus making the port very expensive for bulk grain importers as well as ship operators/owners.

has continued to be committed to providing efficient and cost effective handling solutions for grain cargo which are transported within East & Central Africa including Great Lakes, Southern Sudan and Somalia.

The building of GBHL’s state of the art dry bulk cargo handling facility was financed by various International lending agencies and venture capitalists at the tune of US$35 million. Project construction commenced in December 1998, completed in February 2000 and commissioned in March 2000.

The facility is recognized by the Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) as the specialized bulk grain handling terminal at the port. It is also gazetted by Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) to handle “unentered cargo”. GBHL is ISO certified (ISO 9001:2008) and ISPS Code compliant which is a member of the International Association of Ports & Harbours (IAPH).

Since its inception in the year 2000 GBHL

The facility handles commercial and relief consignments for clienteles such as millers, traders and NGOs among others in East & Central Africa including Great Lakes, Southern Sudan and Somalia GBHL has 250 permanent skilled staff and 1000 pax per day contracted labourers. It’s facilities comprises of a vessel handling facility, a bulk transit terminal, a bulk storage terminal, a rail siding, bagged warehousing and local transportation. The vessel handling facility comprises 3 Buhler ‘Portalino’ Ship Discharge machines with a combined capacity of 1,000mts per Best of Kenya

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hour, 2 Fixed belt conveyors each with a capacity of 600mts/hr linking the berth to transit silo complex. The 2 conveyors have Automatic weight calculators which take the batch weight of bulk grain conveyed. Weights are then electronically displayed at window on a tower at the quay as well as progressively recorded in print at the control room. This facilitates in giving a full account of discharged quantity immediately. 1 x 50ton mobile crane for general lifting and 9 bobcats for mechanised trimming in vessel holds are situated at the port ready for discharge operation. Two (2) deep water berths are dedicated by KPA for the use by bulk grain vessels discharging into GBHL terminal silos. The berths have 12 Metre drafts enabling them to serve panamax vessels. Mr Mohamed Jaffer, Chairman of GBHL,

The bulk transit terminal comprises of 24 transit silos with a total bulk storage capacity of 67,500mts, 1 flat store shed with a bulk storage capacity of 18,000mts, 2 bagging sheds each with 4 bagging lines, with a combined capacity of 400mts per hr, 3 calibrated bulk delivery hoppers for road/rail, 1 rail weighbridge capacity of 160mts and 2 road weighbridges capacity 72mts each, and 2 standby generators covering full terminal operations (discharge and delivery). The bulk storage terminal comprises of 14 long-term storage silos with a total bulk storage capacity of 55,000mts, 2 bagging shed with 4 bagging lines, with a capacity of 200mts per hr, 2 calibrated bulk delivery hopper for road, 2 road weighbridges with a capacity of 72mts each and ample off-road parking for customers’ trucks. The bagged warehousing comprises of various warehouse locations with a combined long-term storage capacity of over 100,000mts. The Local transportation is provided by 10 truck/trailer units for bagged and bulk cargo. Security The terminal has gates providing regulated entry and exit for road and rail transport undertaking deliveries for the terminal. Both road and rail gates are fitted with weighbridges for registering and recording weights of both modes of transport on entry and exit from the terminal. The gates are manned by security guards on 24 hrs basis and are also fitted with electronic surveillance devices (CCTV) to enhance security. Upgrading Programme The upgrading program is targeted at improving service delivery. It will include:

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• • •

Installation of 125,000 tons of additional silo capacity. Installation of an additional railway siding. Improvement of the marshaling system for road transport undertaking delivery from the terminal. On completion of the upgrading program the terminal shall have a total silo capacity of 260,000 tons.

Environment The whole operation and systems used by GBHL are eco-friendly and user-friendly. All discharged grains run through enclosed overhead discharge equipment and conveyors.  The grain passes through dust extraction devices before entering the silos.  This is a safety measure to reduce the risk of explosion and is repeated before deliveries. Importers using the transit terminal thus receive clean grain with the dust already extracted, so dust emissions in GBHL operations are minimal.  The management of GBHL recognise the need to protect the environment and to maintain handling systems that are free of noise, dust and spillage. As an interim measure, GBHL leased warehouses at the port, near the terminal to provide a total of about 75,000 tons of long term storage for grain handled for transit and transshipment.  Using the warehouses has helped to reduce cargo dwell time at the transit silos. But a long term solution was needed to the problem.  The GBHL management was convinced that the answer was to provide long term silo storage for bulk grains.  Plans were made to develop long term bulk storage silos in an area near the transit

terminal that could easily be connected to the current transit silos complex by conveyors. Future Investments GBHL is now looking to the next phase of its investment programme to provide additional vessel discharge equipment by acquiring a third ship un-loader, boosting vessel discharge rates by 60 per cent with consequent saving to customers in freight rates. Phase III will see the development of a further 50,000 mts long-term silo storage capacity, with savings for customers in landside distribution costs. The combined effect of these investments will be to boost annual throughput capacity at GBHL to 3.5 million tons, while crucially providing world class vessel handling rates and adequate silo storage capacity to ensure fluidity of operations.  The investments will total around US$16 million.

Discharge of Bulk Grain vessels Discharge of bulk grain from vessels is fully mechanised and remote controlled. It is monitored from a control room which operates on a 24 hour basis. The main vessel discharge equipment consists of two portalinos, each with capacity to discharge 300 mts per hour. All discharged grain is automatically electronically weighed while being conveyed to the silos, enabling the terminal to compile the vessel out-turns report immediately after completion of discharge. In an effort to offer comprehensive services to its customers, GBHL operates an associate company - Grain Hauliers Limited which offers support services such as clearing and forwarding, warehousing and transport and assists in the facilitation of documentation for the landing of un-entered consignments.

For bagging, the terminal has two sheds, each fitted with four bagging plants which can be calibrated for bagging 25kg, 50kg and 90kg bags. The bagging sheds are also fitted with conveyors providing a total of eight loading bays to road/or rail transport. For bulk deliveries, the terminal has three hoppers, one of which is for road and the two for rail deliveries. The terminal is also fitted with dust extractors which enable it to sift dust from grains and bags separately for delivery to importers. The dust extraction is a safety device but also serves in enhancing the clean condition of grain on delivery to the importer. All terminal activities, including the discharge operations, are controlled and monitored at a central control room. The terminal is also fitted with one rail and two road weighbridges. It also has two generators to continue operations whenever there is disruption in power supply. The

terminal is self-sufficient in maintenance and repair of all its equipment. Warehousing Currently, GBHL offers warehousing for bagged consignments only. They are, however, investing in the provision of additional silos to be built on an adjacent site for warehousing and storage of bulk grain. There are various warehouse locations with a combined long term bagged storage capacity of 75,000 mts. Local transportation is provided by 15 truck/trailer units for bagged cargo. Grain Bulk Handlers Ltd Grain House, Beira Road, Shimanzi P O Box 80469 - GPO 80100, Mombasa, Kenya T: (+254 - 41) 2230183-5, 2230233/5/8 Main: +254 (0) 703 017000 gbh@grainbulk.com www.grainbulk.com

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hour, 2 Fixed belt conveyors each with a capacity of 600mts/hr linking the berth to transit silo complex. The 2 conveyors have Automatic weight calculators which take the batch weight of bulk grain conveyed. Weights are then electronically displayed at window on a tower at the quay as well as progressively recorded in print at the control room. This facilitates in giving a full account of discharged quantity immediately. 1 x 50ton mobile crane for general lifting and 9 bobcats for mechanised trimming in vessel holds are situated at the port ready for discharge operation. Two (2) deep water berths are dedicated by KPA for the use by bulk grain vessels discharging into GBHL terminal silos. The berths have 12 Metre drafts enabling them to serve panamax vessels. Mr Mohamed Jaffer, Chairman of GBHL,

The bulk transit terminal comprises of 24 transit silos with a total bulk storage capacity of 67,500mts, 1 flat store shed with a bulk storage capacity of 18,000mts, 2 bagging sheds each with 4 bagging lines, with a combined capacity of 400mts per hr, 3 calibrated bulk delivery hoppers for road/rail, 1 rail weighbridge capacity of 160mts and 2 road weighbridges capacity 72mts each, and 2 standby generators covering full terminal operations (discharge and delivery). The bulk storage terminal comprises of 14 long-term storage silos with a total bulk storage capacity of 55,000mts, 2 bagging shed with 4 bagging lines, with a capacity of 200mts per hr, 2 calibrated bulk delivery hopper for road, 2 road weighbridges with a capacity of 72mts each and ample off-road parking for customers’ trucks. The bagged warehousing comprises of various warehouse locations with a combined long-term storage capacity of over 100,000mts. The Local transportation is provided by 10 truck/trailer units for bagged and bulk cargo. Security The terminal has gates providing regulated entry and exit for road and rail transport undertaking deliveries for the terminal. Both road and rail gates are fitted with weighbridges for registering and recording weights of both modes of transport on entry and exit from the terminal. The gates are manned by security guards on 24 hrs basis and are also fitted with electronic surveillance devices (CCTV) to enhance security. Upgrading Programme The upgrading program is targeted at improving service delivery. It will include:

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• • •

Installation of 125,000 tons of additional silo capacity. Installation of an additional railway siding. Improvement of the marshaling system for road transport undertaking delivery from the terminal. On completion of the upgrading program the terminal shall have a total silo capacity of 260,000 tons.

Environment The whole operation and systems used by GBHL are eco-friendly and user-friendly. All discharged grains run through enclosed overhead discharge equipment and conveyors.  The grain passes through dust extraction devices before entering the silos.  This is a safety measure to reduce the risk of explosion and is repeated before deliveries. Importers using the transit terminal thus receive clean grain with the dust already extracted, so dust emissions in GBHL operations are minimal.  The management of GBHL recognise the need to protect the environment and to maintain handling systems that are free of noise, dust and spillage. As an interim measure, GBHL leased warehouses at the port, near the terminal to provide a total of about 75,000 tons of long term storage for grain handled for transit and transshipment.  Using the warehouses has helped to reduce cargo dwell time at the transit silos. But a long term solution was needed to the problem.  The GBHL management was convinced that the answer was to provide long term silo storage for bulk grains.  Plans were made to develop long term bulk storage silos in an area near the transit

terminal that could easily be connected to the current transit silos complex by conveyors. Future Investments GBHL is now looking to the next phase of its investment programme to provide additional vessel discharge equipment by acquiring a third ship un-loader, boosting vessel discharge rates by 60 per cent with consequent saving to customers in freight rates. Phase III will see the development of a further 50,000 mts long-term silo storage capacity, with savings for customers in landside distribution costs. The combined effect of these investments will be to boost annual throughput capacity at GBHL to 3.5 million tons, while crucially providing world class vessel handling rates and adequate silo storage capacity to ensure fluidity of operations.  The investments will total around US$16 million.

Discharge of Bulk Grain vessels Discharge of bulk grain from vessels is fully mechanised and remote controlled. It is monitored from a control room which operates on a 24 hour basis. The main vessel discharge equipment consists of two portalinos, each with capacity to discharge 300 mts per hour. All discharged grain is automatically electronically weighed while being conveyed to the silos, enabling the terminal to compile the vessel out-turns report immediately after completion of discharge. In an effort to offer comprehensive services to its customers, GBHL operates an associate company - Grain Hauliers Limited which offers support services such as clearing and forwarding, warehousing and transport and assists in the facilitation of documentation for the landing of un-entered consignments.

For bagging, the terminal has two sheds, each fitted with four bagging plants which can be calibrated for bagging 25kg, 50kg and 90kg bags. The bagging sheds are also fitted with conveyors providing a total of eight loading bays to road/or rail transport. For bulk deliveries, the terminal has three hoppers, one of which is for road and the two for rail deliveries. The terminal is also fitted with dust extractors which enable it to sift dust from grains and bags separately for delivery to importers. The dust extraction is a safety device but also serves in enhancing the clean condition of grain on delivery to the importer. All terminal activities, including the discharge operations, are controlled and monitored at a central control room. The terminal is also fitted with one rail and two road weighbridges. It also has two generators to continue operations whenever there is disruption in power supply. The

terminal is self-sufficient in maintenance and repair of all its equipment. Warehousing Currently, GBHL offers warehousing for bagged consignments only. They are, however, investing in the provision of additional silos to be built on an adjacent site for warehousing and storage of bulk grain. There are various warehouse locations with a combined long term bagged storage capacity of 75,000 mts. Local transportation is provided by 15 truck/trailer units for bagged cargo. Grain Bulk Handlers Ltd Grain House, Beira Road, Shimanzi P O Box 80469 - GPO 80100, Mombasa, Kenya T: (+254 - 41) 2230183-5, 2230233/5/8 Main: +254 (0) 703 017000 gbh@grainbulk.com www.grainbulk.com

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National Housing Corporation Sixty years of provision of affordable housing

Direct funding from the Exchequer was stopped mainly due to the Structural Adjustment Programmes that were being implemented by the Government. During and after the restructuring period, the NHC has been able to develop several housing schemes across the country. Tenantpurchase is the most common mode of sale due to its friendly rates and convenience. In this type of development, the NHC develops houses for sale to wananchi who pay a 10-20 per cent deposit and the balance is in form of a loan to tenants who pay for it within 20 years through monthly remittances that eventually end in a tenant owning the house. Areas with units on tenant purchase include Bububu Likoni, Kisumu Mamboleo, Kisii, Kakamega, Lang’ata and Nyeri. Other units are on rental schemes such as the Changamwe infill, Woodley infill, Eldoret and Nairobi’s Sadi Road South B infill. In 2012, the corporation was able to offload 1,500 units in Madaraka, Nairobi West and Lang’ata Phase 4 and 5 to the public.

A housing unit built using NHC’s EPS panels in Kajiado County. Inset: The Kitchen Area

For the last 60 years, the National Housing Corporation (NHC) has been building houses. What started as the Central Housing Board in 1953 “to provide houses for Africans” has grown into a respectable corporation. The Central Housing Board operated on a Housing Ordinance No.17 of 1953. The ordinance provided funds to build houses for Africans.

of affordable accommodation and lowcost houses for the middle and low income segments of the market, assist in housing research, provide rural housing loans to Kenyans and set standards for other developers.

In 1960, amendments were made to provide housing to any racial community. However, in October 1960, the Minister without Portfolio, Mr. C.B. Madan (later Chief Justice of Kenya) moved the Housing (Amendment) Bill to remove the racial nature of the Central Housing Board and make its services available to all communities.

In the 1980s, the NHC, using funds from the Central Government, built some low-cost housing in Pumwani and Kibera Highrise in Nairobi. For about two decades, the NHC was the market leader in the housing industry but its role declined in the 1990s due to the economic crunch and high interest rates. Mortgage financing also went beyond the reach of most Kenyans as the housing industry became competitive with new entrants into the market.

In 1967, the Central Housing Board was transformed into the National Housing Corporation and given powers to undertake housing projects throughout the country. It was also mandated to promote construction

In 2004 the government started formulating a five-year National Housing Development Programme (NHDP), which was to operationalise proposals contained in the National Housing Policy. The NHC

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also underwent some restructuring which included converting its debts amounting to Sh5.32 billion owed to the government into equity. The government then injected more funds into the form of equities and grants.

Another area in to which the corporation has ventured is the provision of Rural and Peri-urban Housing Loans under which more than KShs 1 billion has been disbursed to applicants all over the country. It provides loans to supplement construction of individual permanent residential houses in rural areas, thereby assisting in meeting the corporation’s mandate of providing decent and affordable housing to all Kenyans.

The corporation developed housing schemes through funding by the Exchequer, while local authorities provided the land on which the houses were built. The houses were sold on either the tenant-purchase model or rented out. The schemes include Madaraka and Ayany estates in Nairobi and the Changamwe and Likoni rental schemes in Mombasa.

Over the past three years, the housing deficit has doubled due to population growth, which has increased the demand for housing. Preliminary results of a recent government survey indicate that the housing deficit in the urban and rural areas stands at 200,000 and 350,000 units, respectively. The corporation is set to bridge the deficit by developing at least 10,000 units over the next five years

through the Turnkey model of delivery in Kisumu Kanyakwar, Stoni Athi, Eldoret, Changamwe, Nyeri, Meru and Nakuru.

and institutions that ride on NHC’s goodwill, market and equity contribution on land, skills, technology and financials.

The NHC further intends to have a county housing scheme where a minimum of 250 units will be developed every year in each county. It intends to reinvest the proceeds gained from the sale of commercial housing into building at least 5,000 low-cost houses under social and public housing for low income earners. Therefore, home ownership will not be perceived to be the preserve of the rich or middle classes. This will also reduce gentrification, where middle income earners occupy low income settlements due to lack of proper houses. All this is in line with the fulfilment of the Vision 2030, the Millennium Development Goals and the Jubilee manifesto.

The other mandate of the NHC is to carry out research on low-cost housing alternatives, especially for low and middle income earners. As a result of this research, the NHC identified the use of Expanded Polystyrene Technology (EPS) panels as a cheaper yet reliable alternative. It has already established a Sh1 billion EPS Factory at Mavoko in Machakos County, which will produce the panels for the local market.

The corporation further proposes to support the housing needs of the various government agencies and institutions by developing at least 10,000 units over the next five years for the Kenya Police, the Kenya Defence Forces, Ministry of Health, Judiciary and the Kenya Prisons. These projects are funded by the Exchequer . The corporation is also looking at some in-house projects. These include Kisumu Kanyakwar, Kericho, Stoni Athi, Eldoret and Changamwe. These will be funded through a corporate bond, cheap international financing, REITS, internally generated revenues and local bank loans. This will further ensure that NHC houses continue to be cheaper, affordable and accessible to all Kenyans.

Besides saving investors labour and time, the EPS panels take less time to fix than ordinary stones. They can be used to erect stairwells, walls and floors. This is a first of its kind in the East and Central Africa. This technology has already been implemented by countries such as Mexico, Britain, Qatar, Nigeria, Mozambique and USA. The NHC is currently under the leadership of Mr Wachira Njuguna, an architect with a vast experience in the building, construction and real estate realm.

National Housing Corporation NHC House; Aga Khan Walk P.O. Box. 30257-00100 Nairobi Tel: 254 20 32147/9 Cell: 254 724 256 403/ 254 735 993 030 Email: info@nhckenya.co.ke website: www.nhckenya.co.ke

The corporation is also seeking to partner with public and private sector developers

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National Housing Corporation Sixty years of provision of affordable housing

Direct funding from the Exchequer was stopped mainly due to the Structural Adjustment Programmes that were being implemented by the Government. During and after the restructuring period, the NHC has been able to develop several housing schemes across the country. Tenantpurchase is the most common mode of sale due to its friendly rates and convenience. In this type of development, the NHC develops houses for sale to wananchi who pay a 10-20 per cent deposit and the balance is in form of a loan to tenants who pay for it within 20 years through monthly remittances that eventually end in a tenant owning the house. Areas with units on tenant purchase include Bububu Likoni, Kisumu Mamboleo, Kisii, Kakamega, Lang’ata and Nyeri. Other units are on rental schemes such as the Changamwe infill, Woodley infill, Eldoret and Nairobi’s Sadi Road South B infill. In 2012, the corporation was able to offload 1,500 units in Madaraka, Nairobi West and Lang’ata Phase 4 and 5 to the public.

A housing unit built using NHC’s EPS panels in Kajiado County. Inset: The Kitchen Area

For the last 60 years, the National Housing Corporation (NHC) has been building houses. What started as the Central Housing Board in 1953 “to provide houses for Africans” has grown into a respectable corporation. The Central Housing Board operated on a Housing Ordinance No.17 of 1953. The ordinance provided funds to build houses for Africans.

of affordable accommodation and lowcost houses for the middle and low income segments of the market, assist in housing research, provide rural housing loans to Kenyans and set standards for other developers.

In 1960, amendments were made to provide housing to any racial community. However, in October 1960, the Minister without Portfolio, Mr. C.B. Madan (later Chief Justice of Kenya) moved the Housing (Amendment) Bill to remove the racial nature of the Central Housing Board and make its services available to all communities.

In the 1980s, the NHC, using funds from the Central Government, built some low-cost housing in Pumwani and Kibera Highrise in Nairobi. For about two decades, the NHC was the market leader in the housing industry but its role declined in the 1990s due to the economic crunch and high interest rates. Mortgage financing also went beyond the reach of most Kenyans as the housing industry became competitive with new entrants into the market.

In 1967, the Central Housing Board was transformed into the National Housing Corporation and given powers to undertake housing projects throughout the country. It was also mandated to promote construction

In 2004 the government started formulating a five-year National Housing Development Programme (NHDP), which was to operationalise proposals contained in the National Housing Policy. The NHC

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also underwent some restructuring which included converting its debts amounting to Sh5.32 billion owed to the government into equity. The government then injected more funds into the form of equities and grants.

Another area in to which the corporation has ventured is the provision of Rural and Peri-urban Housing Loans under which more than KShs 1 billion has been disbursed to applicants all over the country. It provides loans to supplement construction of individual permanent residential houses in rural areas, thereby assisting in meeting the corporation’s mandate of providing decent and affordable housing to all Kenyans.

The corporation developed housing schemes through funding by the Exchequer, while local authorities provided the land on which the houses were built. The houses were sold on either the tenant-purchase model or rented out. The schemes include Madaraka and Ayany estates in Nairobi and the Changamwe and Likoni rental schemes in Mombasa.

Over the past three years, the housing deficit has doubled due to population growth, which has increased the demand for housing. Preliminary results of a recent government survey indicate that the housing deficit in the urban and rural areas stands at 200,000 and 350,000 units, respectively. The corporation is set to bridge the deficit by developing at least 10,000 units over the next five years

through the Turnkey model of delivery in Kisumu Kanyakwar, Stoni Athi, Eldoret, Changamwe, Nyeri, Meru and Nakuru.

and institutions that ride on NHC’s goodwill, market and equity contribution on land, skills, technology and financials.

The NHC further intends to have a county housing scheme where a minimum of 250 units will be developed every year in each county. It intends to reinvest the proceeds gained from the sale of commercial housing into building at least 5,000 low-cost houses under social and public housing for low income earners. Therefore, home ownership will not be perceived to be the preserve of the rich or middle classes. This will also reduce gentrification, where middle income earners occupy low income settlements due to lack of proper houses. All this is in line with the fulfilment of the Vision 2030, the Millennium Development Goals and the Jubilee manifesto.

The other mandate of the NHC is to carry out research on low-cost housing alternatives, especially for low and middle income earners. As a result of this research, the NHC identified the use of Expanded Polystyrene Technology (EPS) panels as a cheaper yet reliable alternative. It has already established a Sh1 billion EPS Factory at Mavoko in Machakos County, which will produce the panels for the local market.

The corporation further proposes to support the housing needs of the various government agencies and institutions by developing at least 10,000 units over the next five years for the Kenya Police, the Kenya Defence Forces, Ministry of Health, Judiciary and the Kenya Prisons. These projects are funded by the Exchequer . The corporation is also looking at some in-house projects. These include Kisumu Kanyakwar, Kericho, Stoni Athi, Eldoret and Changamwe. These will be funded through a corporate bond, cheap international financing, REITS, internally generated revenues and local bank loans. This will further ensure that NHC houses continue to be cheaper, affordable and accessible to all Kenyans.

Besides saving investors labour and time, the EPS panels take less time to fix than ordinary stones. They can be used to erect stairwells, walls and floors. This is a first of its kind in the East and Central Africa. This technology has already been implemented by countries such as Mexico, Britain, Qatar, Nigeria, Mozambique and USA. The NHC is currently under the leadership of Mr Wachira Njuguna, an architect with a vast experience in the building, construction and real estate realm.

National Housing Corporation NHC House; Aga Khan Walk P.O. Box. 30257-00100 Nairobi Tel: 254 20 32147/9 Cell: 254 724 256 403/ 254 735 993 030 Email: info@nhckenya.co.ke website: www.nhckenya.co.ke

The corporation is also seeking to partner with public and private sector developers

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Tiger Brands: Tiger Brands has been built over several decades through the acquisition and clustering of businesses which own leading food, home and personal care brands.

HACO Tiger Brands Adding Value to Life

operations into personal and home care products. Principal to this process were international partners who included Société BIC France; Pro-line International Inc. USA; Alberto Culver Inc. USA; E.T. Browne Drug Company Inc. USA and Jeyes PLC UK. In 2008, HACO entered into a strategic joint venture partnership with leading South African firm Tiger Brands Ltd - one of the largest manufacturers and marketers of fastmoving consumer goods in Africa, whose footprint extends across the continent and select countries globally.

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In the mid-1990’s, HACO diversified its

Tiger Brands is a deeply committed socially responsible corporate citizen – one upheld by a vision to be ‘the most admired branded FMCG Company in emerging markets’. Strategic Focus: HACO’s focus today is on the core business of FMCG categories that spread synergy across the value chain. Its broad basket of categories spans stationery, food, home and personal care as well as baby product categories.

Through this venture, new products have been manufactured in Kenya such as ethnic personal care products. These locallyproduced products are more competitive vis-a-vis similar products from other markets such as India/China and Egypt.

This wide range of brands is underpinned by comprehensive research and meaningful insights into each of the markets in which it operates.

This investment has also enabled HACO improve its human resource training and development, thereby enhancing the quality of its existing workforce.

Incorporated as Hagemeyer, HACO started its humble operations as a single-product manufacturer, dealing primarily with stationery and shaver products.

Sustainability within the Group is framed by a strict adherence to the principles of good governance and environmental management practices, the delivery of maximum economic impact in its operating markets, and partnerships that drive shareholder value.

Benefits of the Joint Venture: This partnership not only enabled extensive capital expenditure investment to boost capacity and match consumer demand in East Africa, but has also enabled HACO witness unparalleled top line growth ever since.

This has enabled the company to successfully exploit COMESA and EAC markets, leading to more competitive sourcing of raw materials due to economies of scale. The increased profit yield has also increased government revenue.

Our Heritage: HACO Tiger Brands is a leading manufacturing and trading company in the FMCG sector in Kenya, whose formidable foundation was established on the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa in 1974.

The company’s vision is to be the most admired branded FMCG Company in emerging markets. Tiger Brands’ mission is to be a high performing, fast-moving consumer goods company with leading brands, operating across the globe in several selected emerging territories.

This success has further been grown and maintained through the perpetual renovation and innovation of its brands, while its approach to expansion has given traction to a distribution network that currently spans the entire eastern Africa and the broader COMESA market region.

The culmination of HACO’s 20 year plus involvement in the hair-care market saw the Company further strengthen its product relevance and competitiveness within the markets it is operating in when it launched its Research & Development Division, which has been pivotal in delivering innovative products into the market. The launch of Miadi marked the first specially tailored products to be launched from HACO Labs. Miadi is today the fastest growing locally manufactured mass market hair product in East Africa. Recently, HACO officially added Black Silk the first locally manufactured premium hair care product to hit the East African market, to its range of hair care products. This product is infused with essential oils which keep Afro-ethnic hair moisturised, and was

Industrialist and HACO Tiger Brands Chairman Dr Chris Kirubi presenting gift packs to the winners of a recent BIC promo

developed over a span of three years with the unique characteristics of Afro-ethnic hair in mind. “If you look at a strand of Afro-ethnic hair you realise it curves, making it harder for sebum to travel from the roots to the ends, therefore it tends to be drier and more brittle,” Trichologist Muli Musyoka said at the launch event. Today, these locally-produced products are strategically integrated with leading international brands such as MOTIONS and TCB. Our Future: From its modest beginnings, HACO Tiger Brands is today one of the region’s leading FMCG manufacturers, and is without question a world-class operation. In this regard, plans to go beyond manufacturing personal and homecare consumer products and venturing into agribusiness and other processing initiatives are on course. These projects are geared to

transform the firm into a truly pan-African outfit. Besides, HACO seeks to continue to hold and grow its market leadership position through constant investment in every asset of the business, be it in people, brands, technology, efficiency, quality or sustainability. As it unfolds, the story of HACO Tiger Brands will continue to be one defined by charisma, belief and the fortuity of life – constantly adding value to life. HACO Tiger Brands’ shareholders are Dr. Chris Kirubi – a leading Kenyan Industrialist and Tiger Brands. Its current factory and operations are based at Kasarani, Nairobi.

Tel: +254 20 864 2000 Email: info@htb.co.ke www.hacotigerbrands.co.ke

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Tiger Brands: Tiger Brands has been built over several decades through the acquisition and clustering of businesses which own leading food, home and personal care brands.

HACO Tiger Brands Adding Value to Life

operations into personal and home care products. Principal to this process were international partners who included Société BIC France; Pro-line International Inc. USA; Alberto Culver Inc. USA; E.T. Browne Drug Company Inc. USA and Jeyes PLC UK. In 2008, HACO entered into a strategic joint venture partnership with leading South African firm Tiger Brands Ltd - one of the largest manufacturers and marketers of fastmoving consumer goods in Africa, whose footprint extends across the continent and select countries globally.

Best of Kenya

112

In the mid-1990’s, HACO diversified its

Tiger Brands is a deeply committed socially responsible corporate citizen – one upheld by a vision to be ‘the most admired branded FMCG Company in emerging markets’. Strategic Focus: HACO’s focus today is on the core business of FMCG categories that spread synergy across the value chain. Its broad basket of categories spans stationery, food, home and personal care as well as baby product categories.

Through this venture, new products have been manufactured in Kenya such as ethnic personal care products. These locallyproduced products are more competitive vis-a-vis similar products from other markets such as India/China and Egypt.

This wide range of brands is underpinned by comprehensive research and meaningful insights into each of the markets in which it operates.

This investment has also enabled HACO improve its human resource training and development, thereby enhancing the quality of its existing workforce.

Incorporated as Hagemeyer, HACO started its humble operations as a single-product manufacturer, dealing primarily with stationery and shaver products.

Sustainability within the Group is framed by a strict adherence to the principles of good governance and environmental management practices, the delivery of maximum economic impact in its operating markets, and partnerships that drive shareholder value.

Benefits of the Joint Venture: This partnership not only enabled extensive capital expenditure investment to boost capacity and match consumer demand in East Africa, but has also enabled HACO witness unparalleled top line growth ever since.

This has enabled the company to successfully exploit COMESA and EAC markets, leading to more competitive sourcing of raw materials due to economies of scale. The increased profit yield has also increased government revenue.

Our Heritage: HACO Tiger Brands is a leading manufacturing and trading company in the FMCG sector in Kenya, whose formidable foundation was established on the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa in 1974.

The company’s vision is to be the most admired branded FMCG Company in emerging markets. Tiger Brands’ mission is to be a high performing, fast-moving consumer goods company with leading brands, operating across the globe in several selected emerging territories.

This success has further been grown and maintained through the perpetual renovation and innovation of its brands, while its approach to expansion has given traction to a distribution network that currently spans the entire eastern Africa and the broader COMESA market region.

The culmination of HACO’s 20 year plus involvement in the hair-care market saw the Company further strengthen its product relevance and competitiveness within the markets it is operating in when it launched its Research & Development Division, which has been pivotal in delivering innovative products into the market. The launch of Miadi marked the first specially tailored products to be launched from HACO Labs. Miadi is today the fastest growing locally manufactured mass market hair product in East Africa. Recently, HACO officially added Black Silk the first locally manufactured premium hair care product to hit the East African market, to its range of hair care products. This product is infused with essential oils which keep Afro-ethnic hair moisturised, and was

Industrialist and HACO Tiger Brands Chairman Dr Chris Kirubi presenting gift packs to the winners of a recent BIC promo

developed over a span of three years with the unique characteristics of Afro-ethnic hair in mind. “If you look at a strand of Afro-ethnic hair you realise it curves, making it harder for sebum to travel from the roots to the ends, therefore it tends to be drier and more brittle,” Trichologist Muli Musyoka said at the launch event. Today, these locally-produced products are strategically integrated with leading international brands such as MOTIONS and TCB. Our Future: From its modest beginnings, HACO Tiger Brands is today one of the region’s leading FMCG manufacturers, and is without question a world-class operation. In this regard, plans to go beyond manufacturing personal and homecare consumer products and venturing into agribusiness and other processing initiatives are on course. These projects are geared to

transform the firm into a truly pan-African outfit. Besides, HACO seeks to continue to hold and grow its market leadership position through constant investment in every asset of the business, be it in people, brands, technology, efficiency, quality or sustainability. As it unfolds, the story of HACO Tiger Brands will continue to be one defined by charisma, belief and the fortuity of life – constantly adding value to life. HACO Tiger Brands’ shareholders are Dr. Chris Kirubi – a leading Kenyan Industrialist and Tiger Brands. Its current factory and operations are based at Kasarani, Nairobi.

Tel: +254 20 864 2000 Email: info@htb.co.ke www.hacotigerbrands.co.ke

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HACO Tiger Brands’ Product Categories HACO Tiger Brands has been built over several decades through the diversification into a broad variety of categories, and maintained through the perpetual renovation and innovation of its brands.

Black Silk is a Luxurious hair care range of products that contains a unique blend of essential oils that protect and condition the hair, assuring less breakage for Soft, Long and Strong hair. Swing your spectacular hair with Black Silk Luxurious Care.

Palmer’s Cocoa Butter Formula is the only brand offering a full line of cocoa butter items, from creams, lotions and lip balms, soaps, body oils and the original solid formulation. Palmer’s Mothers’ range is widely recommended by doctors to prevent and reduce the appearance of stretch marks during and after pregnancy and weight loss. Take a stand against scars & stretch marks with Palmer’s Cocoa Butter Formula.

Key Product Categories HACO’s key product categories are as hereunder: • • • • • •

BIC products provide easy answers for everyday needs. In creating its first product, the BIC Cristal ballpoint pen, BIC chooses to go straight to what’s essential: create something simple, yet reliable, which eases something we all do, that everyone can use. This vision is at the heart of every brand move BIC makes. With BIC you can write your future.

Only All Gold is Crammed full of natural goodness and the finest ingredients that give you value for money and convenience in meal preparation. Bring your meals back to life by preparing your food with All Gold that will ensure they taste real good like good food should.Ensure your family and friends always have the best memories of all the meals they take for maximum joy and peace of mind. All Gold, Tastes real good!

ACE Liquid Toilet Cleaner: Make your house comfortable with ACE Liquid Toilet Cleaner which is specifically formulated with powerful ingredients to remove stubborn stains, neutralize bad odor and kill germs giving you 99.9% germs protection. ACE Toilet Cleaner, Cleans Like New, Germs Free Too

So Soft Fabric Softener & Conditioner: Give your family and entire household the confidence and pleasure of comfort with So Soft Fabric Softener & Conditioner because it is expertly formulated to guarantee your entire household fabrics silky softness and fresh smell, always. So Soft, Feels as Soft as it Smells.

Purity offers a comprehensive feeding solution specially developed to maximize baby’s physical and mental development. Purity provides mothers with a range of products that, when combined, offer balanced nutrition specially designed for baby / toddler. Purity is your trusted partner in motherhood and is specially developed with care without preservatives, colourants and artificial flavourants to maximise your baby’s growth and development. Purity understands your baby and has specialized ranges and partners with you on your emotional journey and devotion to your baby. Purity, the Baby Feeding Experts.

Beacon has a variety of sweets, chocolates and treats for all occasions and ages. Beacons Chocolate have that luxuriously smooth, melt-in-your-mouth chocolate inspiration. Bring life and laughter to all the valuable people in your life by sharing Beacon with friends and family and treasure their most memorable moments. Beacon, creamy and smooth.

Stationery Personal Care Home Care Baby Care Snacks & Treats Groceries

Our Leading Brands: •

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Amara Lotions are specifically formulated for daily use on the whole body and are non greasy with easy application and quick absorption. They contain a unique blend of natural essential extracts including vitamin A & E that leave the skin with a long lasting moisturizing effect giving you the confidence of a smooth and natural glowing skin. Release your inner glow with Amara.

Tastic Spaghetti is premium pasta made in Italy from the world’s best top quality wheat to ensure a perfect meal every time. Tastic spaghetti cooks separate and golden thus ensuring delicious meals every time. Prepare exciting great meals that bring your family and friends together and make you be truly appreciated for your ability to make great meals, every time. Tastic, Perfect. Every time

ACE Bleach caters for your entire household cleaning needs because it is specifically formulated to whiten, brighten and kill germs offering you 99.9% germ protection and the confidence of a clean and fresh home. Ace Bleach, The Whitest Smile in Africa.

Jeyes Bloo Toilet Cleaner: A clean, germ free & fresh smelling toilet can only come about by using Jeyes Bloo Toilet cleaner because it is the only toilet cleaner purposely made to remove all stains and leave any toilet bowl extra fresh, extra clean and well disinfected. Be proud of your toilet because you have Jeyes Bloo Disinfectant Liquid Toilet Cleaner specially designed to leave your loo ultimately clean, extra fresh and sweetly fragranced all the time. Love your Loo with Bloo.

Ingram’s Camphor Cream is a highly trusted brand for the whole family with strong, healing medicinal benefits that is highly relevant and necessary for skin care solutions. It moisturizes, protects, heals, repairs and soothes damaged, cracked or very dry skin. Ingram’s, the skin doctor.

MIADI offers a complete range of hair care products, specially formulated for African hair and covering different segments from Styling products, Relaxers, Treatments to Maintenance products. Miadi products repair, nourish and protect African hair while restoring its natural texture making the hair look healthy and beautiful. Miadi, Made with mother nature. •

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HACO Tiger Brands’ Product Categories HACO Tiger Brands has been built over several decades through the diversification into a broad variety of categories, and maintained through the perpetual renovation and innovation of its brands.

Black Silk is a Luxurious hair care range of products that contains a unique blend of essential oils that protect and condition the hair, assuring less breakage for Soft, Long and Strong hair. Swing your spectacular hair with Black Silk Luxurious Care.

Palmer’s Cocoa Butter Formula is the only brand offering a full line of cocoa butter items, from creams, lotions and lip balms, soaps, body oils and the original solid formulation. Palmer’s Mothers’ range is widely recommended by doctors to prevent and reduce the appearance of stretch marks during and after pregnancy and weight loss. Take a stand against scars & stretch marks with Palmer’s Cocoa Butter Formula.

Key Product Categories HACO’s key product categories are as hereunder: • • • • • •

BIC products provide easy answers for everyday needs. In creating its first product, the BIC Cristal ballpoint pen, BIC chooses to go straight to what’s essential: create something simple, yet reliable, which eases something we all do, that everyone can use. This vision is at the heart of every brand move BIC makes. With BIC you can write your future.

Only All Gold is Crammed full of natural goodness and the finest ingredients that give you value for money and convenience in meal preparation. Bring your meals back to life by preparing your food with All Gold that will ensure they taste real good like good food should.Ensure your family and friends always have the best memories of all the meals they take for maximum joy and peace of mind. All Gold, Tastes real good!

ACE Liquid Toilet Cleaner: Make your house comfortable with ACE Liquid Toilet Cleaner which is specifically formulated with powerful ingredients to remove stubborn stains, neutralize bad odor and kill germs giving you 99.9% germs protection. ACE Toilet Cleaner, Cleans Like New, Germs Free Too

So Soft Fabric Softener & Conditioner: Give your family and entire household the confidence and pleasure of comfort with So Soft Fabric Softener & Conditioner because it is expertly formulated to guarantee your entire household fabrics silky softness and fresh smell, always. So Soft, Feels as Soft as it Smells.

Purity offers a comprehensive feeding solution specially developed to maximize baby’s physical and mental development. Purity provides mothers with a range of products that, when combined, offer balanced nutrition specially designed for baby / toddler. Purity is your trusted partner in motherhood and is specially developed with care without preservatives, colourants and artificial flavourants to maximise your baby’s growth and development. Purity understands your baby and has specialized ranges and partners with you on your emotional journey and devotion to your baby. Purity, the Baby Feeding Experts.

Beacon has a variety of sweets, chocolates and treats for all occasions and ages. Beacons Chocolate have that luxuriously smooth, melt-in-your-mouth chocolate inspiration. Bring life and laughter to all the valuable people in your life by sharing Beacon with friends and family and treasure their most memorable moments. Beacon, creamy and smooth.

Stationery Personal Care Home Care Baby Care Snacks & Treats Groceries

Our Leading Brands: •

Best of Kenya

114

Amara Lotions are specifically formulated for daily use on the whole body and are non greasy with easy application and quick absorption. They contain a unique blend of natural essential extracts including vitamin A & E that leave the skin with a long lasting moisturizing effect giving you the confidence of a smooth and natural glowing skin. Release your inner glow with Amara.

Tastic Spaghetti is premium pasta made in Italy from the world’s best top quality wheat to ensure a perfect meal every time. Tastic spaghetti cooks separate and golden thus ensuring delicious meals every time. Prepare exciting great meals that bring your family and friends together and make you be truly appreciated for your ability to make great meals, every time. Tastic, Perfect. Every time

ACE Bleach caters for your entire household cleaning needs because it is specifically formulated to whiten, brighten and kill germs offering you 99.9% germ protection and the confidence of a clean and fresh home. Ace Bleach, The Whitest Smile in Africa.

Jeyes Bloo Toilet Cleaner: A clean, germ free & fresh smelling toilet can only come about by using Jeyes Bloo Toilet cleaner because it is the only toilet cleaner purposely made to remove all stains and leave any toilet bowl extra fresh, extra clean and well disinfected. Be proud of your toilet because you have Jeyes Bloo Disinfectant Liquid Toilet Cleaner specially designed to leave your loo ultimately clean, extra fresh and sweetly fragranced all the time. Love your Loo with Bloo.

Ingram’s Camphor Cream is a highly trusted brand for the whole family with strong, healing medicinal benefits that is highly relevant and necessary for skin care solutions. It moisturizes, protects, heals, repairs and soothes damaged, cracked or very dry skin. Ingram’s, the skin doctor.

MIADI offers a complete range of hair care products, specially formulated for African hair and covering different segments from Styling products, Relaxers, Treatments to Maintenance products. Miadi products repair, nourish and protect African hair while restoring its natural texture making the hair look healthy and beautiful. Miadi, Made with mother nature. •

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Brookside Dairy Limited

Executive Chairman, Mr. Muhoho Kenyatta

also set up demonstration farms where farmers would be sharing ideas on the dairy enterprise.

• Bank Credit – We facilitate farmers to get loans with leading financial institutions through a check off system

• Services - Provision of animal feeds and farm inputs, through accredited service providers, on credit.

• Cooling Stations – With over 30 milk cooling stations spread throughout the country, Brookside Dairy enjoys an excellent working relationship with individual farmers, co-operatives and self-help groups, all who deliver their milk to these cooling facilities.

• Customer Service– the company maintains an interactive medium of communication through their SMS services.

Brookside Dairy Ltd, State-of-the-art Powder Plant

Our History In 1993, the only dairy company in the country collapsed and dairy farmers were on a quandary with no market for their milk. In the same year, the dairy industry was liberalised and Mr Muhoho Kenyatta, the Executive Chairman of Brookside Dairy, begun a lifelong ambition by building his own dairy in order to create market for the family’s milk and that of other dairy farmers in the country who had nowhere to sell their produce. Today, still owned by the Kenyatta family, Brookside Dairy Limited is the leading dairy

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processor in the region. The company has become one of the top five dairy companies in Africa in a relatively short span of 20 years. The Brookside brand is a household name in many parts of the region and its products are available in 12 countries including Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, DRC, Sudan, Egypt, Syria Singapore, Seychelles and Mauritius. This success is driven by the company’s vision to become the benchmark dairy operator in Africa. Through a combination of various strategies like investment in worldclass operations, acquisitions and mergers

as well as forging partnerships with key industry stakeholders, the company has been able to move closer to achieving its vision. Brand Values The Brookside brand is associated with quality, purity, freshness and trust. We are dedicated to upholding our tag line “Goodness for all “, and therefore carry out all our activities for the mutual benefit of everybody in the value chain, with a strong focus on relationship marketing. Partnership with Farmers Farmers are the mainstay of our business.

As part of our commitment towards the growth and development of the dairy subsector, we have partnered with over 145,000 smallholder farmers distributed in more than 150 cooperative societies, self-help groups throughout Kenya including Individual farmers. These farmers benefit from a field extension program aimed at empowering them to produce more milk in the right quality and thereby earn more money from their dairy businesses. Through this program, the farmers supplying us with milk enjoy a host of benefits, which include: • Prompt and guaranteed payment for milk

delivered to Brookside, thus assuring farmers of a reliable, ready market for their milk.

• Regular training on modern farming techniques. This aims at assisting farmers to grow their daily milk production volumes and engage in clean milk production. Brookside trains over 20,000 farmers throughout Kenya each year. The climax of these trainings is the biennial Brookside Livestock Breeders Show and Sale where more than 30,000 farmers and other stakeholders in the livestock sector from the region interact and learn from dairy experts. We have

We are constantly reviewing these partnerships to bring out the best in our farmers as we focus on growing the region’s dairy sub- sector to become the best performing in the world. World-class Operations Brookside Dairy is committed to quality and world-class operations levels, which is the reason why we were the first dairy processor in the region to be ISO 22000:2005 certified. Our operations meet global best practices in efficiency and have been certified by S.G.S as fully compliant to ISO 14001 as well as the Occupational Health Safety and Welfare

Best of Kenya

117


Brookside Dairy Limited

Executive Chairman, Mr. Muhoho Kenyatta

also set up demonstration farms where farmers would be sharing ideas on the dairy enterprise.

• Bank Credit – We facilitate farmers to get loans with leading financial institutions through a check off system

• Services - Provision of animal feeds and farm inputs, through accredited service providers, on credit.

• Cooling Stations – With over 30 milk cooling stations spread throughout the country, Brookside Dairy enjoys an excellent working relationship with individual farmers, co-operatives and self-help groups, all who deliver their milk to these cooling facilities.

• Customer Service– the company maintains an interactive medium of communication through their SMS services.

Brookside Dairy Ltd, State-of-the-art Powder Plant

Our History In 1993, the only dairy company in the country collapsed and dairy farmers were on a quandary with no market for their milk. In the same year, the dairy industry was liberalised and Mr Muhoho Kenyatta, the Executive Chairman of Brookside Dairy, begun a lifelong ambition by building his own dairy in order to create market for the family’s milk and that of other dairy farmers in the country who had nowhere to sell their produce. Today, still owned by the Kenyatta family, Brookside Dairy Limited is the leading dairy

Best of Kenya

116

processor in the region. The company has become one of the top five dairy companies in Africa in a relatively short span of 20 years. The Brookside brand is a household name in many parts of the region and its products are available in 12 countries including Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, DRC, Sudan, Egypt, Syria Singapore, Seychelles and Mauritius. This success is driven by the company’s vision to become the benchmark dairy operator in Africa. Through a combination of various strategies like investment in worldclass operations, acquisitions and mergers

as well as forging partnerships with key industry stakeholders, the company has been able to move closer to achieving its vision. Brand Values The Brookside brand is associated with quality, purity, freshness and trust. We are dedicated to upholding our tag line “Goodness for all “, and therefore carry out all our activities for the mutual benefit of everybody in the value chain, with a strong focus on relationship marketing. Partnership with Farmers Farmers are the mainstay of our business.

As part of our commitment towards the growth and development of the dairy subsector, we have partnered with over 145,000 smallholder farmers distributed in more than 150 cooperative societies, self-help groups throughout Kenya including Individual farmers. These farmers benefit from a field extension program aimed at empowering them to produce more milk in the right quality and thereby earn more money from their dairy businesses. Through this program, the farmers supplying us with milk enjoy a host of benefits, which include: • Prompt and guaranteed payment for milk

delivered to Brookside, thus assuring farmers of a reliable, ready market for their milk.

• Regular training on modern farming techniques. This aims at assisting farmers to grow their daily milk production volumes and engage in clean milk production. Brookside trains over 20,000 farmers throughout Kenya each year. The climax of these trainings is the biennial Brookside Livestock Breeders Show and Sale where more than 30,000 farmers and other stakeholders in the livestock sector from the region interact and learn from dairy experts. We have

We are constantly reviewing these partnerships to bring out the best in our farmers as we focus on growing the region’s dairy sub- sector to become the best performing in the world. World-class Operations Brookside Dairy is committed to quality and world-class operations levels, which is the reason why we were the first dairy processor in the region to be ISO 22000:2005 certified. Our operations meet global best practices in efficiency and have been certified by S.G.S as fully compliant to ISO 14001 as well as the Occupational Health Safety and Welfare

Best of Kenya

117


Students sitting for the Brookside sponsored Mang’u National Maths contest

other presents .We also encourage farm and factory tours at our Ruiru-based premises where students can learn better animal husbandry as well as observe the milk processing procedure.

• Health: We encourage our children to consume healthy refreshments like milk for their health under a school milk program, while also educating members of the pulic on the health benefits of dairy products.

• Economic Empowerment: We educate

Maseno school player (green) goes for a score against their arch rivals Laiser Hill, during the Brookside Kenya Secondary Schools Sports Association ( KSSSA) Term 1Ball games

(OHS) and the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) standards. Production Capacity The company is also in the process of increasing its production capacity through the installation of a powder plant. This will be the largest and first multi-stage drier in the region and is set to triple our production capacity once it becomes operational in early 2014. This will solve the current seasonality of our industry, which is usually affected by over supply during the rainy season and under supply during the dry season as this milk powder will be used for both operational and strategic stock whilst also ensuring that farmers have a ready market for their milk.

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Our products Brookside has invested heavily in innovation and product development in order to provide different market segments with products that respond to specific market tastes and preferences. Our fully fledged customer care centre stays constantly in touch with consumers and market trends, besides maintaining a global network with strategic stakeholders to monitor changing technology and stakeholder needs, and to respond accordingly. Through developing products that are in line with market demands, we are able to generate a demand for milk, which is an assurance to farmers of a ready market for their milk and constant prompt payment for their milk supplies.

Corporate Social Responsibility We continue to support a corporate social responsibility programme aimed at uplifting living standards of communities where we do business, as well as empower our partners and stakeholders. Our corporate social responsibility focuses on the following four main areas: • Sports: We believe that every child has different talents and if identified and nurtured, can be a good source of income in the future. We therefore help nurture sporting talent among our youth and to promote their physical health through sponsoring the Kenya National Secondary Schools Sports Association Term One Championships and the Regional East African Secondary School Games. We also have a Soccer Scholarship where five of the best boys

footballers win a soccer scholarship with two of our premier league teams.

• Academics: To encourage students to perform well in sciences and to demystify science-based subjects we sponsor National Mathematics contests in three National Secondary Schools namely Mang’u, Maseno and Kabarak High Schools where victors win a full years’ school fees sponsorship among

livestock farmers on modern farming methods to ensure that they manage their farms commercially. Sponsorship of premier league teams To enable us interact with our consumers and stake holders, we are sponsors of two football clubs in the Kenya premier league. Through these football teams, we have developed a Football scholarship where five good footballers annually during our Brookside sponsored National and regional

school games get scholarship to play football in our two teams Employment opportunities Brookside Dairy has created over 2,800 direct employment opportunities in Kenya and another over 175,000 indirectly in the value chain including over 150,000 farmers, 25,000 retailers, 1,250 agents and subagents, 5,000 people within the wholesale business in Kenya and over 280 transporters. We have created another 100 direct and over 10,000 indirect jobs through our regional operations. Increasing consumption of dairy products Brookside Dairy is committed to the overall growth of the dairy sector in the region, as well as the prosperity of the people of this great region and we partner with other industry stake holders in developing campaigns that increase consumption of dairy products for the benefit of our consumers and farmers.

Brookside Dairy Ltd.

Brookside Dairy Tanzania Ltd

Dar es Salaam

Brookside Dairy Uganda Ltd

P.O Box 236-00232 Ruiru, Kenya Pilot Tel : 020-3542480 Tel landline : (020) 2506210/8 Cell : 0735 222 264 or 0722 130 000 Email : maziwa@brookside.co.ke www.brookside.co.ke

Arusha Branch, Mbaunda road P.O Box 3100, Arusha, Tanzania Tel : (+255) 272 507 134/6 Cell : (+255) 732 972 2820 Email : info@brookside.co.tz

Plot 135 Mikocheni Light, Industrial Area P.O Box 3100, Arusha, Tanzania Tel : (+255) 222 774 761 Email : info@brookside.co.tz

Old Port Bell Road P.O Box 40092, Kampala, Uganda Tel: (+256) (+41) 4380468, 4380469, 4236902 (+256) 414 236909/380468/9 Email: info@brooksideuganda.ug

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Students sitting for the Brookside sponsored Mang’u National Maths contest

other presents .We also encourage farm and factory tours at our Ruiru-based premises where students can learn better animal husbandry as well as observe the milk processing procedure.

• Health: We encourage our children to consume healthy refreshments like milk for their health under a school milk program, while also educating members of the pulic on the health benefits of dairy products.

• Economic Empowerment: We educate

Maseno school player (green) goes for a score against their arch rivals Laiser Hill, during the Brookside Kenya Secondary Schools Sports Association ( KSSSA) Term 1Ball games

(OHS) and the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) standards. Production Capacity The company is also in the process of increasing its production capacity through the installation of a powder plant. This will be the largest and first multi-stage drier in the region and is set to triple our production capacity once it becomes operational in early 2014. This will solve the current seasonality of our industry, which is usually affected by over supply during the rainy season and under supply during the dry season as this milk powder will be used for both operational and strategic stock whilst also ensuring that farmers have a ready market for their milk.

Best of Kenya

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Our products Brookside has invested heavily in innovation and product development in order to provide different market segments with products that respond to specific market tastes and preferences. Our fully fledged customer care centre stays constantly in touch with consumers and market trends, besides maintaining a global network with strategic stakeholders to monitor changing technology and stakeholder needs, and to respond accordingly. Through developing products that are in line with market demands, we are able to generate a demand for milk, which is an assurance to farmers of a ready market for their milk and constant prompt payment for their milk supplies.

Corporate Social Responsibility We continue to support a corporate social responsibility programme aimed at uplifting living standards of communities where we do business, as well as empower our partners and stakeholders. Our corporate social responsibility focuses on the following four main areas: • Sports: We believe that every child has different talents and if identified and nurtured, can be a good source of income in the future. We therefore help nurture sporting talent among our youth and to promote their physical health through sponsoring the Kenya National Secondary Schools Sports Association Term One Championships and the Regional East African Secondary School Games. We also have a Soccer Scholarship where five of the best boys

footballers win a soccer scholarship with two of our premier league teams.

• Academics: To encourage students to perform well in sciences and to demystify science-based subjects we sponsor National Mathematics contests in three National Secondary Schools namely Mang’u, Maseno and Kabarak High Schools where victors win a full years’ school fees sponsorship among

livestock farmers on modern farming methods to ensure that they manage their farms commercially. Sponsorship of premier league teams To enable us interact with our consumers and stake holders, we are sponsors of two football clubs in the Kenya premier league. Through these football teams, we have developed a Football scholarship where five good footballers annually during our Brookside sponsored National and regional

school games get scholarship to play football in our two teams Employment opportunities Brookside Dairy has created over 2,800 direct employment opportunities in Kenya and another over 175,000 indirectly in the value chain including over 150,000 farmers, 25,000 retailers, 1,250 agents and subagents, 5,000 people within the wholesale business in Kenya and over 280 transporters. We have created another 100 direct and over 10,000 indirect jobs through our regional operations. Increasing consumption of dairy products Brookside Dairy is committed to the overall growth of the dairy sector in the region, as well as the prosperity of the people of this great region and we partner with other industry stake holders in developing campaigns that increase consumption of dairy products for the benefit of our consumers and farmers.

Brookside Dairy Ltd.

Brookside Dairy Tanzania Ltd

Dar es Salaam

Brookside Dairy Uganda Ltd

P.O Box 236-00232 Ruiru, Kenya Pilot Tel : 020-3542480 Tel landline : (020) 2506210/8 Cell : 0735 222 264 or 0722 130 000 Email : maziwa@brookside.co.ke www.brookside.co.ke

Arusha Branch, Mbaunda road P.O Box 3100, Arusha, Tanzania Tel : (+255) 272 507 134/6 Cell : (+255) 732 972 2820 Email : info@brookside.co.tz

Plot 135 Mikocheni Light, Industrial Area P.O Box 3100, Arusha, Tanzania Tel : (+255) 222 774 761 Email : info@brookside.co.tz

Old Port Bell Road P.O Box 40092, Kampala, Uganda Tel: (+256) (+41) 4380468, 4380469, 4236902 (+256) 414 236909/380468/9 Email: info@brooksideuganda.ug

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CHAPTER 6 Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

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CHAPTER 6 Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

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Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

ushered in the Second Medium Term Plan of Vision 2030 and carries on the system of incorporating critical aspects of each governance pillar at each phase of implementation of the Vision.

Kenya’s Industrialisation Roadmap

Recently, the Government through my Ministry launched the Industrialisation Roadmap. The roadmap seeks to re-ignite the industrial renaissance of Kenya. It has laid out seen key priorities and plans to pursue a raft of ideas to drive rapid impact that will be influential in growing our GDP by US$4-6 billion per year for the next 17 years from US$42 billion to US$216 billion under the Vision 2030 ideals. The Industrialisation Roadmap, aiming to increase Kenya’s industrial economy coincides with the launch of the Second Medium Term Plan of Vision 2030 and is therefore, a key influence in our national economic transformation journey for the next five years.

Total GDP, USD Billion

To achieve Vision 2030 objectives of reaching middle-income status, we need to grow GDP by $4-6 billion per year for the next 17 years

• The roadmap aims at building a highly industrialised economy through, among other impactful sectors, a thriving manufacturing industry. Under the first Medium Term Plan (2008 – 2012) Kenya’s aspiration was to have a robust, diversified and competitive manufacturing sector increasing its contribution to GDP by at least 10 per cent per annum. The foundation for an industrial take-off was laid with the sector’s implementation of identified key flagship projects and other programmes. In addition, policy, legal and institutional reforms were undertaken to address emerging industrial issues and to revitalise the sector.

Mr Adan Mohamed, EBS, Cabinet Secretary, Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

The Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development was established by the Executive Order No. 2 of May, 2013 to formulate policies that promote industrial and enterprise development in Kenya. Our Vision To be a leader in catalysing a diversified, globally competitive and sustainable industrial sector in Kenya. Our Mission To facilitate an expanding, globally competitive and innovative industrial sector by creating an enabling environment. As Kenya marked its 50th Independence Anniversary, Best of Kenya spoke to Cabinet Secretary Mr Adan Mohamed, EBS, on our country’s path to industrialisation, specific efforts being made to overcome challenges

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that impede the process and our country’s envisaged roadmap. Herewith, excerpts: Q: Kenya and other African governments recently celebrated the Africa Industrialisation Day. Why is the industrialisation agenda key for Kenya and Africa? A: First the story of industrialisation in Africa is ripe right now because it’s the driver of Africa’s Renaissance. The concept of African Renaissance stipulates that African people and nations shall overcome the current challenges confronting the continent and achieve cultural, scientific, and economic renewal. In that regard, Africa has tried at various levels to reinvent itself with varying degrees of success. Presently, we are witnessing an “African economic renaissance”. Today, we are

challenging the image of an African continent stalked by ethnic conflict, corrupt dictatorships, religious strife, war and famine. We are challenging this through investors, economists, fund managers and academics. With an average growth rate of a solid 5 per cent over the past decade, Africa is playing catch-up with the Developed World but its growth is one of the world’s fastest-growing economies. In Kenya, our industrialisation strategy is constitutionally embedded through the 20year national economic growth blueprint, the Kenya Vision 2030 which establishes the aspiration to reach middle income status by 2030.

The Government is committed to a production-oriented industrial revolution that will create a strong manufacturing base. In particular, we intend to promote value addition to our raw materials, especially the agricultural-based produce. This in turn will address the country’s unemployment challenge. By 2030 an industrialised economy will contribute to a huge percentage in the informal, formal and unemployed categories. Q: What are the specific priorities the roadmap has focused on? A: We have mapped out the key priorities as follows: •

• Q: How will this happen? A: The national strategy, itself the basis for ministerial strategic plans, has just

Creating appropriate incentives to attract Foreign Direct Investments through: Special Economic Zones, Free Trade Zone, industrial parks and clusters and industrial mapping; Instituting enabling policies and changes to increase global competitiveness by addressing country competitiveness challenges and ease of doing business;

• •

Focusing on building attractive sectors where we have natural competitive advantage and we can leverage regional trends. These sectors include leather, textiles and clothing, agro-processing and furniture; Encouraging growth of and investment in SMEs; Collaborating with key Government ministries, departments and agencies to ensure that infrastructure plans are aligned to and support industrialisation such as energy, access to credit, skills and skill development, ease of doing business and transport; Restructuring failed industries, increasing capacity, attracting new investments; and Enhancing our delivery capability.

Q: Why must this happen? And what are the current risks that might impede the industrialisation agenda? A: It must happen because it is envisaged in the national economic blueprint, Vision 2030, whose economic pillar establishes the manufacturing sector as one of its six priority sectors expected to raise GDP growth rate to 10 per cent by 2012 and sustain the growth rate thereafter to 2030. It is also anticipated that the sector will support the country’s social development agenda through employment creation, foreign exchange generation, and attracting more Foreign Direct Investment (FDI).The national vision therefore requires the manufacturing sector to transform itself into a robust, efficient, modern and export-oriented entity with strong forward and backward linkages.

particularly for SMEs, high cost of labour as compared to other developing markets and high costs of inputs. However, no nation is a stranger to these. The key thing is to fix the challenges that choke our economic growth. We are confident of the appropriate programmes, projects and plans put in place to curb these impediments and deliver these enablers. Q: What role will the Industrialisation Roadmap play in the economy? A: Every individual African country has its own story, but more importantly possesses the ingredients to drive Africa as the world’s dominant economic engine for the 21st century. The Industrialisation Roadmap is specifically to help guide the specific national production and economic goals in line with the Vision 2030. It takes cognisance of the past policies that included import substitution; structural adjustments programmes and export oriented strategy - our focus is to transform the manufacturing industry which will steer the country’s industrialisation efforts up to 2030. The Government through my Ministry is ready to spearhead industrialisation as a way of spurring economic growth and development not only to increase the range of tradable commodities but will also enable us earn more from our products. Moreover, industrialisation will enable us generate opportunities for our growing young population.

We have challenges to this agenda that include concerns over security and corruption, high cost of doing business, low levels of FDI and access to finance,

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Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

ushered in the Second Medium Term Plan of Vision 2030 and carries on the system of incorporating critical aspects of each governance pillar at each phase of implementation of the Vision.

Kenya’s Industrialisation Roadmap

Recently, the Government through my Ministry launched the Industrialisation Roadmap. The roadmap seeks to re-ignite the industrial renaissance of Kenya. It has laid out seen key priorities and plans to pursue a raft of ideas to drive rapid impact that will be influential in growing our GDP by US$4-6 billion per year for the next 17 years from US$42 billion to US$216 billion under the Vision 2030 ideals. The Industrialisation Roadmap, aiming to increase Kenya’s industrial economy coincides with the launch of the Second Medium Term Plan of Vision 2030 and is therefore, a key influence in our national economic transformation journey for the next five years.

Total GDP, USD Billion

To achieve Vision 2030 objectives of reaching middle-income status, we need to grow GDP by $4-6 billion per year for the next 17 years

• The roadmap aims at building a highly industrialised economy through, among other impactful sectors, a thriving manufacturing industry. Under the first Medium Term Plan (2008 – 2012) Kenya’s aspiration was to have a robust, diversified and competitive manufacturing sector increasing its contribution to GDP by at least 10 per cent per annum. The foundation for an industrial take-off was laid with the sector’s implementation of identified key flagship projects and other programmes. In addition, policy, legal and institutional reforms were undertaken to address emerging industrial issues and to revitalise the sector.

Mr Adan Mohamed, EBS, Cabinet Secretary, Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

The Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development was established by the Executive Order No. 2 of May, 2013 to formulate policies that promote industrial and enterprise development in Kenya. Our Vision To be a leader in catalysing a diversified, globally competitive and sustainable industrial sector in Kenya. Our Mission To facilitate an expanding, globally competitive and innovative industrial sector by creating an enabling environment. As Kenya marked its 50th Independence Anniversary, Best of Kenya spoke to Cabinet Secretary Mr Adan Mohamed, EBS, on our country’s path to industrialisation, specific efforts being made to overcome challenges

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that impede the process and our country’s envisaged roadmap. Herewith, excerpts: Q: Kenya and other African governments recently celebrated the Africa Industrialisation Day. Why is the industrialisation agenda key for Kenya and Africa? A: First the story of industrialisation in Africa is ripe right now because it’s the driver of Africa’s Renaissance. The concept of African Renaissance stipulates that African people and nations shall overcome the current challenges confronting the continent and achieve cultural, scientific, and economic renewal. In that regard, Africa has tried at various levels to reinvent itself with varying degrees of success. Presently, we are witnessing an “African economic renaissance”. Today, we are

challenging the image of an African continent stalked by ethnic conflict, corrupt dictatorships, religious strife, war and famine. We are challenging this through investors, economists, fund managers and academics. With an average growth rate of a solid 5 per cent over the past decade, Africa is playing catch-up with the Developed World but its growth is one of the world’s fastest-growing economies. In Kenya, our industrialisation strategy is constitutionally embedded through the 20year national economic growth blueprint, the Kenya Vision 2030 which establishes the aspiration to reach middle income status by 2030.

The Government is committed to a production-oriented industrial revolution that will create a strong manufacturing base. In particular, we intend to promote value addition to our raw materials, especially the agricultural-based produce. This in turn will address the country’s unemployment challenge. By 2030 an industrialised economy will contribute to a huge percentage in the informal, formal and unemployed categories. Q: What are the specific priorities the roadmap has focused on? A: We have mapped out the key priorities as follows: •

• Q: How will this happen? A: The national strategy, itself the basis for ministerial strategic plans, has just

Creating appropriate incentives to attract Foreign Direct Investments through: Special Economic Zones, Free Trade Zone, industrial parks and clusters and industrial mapping; Instituting enabling policies and changes to increase global competitiveness by addressing country competitiveness challenges and ease of doing business;

• •

Focusing on building attractive sectors where we have natural competitive advantage and we can leverage regional trends. These sectors include leather, textiles and clothing, agro-processing and furniture; Encouraging growth of and investment in SMEs; Collaborating with key Government ministries, departments and agencies to ensure that infrastructure plans are aligned to and support industrialisation such as energy, access to credit, skills and skill development, ease of doing business and transport; Restructuring failed industries, increasing capacity, attracting new investments; and Enhancing our delivery capability.

Q: Why must this happen? And what are the current risks that might impede the industrialisation agenda? A: It must happen because it is envisaged in the national economic blueprint, Vision 2030, whose economic pillar establishes the manufacturing sector as one of its six priority sectors expected to raise GDP growth rate to 10 per cent by 2012 and sustain the growth rate thereafter to 2030. It is also anticipated that the sector will support the country’s social development agenda through employment creation, foreign exchange generation, and attracting more Foreign Direct Investment (FDI).The national vision therefore requires the manufacturing sector to transform itself into a robust, efficient, modern and export-oriented entity with strong forward and backward linkages.

particularly for SMEs, high cost of labour as compared to other developing markets and high costs of inputs. However, no nation is a stranger to these. The key thing is to fix the challenges that choke our economic growth. We are confident of the appropriate programmes, projects and plans put in place to curb these impediments and deliver these enablers. Q: What role will the Industrialisation Roadmap play in the economy? A: Every individual African country has its own story, but more importantly possesses the ingredients to drive Africa as the world’s dominant economic engine for the 21st century. The Industrialisation Roadmap is specifically to help guide the specific national production and economic goals in line with the Vision 2030. It takes cognisance of the past policies that included import substitution; structural adjustments programmes and export oriented strategy - our focus is to transform the manufacturing industry which will steer the country’s industrialisation efforts up to 2030. The Government through my Ministry is ready to spearhead industrialisation as a way of spurring economic growth and development not only to increase the range of tradable commodities but will also enable us earn more from our products. Moreover, industrialisation will enable us generate opportunities for our growing young population.

We have challenges to this agenda that include concerns over security and corruption, high cost of doing business, low levels of FDI and access to finance,

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The Road Kenya Has Taken “Transforming Kenya into a globally competitive regional industrial hub”

Dr Wilson Songa, MBS, Principal Secretary, Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

country into a newly industrialising “middle income country providing a high quality life to all its citizens by the year 2030”. This Vision is being deepened through the Jubilee Manifesto, under the theme: “Manufacturing: Sparkling an Industrial Revolution”, that targets to have Kenya as the natural destination for investment to meet the growing demand for manufactured goods across the region.

H.E. President Uhuru Kenyatta is conducted around the Micro & Small Enterprises Authority (MSEA) stand during the 2013 Nairobi Agricultural Show. With him are Industrialization & Enterprise Development PS Dr. Wilson Songa (left) and MSEA Acting CEO Patrick Mwangi

Africa is a continent endowed with rich natural resources. The continent’s natural resource base provides a foundation for resource based industrialisation. The challenge facing Africa today is to transform the economy from a primary resourcedependent one to a more dynamic and diversified industrial economy. The continent’s global share of industrial output and manufactured exports is negligible compared to other regions in the world; and manufacturing value added to GDP ratio is slightly above 20 per cent in only a few countries on the continent. In addressing these challenges, the Heads of State of the African Union adopted the strategy for implementation of the Action Plan for Accelerated Industrial Development of Africa (AIDA) in 2008. The

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aim of this strategy is to foster sustainable economic growth, wealth creation and global integration using manufacturing as a dynamic force.

creation, improved incomes, and a higher standard of living for the region’s people. President Uhuru Kenyatta was elected to chair the EAC affairs for one year.

The implementation of this strategy is being coordinated by the Conference of African Ministers of Industry (CAMI) bureau that is currently being chaired by Kenya, through the Cabinet Secretary, Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development for the next two years.

The EAC is expected to become a Single Customs Territory in January 2014 with a total population of 140 million. Kenya is also in COMESA with a population of 400 million. The region has a high average growth rate of 3 per cent with incomes growing at a rate of 5 – 6 per cent per annum.

At the regional level, the East African Community (EAC) has developed the EAC Industrialisation Policy and Strategy (2012 -2032) whose objective is to enhance industrial production and productivity and to accelerate the structural transformation of the economies of the five EAC partner states in order to enable sustainable wealth

Negotiations are ongoing to create an EACCOMESA-SADC Tripartite Free Trade Area block by 2014. The tripartite brings together a population of over 600 million. These developments provide numerous market opportunities for manufactured products. The Kenya Vision 2030 aims to transform the

Similarly, the manifesto has placed emphasis on trade and foreign affairs aimed at establishing global trade priorities through regional and international trade agreements thereby further expanding market access for manufactured products. The devolved government structure is expected to urbanise the rural settings through development of the County Governments and this provides additional opportunities for access to locally manufactured products. The Sessional Paper No. 9 of 2012 on the National Industrialisation Policy Framework (2012 -2030) addressed this elaborate industrialisation agenda and is geared towards “Transforming Kenya into a globally competitive regional industrial hub”. The Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development is alive to the important responsibility bestowed upon it to drive the continent’s and region’s industrialisation agenda. It is for this reason that during the Africa Industrialisation day for this year, celebrated annually on November 20, that the Ministry launched the Industrialisation Roadmap. The road map, that guides the industrialisation process for

Small scale coffee farmers display their produce during the 2013 Ushirika Day celebrations at Uhuru Park, Nairobi

the short to medium term, targets to have an annual GDP growth rate of more than 10 per cent, create 5 million jobs by year 2017, and increase foreign direct investment in excess of US$1 billion in the same period. It is imperative to note that the foundations and other fundamentals to support industrial transformation are already falling in place. Kenya is already considered a regional transport hub for 54 destinations (through Kenya Airways) and a financial service hub with the highest number of banks with over 200 regional branches in the EAC member states. As the country that has fully embraced mobile banking, and the large critical mass of innovate ICT human resource, Kenya is now considered worldwide as an ICT innovation Centre. The cooperative movement is ranked first in Africa and seventh in the world. This provides a strong base for mobilising entrepreneurs and growing the Micro and Small Enterprises (MSE) sectors of the economy into vibrant, sustainable value adding units.

Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development. Similarly, to ensure the institutional arrangement is in place for industrial takeoff, the activities for private sector development have been placed under this Ministry. The private sector is the engine of growth whereas the role of the public sector is to provide the enabling environment. A regulatory and legislative framework has been put in place that supports public private partnerships. As we celebrate 50 years of Kenya’s independence, we take note that the contribution of the industrial sector to the GDP has remained stagnant at 15 per cent, but is on the verge of takeoff. I encourage all players in both the public and private sectors to seize this moment and together develop the industrial sector at the national, regional and continental levels.

Dr Wilson Songa, MBS Principal Secretary, Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

The MSE sector is the bedrock of industrialisation and it is important to note that its activities have now been consolidated under the Micro and Small Enterprises Authority, an agency under the

Best of Kenya

125


The Road Kenya Has Taken “Transforming Kenya into a globally competitive regional industrial hub”

Dr Wilson Songa, MBS, Principal Secretary, Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

country into a newly industrialising “middle income country providing a high quality life to all its citizens by the year 2030”. This Vision is being deepened through the Jubilee Manifesto, under the theme: “Manufacturing: Sparkling an Industrial Revolution”, that targets to have Kenya as the natural destination for investment to meet the growing demand for manufactured goods across the region.

H.E. President Uhuru Kenyatta is conducted around the Micro & Small Enterprises Authority (MSEA) stand during the 2013 Nairobi Agricultural Show. With him are Industrialization & Enterprise Development PS Dr. Wilson Songa (left) and MSEA Acting CEO Patrick Mwangi

Africa is a continent endowed with rich natural resources. The continent’s natural resource base provides a foundation for resource based industrialisation. The challenge facing Africa today is to transform the economy from a primary resourcedependent one to a more dynamic and diversified industrial economy. The continent’s global share of industrial output and manufactured exports is negligible compared to other regions in the world; and manufacturing value added to GDP ratio is slightly above 20 per cent in only a few countries on the continent. In addressing these challenges, the Heads of State of the African Union adopted the strategy for implementation of the Action Plan for Accelerated Industrial Development of Africa (AIDA) in 2008. The

Best of Kenya

124

aim of this strategy is to foster sustainable economic growth, wealth creation and global integration using manufacturing as a dynamic force.

creation, improved incomes, and a higher standard of living for the region’s people. President Uhuru Kenyatta was elected to chair the EAC affairs for one year.

The implementation of this strategy is being coordinated by the Conference of African Ministers of Industry (CAMI) bureau that is currently being chaired by Kenya, through the Cabinet Secretary, Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development for the next two years.

The EAC is expected to become a Single Customs Territory in January 2014 with a total population of 140 million. Kenya is also in COMESA with a population of 400 million. The region has a high average growth rate of 3 per cent with incomes growing at a rate of 5 – 6 per cent per annum.

At the regional level, the East African Community (EAC) has developed the EAC Industrialisation Policy and Strategy (2012 -2032) whose objective is to enhance industrial production and productivity and to accelerate the structural transformation of the economies of the five EAC partner states in order to enable sustainable wealth

Negotiations are ongoing to create an EACCOMESA-SADC Tripartite Free Trade Area block by 2014. The tripartite brings together a population of over 600 million. These developments provide numerous market opportunities for manufactured products. The Kenya Vision 2030 aims to transform the

Similarly, the manifesto has placed emphasis on trade and foreign affairs aimed at establishing global trade priorities through regional and international trade agreements thereby further expanding market access for manufactured products. The devolved government structure is expected to urbanise the rural settings through development of the County Governments and this provides additional opportunities for access to locally manufactured products. The Sessional Paper No. 9 of 2012 on the National Industrialisation Policy Framework (2012 -2030) addressed this elaborate industrialisation agenda and is geared towards “Transforming Kenya into a globally competitive regional industrial hub”. The Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development is alive to the important responsibility bestowed upon it to drive the continent’s and region’s industrialisation agenda. It is for this reason that during the Africa Industrialisation day for this year, celebrated annually on November 20, that the Ministry launched the Industrialisation Roadmap. The road map, that guides the industrialisation process for

Small scale coffee farmers display their produce during the 2013 Ushirika Day celebrations at Uhuru Park, Nairobi

the short to medium term, targets to have an annual GDP growth rate of more than 10 per cent, create 5 million jobs by year 2017, and increase foreign direct investment in excess of US$1 billion in the same period. It is imperative to note that the foundations and other fundamentals to support industrial transformation are already falling in place. Kenya is already considered a regional transport hub for 54 destinations (through Kenya Airways) and a financial service hub with the highest number of banks with over 200 regional branches in the EAC member states. As the country that has fully embraced mobile banking, and the large critical mass of innovate ICT human resource, Kenya is now considered worldwide as an ICT innovation Centre. The cooperative movement is ranked first in Africa and seventh in the world. This provides a strong base for mobilising entrepreneurs and growing the Micro and Small Enterprises (MSE) sectors of the economy into vibrant, sustainable value adding units.

Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development. Similarly, to ensure the institutional arrangement is in place for industrial takeoff, the activities for private sector development have been placed under this Ministry. The private sector is the engine of growth whereas the role of the public sector is to provide the enabling environment. A regulatory and legislative framework has been put in place that supports public private partnerships. As we celebrate 50 years of Kenya’s independence, we take note that the contribution of the industrial sector to the GDP has remained stagnant at 15 per cent, but is on the verge of takeoff. I encourage all players in both the public and private sectors to seize this moment and together develop the industrial sector at the national, regional and continental levels.

Dr Wilson Songa, MBS Principal Secretary, Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development

The MSE sector is the bedrock of industrialisation and it is important to note that its activities have now been consolidated under the Micro and Small Enterprises Authority, an agency under the

Best of Kenya

125


Kenya Accreditation Service Providing accreditation services that promote fair trade, health, safety and protection of the environment

Accreditation Body (NAB) mandated by the government of Kenya to provide accreditation services to conformity assessment bodies in the fields of inspection, testing, calibration and certification in both the public and private sectors of our economy.

Vision To be a global leader in the provision of accreditation services.

Mission Provision of accreditation services that promote fair trade, health and safety as well as protection of the environment. KENAS operations are overseen by the International Accreditation Forum (IAF), International Laboratory Accreditation Corporation (ILAC), the industry, government and professional bodies, some of whose representatives make up the KENAS Board, the Accreditation Committee and other Technical Committees. KENAS is a member of IAF and an associate member of ILAC. IAF and ILAC are international umbrella organizations that oversee accreditation activities at a global level.

Mr Sammy Milgo, Managing Director KENAS (left) receives the membership certificate from Mr Ron Josias, Chairperson AFRAC in September 2013

A Historical Account of KENAS The term accreditation has been used in relation to institutions offering some form of training that are approved or certified by a recognized organization that meet all formal requirements of academic excellence, curriculum, facilities etc. However, the term accreditation, as used by Kenya Accreditation Service (KENAS), is defined in KS ISO/IEC 17000:2004 (conformity assessment fundamentals and vocabulary) as a third party attestation related to a conformity assessment body conveying formal demonstration of its competence to carry out specific conformity assessment tasks. A Conformity Assessment Body (CAB) is a testing laboratory, a calibration laboratory, a certification body or an inspection body that provides inspection, testing and calibration, and certification services in all sectors. Matters pertaining to accreditation of Conformity Assessment Bodies in Kenya began

in the year 1984 when the National Calibration Service was set up under the aegis of the National Standards Body, KEBS. Accreditation was then specific to calibration services. In 1995, the Quality Systems Assessment Committee (QSAC) was established through a Legal Notice No. 90 of 1995. This Legal Notice which was established under the Standards Act Cap 496 Laws of Kenya mandated QSAC to register assessors and auditors as well as provide accreditation services. A peer evaluation of QSAC was conducted by the International Accreditation Forum (IAF) in the year 1990 under the support of UNIDO (The United Nations Industrial Development Organization) through an expert from North America. The peer evaluation report indicated that there was a conflict of interest in the activities of QSAC on the basis of its establishment under the same legal instrument setting up the National Standards Body (KEBS) which carried out conformity assessment activities.

Additionally, QSAC was registering assessors and auditors used by certification bodies hence another area of conflict. Further, KEBS and QSAC were located in the same premises which also constituted to a conflict of interest in terms of demonstration of independence. This is contrary to the requirements of the standard ISO/IEC 17011: Conformity Assessment Requirements for Accreditation Bodies accrediting conformity assessment bodies which accreditation bodies are obliged to conform with. The foregoing issues were ironed out through the establishment of KENAS under the State Corporations Act Cap 446; Laws of Kenya vide Legal Notice No. 55 of May 2009. In 2011, the first Board of KENAS was appointed which embarked on overseeing the establishment of requisite operational structures for KENAS. Kenya Accreditation Service (KENAS) Established in 2009 vide a Legal Notice No. 55 under the State Corporations Act, Cap 446, KENAS is the sole National

KENAS is also a key member and player of the African Accreditation Corporation (AFRAC), the regional accreditation cooperation body in Africa. KENAS is the only established Accreditation Body in the East Africa Community (EAC) at the moment and is Instrumental in shaping the direction of accreditation programs in the EAC through its active participation the East Africa Accreditation Board (EAAB).

Accreditation by KENAS In 2008, the first accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025 was granted to various calibration laboratories/ centers under the previously established national calibration scheme. These calibration centers were: Sonic Quality Inspectors Limited, Elisters 2000 Limited, ESTEC Limited & Quality Assurance Systems Limited (QAS). In 2008, KENAS accredited the first Proficiency Testing provider in Kenya known as Human Quality Assurance Systems (HUQAS) to ISO Guide 43, a standard which is now known as ISO/IEC 17043 - Conformity Assessment—General requirements for proficiency testing.

of various types of bodies performing inspection to an Inspection Body (Avante Garde Engineers & Consultants of India). In 2012, the first certification body was accredited to ISO/IEC 17021 Conformity Assessment-Requirements for bodies providing audit and certification of management systems to Société Générale de Surveillance (SGS). The numbers for accredited firms have grown exponentially since 2008 with 33 CABs having been evaluated for competence by KENAS. KENAS continues to play the significant role of accrediting testing laboratories, calibration laboratories, inspection bodies and certification bodies which are responsible for assuring quality and safety parameters in products and services before they are used by consumers. This has been a key driver in trade facilitation.

Our Key Achievements • KENAS is a member of the International Accreditation Forum effective July 2013. • KENAS is an associate member to ILAC (International Laboratory Accreditation Corporation). A pre-peer evaluation by African Accreditation Cooperation (AFRAC) & ILAC was conducted in August 2013 in readiness for a peer evaluation for purpose of attainment of full membership to ILAC. • KENAS is a full member of the Africa Accreditation Cooperation (AFRAC). • KENAS is the only Accredited Body (AB) in the East Africa Community and

Tel: +254 725 227 640 / 787 395 679 E-mail: info@kenyaaccreditation.org www.kenas.go.ke

NOTICE PUBLICATION OF CONFORMITY ASSESSMENT BODIES ACCREDITED BETWEEN JUNE AND DECEMBER 2013 Competence in Conformity Assessment

Kenya Accreditation Service (KENAS) is the sole National Accreditation Body (NAB) recognized and mandated by the Government of Kenya to offer accreditation services to Conformity Assessment Bodies (CABs) and create awareness which includes publication of the CABs that it accredits. THE FOLLOWING CONFORMITY ASSESSMENT BODIES HAVE BEEN ACCREDITED BETWEEN JUNE 2013 AND DECEMBER 2013 Analabs Ltd

 

Kenya Agricultural Institute (KARI) (NARL) 

Kenya Airways 

Unga Ltd

Nyumbani Diagnostics Laboratory

 

The year 2011 saw two firsts for KENAS with the first medical laboratory getting accredited to ISO 15189 (Ampath Reference Laboratory) and ISO/IEC 17020 Conformity assessment - Requirements for the operation

a member of East Africa Accreditation Board (EAAB). The first performance contract was signed with the Ministry of Industrialization for the year 2011 - 2012. Thereafter, a new office space for KENAS was acquired at Upper Hill, Nairobi. The Managing Director/CEO and other technical and operational staff were recruited between June and August 2012. This has been critical in enabling the implementation of its Strategic Plan that includes PTB, SIDA, etc. Capacity Building of staff has been a foundational approach for KENAS through local and external training by the Government of Kenya in collaboration with support partners. KENAS has developed a draft Accreditation Bill aimed at improving service delivery in line with its mandate. This has gone through stakeholders consultation forums. KENAS successfully hosted the 4th Annual AFRAC General Assembly Meetings in September 2013. KENAS has been actively participative and supportive of the World Accreditation Day annual celebrations held on June 9th, every year. Following the establishment of KENAS, a strategic plan was set up that included the mission and vision of KENAS. To date, KENAS has accredited a total of 33 Conformity Assessment Bodies (CABs).

Nakuru Water & Sanitation Company Ltd 

Ideal Quality Trail Systems Ltd

Kibos Sugar & Allied Industries  

Mea Ltd

Traceable Measurement Ltd

National HIV Reference Laboratory 

The Nairobi Hospital Laboratory

For a detailed summary of the scopes of accreditation, visit our website www.kenas.go.ke/services/accredited CABs

Best of Kenya

126

Kenya�Accreditation�Service�(KENAS)�|�Embankment�Plaza,�2nd�Floor,�Longonot�Road,�Upperhill,�Naiorbi�|�P.�O.�Box�47400-00100�Nbi�|������������������������������������� info@kenyaaccreditation.org�|�www.kenas.go.ke�|�(+254)�254�725�227640�/�787�395679�


Kenya Accreditation Service Providing accreditation services that promote fair trade, health, safety and protection of the environment

Accreditation Body (NAB) mandated by the government of Kenya to provide accreditation services to conformity assessment bodies in the fields of inspection, testing, calibration and certification in both the public and private sectors of our economy.

Vision To be a global leader in the provision of accreditation services.

Mission Provision of accreditation services that promote fair trade, health and safety as well as protection of the environment. KENAS operations are overseen by the International Accreditation Forum (IAF), International Laboratory Accreditation Corporation (ILAC), the industry, government and professional bodies, some of whose representatives make up the KENAS Board, the Accreditation Committee and other Technical Committees. KENAS is a member of IAF and an associate member of ILAC. IAF and ILAC are international umbrella organizations that oversee accreditation activities at a global level.

Mr Sammy Milgo, Managing Director KENAS (left) receives the membership certificate from Mr Ron Josias, Chairperson AFRAC in September 2013

A Historical Account of KENAS The term accreditation has been used in relation to institutions offering some form of training that are approved or certified by a recognized organization that meet all formal requirements of academic excellence, curriculum, facilities etc. However, the term accreditation, as used by Kenya Accreditation Service (KENAS), is defined in KS ISO/IEC 17000:2004 (conformity assessment fundamentals and vocabulary) as a third party attestation related to a conformity assessment body conveying formal demonstration of its competence to carry out specific conformity assessment tasks. A Conformity Assessment Body (CAB) is a testing laboratory, a calibration laboratory, a certification body or an inspection body that provides inspection, testing and calibration, and certification services in all sectors. Matters pertaining to accreditation of Conformity Assessment Bodies in Kenya began

in the year 1984 when the National Calibration Service was set up under the aegis of the National Standards Body, KEBS. Accreditation was then specific to calibration services. In 1995, the Quality Systems Assessment Committee (QSAC) was established through a Legal Notice No. 90 of 1995. This Legal Notice which was established under the Standards Act Cap 496 Laws of Kenya mandated QSAC to register assessors and auditors as well as provide accreditation services. A peer evaluation of QSAC was conducted by the International Accreditation Forum (IAF) in the year 1990 under the support of UNIDO (The United Nations Industrial Development Organization) through an expert from North America. The peer evaluation report indicated that there was a conflict of interest in the activities of QSAC on the basis of its establishment under the same legal instrument setting up the National Standards Body (KEBS) which carried out conformity assessment activities.

Additionally, QSAC was registering assessors and auditors used by certification bodies hence another area of conflict. Further, KEBS and QSAC were located in the same premises which also constituted to a conflict of interest in terms of demonstration of independence. This is contrary to the requirements of the standard ISO/IEC 17011: Conformity Assessment Requirements for Accreditation Bodies accrediting conformity assessment bodies which accreditation bodies are obliged to conform with. The foregoing issues were ironed out through the establishment of KENAS under the State Corporations Act Cap 446; Laws of Kenya vide Legal Notice No. 55 of May 2009. In 2011, the first Board of KENAS was appointed which embarked on overseeing the establishment of requisite operational structures for KENAS. Kenya Accreditation Service (KENAS) Established in 2009 vide a Legal Notice No. 55 under the State Corporations Act, Cap 446, KENAS is the sole National

KENAS is also a key member and player of the African Accreditation Corporation (AFRAC), the regional accreditation cooperation body in Africa. KENAS is the only established Accreditation Body in the East Africa Community (EAC) at the moment and is Instrumental in shaping the direction of accreditation programs in the EAC through its active participation the East Africa Accreditation Board (EAAB).

Accreditation by KENAS In 2008, the first accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025 was granted to various calibration laboratories/ centers under the previously established national calibration scheme. These calibration centers were: Sonic Quality Inspectors Limited, Elisters 2000 Limited, ESTEC Limited & Quality Assurance Systems Limited (QAS). In 2008, KENAS accredited the first Proficiency Testing provider in Kenya known as Human Quality Assurance Systems (HUQAS) to ISO Guide 43, a standard which is now known as ISO/IEC 17043 - Conformity Assessment—General requirements for proficiency testing.

of various types of bodies performing inspection to an Inspection Body (Avante Garde Engineers & Consultants of India). In 2012, the first certification body was accredited to ISO/IEC 17021 Conformity Assessment-Requirements for bodies providing audit and certification of management systems to Société Générale de Surveillance (SGS). The numbers for accredited firms have grown exponentially since 2008 with 33 CABs having been evaluated for competence by KENAS. KENAS continues to play the significant role of accrediting testing laboratories, calibration laboratories, inspection bodies and certification bodies which are responsible for assuring quality and safety parameters in products and services before they are used by consumers. This has been a key driver in trade facilitation.

Our Key Achievements • KENAS is a member of the International Accreditation Forum effective July 2013. • KENAS is an associate member to ILAC (International Laboratory Accreditation Corporation). A pre-peer evaluation by African Accreditation Cooperation (AFRAC) & ILAC was conducted in August 2013 in readiness for a peer evaluation for purpose of attainment of full membership to ILAC. • KENAS is a full member of the Africa Accreditation Cooperation (AFRAC). • KENAS is the only Accredited Body (AB) in the East Africa Community and

Tel: +254 725 227 640 / 787 395 679 E-mail: info@kenyaaccreditation.org www.kenas.go.ke

NOTICE PUBLICATION OF CONFORMITY ASSESSMENT BODIES ACCREDITED BETWEEN JUNE AND DECEMBER 2013 Competence in Conformity Assessment

Kenya Accreditation Service (KENAS) is the sole National Accreditation Body (NAB) recognized and mandated by the Government of Kenya to offer accreditation services to Conformity Assessment Bodies (CABs) and create awareness which includes publication of the CABs that it accredits. THE FOLLOWING CONFORMITY ASSESSMENT BODIES HAVE BEEN ACCREDITED BETWEEN JUNE 2013 AND DECEMBER 2013 Analabs Ltd

 

Kenya Agricultural Institute (KARI) (NARL) 

Kenya Airways 

Unga Ltd

Nyumbani Diagnostics Laboratory

 

The year 2011 saw two firsts for KENAS with the first medical laboratory getting accredited to ISO 15189 (Ampath Reference Laboratory) and ISO/IEC 17020 Conformity assessment - Requirements for the operation

a member of East Africa Accreditation Board (EAAB). The first performance contract was signed with the Ministry of Industrialization for the year 2011 - 2012. Thereafter, a new office space for KENAS was acquired at Upper Hill, Nairobi. The Managing Director/CEO and other technical and operational staff were recruited between June and August 2012. This has been critical in enabling the implementation of its Strategic Plan that includes PTB, SIDA, etc. Capacity Building of staff has been a foundational approach for KENAS through local and external training by the Government of Kenya in collaboration with support partners. KENAS has developed a draft Accreditation Bill aimed at improving service delivery in line with its mandate. This has gone through stakeholders consultation forums. KENAS successfully hosted the 4th Annual AFRAC General Assembly Meetings in September 2013. KENAS has been actively participative and supportive of the World Accreditation Day annual celebrations held on June 9th, every year. Following the establishment of KENAS, a strategic plan was set up that included the mission and vision of KENAS. To date, KENAS has accredited a total of 33 Conformity Assessment Bodies (CABs).

Nakuru Water & Sanitation Company Ltd 

Ideal Quality Trail Systems Ltd

Kibos Sugar & Allied Industries  

Mea Ltd

Traceable Measurement Ltd

National HIV Reference Laboratory 

The Nairobi Hospital Laboratory

For a detailed summary of the scopes of accreditation, visit our website www.kenas.go.ke/services/accredited CABs

Best of Kenya

126

Kenya�Accreditation�Service�(KENAS)�|�Embankment�Plaza,�2nd�Floor,�Longonot�Road,�Upperhill,�Naiorbi�|�P.�O.�Box�47400-00100�Nbi�|������������������������������������� info@kenyaaccreditation.org�|�www.kenas.go.ke�|�(+254)�254�725�227640�/�787�395679�


Industrial & Commercial Development Corporation (ICDC) More than 50 years of Turning Ideas into Wealth for Kenya and Kenyans! adequately catered to by the mainstream financial services providers. Alignment of its business with Vision 2030 has ensured that operations are geared towards catalysing economic growth and creation of sustainable wealth for Kenyans. The corporation has diversified its products and services portfolio in various debt and equity product offerings with its main sectors of focus being manufacturing and agroprocessing, financial Services and education. However, to ensure an appropriate diversification of its investment portfolio and to grow alternative revenue streams for long term sustainability, ICDC also seeks, to invest in healthcare, wholesale & retail trade, real estate, energy, entertainment, tourism, transport and ICT.

ICDC Executive Director, Mr Peter Kimurwa (left), presents a cheque to Dr Jonathan Ciano, Chief Executive Officer Uchumi Supermarkets Limited for expansion and refurbishment of the retailer’s existing branches

When you talk of institutions that were at the foundation of this great nation, the ICDC springs to mind. The corporation has been a critical contributor to the consistent creation and growth of Kenya’s corporate landscape over the last 50 years! A few examples of Kenya’s iconic companies founded by ICDC are General Motors (EA) Ltd, Centum Investment Company Ltd (previously known as ICDC Investment), Uchumi Supermarkets Ltd, Yana Tyres Ltd (previously known as Firestone) AON Insurance Brokers Ltd (previously known as Minet ICDC Insurance Brokers), the Coca Cola franchise companies – Nairobi Bottlers, Mount Kenya Bottlers, Rift Valley Bottlers and Kisii Bottlers, Kenya Wine Agencies Ltd,

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Eveready East Africa Ltd and Unilever Kenya (previously known as East African Industries). A number of these companies have been listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange through Initial Public Offerings (IPO) allowing ICDC as a majority shareholder to cede substantial shareholding to the public. Having been in operation for such a long time, ICDC looks back with pride on a rich track record of being a pacesetter in the country’s economic development. The corporation has been responsible for the prosperity of the people through its unique mandate of creating and nurturing enterprises in various sectors of the economy, thereby creating jobs and wealth

for Kenyans. Indeed, as Kenya celebrates her Golden Jubilee, ICDC is proud to have been a great contributor to the nation’s development journey thus far. Looking forward to the next 50 years, ICDC is ready and fully committed to growing the next lot of blue-chip companies in acknowledgement that there is an opportunity to do much more in promoting Kenya’s social and economic development. ICDC has developed and rolled out a new business model focussed on several carefully chosen sectors of the economy as well as customer segments that are not

The customer segments that ICDC has chosen to serve are those with the highest attractiveness and developmental value, in line with its mandate. The focus is on high growth innovative SMEs, which have been in business for 2-5 years, medium-sized as well as large corporate companies, distressed enterprises in need of a turnaround, international investors wishing to invest in Kenya and entrepreneurs with sound technical expertise and some financial and professional background in the fields in which they wish to venture.

Kisii Bottlers Limited, a soft drinks manufacturing and bottling plant under the Coca Cola franchise, an ICDC joint venture

ICDC has carried out a comprehensive organisational redesign and positioned itself as ‘The investment partner of choice offering creative and flexible financial solutions’. The Corporation is committed to fulfilling its mission which is ‘To be the catalyst for wealth creation’.

It recently established a state-of-the-art customer service centre that has enhanced the quality of interaction with its clientele. Entrepreneurs seeking to expand into new business lines or restructure their operations have approached the ICDC to consider taking up equity stakes in form of joint ventures and strategic partnerships. Businesses that require finance for working capital, trade, and business expansion or assets acquisition are eligible for a wide variety of debt products, which are tailored suitably for each market segment. Technical advisory services are offered

on a consultancy basis to ICDC clients in business plan and feasibility study development, corporate secretarial and internal audit services. The ICDC’s current investments include: •

A credit facility extended to an established commercial bank for onward lending to small businesses in various sectors; A credit line provided to a microfinance institution that supports Kenyans to access health insurance and provides health workers with personal and development loans; A credit facility to a company in the green and renewable energy sector that is turning waste into wealth through production of briquettes from sugarcane bagasse. The briquettes are provided to various manufacturing concerns to help them reduce the use of fossil fuels and realise energy savings towards becoming eligible for carbon credits; An equity stake in a fruit puree processing plant at the coast that seeks to empower smallholder farmers by providing a market for their produce, thus reducing wastage during periods of glut; A credit facility to private developers in partnership with two other financial service providers for the development

of townhouses in Kiambu in a bid to reduce the housing deficit in the country; ICDC’s own development of residential apartments for sale in Mombasa County.

Furthermore, the corporation, in partnership with Kthe Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development, is championing the creation of the first SME Industrial Park in Eldoret County, which will be a Vision 2030 flagship project. The industrial park will host a myriad of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) in the manufacturing and agro-processing sectors. As the nation celebrates its Golden Jubilee, ICDC marks 60 years of ‘Turning Ideas into Wealth’. As the country gears up for the socio-economic revolution that will see Kenya attain middle income status in the next seventeen years, ICDC has what it takes to play its part to make Kenya’s dream a reality through productive and mutually beneficial partnerships with entrepreneurs. Tel: +254-20-2771000 Email: info@icdc.co.ke www.icdc.co.ke

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Industrial & Commercial Development Corporation (ICDC) More than 50 years of Turning Ideas into Wealth for Kenya and Kenyans! adequately catered to by the mainstream financial services providers. Alignment of its business with Vision 2030 has ensured that operations are geared towards catalysing economic growth and creation of sustainable wealth for Kenyans. The corporation has diversified its products and services portfolio in various debt and equity product offerings with its main sectors of focus being manufacturing and agroprocessing, financial Services and education. However, to ensure an appropriate diversification of its investment portfolio and to grow alternative revenue streams for long term sustainability, ICDC also seeks, to invest in healthcare, wholesale & retail trade, real estate, energy, entertainment, tourism, transport and ICT.

ICDC Executive Director, Mr Peter Kimurwa (left), presents a cheque to Dr Jonathan Ciano, Chief Executive Officer Uchumi Supermarkets Limited for expansion and refurbishment of the retailer’s existing branches

When you talk of institutions that were at the foundation of this great nation, the ICDC springs to mind. The corporation has been a critical contributor to the consistent creation and growth of Kenya’s corporate landscape over the last 50 years! A few examples of Kenya’s iconic companies founded by ICDC are General Motors (EA) Ltd, Centum Investment Company Ltd (previously known as ICDC Investment), Uchumi Supermarkets Ltd, Yana Tyres Ltd (previously known as Firestone) AON Insurance Brokers Ltd (previously known as Minet ICDC Insurance Brokers), the Coca Cola franchise companies – Nairobi Bottlers, Mount Kenya Bottlers, Rift Valley Bottlers and Kisii Bottlers, Kenya Wine Agencies Ltd,

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Eveready East Africa Ltd and Unilever Kenya (previously known as East African Industries). A number of these companies have been listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange through Initial Public Offerings (IPO) allowing ICDC as a majority shareholder to cede substantial shareholding to the public. Having been in operation for such a long time, ICDC looks back with pride on a rich track record of being a pacesetter in the country’s economic development. The corporation has been responsible for the prosperity of the people through its unique mandate of creating and nurturing enterprises in various sectors of the economy, thereby creating jobs and wealth

for Kenyans. Indeed, as Kenya celebrates her Golden Jubilee, ICDC is proud to have been a great contributor to the nation’s development journey thus far. Looking forward to the next 50 years, ICDC is ready and fully committed to growing the next lot of blue-chip companies in acknowledgement that there is an opportunity to do much more in promoting Kenya’s social and economic development. ICDC has developed and rolled out a new business model focussed on several carefully chosen sectors of the economy as well as customer segments that are not

The customer segments that ICDC has chosen to serve are those with the highest attractiveness and developmental value, in line with its mandate. The focus is on high growth innovative SMEs, which have been in business for 2-5 years, medium-sized as well as large corporate companies, distressed enterprises in need of a turnaround, international investors wishing to invest in Kenya and entrepreneurs with sound technical expertise and some financial and professional background in the fields in which they wish to venture.

Kisii Bottlers Limited, a soft drinks manufacturing and bottling plant under the Coca Cola franchise, an ICDC joint venture

ICDC has carried out a comprehensive organisational redesign and positioned itself as ‘The investment partner of choice offering creative and flexible financial solutions’. The Corporation is committed to fulfilling its mission which is ‘To be the catalyst for wealth creation’.

It recently established a state-of-the-art customer service centre that has enhanced the quality of interaction with its clientele. Entrepreneurs seeking to expand into new business lines or restructure their operations have approached the ICDC to consider taking up equity stakes in form of joint ventures and strategic partnerships. Businesses that require finance for working capital, trade, and business expansion or assets acquisition are eligible for a wide variety of debt products, which are tailored suitably for each market segment. Technical advisory services are offered

on a consultancy basis to ICDC clients in business plan and feasibility study development, corporate secretarial and internal audit services. The ICDC’s current investments include: •

A credit facility extended to an established commercial bank for onward lending to small businesses in various sectors; A credit line provided to a microfinance institution that supports Kenyans to access health insurance and provides health workers with personal and development loans; A credit facility to a company in the green and renewable energy sector that is turning waste into wealth through production of briquettes from sugarcane bagasse. The briquettes are provided to various manufacturing concerns to help them reduce the use of fossil fuels and realise energy savings towards becoming eligible for carbon credits; An equity stake in a fruit puree processing plant at the coast that seeks to empower smallholder farmers by providing a market for their produce, thus reducing wastage during periods of glut; A credit facility to private developers in partnership with two other financial service providers for the development

of townhouses in Kiambu in a bid to reduce the housing deficit in the country; ICDC’s own development of residential apartments for sale in Mombasa County.

Furthermore, the corporation, in partnership with Kthe Ministry of Industrialisation and Enterprise Development, is championing the creation of the first SME Industrial Park in Eldoret County, which will be a Vision 2030 flagship project. The industrial park will host a myriad of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) in the manufacturing and agro-processing sectors. As the nation celebrates its Golden Jubilee, ICDC marks 60 years of ‘Turning Ideas into Wealth’. As the country gears up for the socio-economic revolution that will see Kenya attain middle income status in the next seventeen years, ICDC has what it takes to play its part to make Kenya’s dream a reality through productive and mutually beneficial partnerships with entrepreneurs. Tel: +254-20-2771000 Email: info@icdc.co.ke www.icdc.co.ke

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production capacity to 120,000 tonnes per annum.

East African Portland Cement Company

In the last few years, EAPCC has greatly expanded its production capacity. With the introduction of Mill No. 5 and the embrace of coal energy, the Company can presently produce over 1.3 million tonnes of cement per annum at reduced cost. Furthermore, the Company’s recently implemented ERP system was recognised as the best for 2011. The Company now has fully automated business processes which means complex paperwork is now largely a thing of the past. The Company progressively continues to cut down on paper use.

Building Kenya from the Ground up

Historical Milestones 1933 - EAPCC registered. The first cement manufacturer in East and Central Africa. Capacity of 60,000 tonnes per year with one mill. 1934 - Cement deliveries begin. 1956 - Athi River Factory construction begins. 1957 - Athi River Factory complete. Two mills added to bring total mills to four. Capacity doubles to 120,000 tonnes a year. 1974 - A new rotary wet kiln commissioned. Capacity rises to 300,000 tonnes a year. 1979 - Fourth mill added. Mill number three is upgraded. Capacity rises to 340,000 tonnes a year.

Factory: Main EAPCC plant at Athi River

In its 80 years of operations East African Portland Cement Company (EAPCC) has played an important role in Kenya’s economic history. Some of the oldest and most iconic buildings in the country, structures which are synonymous with this nation’s national and international identity, for example the Kenyatta International Convention Centre (KICC), Kipande House and the Co-operative Bank Headquarters, were constructed using Blue Triangle Cement. These structures stand not only as living monuments to our resilience and progress as a country but also to the durability and strength of Blue Triangle Cement.   In 1933, when the Company started operations it had a capacity of 60,000 tonnes. This has grown steadily to an installed capacity today of 1.3 million tonnes. EAPCC’s human resource pool is one of the most diverse and qualified in the industry. This is a national Company with regional interests.

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The Company’s business processes and systems are ISO 9001: 2008-certified, a mark of commitment to sustaining customer value. The Company’s safety procedures are continuously audited and certified (OHSAS Certified) by the Kenya Bureau of Standards, Kenya’s premier standards agency, which enables the Company to maintain high safety standards and constantly innovate to improve them. EAPCC is the only company in the cement industry operating under two safety regimes: The Occupational Health and Safety Act (2007) under the Government of Kenya and the OHSAS standard managed by the British Safety Council, underscoring EAPCC’s high level of commitment to safety at the workplace. Regular drills are conducted to keep staff sensitized on safety. Our ERP system was recognized by the Computer Society of Kenya (CSK) as the best of class in 2011. With such attributes embodied in EAPCC, the quality of Blue Triangle Cement is assured. For instance, walls plastered with Blue Triangle tend to require less paint,

particularly undercoats, because of the brightness of our Blue Triangle Cement. This saves the customer money. History The East African Portland Cement Company started as a trading company importing cement mainly from England for early construction work in East Africa. It was formed by Blue Circle Industries United Kingdom. The name Portland is derived from the resemblance in colour of set cement to the Portland stone that was mined on the Isle of Portland in Dorset, England. It was not until February 1933 that the Company was incorporated in Kenya with the first factory in Nairobi’s Industrial Area. The Company had one cement mill (Mill No. 2) and used to import clinker from India. The production capacity was about 60,000 tonnes of cement. In December 1956, construction of the Athi River facility started. The factory was commissioned in 1958 and consisted of a Rotary Kiln (Wet), a big cement mill (Cement Mill 1 & 3). This significantly increased

1996 - Brand new kiln commissioned. New Mill added. Capacity doubles to 600,000 tonnes a year. 1997 - Manufacturing process from wet process to dry process. 2007 - Company conducts groundbreaking for new mill. 2009 - New mill commissioned. Capacity doubles to 1.3 million tonnes. EAPCC acquires ISO 9001: 2008 certification. 2010 - EAPCC implements ERP system which automates all business processes. 2011 - EAPCC receives recognition from Computer Society of Kenya for Best ERP system implementation. EAPCC embarks on new 5 year strategic plan (2011-2016) targeted at raising production capacity and profitability. 2012 - Kenya Bureau of Standards renews EAPCC’s ISO re-certification after bi-annual surveillance audit of business processes and

Dam: Chemususu Dam at Eldama Ravine, Baringo County. A flagship Vision 2030 project built with Blue Triangle Cement

procedures over a period of three- years. Strategy In the months and years to come, EAPCC is expanding cement manufacturing capacity though a Kiln up-rate project and investment in new equipment including a new packing line. The Company is working closely with the Vision 2030 National Secretariat and as a result Blue Triangle Cement is the preferred cement brand for flagship Vision 2030 projects such as Chemususu Dam in Eldama Ravine, the Geothermal Power Plant in Menengai Crater and the Thika Superhighway. We intend to deepen our involvement with real estate by diversifying our product offerings to provide specific solutions for home owners. This includes paving blocks, culverts and concrete pipes for drainage. EAPCC will also invest in concrete mixer trucks for contractors involved in large scale construction projects, such as housing developments, that call for high volumes and who prefer ready mixed concrete to save time and money.   We are committed to better and brighter lives for the communities we operate in, and the nation at large, by sponsoring a wide range of development projects through our Corporate Social Responsibility investments. EAPCC consistently supports brilliant but disadvantaged children as well as building classes, dormitories and boreholes to support learning primarily in hardship areas where the Company sources its raw material. From support staff to management, employees receive continuous training to keep their skills updated. They are also encouraged to pursue higher studies.

Nairobi Skyline: Nairobi's skyline at night. Many iconic buildings in Nairobi were built using Blue Triangle cement. This includes the magnificent KICC and Co-Operative Bank Headquarters seen in the photo

Although we have some of the most diverse and qualified resource pool in the nation, we encourage continued staff development. Growth, expansion and sustained profitability are the guiding principles of our business model. Our permanent base in Uganda gives us a foothold in the region from where we continue to expand our regional operations even as we grow our market share in Kenya. We engage in continuous product improvement as well, pegged on changing market trends, technological advancement and the dynamics of customer needs and wants. Our commitment is to sustain customer satisfaction. +254 722- 203 076 +254 722- 203 078/80 +254733- 333212/14 Email: customercare@eapcc.co.ke www.eastafricanportland.com

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production capacity to 120,000 tonnes per annum.

East African Portland Cement Company

In the last few years, EAPCC has greatly expanded its production capacity. With the introduction of Mill No. 5 and the embrace of coal energy, the Company can presently produce over 1.3 million tonnes of cement per annum at reduced cost. Furthermore, the Company’s recently implemented ERP system was recognised as the best for 2011. The Company now has fully automated business processes which means complex paperwork is now largely a thing of the past. The Company progressively continues to cut down on paper use.

Building Kenya from the Ground up

Historical Milestones 1933 - EAPCC registered. The first cement manufacturer in East and Central Africa. Capacity of 60,000 tonnes per year with one mill. 1934 - Cement deliveries begin. 1956 - Athi River Factory construction begins. 1957 - Athi River Factory complete. Two mills added to bring total mills to four. Capacity doubles to 120,000 tonnes a year. 1974 - A new rotary wet kiln commissioned. Capacity rises to 300,000 tonnes a year. 1979 - Fourth mill added. Mill number three is upgraded. Capacity rises to 340,000 tonnes a year.

Factory: Main EAPCC plant at Athi River

In its 80 years of operations East African Portland Cement Company (EAPCC) has played an important role in Kenya’s economic history. Some of the oldest and most iconic buildings in the country, structures which are synonymous with this nation’s national and international identity, for example the Kenyatta International Convention Centre (KICC), Kipande House and the Co-operative Bank Headquarters, were constructed using Blue Triangle Cement. These structures stand not only as living monuments to our resilience and progress as a country but also to the durability and strength of Blue Triangle Cement.   In 1933, when the Company started operations it had a capacity of 60,000 tonnes. This has grown steadily to an installed capacity today of 1.3 million tonnes. EAPCC’s human resource pool is one of the most diverse and qualified in the industry. This is a national Company with regional interests.

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The Company’s business processes and systems are ISO 9001: 2008-certified, a mark of commitment to sustaining customer value. The Company’s safety procedures are continuously audited and certified (OHSAS Certified) by the Kenya Bureau of Standards, Kenya’s premier standards agency, which enables the Company to maintain high safety standards and constantly innovate to improve them. EAPCC is the only company in the cement industry operating under two safety regimes: The Occupational Health and Safety Act (2007) under the Government of Kenya and the OHSAS standard managed by the British Safety Council, underscoring EAPCC’s high level of commitment to safety at the workplace. Regular drills are conducted to keep staff sensitized on safety. Our ERP system was recognized by the Computer Society of Kenya (CSK) as the best of class in 2011. With such attributes embodied in EAPCC, the quality of Blue Triangle Cement is assured. For instance, walls plastered with Blue Triangle tend to require less paint,

particularly undercoats, because of the brightness of our Blue Triangle Cement. This saves the customer money. History The East African Portland Cement Company started as a trading company importing cement mainly from England for early construction work in East Africa. It was formed by Blue Circle Industries United Kingdom. The name Portland is derived from the resemblance in colour of set cement to the Portland stone that was mined on the Isle of Portland in Dorset, England. It was not until February 1933 that the Company was incorporated in Kenya with the first factory in Nairobi’s Industrial Area. The Company had one cement mill (Mill No. 2) and used to import clinker from India. The production capacity was about 60,000 tonnes of cement. In December 1956, construction of the Athi River facility started. The factory was commissioned in 1958 and consisted of a Rotary Kiln (Wet), a big cement mill (Cement Mill 1 & 3). This significantly increased

1996 - Brand new kiln commissioned. New Mill added. Capacity doubles to 600,000 tonnes a year. 1997 - Manufacturing process from wet process to dry process. 2007 - Company conducts groundbreaking for new mill. 2009 - New mill commissioned. Capacity doubles to 1.3 million tonnes. EAPCC acquires ISO 9001: 2008 certification. 2010 - EAPCC implements ERP system which automates all business processes. 2011 - EAPCC receives recognition from Computer Society of Kenya for Best ERP system implementation. EAPCC embarks on new 5 year strategic plan (2011-2016) targeted at raising production capacity and profitability. 2012 - Kenya Bureau of Standards renews EAPCC’s ISO re-certification after bi-annual surveillance audit of business processes and

Dam: Chemususu Dam at Eldama Ravine, Baringo County. A flagship Vision 2030 project built with Blue Triangle Cement

procedures over a period of three- years. Strategy In the months and years to come, EAPCC is expanding cement manufacturing capacity though a Kiln up-rate project and investment in new equipment including a new packing line. The Company is working closely with the Vision 2030 National Secretariat and as a result Blue Triangle Cement is the preferred cement brand for flagship Vision 2030 projects such as Chemususu Dam in Eldama Ravine, the Geothermal Power Plant in Menengai Crater and the Thika Superhighway. We intend to deepen our involvement with real estate by diversifying our product offerings to provide specific solutions for home owners. This includes paving blocks, culverts and concrete pipes for drainage. EAPCC will also invest in concrete mixer trucks for contractors involved in large scale construction projects, such as housing developments, that call for high volumes and who prefer ready mixed concrete to save time and money.   We are committed to better and brighter lives for the communities we operate in, and the nation at large, by sponsoring a wide range of development projects through our Corporate Social Responsibility investments. EAPCC consistently supports brilliant but disadvantaged children as well as building classes, dormitories and boreholes to support learning primarily in hardship areas where the Company sources its raw material. From support staff to management, employees receive continuous training to keep their skills updated. They are also encouraged to pursue higher studies.

Nairobi Skyline: Nairobi's skyline at night. Many iconic buildings in Nairobi were built using Blue Triangle cement. This includes the magnificent KICC and Co-Operative Bank Headquarters seen in the photo

Although we have some of the most diverse and qualified resource pool in the nation, we encourage continued staff development. Growth, expansion and sustained profitability are the guiding principles of our business model. Our permanent base in Uganda gives us a foothold in the region from where we continue to expand our regional operations even as we grow our market share in Kenya. We engage in continuous product improvement as well, pegged on changing market trends, technological advancement and the dynamics of customer needs and wants. Our commitment is to sustain customer satisfaction. +254 722- 203 076 +254 722- 203 078/80 +254733- 333212/14 Email: customercare@eapcc.co.ke www.eastafricanportland.com

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CHAPTER 7 Health

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CHAPTER 7 Health

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Kenya Medical Training College Quality training of health professionals towards realisation of Vision 2030

Dr C. Olang’o Onudi, KMTC Director

three years, KMTC has opened six colleges in Bungoma, Nyamira, Bondo, Bomet, Vihiga and Migori all situated in district hospitals for close proximity to clinical areas. To allow small colleges spur growth, KMTC also carved two more from existing colleges: Manza and Lake Victoria MTCs - Machakos and Kisumu MTCs respectively.

KMTC Nursing students in a Skills Lab with one of the lecturers

Vision To be a model institution in the training and development of competent multidisciplinary health professionals. Mission To provide quality training and development of competent multidisciplinary health professionals. Background Established in 1927 at the Kenya Institute of Administration (KIA) in Kabete with only four pioneer students, the Kenya Medical Training College (KMTC) is the only public middle level health training institution under the Ministry of Health today; and has played a critical role in addressing human resource shortages in Kenya’s health sector. The College has since inception grown tremendously, curving a niche for itself as the largest mid-level health training institution in East and Central Africa. It boasts of a growing student population of more than 21,000 attending more than 50 medical courses – which reflects the institution’s responsiveness to the needs of our nation;

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and a staff compliment numbering more than 2,000. The College produces more than 6,000 graduates every year for both the Kenyan public and private health sectors, accounting for more than 80 per cent of the health workers in Kenya’s health delivery systems, making it the biggest single human resource contributor to the health sector in Kenya. KMTC is currently composed of 36 constituent colleges spread across the country, ensuring that its impact in improving quality healthcare training is felt throughout the country and beyond. This unprecedented growth is attributable to the unwavering support and hard work by the College’s dedicated staff, students’ diligence, sound management, the government and development partners which include USAID-funded Capacity Kenya, Funzo Project and Management Science for Health, Jhpiego Corporation, Sight Savers, JICA, Kenyatta National Hospital, Centre for Diseases Control and Constituency Development Funds.

This support has enabled KMTC to make a significant contribution to the government’s endeavour to provide efficient and high quality healthcare that is accessible, equitable and affordable to all Kenyans. Addressing the challenges Quality health training is critical to Kenya’s socio-economic transformation necessary in propelling the country towards Vision 2030; the attainment of MDGs; and in driving innovation and health reforms which enable the country to respond to global health challenges. According to Dr C. Olang’o Onudi - the KMTC Director, the College’s biggest challenge today remains how to constantly expand to accommodate the increasing student numbers. Four years ago, KMTC could only admit about 10 per cent of applicants, whose number was just slightly over 2,000. In response, the KMTC management put in place various strategies, one of which is the opening of new training colleges. In the last

KMTC has also started existing programmes in campuses which did not previously offer them. This has over the last four years tremendously increased pre-service intake and helped decentralise some of the programmes from Nairobi MTC, which was previously the only College offering the courses. Degree programmes planned KMTC has started three new courses – Certificate in Orthopedic Plaster Technology, Diploma in Registered Nursing, Mental Health and Psychiatry and Higher Diploma in Mental Health and Psychiatry for Clinical Officers. Plans to convert KMTC to a degree-awarding institution offering programmes in Nutrition, Pharmacy, Medical Laboratory Sciences and Clinical Medicine in collaboration with the University of Nairobi are ongoing. These market driven courses will run hand-in-hand with the certificate and diploma courses that the College offers. Infrastructure Development KMTC has embarked on infrastructure development to create more student facilities and improve the image of the institution. Its key focus is on expanding and rehabilitating the existing facilities in various constituent colleges and training equipment to be in line with global health training trends. To provide room for rapidly increased student population and to ensure quality health training, new buildings have been put up in most of the colleges. Dilapidated and unused facilities have been renovated to not only create training chances but also to give the college a facelift and a competitive edge.

Optical Technology students undertaking practicals

These efforts have seen the College more than double its intake, with close to 7,000 students joining in 2013. Training developments KMTC’s training is community-based, hence focus has been placed on improving the transport system so as to efficiently and effectively access training sites and clinical areas with each constituent college now having a bus at its disposal. A major milestone in the improvement of teaching methodologies at the College has been the establishment of the KMTC Skills Lab and integration of an e-learning platform with help from the Belgium Government. These unique teaching models give KMTC students a hands-on experience, making teaching and learning enjoyable and highly motivating. Students have the opportunity of training independently during their free time or with the assistance of a student facilitator, an approach which gives students opportunities to perfect their skills before going to deal with live patients. This has further revolutionised training methodologies at the College, and is useful to those with little face-time interaction with lecturers. The College has also put in place mechanisms to encourage staff and students to take part in research, and held the first KMTC Scientific Conference in 2010, and the second in 2012 whose theme was Medical Training and Innovations towards Realisation of Vision 2030. As part of its efforts to support devolution and take services closer to the people, KMTC aims to establish at least one campus in every county. In recognition of its quality training delivery, KMTC was awarded ISO 9001: 2008 certification by the Kenya Bureau of

Standards in July, 2009, and recertified in December 2012 for another three year term. KMTC constituent colleges Nairobi; Eldoret; Nakuru; Nyeri; Embu; Garissa; Homabay; Kabarnet; Kakamega; Kapkatet; Karen;Karuri; Webuye; Thika; Port Reitz; Mombasa; Muranga; Msambweni; Mathare; Meru; Machakos; Loitoktok; Kitui; Lodwar; Kisumu; Kilifi; Kisii; Siaya; Bungoma; Nyamira; Bondo; Manza; Lake Victoria, Bomet, Vihiga and Migori. Courses offered • Clinical Medicine (Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Community Nutrition (Certificate and Diploma) • Community Oral Health (Diploma) • Dental Technology (Diploma) • Environmental Health Sciences (Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Health Education (Higher Diploma) • Health Records and Information (Certificate and Diploma) • Medical Education (Higher Diploma) • Medical Engineering (Certificate, Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Medical Imaging Sciences (Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Medical Laboratory Sciences (Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Nursing (Certificate, Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Registered Nursing- Mental Health and Psychiatry (Diploma) • Occupational therapy (Diploma) • Optometry Technology (Diploma) • Orthopaedic Technology (Diploma) • Pharmacy (Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Physiotherapy (Diploma) • Orthopedic Plaster Technology (Certificate) Tel: (+254) 020 725711/2/3/4 Email: info@kmtc.ac.ke www.kmtc.ac.ke

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Kenya Medical Training College Quality training of health professionals towards realisation of Vision 2030

Dr C. Olang’o Onudi, KMTC Director

three years, KMTC has opened six colleges in Bungoma, Nyamira, Bondo, Bomet, Vihiga and Migori all situated in district hospitals for close proximity to clinical areas. To allow small colleges spur growth, KMTC also carved two more from existing colleges: Manza and Lake Victoria MTCs - Machakos and Kisumu MTCs respectively.

KMTC Nursing students in a Skills Lab with one of the lecturers

Vision To be a model institution in the training and development of competent multidisciplinary health professionals. Mission To provide quality training and development of competent multidisciplinary health professionals. Background Established in 1927 at the Kenya Institute of Administration (KIA) in Kabete with only four pioneer students, the Kenya Medical Training College (KMTC) is the only public middle level health training institution under the Ministry of Health today; and has played a critical role in addressing human resource shortages in Kenya’s health sector. The College has since inception grown tremendously, curving a niche for itself as the largest mid-level health training institution in East and Central Africa. It boasts of a growing student population of more than 21,000 attending more than 50 medical courses – which reflects the institution’s responsiveness to the needs of our nation;

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and a staff compliment numbering more than 2,000. The College produces more than 6,000 graduates every year for both the Kenyan public and private health sectors, accounting for more than 80 per cent of the health workers in Kenya’s health delivery systems, making it the biggest single human resource contributor to the health sector in Kenya. KMTC is currently composed of 36 constituent colleges spread across the country, ensuring that its impact in improving quality healthcare training is felt throughout the country and beyond. This unprecedented growth is attributable to the unwavering support and hard work by the College’s dedicated staff, students’ diligence, sound management, the government and development partners which include USAID-funded Capacity Kenya, Funzo Project and Management Science for Health, Jhpiego Corporation, Sight Savers, JICA, Kenyatta National Hospital, Centre for Diseases Control and Constituency Development Funds.

This support has enabled KMTC to make a significant contribution to the government’s endeavour to provide efficient and high quality healthcare that is accessible, equitable and affordable to all Kenyans. Addressing the challenges Quality health training is critical to Kenya’s socio-economic transformation necessary in propelling the country towards Vision 2030; the attainment of MDGs; and in driving innovation and health reforms which enable the country to respond to global health challenges. According to Dr C. Olang’o Onudi - the KMTC Director, the College’s biggest challenge today remains how to constantly expand to accommodate the increasing student numbers. Four years ago, KMTC could only admit about 10 per cent of applicants, whose number was just slightly over 2,000. In response, the KMTC management put in place various strategies, one of which is the opening of new training colleges. In the last

KMTC has also started existing programmes in campuses which did not previously offer them. This has over the last four years tremendously increased pre-service intake and helped decentralise some of the programmes from Nairobi MTC, which was previously the only College offering the courses. Degree programmes planned KMTC has started three new courses – Certificate in Orthopedic Plaster Technology, Diploma in Registered Nursing, Mental Health and Psychiatry and Higher Diploma in Mental Health and Psychiatry for Clinical Officers. Plans to convert KMTC to a degree-awarding institution offering programmes in Nutrition, Pharmacy, Medical Laboratory Sciences and Clinical Medicine in collaboration with the University of Nairobi are ongoing. These market driven courses will run hand-in-hand with the certificate and diploma courses that the College offers. Infrastructure Development KMTC has embarked on infrastructure development to create more student facilities and improve the image of the institution. Its key focus is on expanding and rehabilitating the existing facilities in various constituent colleges and training equipment to be in line with global health training trends. To provide room for rapidly increased student population and to ensure quality health training, new buildings have been put up in most of the colleges. Dilapidated and unused facilities have been renovated to not only create training chances but also to give the college a facelift and a competitive edge.

Optical Technology students undertaking practicals

These efforts have seen the College more than double its intake, with close to 7,000 students joining in 2013. Training developments KMTC’s training is community-based, hence focus has been placed on improving the transport system so as to efficiently and effectively access training sites and clinical areas with each constituent college now having a bus at its disposal. A major milestone in the improvement of teaching methodologies at the College has been the establishment of the KMTC Skills Lab and integration of an e-learning platform with help from the Belgium Government. These unique teaching models give KMTC students a hands-on experience, making teaching and learning enjoyable and highly motivating. Students have the opportunity of training independently during their free time or with the assistance of a student facilitator, an approach which gives students opportunities to perfect their skills before going to deal with live patients. This has further revolutionised training methodologies at the College, and is useful to those with little face-time interaction with lecturers. The College has also put in place mechanisms to encourage staff and students to take part in research, and held the first KMTC Scientific Conference in 2010, and the second in 2012 whose theme was Medical Training and Innovations towards Realisation of Vision 2030. As part of its efforts to support devolution and take services closer to the people, KMTC aims to establish at least one campus in every county. In recognition of its quality training delivery, KMTC was awarded ISO 9001: 2008 certification by the Kenya Bureau of

Standards in July, 2009, and recertified in December 2012 for another three year term. KMTC constituent colleges Nairobi; Eldoret; Nakuru; Nyeri; Embu; Garissa; Homabay; Kabarnet; Kakamega; Kapkatet; Karen;Karuri; Webuye; Thika; Port Reitz; Mombasa; Muranga; Msambweni; Mathare; Meru; Machakos; Loitoktok; Kitui; Lodwar; Kisumu; Kilifi; Kisii; Siaya; Bungoma; Nyamira; Bondo; Manza; Lake Victoria, Bomet, Vihiga and Migori. Courses offered • Clinical Medicine (Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Community Nutrition (Certificate and Diploma) • Community Oral Health (Diploma) • Dental Technology (Diploma) • Environmental Health Sciences (Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Health Education (Higher Diploma) • Health Records and Information (Certificate and Diploma) • Medical Education (Higher Diploma) • Medical Engineering (Certificate, Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Medical Imaging Sciences (Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Medical Laboratory Sciences (Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Nursing (Certificate, Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Registered Nursing- Mental Health and Psychiatry (Diploma) • Occupational therapy (Diploma) • Optometry Technology (Diploma) • Orthopaedic Technology (Diploma) • Pharmacy (Diploma and Higher Diploma) • Physiotherapy (Diploma) • Orthopedic Plaster Technology (Certificate) Tel: (+254) 020 725711/2/3/4 Email: info@kmtc.ac.ke www.kmtc.ac.ke

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Something of Permanent Value for the Children of East Africa “I wish we could do something special for the children of Kenya, something of permanent value...” Sixty-six years ago, Colonel Ewart Grogan decided that the most fitting way he could remember his beloved wife, Gertrude Edith, was by donating some land where the children of East Africa would receive dedicated health care. The colonel’s gift and dream has grown to become what is now the leading paediatric care hospital in East and Central Africa

A paediatric nurse with a recovering patient in one of the wards at Gertrude’s Children Hospital

A dentist attends to a patient at the Dental Clinic

Through these new facilities, Gertrude’s hopes to continue to find satisfaction in the faces of joy every time our compassionate care turns a child’s illness towards recovery; or when prevention, diagnosis and intervention help avert a disease. The Chandaria Centre hosts 23 paediatric specialist clinics that provide direct access to top paediatric specialists and a highly skilled nursing and support staff. Greater specialisation and recent developments in surgery make it necessary that a dedicated ward is set aside for surgical patients, either for day surgery or otherwise, with close proximity to theatre and ICU being of paramount significance.

The recently-opened Chandaria Medical Centre. The centre houses 23 specialist paediatric clinics, an ultra-modern diagnostic centre and an intensive care unit with state-of-the-art facilities

It is just over 60 years since the first baby was brought to Gertrude’s Children’s Hospital in Nairobi for medical attention. It has been 60 years of change and challenges for us, not just in terms of new structures such as the recently opened Chandaria Medical Centre, but also in what our clients have come to expect. Today, Gertrude’s Children’s Hospital and its nine satellites attend to over 300,000 children as outpatients and admit about 6,000 patients a year. These are not all from Kenya, but include those referred from neighbouring countries, including Uganda, Tanzania, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Burundi and South Sudan.

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Through the years, Gertrude’s has kept the vision of Colonel Grogan alive through the delivery of high-quality paediatric care and through the education and training of future child health care providers. The hospital, which operates as a trust and is managed by a volunteer board of trustees, runs a charitable foundation, through which the same quality care is delivered to those who could otherwise not afford such health care. In all our wards, our medical teams are committed to providing compassionate, high quality care from our main hospital at Muthaiga and from all our nine satellite clinics.

Chandaria Medical Centre The centre, another milestone in the aspiration to become a regional centre of excellence, is the Chandaria Medical Centre, named in honour of the Chandaria Foundation, which gave a major donation towards its construction. The diagnostic centre has a surgical ward, specialised clinics and modern equipment, including a computed tomography (CT) scan for children and adults, a dental orthopantomograph (OPG) and an image intensifier. The centre also has six intensive care unit (ICU) beds, three neonatal ICU beds and four high dependency unit (HDU) beds.

By having a dedicated reception and triage area, the new surgical ward eases the admission of patients requiring surgical care. Facilities in the surgical ward, which is located on the first floor of the Chandaria Medical Centre, include a four-bed Burns Unit and accommodation for patients and their care-givers. The Intensive Care Unit/High Dependency Unit located on the second floor enhances the care of critically-ill infants, children and teenagers. The facility has six ICU beds (including two isolation rooms), three neonatal ICU beds and four High Dependency unit beds. The facility allows the separation of medical and surgical patients to minimise infection and ensure the appropriate level of care, while allowing for integrated management of patients.

The Radiology Unit provides a variety of paediatric radiology services to assist in diagnosing disorders in children from the tiniest infants to teenagers, using the most modern equipment. Modern equipment at the unit includes a CT scan, dental OPG, Image Instensifier, ultrasound, general/ flouroscopy x-ray and multi-function portable equipment. The litmus test for us in the coming years will be not just how many children we treat, but how well we treat them. Over the next years, our new investments will include continuing to build skills and training of our workforce, and the technology we use to both care for and communicate with patients and partners. We have established a centre that will focus on the medical needs of adolescents, an age-group that has often fallen through the cracks in terms of specialised care. At Gertrude’s Children’s Hospital, we believe that what began with the vision and passion of Col Grogan has grown into a facility that provides a future for thousands of children in East Africa. It is these children who give us the inspiration and motivation every day.

A patient prepares to undergo CT Scan at the new Chandaria Medical Clinic

P.O.Box 42325 - 00100, Nairobi, Kenya Email: info@gerties.org www.gerties.org Tel: 020-7206000

Play therapy is an important part of recovery for children admitted to the hospital

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Something of Permanent Value for the Children of East Africa “I wish we could do something special for the children of Kenya, something of permanent value...” Sixty-six years ago, Colonel Ewart Grogan decided that the most fitting way he could remember his beloved wife, Gertrude Edith, was by donating some land where the children of East Africa would receive dedicated health care. The colonel’s gift and dream has grown to become what is now the leading paediatric care hospital in East and Central Africa

A paediatric nurse with a recovering patient in one of the wards at Gertrude’s Children Hospital

A dentist attends to a patient at the Dental Clinic

Through these new facilities, Gertrude’s hopes to continue to find satisfaction in the faces of joy every time our compassionate care turns a child’s illness towards recovery; or when prevention, diagnosis and intervention help avert a disease. The Chandaria Centre hosts 23 paediatric specialist clinics that provide direct access to top paediatric specialists and a highly skilled nursing and support staff. Greater specialisation and recent developments in surgery make it necessary that a dedicated ward is set aside for surgical patients, either for day surgery or otherwise, with close proximity to theatre and ICU being of paramount significance.

The recently-opened Chandaria Medical Centre. The centre houses 23 specialist paediatric clinics, an ultra-modern diagnostic centre and an intensive care unit with state-of-the-art facilities

It is just over 60 years since the first baby was brought to Gertrude’s Children’s Hospital in Nairobi for medical attention. It has been 60 years of change and challenges for us, not just in terms of new structures such as the recently opened Chandaria Medical Centre, but also in what our clients have come to expect. Today, Gertrude’s Children’s Hospital and its nine satellites attend to over 300,000 children as outpatients and admit about 6,000 patients a year. These are not all from Kenya, but include those referred from neighbouring countries, including Uganda, Tanzania, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Burundi and South Sudan.

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Through the years, Gertrude’s has kept the vision of Colonel Grogan alive through the delivery of high-quality paediatric care and through the education and training of future child health care providers. The hospital, which operates as a trust and is managed by a volunteer board of trustees, runs a charitable foundation, through which the same quality care is delivered to those who could otherwise not afford such health care. In all our wards, our medical teams are committed to providing compassionate, high quality care from our main hospital at Muthaiga and from all our nine satellite clinics.

Chandaria Medical Centre The centre, another milestone in the aspiration to become a regional centre of excellence, is the Chandaria Medical Centre, named in honour of the Chandaria Foundation, which gave a major donation towards its construction. The diagnostic centre has a surgical ward, specialised clinics and modern equipment, including a computed tomography (CT) scan for children and adults, a dental orthopantomograph (OPG) and an image intensifier. The centre also has six intensive care unit (ICU) beds, three neonatal ICU beds and four high dependency unit (HDU) beds.

By having a dedicated reception and triage area, the new surgical ward eases the admission of patients requiring surgical care. Facilities in the surgical ward, which is located on the first floor of the Chandaria Medical Centre, include a four-bed Burns Unit and accommodation for patients and their care-givers. The Intensive Care Unit/High Dependency Unit located on the second floor enhances the care of critically-ill infants, children and teenagers. The facility has six ICU beds (including two isolation rooms), three neonatal ICU beds and four High Dependency unit beds. The facility allows the separation of medical and surgical patients to minimise infection and ensure the appropriate level of care, while allowing for integrated management of patients.

The Radiology Unit provides a variety of paediatric radiology services to assist in diagnosing disorders in children from the tiniest infants to teenagers, using the most modern equipment. Modern equipment at the unit includes a CT scan, dental OPG, Image Instensifier, ultrasound, general/ flouroscopy x-ray and multi-function portable equipment. The litmus test for us in the coming years will be not just how many children we treat, but how well we treat them. Over the next years, our new investments will include continuing to build skills and training of our workforce, and the technology we use to both care for and communicate with patients and partners. We have established a centre that will focus on the medical needs of adolescents, an age-group that has often fallen through the cracks in terms of specialised care. At Gertrude’s Children’s Hospital, we believe that what began with the vision and passion of Col Grogan has grown into a facility that provides a future for thousands of children in East Africa. It is these children who give us the inspiration and motivation every day.

A patient prepares to undergo CT Scan at the new Chandaria Medical Clinic

P.O.Box 42325 - 00100, Nairobi, Kenya Email: info@gerties.org www.gerties.org Tel: 020-7206000

Play therapy is an important part of recovery for children admitted to the hospital

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CHAPTER 8 Banking and Finance

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CHAPTER 8 Banking and Finance

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100-Plus Years of Wealth Creation Through Savings A pioneer financial institution in Kenya, the Bank’s journey started in 1910, as the then Savings Bank. After a review in 1978, it became the Kenya Post Office Savings Bank. Postbank has over the year’s successfully executed its mandate and helped Kenyans from all social strata create wealth. Since 1910, the product range has been diversified from the one product through the passbook to an array of savings products, remittance, collection and payment services. The Journey so far.. A Bank of many firsts 1910 - First Bank that was locally incorporated. 1911 - First Bank to provide banking services to Kenyans of African origin. 1931- The First Bank to introduce Home Safes. Through the passbook account, Postbank pioneered the branchless banking ‘any-branch-is-your-bank’ concept in the pre-technology days. 1995 - First Bank to offer international money transfer service in Kenya, and winning several service awards in Africa, the Middle East and South East Asia (AMESEA) region. 2000 - The Bank embarked on expansion of its product range, in particular the rollout of Bidii Savings Account; this emphasised the Banks new mindset.

A delighted Postbank team receives the top COYA award for Productivity and Quality Service from a representative of Kenya Institute of Management (KIM)

2010 - Postbank collaborated with the mobile telephony providers and now offers its own mobile banking service “Patacash.” The service allows depositing and withdrawals from customers’ accounts using the mobile phone. Still In 2010 - Due to the success in the implementation of its new service delivery system, Postbank secured a tender to offer consultancy services, through the World Savings Banks Institute (WSBI) and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (B&MGF), to Lesotho Postbank for the implementation of a new electronic transacting platform and roll out an agency banking model.

2011 - The Bank entered into credit/lending partnership with AAR Credit Services Ltd and rolled out the product to all 98 Postbank branches. This product enables Postbank customers to access credit, allowing the bank to ingeniously offer credit products in spite of the limitations of its mandate. 2012 - First Bank to provide interoperability and collaborations with other banks. Currently provides online banking to customers of 5 commercial banks, these collaborations are geared towards enhancing financial inclusion and access to finance for Kenyans, thus contributing to the Vision 2030.

RECENT AWARDS

Our Vision

Postbank’s mission is to Provide Accessible and Sustainable Banking and Other Related Financial Services, through Innovative Delivery Systems for Wealth Creation to the Benefit of Customers and Other Stakeholders

‘To Be the Bank of Choice’

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Philosophical advances and changes in savings and banking have taken place in Postbank’s 100-plus years of existence.

Nominated among the top 5 banks in customer satisfaction in Kenya in the BANKING, Africa Banking Industry Customer Satisfaction Survey, April 2013” report by KPMG. Ranked 4th in Africa among the top 100 organisations in East Africa that have increased value to customers through adoption of technology, the 2013 CIO100 Annual Awards.

1st Runners-Up, Innovative use of Technology, 2011 (Microfinance Recognition Awards Africa)

2002 - The Bank embarked on restructuring and transformation. The exercise culminated in the expansion of the Bank’s outreach through a network of ATMs.

Nominated among five Banks in Africa for the Most Innovative Bank of the Year Award 2011 (African Banker Awards)

2007 - Postbank was among the First financial institutions to receive ISO 9001:2008 certification in line with initiatives to improve financial services delivery, prompting the provision of high quality services to meet customer expectations in line with the service charter.

In 2011: Postbank was officially voted 2nd Runners-Up, Corporate Governance, Financial category, 2011 (Institute of Certified Public Secretaries of Kenya Champions of Governance Awards).

Computer Society of Kenya ICT Excellence Awards (2010)

Best Company of the Year in Productivity and Quality Service (2012)

1st Runners-Up CEO of the Year Dr Nyambura Koigi (2012)

The Bank recognises that building domestic savings mobilisation helps the poor to get out of poverty. Thus, it provides affordable savings facilities and instruments through its vast branch network of 98 branches, 772 Postbank “Mashinani” agent locations and roundthe-clock services through over 1200 ATMs spread throughout the country.

2008 - The First Bank in Kenya to implement the automated counter/teller service through Point of Sale terminals. Postbank adopted the new business model that embraces the use of Point of Sale (POS) terminal and paperless banking.

Our Mission

OTHER RECENT AWARDS INCLUDE

Winners, the Child and Youth Finance International – 2013 Pioneer Awards.

2008 - The First Bank to sign as an M-Pesa agent. Also receiving an award for the Dealer of the Year in the same year.

Postbank House

Dr Nyambura Koigi, Managing Director Postbank

2009 – The Bank was among the First to reach the unbanked in the rural areas through the Postbank “Mashinani” agency services. The bank partnered with rural business communities countrywide to provide affordable and accessible banking services to the community through the service.

First Branchless Bank in Kenya (2012)

Dr Nyambura Koigi for Outstanding Leadership in Enhancing Productivity (2012)

P.O. Box 30311-00100, Nairobi Tel: (+254)20 2803333/341/350/248, 2803000 info@postbank.co.ke www.postbank.co.ke

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100-Plus Years of Wealth Creation Through Savings A pioneer financial institution in Kenya, the Bank’s journey started in 1910, as the then Savings Bank. After a review in 1978, it became the Kenya Post Office Savings Bank. Postbank has over the year’s successfully executed its mandate and helped Kenyans from all social strata create wealth. Since 1910, the product range has been diversified from the one product through the passbook to an array of savings products, remittance, collection and payment services. The Journey so far.. A Bank of many firsts 1910 - First Bank that was locally incorporated. 1911 - First Bank to provide banking services to Kenyans of African origin. 1931- The First Bank to introduce Home Safes. Through the passbook account, Postbank pioneered the branchless banking ‘any-branch-is-your-bank’ concept in the pre-technology days. 1995 - First Bank to offer international money transfer service in Kenya, and winning several service awards in Africa, the Middle East and South East Asia (AMESEA) region. 2000 - The Bank embarked on expansion of its product range, in particular the rollout of Bidii Savings Account; this emphasised the Banks new mindset.

A delighted Postbank team receives the top COYA award for Productivity and Quality Service from a representative of Kenya Institute of Management (KIM)

2010 - Postbank collaborated with the mobile telephony providers and now offers its own mobile banking service “Patacash.” The service allows depositing and withdrawals from customers’ accounts using the mobile phone. Still In 2010 - Due to the success in the implementation of its new service delivery system, Postbank secured a tender to offer consultancy services, through the World Savings Banks Institute (WSBI) and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (B&MGF), to Lesotho Postbank for the implementation of a new electronic transacting platform and roll out an agency banking model.

2011 - The Bank entered into credit/lending partnership with AAR Credit Services Ltd and rolled out the product to all 98 Postbank branches. This product enables Postbank customers to access credit, allowing the bank to ingeniously offer credit products in spite of the limitations of its mandate. 2012 - First Bank to provide interoperability and collaborations with other banks. Currently provides online banking to customers of 5 commercial banks, these collaborations are geared towards enhancing financial inclusion and access to finance for Kenyans, thus contributing to the Vision 2030.

RECENT AWARDS

Our Vision

Postbank’s mission is to Provide Accessible and Sustainable Banking and Other Related Financial Services, through Innovative Delivery Systems for Wealth Creation to the Benefit of Customers and Other Stakeholders

‘To Be the Bank of Choice’

Best of Kenya

140

Philosophical advances and changes in savings and banking have taken place in Postbank’s 100-plus years of existence.

Nominated among the top 5 banks in customer satisfaction in Kenya in the BANKING, Africa Banking Industry Customer Satisfaction Survey, April 2013” report by KPMG. Ranked 4th in Africa among the top 100 organisations in East Africa that have increased value to customers through adoption of technology, the 2013 CIO100 Annual Awards.

1st Runners-Up, Innovative use of Technology, 2011 (Microfinance Recognition Awards Africa)

2002 - The Bank embarked on restructuring and transformation. The exercise culminated in the expansion of the Bank’s outreach through a network of ATMs.

Nominated among five Banks in Africa for the Most Innovative Bank of the Year Award 2011 (African Banker Awards)

2007 - Postbank was among the First financial institutions to receive ISO 9001:2008 certification in line with initiatives to improve financial services delivery, prompting the provision of high quality services to meet customer expectations in line with the service charter.

In 2011: Postbank was officially voted 2nd Runners-Up, Corporate Governance, Financial category, 2011 (Institute of Certified Public Secretaries of Kenya Champions of Governance Awards).

Computer Society of Kenya ICT Excellence Awards (2010)

Best Company of the Year in Productivity and Quality Service (2012)

1st Runners-Up CEO of the Year Dr Nyambura Koigi (2012)

The Bank recognises that building domestic savings mobilisation helps the poor to get out of poverty. Thus, it provides affordable savings facilities and instruments through its vast branch network of 98 branches, 772 Postbank “Mashinani” agent locations and roundthe-clock services through over 1200 ATMs spread throughout the country.

2008 - The First Bank in Kenya to implement the automated counter/teller service through Point of Sale terminals. Postbank adopted the new business model that embraces the use of Point of Sale (POS) terminal and paperless banking.

Our Mission

OTHER RECENT AWARDS INCLUDE

Winners, the Child and Youth Finance International – 2013 Pioneer Awards.

2008 - The First Bank to sign as an M-Pesa agent. Also receiving an award for the Dealer of the Year in the same year.

Postbank House

Dr Nyambura Koigi, Managing Director Postbank

2009 – The Bank was among the First to reach the unbanked in the rural areas through the Postbank “Mashinani” agency services. The bank partnered with rural business communities countrywide to provide affordable and accessible banking services to the community through the service.

First Branchless Bank in Kenya (2012)

Dr Nyambura Koigi for Outstanding Leadership in Enhancing Productivity (2012)

P.O. Box 30311-00100, Nairobi Tel: (+254)20 2803333/341/350/248, 2803000 info@postbank.co.ke www.postbank.co.ke

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People-Focused Banking Exemplified With years of perfecting banking for ordinary people, Co-op Bank has set the trend both locally and regionally for people focused banking

Dr Gideon Muriuki- Group Managing Director & CEO

The Co-operative Bank of Kenya was started by peasant farmers in the 1960s to provide affordable financial services to the Co-operative Movement. The mission of the bank was to provide value-added banking services to the movement. Today, the Co-operative Bank is a successful financial institution and an iconic bank within the Kenyan banking sector. The bank has remained faithful to the ideals of the founding fathers and continues to invest enormous resources to benefit the Co-operative Movement. The vision of Co-op Bank is to be the leading and dominant Kenyan bank with a strong countrywide presence, playing a central role in the co-operative movement and providing relevant and innovative financial services to our customers for the optimum benefit of all our stakeholders. Market Growth Today, the Co-operative Bank is the third largest bank in Kenya with an asset base of over KShs225 billion and over 3.5 million account holders. Growing the bank’s reach is a priority and the branch network has expanded tremendously. Co-op Bank has 125 branches and over 500 ATMs, and 6,000 Co-op Kwa Jirani Agents. The growth is both local and also regional. The bank has opened a subsidiary in South Sudan in the capital Juba; The Co-operative Bank of South Sudan is owned 49 per cent by the Government of South Sudan and 51 per cent by the Co-operative Bank of Kenya. Expansion in the East Africa region will ensure that the bank’s vision of partnering with the co-operative movement is spread in the region. Its profitability has also seen growth year over year since Dr. Gideon Muruiki became the Managing Director and CEO in 2001. For the half year ended 30th June 2013 the bank reported a profit before tax of KShs5.87 billion compared to KES 5.01 billion in the same period in 2012, a commendable growth of 17 per cent.

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Co-operative Bank Foundation is the bank's flagship scholarship programme

Customer Focus With one in five Kenyans being a member of a co-operative, the role of Co-op Bank as an apex financial institution for co-operatives is even more crucial as it affects the lives of the majority of Kenyans, who directly or indirectly derive their livelihood from the movement. To enhance the service it offers co-operative and Sacco members, the bank has introduced Saccolink switch. This multimillion investment enables Saccos to link their back-office operations to the bank, thereby providing capacity to over 10 million Sacco members to access convenient banking services both at the Cooperative Bank and VISA outlets countrywide. The bank continues to look for new ways to add value to its customers. Most recently, the bank has partnered with Co-operatives Insurance Company (CIC) to provide insurance services. The partnership offers customers a one-stop shop for both banking and a full range of Insurance services. Small and microenterprises (SMEs) are the primary source of employment for many across the world. At Co-operative Bank, there are many products designed especially for the SMEs such as the Bizwise SME loan. A variety of other innovative products are available customers such as the Good Home Mortgage. This is a mortgage product designed to effectively respond to the great need for housing loans in Kenya. The loan enables individuals to have access to decent and affordable housing. The Club Special Loan is designed for investment groups wishing to borrow up to KShs50 million. Additional services are available through Co-op Bank’s subsidiaries such as Coop Consultancy, Co-op Trust Investment Service and Kingdom Securities.

the fastest turnaround time for Renewable Energy (RE) and Energy Efficiency (EE) financing for SME and large enterprises. Community Involvement The bank established the Co-op Foundation, whose mission is to sponsor bright but less fortunate students through a high school education scholarship programme. To date, the bank has assisted over 1,500 students. The top students from the secondary school scheme receive a scholarship towards their undergraduate education as well as an internship at Co-operative Bank. The bank is also dedicated to protecting the environment and has spearheaded several environmental initiatives such as rehabilitation of the Mau Complex, which is largest forest left in Kenya. The initiative was launched by planting trees at the source of the Njoro River that originates from the forest. The Kingdom Bank In August 2004, the bank’s Board of Directors declared; “Co-operative Bank shall be the Kingdom Bank through which God will bless His people of Kenya.” It is by these words that the bank operates while serving its millions of customers. As we celebrate Kenya turning 50, the bank continues to set itself apart from its peers through its cooperative banking model, branch, ATM and agent growth plans. In addition the regional growth and introduction of innovative products will see the bank continue to soar.

Tel: +254-20-2776000 www.co-opbank.co.ke

Co-op Bank won the ‘Most Green Bank’ 2013 Energy Management Awards; this was in recognition of its active promotion of green energy among clients. Co-op Bank has

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People-Focused Banking Exemplified With years of perfecting banking for ordinary people, Co-op Bank has set the trend both locally and regionally for people focused banking

Dr Gideon Muriuki- Group Managing Director & CEO

The Co-operative Bank of Kenya was started by peasant farmers in the 1960s to provide affordable financial services to the Co-operative Movement. The mission of the bank was to provide value-added banking services to the movement. Today, the Co-operative Bank is a successful financial institution and an iconic bank within the Kenyan banking sector. The bank has remained faithful to the ideals of the founding fathers and continues to invest enormous resources to benefit the Co-operative Movement. The vision of Co-op Bank is to be the leading and dominant Kenyan bank with a strong countrywide presence, playing a central role in the co-operative movement and providing relevant and innovative financial services to our customers for the optimum benefit of all our stakeholders. Market Growth Today, the Co-operative Bank is the third largest bank in Kenya with an asset base of over KShs225 billion and over 3.5 million account holders. Growing the bank’s reach is a priority and the branch network has expanded tremendously. Co-op Bank has 125 branches and over 500 ATMs, and 6,000 Co-op Kwa Jirani Agents. The growth is both local and also regional. The bank has opened a subsidiary in South Sudan in the capital Juba; The Co-operative Bank of South Sudan is owned 49 per cent by the Government of South Sudan and 51 per cent by the Co-operative Bank of Kenya. Expansion in the East Africa region will ensure that the bank’s vision of partnering with the co-operative movement is spread in the region. Its profitability has also seen growth year over year since Dr. Gideon Muruiki became the Managing Director and CEO in 2001. For the half year ended 30th June 2013 the bank reported a profit before tax of KShs5.87 billion compared to KES 5.01 billion in the same period in 2012, a commendable growth of 17 per cent.

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Co-operative Bank Foundation is the bank's flagship scholarship programme

Customer Focus With one in five Kenyans being a member of a co-operative, the role of Co-op Bank as an apex financial institution for co-operatives is even more crucial as it affects the lives of the majority of Kenyans, who directly or indirectly derive their livelihood from the movement. To enhance the service it offers co-operative and Sacco members, the bank has introduced Saccolink switch. This multimillion investment enables Saccos to link their back-office operations to the bank, thereby providing capacity to over 10 million Sacco members to access convenient banking services both at the Cooperative Bank and VISA outlets countrywide. The bank continues to look for new ways to add value to its customers. Most recently, the bank has partnered with Co-operatives Insurance Company (CIC) to provide insurance services. The partnership offers customers a one-stop shop for both banking and a full range of Insurance services. Small and microenterprises (SMEs) are the primary source of employment for many across the world. At Co-operative Bank, there are many products designed especially for the SMEs such as the Bizwise SME loan. A variety of other innovative products are available customers such as the Good Home Mortgage. This is a mortgage product designed to effectively respond to the great need for housing loans in Kenya. The loan enables individuals to have access to decent and affordable housing. The Club Special Loan is designed for investment groups wishing to borrow up to KShs50 million. Additional services are available through Co-op Bank’s subsidiaries such as Coop Consultancy, Co-op Trust Investment Service and Kingdom Securities.

the fastest turnaround time for Renewable Energy (RE) and Energy Efficiency (EE) financing for SME and large enterprises. Community Involvement The bank established the Co-op Foundation, whose mission is to sponsor bright but less fortunate students through a high school education scholarship programme. To date, the bank has assisted over 1,500 students. The top students from the secondary school scheme receive a scholarship towards their undergraduate education as well as an internship at Co-operative Bank. The bank is also dedicated to protecting the environment and has spearheaded several environmental initiatives such as rehabilitation of the Mau Complex, which is largest forest left in Kenya. The initiative was launched by planting trees at the source of the Njoro River that originates from the forest. The Kingdom Bank In August 2004, the bank’s Board of Directors declared; “Co-operative Bank shall be the Kingdom Bank through which God will bless His people of Kenya.” It is by these words that the bank operates while serving its millions of customers. As we celebrate Kenya turning 50, the bank continues to set itself apart from its peers through its cooperative banking model, branch, ATM and agent growth plans. In addition the regional growth and introduction of innovative products will see the bank continue to soar.

Tel: +254-20-2776000 www.co-opbank.co.ke

Co-op Bank won the ‘Most Green Bank’ 2013 Energy Management Awards; this was in recognition of its active promotion of green energy among clients. Co-op Bank has

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Equity Bank Nurturing entrepreneurial spirit

Bank

Your Listening, Caring Partner

done through Equity Group Foundation in partnership with The MasterCard Foundation and support of USAID, UKaid and KfW. Equity Bank has also sponsored over 1,550 best students to pursue university education - 92 of them in Ivy League schools. “There is the mindset of leadership in this Bank that we need not be just good bankers but we need to do good in society. We need to do well and at the same time do good to society, realising that we have existed on a public licence and that we need to show gratitude for and re-invest,” says Dr Mwangi. Looking to the future With the acknowledgement that the Bank propelled the country’s population from a financial inclusion of 8 per cent to just over 40 per cent, one of its focus areas moving forward will be making financial services a lifestyle.

Dr James Mwangi named Africa Innovation Leader of the Year 2012 by Africa Investor

Equity Bank agent

Equity Bank has now come up with initiatives and innovations that encompass the life of a Kenyan. People no longer need to carry cash when they go to the supermarket. They are able to pay for their goods and services using a debit card. If they decide that they need cash, there is always the ‘cashback’ option, where you can withdraw money from the till. And they can still pay for their fare home using the ‘bebapay’ option.

Equity Bank Group Head Office

From a small, insolvent building society with a balance sheet of only Ksh28 million and ranked position 66 out of 66, to a financial giant now ranked the 2nd most profitable bank with the second largest balance sheet in East and Central Africa, and the largest customer base in Africa, Equity Bank is a classic example of the Kenyan entrepreneurial spirit. Recognising that accessing a bank would present problems for many unbanked people in the rural areas, Equity Bank decided to change the playing field and take the bank to its customers. The Bank made it its mandate to transform the lives and livelihoods of people socially and economically by making available to them modern, inclusive financial services that maximised their opportunities. In a word, Equity democratised banking and made access to savings, loans and insurance possible to ordinary people. However, despite all this, Dr James Mwangi, Equity Bank Chief Executive Officer and

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Managing Director feels what the Bank will be remembered for most is its intervention in the transformation of subsistence agriculture to small scale commercial or agri-business. “The second one is helping to formalise what we used to call ‘jua kali’ and give that class of micro-businesses dignity and honour and help them to transform from micro to small, from small to medium enterprises and form Kenya’s real face of wealth creation.” Nurturing the entrepreneurial spirit Equity Bank has significant interest in nurturing that entrepreneurial spirit and recognising that an institution can transform philanthropy and convert the traditional way of perceiving philanthropy using other methods. Equity Bank through Equity Group Foundation’s (Financial Knowledge for Africa) FIKA programme in partnership with The MasterCard Foundation rolled out a programme to empower women and youth by equipping them with knowledge, skills, and attitudes, which they need to adopt for good financial management practices.

FiKA is a comprehensive 13-week financial education program - covering budgeting, savings, debt management, financial negotiations and banking services. The programme targets to benefit 1,000,000 women and youth and has so far benefitted 800,000. Under the Entrepreneurship Training programme the target is to train 10,000 youth and women entrepreneurs to improve practical and applicable small business skills so that they successfully manage their businesses and foster an entrepreneurial spirit. The training covers seven thematic areas: marketing, record keeping, costing, business planning, people and productivity stock control and buying. Over 5,000 have so far being trained in partnership with The MasterCard Foundation and the International Labour Organization (ILO). The Wings to Fly altruism is another method. The programme targets to give 10,000 scholarships to needy bright students with raw talents around the country. This has been

Digital money As a recognised leader in financial innovation, Equity Bank was the first institution to introduce the EMV compliant ATM cards in Kenya. It also played the lead role in championing agency banking which continues to demystify banking by taking financial services to the doorsteps of citizens of Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania. In 2011, Equity Bank was named Africa’s Most Innovative Bank by the African Banker for championing delivery channels that have taken financial services to the last mile. The Bank is now looking towards going the digital money way. Cash vouchers have replaced the conventional cash and food distribution for the needy. Wealth creation And after recently joining hands with PayPal, the Bank fully ventured into the global e-commerce ring. More Kenyans can now buy and sell goods and services online without sharing financial information, and with the flexibility to pay using their debit or credit cards. Equity Bank has come to play an important role in the lives of many, earning the brand respect and trust. The Bank resonates with its clients in the way the clients define themselves - as members, not customers.

A Wings To Fly scholar receives scholarship letter

People who are valued for who they are, not simply the profit they represent. The biggest challenge for Africa has been poverty, which can only be confronted by entrepreneurs who create wealth. Equity Bank wants to be the catalyst for an entrepreneurial culture where people will be encouraged to embrace the production of goods and services, which will in the end, transform into wealth creation by and for Africans themselves. Equity Centre, Hospital Road, Upper Hill. +254 - 020 2262000 +254 - 0711 026000 +254 - 0732 112000 http://www.facebook.com/KeEquityBank https://twitter.com/KeEquityBank Email: info@equitybank.co.ke www.equitybankgroup.com

The use of Biometric Technology in Northern Kenya was a first by Equity where beneficiaries receive cash aid which they access from agents using their prepaid cards instead of food relief

Best of Kenya

145


Equity Bank Nurturing entrepreneurial spirit

Bank

Your Listening, Caring Partner

done through Equity Group Foundation in partnership with The MasterCard Foundation and support of USAID, UKaid and KfW. Equity Bank has also sponsored over 1,550 best students to pursue university education - 92 of them in Ivy League schools. “There is the mindset of leadership in this Bank that we need not be just good bankers but we need to do good in society. We need to do well and at the same time do good to society, realising that we have existed on a public licence and that we need to show gratitude for and re-invest,” says Dr Mwangi. Looking to the future With the acknowledgement that the Bank propelled the country’s population from a financial inclusion of 8 per cent to just over 40 per cent, one of its focus areas moving forward will be making financial services a lifestyle.

Dr James Mwangi named Africa Innovation Leader of the Year 2012 by Africa Investor

Equity Bank agent

Equity Bank has now come up with initiatives and innovations that encompass the life of a Kenyan. People no longer need to carry cash when they go to the supermarket. They are able to pay for their goods and services using a debit card. If they decide that they need cash, there is always the ‘cashback’ option, where you can withdraw money from the till. And they can still pay for their fare home using the ‘bebapay’ option.

Equity Bank Group Head Office

From a small, insolvent building society with a balance sheet of only Ksh28 million and ranked position 66 out of 66, to a financial giant now ranked the 2nd most profitable bank with the second largest balance sheet in East and Central Africa, and the largest customer base in Africa, Equity Bank is a classic example of the Kenyan entrepreneurial spirit. Recognising that accessing a bank would present problems for many unbanked people in the rural areas, Equity Bank decided to change the playing field and take the bank to its customers. The Bank made it its mandate to transform the lives and livelihoods of people socially and economically by making available to them modern, inclusive financial services that maximised their opportunities. In a word, Equity democratised banking and made access to savings, loans and insurance possible to ordinary people. However, despite all this, Dr James Mwangi, Equity Bank Chief Executive Officer and

Best of Kenya

144

Managing Director feels what the Bank will be remembered for most is its intervention in the transformation of subsistence agriculture to small scale commercial or agri-business. “The second one is helping to formalise what we used to call ‘jua kali’ and give that class of micro-businesses dignity and honour and help them to transform from micro to small, from small to medium enterprises and form Kenya’s real face of wealth creation.” Nurturing the entrepreneurial spirit Equity Bank has significant interest in nurturing that entrepreneurial spirit and recognising that an institution can transform philanthropy and convert the traditional way of perceiving philanthropy using other methods. Equity Bank through Equity Group Foundation’s (Financial Knowledge for Africa) FIKA programme in partnership with The MasterCard Foundation rolled out a programme to empower women and youth by equipping them with knowledge, skills, and attitudes, which they need to adopt for good financial management practices.

FiKA is a comprehensive 13-week financial education program - covering budgeting, savings, debt management, financial negotiations and banking services. The programme targets to benefit 1,000,000 women and youth and has so far benefitted 800,000. Under the Entrepreneurship Training programme the target is to train 10,000 youth and women entrepreneurs to improve practical and applicable small business skills so that they successfully manage their businesses and foster an entrepreneurial spirit. The training covers seven thematic areas: marketing, record keeping, costing, business planning, people and productivity stock control and buying. Over 5,000 have so far being trained in partnership with The MasterCard Foundation and the International Labour Organization (ILO). The Wings to Fly altruism is another method. The programme targets to give 10,000 scholarships to needy bright students with raw talents around the country. This has been

Digital money As a recognised leader in financial innovation, Equity Bank was the first institution to introduce the EMV compliant ATM cards in Kenya. It also played the lead role in championing agency banking which continues to demystify banking by taking financial services to the doorsteps of citizens of Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania. In 2011, Equity Bank was named Africa’s Most Innovative Bank by the African Banker for championing delivery channels that have taken financial services to the last mile. The Bank is now looking towards going the digital money way. Cash vouchers have replaced the conventional cash and food distribution for the needy. Wealth creation And after recently joining hands with PayPal, the Bank fully ventured into the global e-commerce ring. More Kenyans can now buy and sell goods and services online without sharing financial information, and with the flexibility to pay using their debit or credit cards. Equity Bank has come to play an important role in the lives of many, earning the brand respect and trust. The Bank resonates with its clients in the way the clients define themselves - as members, not customers.

A Wings To Fly scholar receives scholarship letter

People who are valued for who they are, not simply the profit they represent. The biggest challenge for Africa has been poverty, which can only be confronted by entrepreneurs who create wealth. Equity Bank wants to be the catalyst for an entrepreneurial culture where people will be encouraged to embrace the production of goods and services, which will in the end, transform into wealth creation by and for Africans themselves. Equity Centre, Hospital Road, Upper Hill. +254 - 020 2262000 +254 - 0711 026000 +254 - 0732 112000 http://www.facebook.com/KeEquityBank https://twitter.com/KeEquityBank Email: info@equitybank.co.ke www.equitybankgroup.com

The use of Biometric Technology in Northern Kenya was a first by Equity where beneficiaries receive cash aid which they access from agents using their prepaid cards instead of food relief

Best of Kenya

145


System (CDS) operated by CDSC. With the implementation of Dematerialization, risks involved with physical certificates have been eliminated and the time required to clear each transaction reduced tremendously.

Central Depository & Settlement Corporation Limited (CDSC)

This process has significantly raised the profile of Kenya’s Capital Markets in adherence to international best practice. Consequently, the enhanced efficiency arising from Dematerialization is expected to encourage more investors to flock to the securities exchange.

‘Safeguarding Your Investments’ Safaricom being among them. Prior to November 2004, the NSE used a manual delivery and settlement system. The system involved the exchange of transfer forms and share certificates between stockbrokers, NSE and the relevant shares registrars of listed companies before a trading transaction could be completed and the buyer issued with a share certificate in his/her name. The delivery and settlement system was intended to take the T+5 Cycle (day of trading plus five days). However, in practice it took an average of between eight (8) and fourteen (14) days and sometimes it could even take up to 60 days to complete a transaction. The use of paper certificates faced several challenges ranging from duplication of shares, signature mismatches, and theft and loss of share certificates among others. These challenges were a major contributor to arbitration cases and investor disputes.

CDSC Chairman Mike Bristow (left), NSE Chief Executive Peter Mwangi (center) and CMA Chairman Kung’u Gatabaki (right) confer during the Capital Markets Joint Board meeting in Mombasa recently

The Central Depository & Settlement Corporation Limited (CDSC) is a limited liability Company approved by the Capital Markets Authority under Section 5 of the Central Depositories Act, 2000 to establish and operate a system for the central handling of deliveries and settlement of securities in the Kenya Capital Markets. It was incorporated on 23rd March 1999 under the Companies Act, 2000 and commenced its operations as a central depository on 10th November 2004.

for immobilization, meaning that from that date, the certificates could be surrendered and replaced with an electronic record of holdings referred to as a book entry security. It also meant that no eligible security could be traded on the securities exchange without being immobilized.

The central depository system provides a centralized system for the transfer and registration of securities in electronic format without the necessity of physical certificates.

The introduction of the book entry or electronic securities in the market, has eliminated the inefficiencies and risks associated with a paper based trading environment, enhanced the safety and security of dealing with shares by bringing , transparency to transactions in the market thereby building investors’ confidence and leading to increased market activity. The number of investor’s CDS accounts has grown exponentially since that time, from 30,000 accounts in 2004, to the current 2.4 million plus accounts. The successful IPOs that were launched in the market between 2005 and 2008 contributed largely to the exponential growth; the likes of Kengen and

Since inception, CDSC has registered impressive milestones; as part of its larger mission to enhance efficiency in the capital markets. Immobilization In November 2004, the immobilization of securities started in a phased approach, where the listed companies were divided into four tranches, and CDSC progressively declared each tranche of securities eligible

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146

By February 2005, all securities listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange were eligible for immobilization, and all trading conducted on book entry securities.

The commissioning of the CDS system saw the corporation kick off its operations with a T+5 settlement cycle, meaning that following a trade at the securities exchange, the settlement process took five days to complete instead of the “T+n…“ cycle. The settlement process is the movement of funds from buyers to sellers and transfer of the related securities from sellers to buyers. In January 2008 the settlement cycle was improved to T+4, taking Kenya a step closer to compliance with the global standards of T+3 for settlement of transactions in securities markets. The improvement also supported a two hour increase in trading hours which now run from 9.00 a.m. to 300 p.m. all this bringing forth increased trading activity, market liquidity, increased investor appetite ( local and foreign), increased investor confidence, transparency in buying and selling of securities amongst others. In July 2011, Kenya achieved the global best practice standard after CDSC launched a T+3 settlement cycle, upgrading its delivery, clearing and settlement functions to comply with international standards. In 2006, the Safaricom IPO; the largest IPO in the history of East and Central Africa was launched, issued and settled through the Central Depository System. The corporation was central to the implementation of the Automated Trading System (ATS). In 2008, CDSC embarked on a series of joint investor education campaigns together the Capital Markets Authority

Investors now will no longer worry about loss of share certificates, nor the mutilation of certificates; and issuers will have less cost of issuing new shares as all these shall now be done in electronic format. Rose Mambo, CEO CDSC

and the Nairobi Securities Exchange in a bid to create financial literacy amongst investors. This endeavor now has an annual countrywide calendar of events. SMS Service With the impressive growth in investor numbers, CDSC introduced an SMS service which gives investors 24 hour access to their CDS accounts enabling them to keep track of their shares on their mobile phones anywhere and at any time. This service can be accessed by sending an SMS to 22372 and following the instructions thereof to complete one’s registration. In this regard, CDSC ensures that once subscribed, investors are always aware of their current shares portfolio and receive notifications whenever a transaction occurs in their respective securities accounts. Investors also receive corporate action announcements for such as bonus, share splits, dividends, etc. Dematerialization After nine years of successful investor voluntary immobilization of securities listed at the bourse, which saw a total of 80.95% of free float shares immobilized by end of 2012, and 52% of the total market capitalization being immobilized, CDSC in conjunction with the NSE and in consultation with CMA and other key stakeholders commenced a process towards the dematerialization of all securities quoted at the NSE as provided for in section 7 of the Central Depositories Act 2000. All Issuers of securities listed at the securities exchange were required to issue notices to their shareholders once a week for a period of three consecutive weeks leading up to the dematerialization date; a requirement they all compiled with. The process of Dematerialization commenced in 2012 and reached its conclusion on 1st November, 2013, when shares of all firms listed at the NSE were irreversibly converted into electronic form. Share certificates shall no longer be recognized as prima facie evidence of ownership of shares since evidence of ownership is now in the electronic holdings maintained in the Central Depository

All shares that had not been immobilized by the dematerialization date are now reflected as a record in the depository in the shareholders’ name pending the opening of a CDS account. However, it is worth noting that if a shareholder had immobilized their shares, they were not required to take any further action as a result of dematerialization. The decision to dematerialize all Securities quoted at the securities exchange is therefore a game changer and a major step in our capital market. Dematerialization continues to significantly raise the profile of Kenya’s capital market in adherence to international best practice, and opens up more avenues for products such as securities borrowing and lending, collateral management and investor services such as online voting and consolidated processing of corporate actions like dividends and bonuses. Throughout the growth process, CDSC has taken measures to ensure the security of shareholders’ shares. CDSC has offsite back up facilities and procedures that would ensure business continuity in the event of anything happening either to the computer system or its usual premises. CDSC has also taken precautions to ensure its system is not interfered with. The system is already robust enough to guarantee 99.9 per cent uptime and is backed by a strong IT team.

also taken advantage of this mechanism. CDSC is in the process of upgrading its system to embrace a modern and robust system architecture which is intended to achieve enhanced security features, through the use of technology that is more user-friendly and which will increase the array of business products that CDSC can support within the capital markets in line with its strategic initiatives. This will not only increase the efficiency in the capital markets but also the speed with which shares can be turned around while increasing the spectrum of business array that CDSC can engage in. The upgrade is expected to be complete by December 2014. The incorporation and establishment of CDSC Registrars Ltd in 2009 and 2010, a subsidiary fully owned and operated by CDSC, respectively brought about a new sphere to CDSC’s successes. The CDSC Registrars Limited Company was appointed as Registrars for the Deacon Public Offer in 2011 in Kenya, while CDSC Registrars Rwanda was appointed for the Bank of Kigali and Bralirwa IPO’s in 2011. The Nairobi Securities Exchange also appointed CDSC Registrars to manage its registry business. I & M and UAP insurance companies are amongst companies that have contracted the CDSC Registry arm to handle their respective registry businesses. As Kenya celebrates 50 years since it achieved its independence, CDSC looks back at the journey it has made, as part of its larger vision to make key contributions to Kenya’s economic growth with pride. For more information, please visit us or contact us on Kimathi Street, Nation Centre, 10th floor Tel: +254 020 2912000, 2229407 Mobile: 0724 256 134 or 0733 222 033 Email: cdsckenya@cdsckenya.com Website: www.cdsckenya.com

The benefits of an electronic market are already making an impact at the regional level. The East African Community is already enjoying benefits of linkages between the markets in the region, especially with regard to cross listed securities. The Regional Inter-depository Transfer Mechanism (RITM) is now available for holders of cross listed securities wishing to move their securities from the depository in one country to another, to enable them trade in the other market. This opens up new possibilities for investors seeking cross-border trade opportunities. Indeed it is this process that made it possible for shares of Umeme, cross listed in Nairobi in December 2012, to make its first trade in Nairobi in August 2013. The shares were made available across the border using the electronic transfer process agreed at the regional level. The cross listing of Uchumi in Rwanda in October 2013 has

Best of Kenya

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System (CDS) operated by CDSC. With the implementation of Dematerialization, risks involved with physical certificates have been eliminated and the time required to clear each transaction reduced tremendously.

Central Depository & Settlement Corporation Limited (CDSC)

This process has significantly raised the profile of Kenya’s Capital Markets in adherence to international best practice. Consequently, the enhanced efficiency arising from Dematerialization is expected to encourage more investors to flock to the securities exchange.

‘Safeguarding Your Investments’ Safaricom being among them. Prior to November 2004, the NSE used a manual delivery and settlement system. The system involved the exchange of transfer forms and share certificates between stockbrokers, NSE and the relevant shares registrars of listed companies before a trading transaction could be completed and the buyer issued with a share certificate in his/her name. The delivery and settlement system was intended to take the T+5 Cycle (day of trading plus five days). However, in practice it took an average of between eight (8) and fourteen (14) days and sometimes it could even take up to 60 days to complete a transaction. The use of paper certificates faced several challenges ranging from duplication of shares, signature mismatches, and theft and loss of share certificates among others. These challenges were a major contributor to arbitration cases and investor disputes.

CDSC Chairman Mike Bristow (left), NSE Chief Executive Peter Mwangi (center) and CMA Chairman Kung’u Gatabaki (right) confer during the Capital Markets Joint Board meeting in Mombasa recently

The Central Depository & Settlement Corporation Limited (CDSC) is a limited liability Company approved by the Capital Markets Authority under Section 5 of the Central Depositories Act, 2000 to establish and operate a system for the central handling of deliveries and settlement of securities in the Kenya Capital Markets. It was incorporated on 23rd March 1999 under the Companies Act, 2000 and commenced its operations as a central depository on 10th November 2004.

for immobilization, meaning that from that date, the certificates could be surrendered and replaced with an electronic record of holdings referred to as a book entry security. It also meant that no eligible security could be traded on the securities exchange without being immobilized.

The central depository system provides a centralized system for the transfer and registration of securities in electronic format without the necessity of physical certificates.

The introduction of the book entry or electronic securities in the market, has eliminated the inefficiencies and risks associated with a paper based trading environment, enhanced the safety and security of dealing with shares by bringing , transparency to transactions in the market thereby building investors’ confidence and leading to increased market activity. The number of investor’s CDS accounts has grown exponentially since that time, from 30,000 accounts in 2004, to the current 2.4 million plus accounts. The successful IPOs that were launched in the market between 2005 and 2008 contributed largely to the exponential growth; the likes of Kengen and

Since inception, CDSC has registered impressive milestones; as part of its larger mission to enhance efficiency in the capital markets. Immobilization In November 2004, the immobilization of securities started in a phased approach, where the listed companies were divided into four tranches, and CDSC progressively declared each tranche of securities eligible

Best of Kenya

146

By February 2005, all securities listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange were eligible for immobilization, and all trading conducted on book entry securities.

The commissioning of the CDS system saw the corporation kick off its operations with a T+5 settlement cycle, meaning that following a trade at the securities exchange, the settlement process took five days to complete instead of the “T+n…“ cycle. The settlement process is the movement of funds from buyers to sellers and transfer of the related securities from sellers to buyers. In January 2008 the settlement cycle was improved to T+4, taking Kenya a step closer to compliance with the global standards of T+3 for settlement of transactions in securities markets. The improvement also supported a two hour increase in trading hours which now run from 9.00 a.m. to 300 p.m. all this bringing forth increased trading activity, market liquidity, increased investor appetite ( local and foreign), increased investor confidence, transparency in buying and selling of securities amongst others. In July 2011, Kenya achieved the global best practice standard after CDSC launched a T+3 settlement cycle, upgrading its delivery, clearing and settlement functions to comply with international standards. In 2006, the Safaricom IPO; the largest IPO in the history of East and Central Africa was launched, issued and settled through the Central Depository System. The corporation was central to the implementation of the Automated Trading System (ATS). In 2008, CDSC embarked on a series of joint investor education campaigns together the Capital Markets Authority

Investors now will no longer worry about loss of share certificates, nor the mutilation of certificates; and issuers will have less cost of issuing new shares as all these shall now be done in electronic format. Rose Mambo, CEO CDSC

and the Nairobi Securities Exchange in a bid to create financial literacy amongst investors. This endeavor now has an annual countrywide calendar of events. SMS Service With the impressive growth in investor numbers, CDSC introduced an SMS service which gives investors 24 hour access to their CDS accounts enabling them to keep track of their shares on their mobile phones anywhere and at any time. This service can be accessed by sending an SMS to 22372 and following the instructions thereof to complete one’s registration. In this regard, CDSC ensures that once subscribed, investors are always aware of their current shares portfolio and receive notifications whenever a transaction occurs in their respective securities accounts. Investors also receive corporate action announcements for such as bonus, share splits, dividends, etc. Dematerialization After nine years of successful investor voluntary immobilization of securities listed at the bourse, which saw a total of 80.95% of free float shares immobilized by end of 2012, and 52% of the total market capitalization being immobilized, CDSC in conjunction with the NSE and in consultation with CMA and other key stakeholders commenced a process towards the dematerialization of all securities quoted at the NSE as provided for in section 7 of the Central Depositories Act 2000. All Issuers of securities listed at the securities exchange were required to issue notices to their shareholders once a week for a period of three consecutive weeks leading up to the dematerialization date; a requirement they all compiled with. The process of Dematerialization commenced in 2012 and reached its conclusion on 1st November, 2013, when shares of all firms listed at the NSE were irreversibly converted into electronic form. Share certificates shall no longer be recognized as prima facie evidence of ownership of shares since evidence of ownership is now in the electronic holdings maintained in the Central Depository

All shares that had not been immobilized by the dematerialization date are now reflected as a record in the depository in the shareholders’ name pending the opening of a CDS account. However, it is worth noting that if a shareholder had immobilized their shares, they were not required to take any further action as a result of dematerialization. The decision to dematerialize all Securities quoted at the securities exchange is therefore a game changer and a major step in our capital market. Dematerialization continues to significantly raise the profile of Kenya’s capital market in adherence to international best practice, and opens up more avenues for products such as securities borrowing and lending, collateral management and investor services such as online voting and consolidated processing of corporate actions like dividends and bonuses. Throughout the growth process, CDSC has taken measures to ensure the security of shareholders’ shares. CDSC has offsite back up facilities and procedures that would ensure business continuity in the event of anything happening either to the computer system or its usual premises. CDSC has also taken precautions to ensure its system is not interfered with. The system is already robust enough to guarantee 99.9 per cent uptime and is backed by a strong IT team.

also taken advantage of this mechanism. CDSC is in the process of upgrading its system to embrace a modern and robust system architecture which is intended to achieve enhanced security features, through the use of technology that is more user-friendly and which will increase the array of business products that CDSC can support within the capital markets in line with its strategic initiatives. This will not only increase the efficiency in the capital markets but also the speed with which shares can be turned around while increasing the spectrum of business array that CDSC can engage in. The upgrade is expected to be complete by December 2014. The incorporation and establishment of CDSC Registrars Ltd in 2009 and 2010, a subsidiary fully owned and operated by CDSC, respectively brought about a new sphere to CDSC’s successes. The CDSC Registrars Limited Company was appointed as Registrars for the Deacon Public Offer in 2011 in Kenya, while CDSC Registrars Rwanda was appointed for the Bank of Kigali and Bralirwa IPO’s in 2011. The Nairobi Securities Exchange also appointed CDSC Registrars to manage its registry business. I & M and UAP insurance companies are amongst companies that have contracted the CDSC Registry arm to handle their respective registry businesses. As Kenya celebrates 50 years since it achieved its independence, CDSC looks back at the journey it has made, as part of its larger vision to make key contributions to Kenya’s economic growth with pride. For more information, please visit us or contact us on Kimathi Street, Nation Centre, 10th floor Tel: +254 020 2912000, 2229407 Mobile: 0724 256 134 or 0733 222 033 Email: cdsckenya@cdsckenya.com Website: www.cdsckenya.com

The benefits of an electronic market are already making an impact at the regional level. The East African Community is already enjoying benefits of linkages between the markets in the region, especially with regard to cross listed securities. The Regional Inter-depository Transfer Mechanism (RITM) is now available for holders of cross listed securities wishing to move their securities from the depository in one country to another, to enable them trade in the other market. This opens up new possibilities for investors seeking cross-border trade opportunities. Indeed it is this process that made it possible for shares of Umeme, cross listed in Nairobi in December 2012, to make its first trade in Nairobi in August 2013. The shares were made available across the border using the electronic transfer process agreed at the regional level. The cross listing of Uchumi in Rwanda in October 2013 has

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CHAPTER 9 Energy

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CHAPTER 9 Energy

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Electrifying the City In the 2011/2012 Budget, Treasury allocated KShs15.6 billion for the expansion of electricity transmission systems, KShs16 billion towards geothermal development, and KShs5.6 billion for rural electrification programmes. It is all in the spirit of keeping the city electrified and the country powered

and 67.65 per cent of the total final energy consumption. Power demand is projected to peak at 2,029 mega watts (MW) by 2016, and 15,000 MW by the year 2030. According to Kenya Power, the new sources of energy lie in the exploitation of geothermal power, coal, renewable energy sources, and connecting Kenya to energy-surplus countries in the region. In the 2011/2012 Budget, the Treasury allocated KShs15.6 billion towards the expansion of electricity transmission system, KShs16 billion towards geothermal development, and Sh5.6 billion for rural electrification programmes. Accordingly, KPLC says, the country’s installed power capacity stood at 1599.9 MW by May this year against available generation capacity of 1359.2 MW, while system peak demand stands at 1,191.03MW. To meet the rising demand for energy, which is projected to increase at an average of eight per cent in coming years, the country needs massive investments in generation, transmission and distribution some KShs1.7 trillion is required to generate 5,000 megawatts of geothermal power alone by 2030. The energy sector contributes about 9.49 per cent to the GDP with the petroleum, electricity and fuelwood sectors contributing 8.4 per cent, 0.6 per and 0.4 per cent, respectively. The GDP per unit of oil equivalent is PPP US$2.98 compared to that of Botswana of US$12 and Tanzania US$2.53. Nairobi accounts for about half of Kenya’s total electricity sales, according to reports in the Kenya Power annual report—underlining the significance of the capital’s economic contribution to economic development.

The rising demand for electricity has tended to exert pressure on the city’s power infrastructure. Increased demand for electricity in Nairobi, which accounts for more than half of the national energy consumption, coupled with an inadequate power infrastructure, including substations and transmission lines, has contributed to supply interruptions. This means reduced productivity as companies seek energy alternatives such as fuel generators to sustain production.

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Estimates indicate that the energy subsector requires more than KShs400 billion worth of investment over the next five years to meet growing power demand in the country, which has been steadily increasing, prompted by accelerated connections of ordinary and industrial consumers. “The demand for electricity has grown at an annual average rate of 5.3 per cent over the past five years, and is projected to accelerate to over 10 per cent per year due to the implementation of the Vision 2030 projects,” says former Kenya Power Managing Director Joseph Njoroge.

He says this has necessitated increased investments in new generation capacity to meet the ever-rising demand. According to the National Energy Matrix, total final energy consumption in Kenya in 2009 was 14,353.8 tonnes of oil and other equivalents while the total primary energy supply was 18,215.99. Petroleum fuel accounts for about 28.57 per cent of the total final energy consumption, while electricity and combustible renewable sources account for about 3.11 per cent

Kenya Power recorded sales of Sh24.1 billion in the year to June, which is 55 per cent of the total electricity sales of Sh43.8 billion. This has made it critical for the power chiefs to build new substations and high voltage lines to allow Nairobi to reap from the additional upcoming power plants that will help meet the new electricity demand. Ketraco has kicked off a Sh22.5 billion expansion plan that will start with the construction of four substations at Athi River, Isinya, Ngong, and Komarock to help connect the city with power generators in

Rift Valley, central Kenya and Uganda. There are also opportunities in the exploration of wind energy and large-scale investment in solar power and biofuels. The vast expanse of the country enjoys sunlight for the better part of the year, which is conducive for solar harvesting. Experimental growing of the “Jatropha” plant has begun in the country and especially in the hotter and humid coastal region, which is said to favour the plant. Jatropha is already being tested as an eco-friendly organic alternative to diesel fuel. A 2007 World Bank report said Kenya has annual solar energy resources equivalent to the discovery of roughly 70 million tons of oil. About 30 000 solar photovoltaic (PV) systems are sold annually. The industry is thriving, making the country one of the best examples of where solar energy technology has taken off in sub-Saharan Africa. But further investment is required, especially in the manufacturing of PV panels. Kenya’s wind energy capacity is considerable; the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has estimated it could reach 3,000 megawatts (MW), more than double the current national demand. Northern districts such as Turkana and Marsabit have the greatest potential, and wind farm construction is proceeding apace.

the Kenya Electricity Generating Company (KenGen), Kenya has the potential to install more than 2,000MW of renewable electricity over the next three years under the green energy initiative championed by the government. Mr Njoroge says Kenya has the potential to install about 800MW of wind power and 500MW of geothermal power over the next two to three years. Other identified renewable energy sources include biomass, hydro and municipal solid waste. The government is also betting big on wind power. Already KenGen has set up a 5.1-MW wind farm in Ngong, which was commissioned in September 2008. The company plans to erect a second 10-MW wind farm in the area, at a cost of KShs2 billion [about US$25 million]. The government is also encouraging private companies to set up wind farms. The African Development Bank pumped more than $400 million into what is set to be the biggest wind farm in Africa. The 300-MW wind farm will be constructed in Turkana county under the Lake Turkana Wind Power Company (LTWP) and was set to go online by July 2

According to Mr Eddie Njoroge, the CEO of

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Electrifying the City In the 2011/2012 Budget, Treasury allocated KShs15.6 billion for the expansion of electricity transmission systems, KShs16 billion towards geothermal development, and KShs5.6 billion for rural electrification programmes. It is all in the spirit of keeping the city electrified and the country powered

and 67.65 per cent of the total final energy consumption. Power demand is projected to peak at 2,029 mega watts (MW) by 2016, and 15,000 MW by the year 2030. According to Kenya Power, the new sources of energy lie in the exploitation of geothermal power, coal, renewable energy sources, and connecting Kenya to energy-surplus countries in the region. In the 2011/2012 Budget, the Treasury allocated KShs15.6 billion towards the expansion of electricity transmission system, KShs16 billion towards geothermal development, and Sh5.6 billion for rural electrification programmes. Accordingly, KPLC says, the country’s installed power capacity stood at 1599.9 MW by May this year against available generation capacity of 1359.2 MW, while system peak demand stands at 1,191.03MW. To meet the rising demand for energy, which is projected to increase at an average of eight per cent in coming years, the country needs massive investments in generation, transmission and distribution some KShs1.7 trillion is required to generate 5,000 megawatts of geothermal power alone by 2030. The energy sector contributes about 9.49 per cent to the GDP with the petroleum, electricity and fuelwood sectors contributing 8.4 per cent, 0.6 per and 0.4 per cent, respectively. The GDP per unit of oil equivalent is PPP US$2.98 compared to that of Botswana of US$12 and Tanzania US$2.53. Nairobi accounts for about half of Kenya’s total electricity sales, according to reports in the Kenya Power annual report—underlining the significance of the capital’s economic contribution to economic development.

The rising demand for electricity has tended to exert pressure on the city’s power infrastructure. Increased demand for electricity in Nairobi, which accounts for more than half of the national energy consumption, coupled with an inadequate power infrastructure, including substations and transmission lines, has contributed to supply interruptions. This means reduced productivity as companies seek energy alternatives such as fuel generators to sustain production.

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Estimates indicate that the energy subsector requires more than KShs400 billion worth of investment over the next five years to meet growing power demand in the country, which has been steadily increasing, prompted by accelerated connections of ordinary and industrial consumers. “The demand for electricity has grown at an annual average rate of 5.3 per cent over the past five years, and is projected to accelerate to over 10 per cent per year due to the implementation of the Vision 2030 projects,” says former Kenya Power Managing Director Joseph Njoroge.

He says this has necessitated increased investments in new generation capacity to meet the ever-rising demand. According to the National Energy Matrix, total final energy consumption in Kenya in 2009 was 14,353.8 tonnes of oil and other equivalents while the total primary energy supply was 18,215.99. Petroleum fuel accounts for about 28.57 per cent of the total final energy consumption, while electricity and combustible renewable sources account for about 3.11 per cent

Kenya Power recorded sales of Sh24.1 billion in the year to June, which is 55 per cent of the total electricity sales of Sh43.8 billion. This has made it critical for the power chiefs to build new substations and high voltage lines to allow Nairobi to reap from the additional upcoming power plants that will help meet the new electricity demand. Ketraco has kicked off a Sh22.5 billion expansion plan that will start with the construction of four substations at Athi River, Isinya, Ngong, and Komarock to help connect the city with power generators in

Rift Valley, central Kenya and Uganda. There are also opportunities in the exploration of wind energy and large-scale investment in solar power and biofuels. The vast expanse of the country enjoys sunlight for the better part of the year, which is conducive for solar harvesting. Experimental growing of the “Jatropha” plant has begun in the country and especially in the hotter and humid coastal region, which is said to favour the plant. Jatropha is already being tested as an eco-friendly organic alternative to diesel fuel. A 2007 World Bank report said Kenya has annual solar energy resources equivalent to the discovery of roughly 70 million tons of oil. About 30 000 solar photovoltaic (PV) systems are sold annually. The industry is thriving, making the country one of the best examples of where solar energy technology has taken off in sub-Saharan Africa. But further investment is required, especially in the manufacturing of PV panels. Kenya’s wind energy capacity is considerable; the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has estimated it could reach 3,000 megawatts (MW), more than double the current national demand. Northern districts such as Turkana and Marsabit have the greatest potential, and wind farm construction is proceeding apace.

the Kenya Electricity Generating Company (KenGen), Kenya has the potential to install more than 2,000MW of renewable electricity over the next three years under the green energy initiative championed by the government. Mr Njoroge says Kenya has the potential to install about 800MW of wind power and 500MW of geothermal power over the next two to three years. Other identified renewable energy sources include biomass, hydro and municipal solid waste. The government is also betting big on wind power. Already KenGen has set up a 5.1-MW wind farm in Ngong, which was commissioned in September 2008. The company plans to erect a second 10-MW wind farm in the area, at a cost of KShs2 billion [about US$25 million]. The government is also encouraging private companies to set up wind farms. The African Development Bank pumped more than $400 million into what is set to be the biggest wind farm in Africa. The 300-MW wind farm will be constructed in Turkana county under the Lake Turkana Wind Power Company (LTWP) and was set to go online by July 2

According to Mr Eddie Njoroge, the CEO of

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CHAPTER 10 Water Management

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CHAPTER 10 Water Management

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Lake Victoria North Water Services Board forms the bulk of our stakeholders, have not been forgotten either. The uniqueness of the rural set ups necessitates a more focused and strategic approach towards water and sanitation service provision interventions. The Board has rolled out a number of projects in the rural areas based on their individual respective needs, with funding mainly from the Water Services Trust Fund and UNICEF through a Community Project Cycle and WASH programmes. This, in addition to a number of projects being undertaken by the District Water Officers in these areas, has sustained increased expansion of service provision. World Bank funds water projects in LVNWSB Lake Victoria North Water Services Board is in the process of finalising major projects under the Nzoia Cluster Phase III Water and Sanitation Programme with financial support from the World Bank and the Government of Kenya. The WASSIP programme was designed to provide major facelifts to various small cluster towns within the Board’s area of jurisdiction which have suffered from perennial lack of water and inadequate sanitation.

Introduction Lake Victoria North Water Services Board (LVNWSB) is one of the eight Water Services Boards established under the Water Act of 2002 with the mandate of ensuring efficient and economic provision of water and sanitation services within their respective areas of jurisdiction. The Board serves about 20 per cent of the entire population of Kenya, approximately 7 million people, in an expansive geographical coverage of about 14,000 square kilometres in eight counties including Kakamega (the second most populous county after Nairobi), Busia, Bungoma and Vihiga counties in the Western region and Uasin Gishu, Trans-Nzoia and parts of Nandi and Elgeyo Marakwet counties in the North Rift. The mandate of the Board is to contract, monitor and enforce agreements between it and water service providers in accordance with the regulations set by the Water Services Regulatory Board; ensure effective and economical provision of water services

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within its area of jurisdiction; monitor and acquire assets; plan, manage and develop water and sewerage services and take custody of water services provision assets. Like other water service boards in Kenya, the LVNWSB has the mandate of ensuring efficient and economic provision of water and sewerage services within its area of jurisdiction. Direct provision of water and sewerage services is undertaken by Water Service Providers (WSPs) who are the Board’s agents. Infrastructure development In order to keep up with the growing demand for our services, LVNWSB intensified infrastructural investments geared towards expanding service provision to our people. The Board systematised intervention plans towards reaching more people by developing a long term infrastructural investment plan targeting all the major towns in the order of needs. The long term Water and Sanitation Service

Improvement Plan was clustered into three main phases: the Nzoia Cluster Phase I, II and III. The projects are majorly financed through support from the Government of Kenya and our development partners including the Federal Republic of Germany through KfW, the World Bank, Italian government, Japanese government through the Japanese International Corporation Agency (JICA), Water Services Trust Fund and UNICEF, among others. The projects have been distributed evenly within the Board’s coverage area, with almost all the major towns having their supply systems either improved or new ones developed, resulting in close to 1 million new consumers who hitherto did not have access to the precious commodity now being guaranteed of regular and uninterrupted supply. The rural populations which apparently

The objectives of the WaSSSIP project include increasing access to reliable, affordable and sustainable water supply and sanitation services as well as improving the water and wastewater services in areas of LVNWSB’s jurisdiction. One of the biggest beneficiaries of the programme is Mumias Municipality and its environs, through the implementation of the Mumias Water Supply Project, at a cost of KShs1.6 billion. The project, which is targeted to benefit the small urban centres along the main pipeline and the adjoining rural areas, will see an increase in production of potable water from the current 1,618m3/d to 15,000m3 per day, which is enough to serve over 150,000 people by the design horizon of up to the year 2025. In Kimilili town, the Kimilili Water Supply Project was expanded at a cost of over KShs281 million to supply water to Kimilili Municipality and the adjacent rural areas of Ndivisi, Bituyu, Misikhu and Lugulu. In Lessos Trading Centre, the Lessos Water Supply Project is complete and operational. The same is the case with The Lumakanda Kipkaren centres where a new water supply

project is in its final stages of completion at a cost of over KShs260 million. In Eldoret town, the Chebara/Chebiamit Treatment Works, the main source of water for Eldoret town and its environs, has been expanded to produce an additional 10,000m3 per day, raising the total production of water from the Chebara Treatment Works alone from the current 18,000 m3 to 28,000 m3. In addition, there has been expansion of the reticulation system in Eldoret to expand supply of water in Eldoret town. The other towns that have also benefited from the WaSSIP programme are Kaimosi, Jeptulu, Serem and Hamisi where similar works have been undertaken. Following the successful implementation of the first phase of the project, the World Bank has granted the Board additional finances through the Ministry of Environment, Water and Natural Resources for implementation of more projects. These include the expansion of Kapsoya Treatment Works and Ellegerini pipeline in Uasin Gishu County, Kipkarren Dam Water Supply Project, Extensions for Kapsowar/ Kapcherop Water Distribution Network and electricity generation from Eldoret Waste Water Treatment Plant. Other projects include the rehabilitation of Kwanza Water Supply Project and construction of sanitation facilities for informal settlements in Mumias and Eldoret towns. This programme shall also undertake drilling and equipping of drought mitigation boreholes in a number of drought affected

parts of the Board’s area of jurisdiction. This will come together with a package Treatment Units and Supply of Plastic Tanks to mitigate on droughts. Provision of water and sanitation services Direct Water Services provision is undertaken on behalf of the Board by its contracted agents; Water Service Providers. The Water Service Providers include:

• Eldoret Water and Sanitation Company (Eldowas) in Uasin Gishu County

• Nzoia Water and Sanitation Company • • •

(Nzowasco), serving Bungoma and Trans Nzoia County Kapsabet Nandi Water and Sanitation Company (Kapnawasco), serving parts of Nandi County Amatsi Water and Sanitation Company (Amatsi), serving Vihiga County Kakamega Busia Water Supply for Kakamega and Busia counties.

Lake Victoria North Water Services Board, Maji Safi Maisha Bora LVNWSB certified to ISO 9001:2008 and ISO 14001:2004

KEFINCO Building Off Kakamega/Kisumu Road P. O Box 673 - 50100, Kakamega Tel: +254-056-30795, 31552 Email: info@lvnwsb.go.ke www.lvnwsb.go.ke

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Lake Victoria North Water Services Board forms the bulk of our stakeholders, have not been forgotten either. The uniqueness of the rural set ups necessitates a more focused and strategic approach towards water and sanitation service provision interventions. The Board has rolled out a number of projects in the rural areas based on their individual respective needs, with funding mainly from the Water Services Trust Fund and UNICEF through a Community Project Cycle and WASH programmes. This, in addition to a number of projects being undertaken by the District Water Officers in these areas, has sustained increased expansion of service provision. World Bank funds water projects in LVNWSB Lake Victoria North Water Services Board is in the process of finalising major projects under the Nzoia Cluster Phase III Water and Sanitation Programme with financial support from the World Bank and the Government of Kenya. The WASSIP programme was designed to provide major facelifts to various small cluster towns within the Board’s area of jurisdiction which have suffered from perennial lack of water and inadequate sanitation.

Introduction Lake Victoria North Water Services Board (LVNWSB) is one of the eight Water Services Boards established under the Water Act of 2002 with the mandate of ensuring efficient and economic provision of water and sanitation services within their respective areas of jurisdiction. The Board serves about 20 per cent of the entire population of Kenya, approximately 7 million people, in an expansive geographical coverage of about 14,000 square kilometres in eight counties including Kakamega (the second most populous county after Nairobi), Busia, Bungoma and Vihiga counties in the Western region and Uasin Gishu, Trans-Nzoia and parts of Nandi and Elgeyo Marakwet counties in the North Rift. The mandate of the Board is to contract, monitor and enforce agreements between it and water service providers in accordance with the regulations set by the Water Services Regulatory Board; ensure effective and economical provision of water services

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within its area of jurisdiction; monitor and acquire assets; plan, manage and develop water and sewerage services and take custody of water services provision assets. Like other water service boards in Kenya, the LVNWSB has the mandate of ensuring efficient and economic provision of water and sewerage services within its area of jurisdiction. Direct provision of water and sewerage services is undertaken by Water Service Providers (WSPs) who are the Board’s agents. Infrastructure development In order to keep up with the growing demand for our services, LVNWSB intensified infrastructural investments geared towards expanding service provision to our people. The Board systematised intervention plans towards reaching more people by developing a long term infrastructural investment plan targeting all the major towns in the order of needs. The long term Water and Sanitation Service

Improvement Plan was clustered into three main phases: the Nzoia Cluster Phase I, II and III. The projects are majorly financed through support from the Government of Kenya and our development partners including the Federal Republic of Germany through KfW, the World Bank, Italian government, Japanese government through the Japanese International Corporation Agency (JICA), Water Services Trust Fund and UNICEF, among others. The projects have been distributed evenly within the Board’s coverage area, with almost all the major towns having their supply systems either improved or new ones developed, resulting in close to 1 million new consumers who hitherto did not have access to the precious commodity now being guaranteed of regular and uninterrupted supply. The rural populations which apparently

The objectives of the WaSSSIP project include increasing access to reliable, affordable and sustainable water supply and sanitation services as well as improving the water and wastewater services in areas of LVNWSB’s jurisdiction. One of the biggest beneficiaries of the programme is Mumias Municipality and its environs, through the implementation of the Mumias Water Supply Project, at a cost of KShs1.6 billion. The project, which is targeted to benefit the small urban centres along the main pipeline and the adjoining rural areas, will see an increase in production of potable water from the current 1,618m3/d to 15,000m3 per day, which is enough to serve over 150,000 people by the design horizon of up to the year 2025. In Kimilili town, the Kimilili Water Supply Project was expanded at a cost of over KShs281 million to supply water to Kimilili Municipality and the adjacent rural areas of Ndivisi, Bituyu, Misikhu and Lugulu. In Lessos Trading Centre, the Lessos Water Supply Project is complete and operational. The same is the case with The Lumakanda Kipkaren centres where a new water supply

project is in its final stages of completion at a cost of over KShs260 million. In Eldoret town, the Chebara/Chebiamit Treatment Works, the main source of water for Eldoret town and its environs, has been expanded to produce an additional 10,000m3 per day, raising the total production of water from the Chebara Treatment Works alone from the current 18,000 m3 to 28,000 m3. In addition, there has been expansion of the reticulation system in Eldoret to expand supply of water in Eldoret town. The other towns that have also benefited from the WaSSIP programme are Kaimosi, Jeptulu, Serem and Hamisi where similar works have been undertaken. Following the successful implementation of the first phase of the project, the World Bank has granted the Board additional finances through the Ministry of Environment, Water and Natural Resources for implementation of more projects. These include the expansion of Kapsoya Treatment Works and Ellegerini pipeline in Uasin Gishu County, Kipkarren Dam Water Supply Project, Extensions for Kapsowar/ Kapcherop Water Distribution Network and electricity generation from Eldoret Waste Water Treatment Plant. Other projects include the rehabilitation of Kwanza Water Supply Project and construction of sanitation facilities for informal settlements in Mumias and Eldoret towns. This programme shall also undertake drilling and equipping of drought mitigation boreholes in a number of drought affected

parts of the Board’s area of jurisdiction. This will come together with a package Treatment Units and Supply of Plastic Tanks to mitigate on droughts. Provision of water and sanitation services Direct Water Services provision is undertaken on behalf of the Board by its contracted agents; Water Service Providers. The Water Service Providers include:

• Eldoret Water and Sanitation Company (Eldowas) in Uasin Gishu County

• Nzoia Water and Sanitation Company • • •

(Nzowasco), serving Bungoma and Trans Nzoia County Kapsabet Nandi Water and Sanitation Company (Kapnawasco), serving parts of Nandi County Amatsi Water and Sanitation Company (Amatsi), serving Vihiga County Kakamega Busia Water Supply for Kakamega and Busia counties.

Lake Victoria North Water Services Board, Maji Safi Maisha Bora LVNWSB certified to ISO 9001:2008 and ISO 14001:2004

KEFINCO Building Off Kakamega/Kisumu Road P. O Box 673 - 50100, Kakamega Tel: +254-056-30795, 31552 Email: info@lvnwsb.go.ke www.lvnwsb.go.ke

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CHAPTER 11 Information and Communications Technology (ICT)

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CHAPTER 11 Information and Communications Technology (ICT)

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Communications Commission of Kenya (CCK) Transforming Lives Through ICTs Plan, which has taken into consideration critical government ideals set out in the Constitution, Vision 2030 and the National ICT Policy, aims to reconfigure CCK to play a facilitatory role in line with the dynamic nature of the ICT sector. To expedite the implementation of ICT projects to the under served areas of the country, CCK is mandated to administer and manage the Universal Service Fund (USF). The Fund, whose governance structure is now in place and is ready for operationalization, will be a collective contribution by all the players in the ICT sector. The purpose of the Fund is to support widespread access to ICT services, promote capacity building and innovations in ICT services in the country. Over the last five years, as activities to operationalize the Fund were underway, CCK has been implementing universal access projects on a pilot basis in various regions across the country. CCK has partnered with various institutions to provide computers and internet connectivity to 16 school-based ICT centers in Coast, Eastern, Nyanza, Western, Rift Valley, Central North Eastern and Nairobi regions.

Cabinet secretaries, Dr. Fred Matinagi, Ministry of Information, Communications and Technology and Ms. Anne Waiguru, Ministry of Devolution and Planning, pose for a picture during the launch of the National Broadband Strategy in July 2013

The last 50 years have seen tremendous growth in Kenya on various fronts more so socially, economically and politically. Of importance to note is the rapid growth and widespread use of Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) across the country. The Communications Commission of Kenya (CCK) has played a critical role in the growth of the ICT sector since commencing its operations in July 1999. CCK is mandated by the Kenya Information and Communications Act Cap 411A to license all systems and services in the communications industry, including telecommunications, postal/courier and broadcasting. CCK is also responsible for managing the country’s frequency spectrum and numbering resources, and facilitating the development of e-commerce. Today, Kenya boasts over 31 million mobile

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subscribers who are served by four mobile service providers representing 77% of the population. This growing use of the mobile phone could be attributed to efforts put in place to ensure both the devices and cost of calling are affordable. CCK is mandated to manage competition in the ICT sector and subsequently carries out various initiatives to ensure both the consumers and investors are benefiting from the servies available. Over the last decade, CCK has continued to revise downwards mobile termination rates in line with the studies carried out to determine optimal costs. Consequently, the cost of calling has significantly dropped and subscribers can now enjoy calling rates as low as ksh2.00 per minute. The mobile phone has become a ubiquitous device and has evolved to be more than just a voice device. With the increased use of smartphones and innovative applications, mobile phones today perform multiple

functions. Statistics from the sector show that the mobile internet subscriptions account for 99 percent of total internet subscriptions which stood at 11.6million in September 2013. Kenya is recognized world over for the development and innovative use of mobile money services. This innovative use of the mobile phone has enabled diverse financial transactions including banking and has revolutionized payment systems in the country. Over 80 per cent of mobile subscribers in Kenya are actively using mobile money services. With all these initiatives aimed at increasing access to ICT services across the country, CCK’s vision remains ensuring access to and use of information and communication services by all in Kenya by 2018. Over the next five years, CCK will continue working towards implementing goals set out in its 2013-2018 Strategic Plan. The Strategic

Digital migration- John Omo, Company Secretary, and Amb. Bruce Madete, Alternate CCK Board Director, flag off the Digital Migration roadshow in Nairobi

CCK supports a one-stop web portal for and on Persons with Disabilities (PwD) (www. kenyadisability.or.ke). Further, CCK supports eight PwD institutions including Thika High School for the Blind, Machakos Technical Institute for the Blind, Kibos Secondary School for the Blind (Kisumu), Rev Muhoro Secondary School for the Deaf (Mukurweini), Kuja Secondary School for the Deaf (Rongo), Mombasa Secondary School for the Physically Disabled and Joyland Secondary School (Kisumu). In addition, CCK has also worked with Kenya Institue of Curriculum Development to digitize the secondary schools curriculum. To enable Kenya achieve the Vision 2030 goal of becoming a knowledge-based society; access to high speed internet is critical. CCK in collaboration with the Ministry of Information, Communications and Technology developed the National Broadband Strategy (NBS) which provides a roadmap towards achieving a connected economy. Given the continued demand by consumers for higher capacity Internet connection, the 2013-18 Strategic Plan aims to grow wireless broadband to 10 percent up from the current 2.4 per cent. The NBS focuses on five key thematic areas: infrastructure, connectivity and devices; content, applications and innovations;

CCK Board Chairman, Ngene Gituku, officially launches the E-Resource Centres in partnership with Kenya National Library Services (KNLS). Looking on are CCK Director General, Francis Wangusi (front left) and KNLS CEO, Mr. Atuti (back left)

capacity building and awareness; policy, legal and regulatory environment; and financing and investment. To achieve this, CCK will work with a cross section of institutions. It is envisaged that with access high quality broadband there shall be positive growth in investments, education and training, access to online government services and increased job creation. As more Kenyans access the cyber world, the risks of cybercrime proportionately increase. To curb this, CCK facilitated the establishment of the Kenya Computer

Incidence Response Team Coordination Centre (KE-CIRT/CC) whose role is to respond to and manage cyber security incidents on a national level in collaboration with local stakeholders. Further, CCK is currently setting up the Public Key Infrsaucture (PKI) which will provide a platform for licensing and certification electronic signatures. Once the PKI is operational, the take up of electronic commerce in the country will be catalyzed. Information and entertainment is big business, and this can be seen in the

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Communications Commission of Kenya (CCK) Transforming Lives Through ICTs Plan, which has taken into consideration critical government ideals set out in the Constitution, Vision 2030 and the National ICT Policy, aims to reconfigure CCK to play a facilitatory role in line with the dynamic nature of the ICT sector. To expedite the implementation of ICT projects to the under served areas of the country, CCK is mandated to administer and manage the Universal Service Fund (USF). The Fund, whose governance structure is now in place and is ready for operationalization, will be a collective contribution by all the players in the ICT sector. The purpose of the Fund is to support widespread access to ICT services, promote capacity building and innovations in ICT services in the country. Over the last five years, as activities to operationalize the Fund were underway, CCK has been implementing universal access projects on a pilot basis in various regions across the country. CCK has partnered with various institutions to provide computers and internet connectivity to 16 school-based ICT centers in Coast, Eastern, Nyanza, Western, Rift Valley, Central North Eastern and Nairobi regions.

Cabinet secretaries, Dr. Fred Matinagi, Ministry of Information, Communications and Technology and Ms. Anne Waiguru, Ministry of Devolution and Planning, pose for a picture during the launch of the National Broadband Strategy in July 2013

The last 50 years have seen tremendous growth in Kenya on various fronts more so socially, economically and politically. Of importance to note is the rapid growth and widespread use of Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) across the country. The Communications Commission of Kenya (CCK) has played a critical role in the growth of the ICT sector since commencing its operations in July 1999. CCK is mandated by the Kenya Information and Communications Act Cap 411A to license all systems and services in the communications industry, including telecommunications, postal/courier and broadcasting. CCK is also responsible for managing the country’s frequency spectrum and numbering resources, and facilitating the development of e-commerce. Today, Kenya boasts over 31 million mobile

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subscribers who are served by four mobile service providers representing 77% of the population. This growing use of the mobile phone could be attributed to efforts put in place to ensure both the devices and cost of calling are affordable. CCK is mandated to manage competition in the ICT sector and subsequently carries out various initiatives to ensure both the consumers and investors are benefiting from the servies available. Over the last decade, CCK has continued to revise downwards mobile termination rates in line with the studies carried out to determine optimal costs. Consequently, the cost of calling has significantly dropped and subscribers can now enjoy calling rates as low as ksh2.00 per minute. The mobile phone has become a ubiquitous device and has evolved to be more than just a voice device. With the increased use of smartphones and innovative applications, mobile phones today perform multiple

functions. Statistics from the sector show that the mobile internet subscriptions account for 99 percent of total internet subscriptions which stood at 11.6million in September 2013. Kenya is recognized world over for the development and innovative use of mobile money services. This innovative use of the mobile phone has enabled diverse financial transactions including banking and has revolutionized payment systems in the country. Over 80 per cent of mobile subscribers in Kenya are actively using mobile money services. With all these initiatives aimed at increasing access to ICT services across the country, CCK’s vision remains ensuring access to and use of information and communication services by all in Kenya by 2018. Over the next five years, CCK will continue working towards implementing goals set out in its 2013-2018 Strategic Plan. The Strategic

Digital migration- John Omo, Company Secretary, and Amb. Bruce Madete, Alternate CCK Board Director, flag off the Digital Migration roadshow in Nairobi

CCK supports a one-stop web portal for and on Persons with Disabilities (PwD) (www. kenyadisability.or.ke). Further, CCK supports eight PwD institutions including Thika High School for the Blind, Machakos Technical Institute for the Blind, Kibos Secondary School for the Blind (Kisumu), Rev Muhoro Secondary School for the Deaf (Mukurweini), Kuja Secondary School for the Deaf (Rongo), Mombasa Secondary School for the Physically Disabled and Joyland Secondary School (Kisumu). In addition, CCK has also worked with Kenya Institue of Curriculum Development to digitize the secondary schools curriculum. To enable Kenya achieve the Vision 2030 goal of becoming a knowledge-based society; access to high speed internet is critical. CCK in collaboration with the Ministry of Information, Communications and Technology developed the National Broadband Strategy (NBS) which provides a roadmap towards achieving a connected economy. Given the continued demand by consumers for higher capacity Internet connection, the 2013-18 Strategic Plan aims to grow wireless broadband to 10 percent up from the current 2.4 per cent. The NBS focuses on five key thematic areas: infrastructure, connectivity and devices; content, applications and innovations;

CCK Board Chairman, Ngene Gituku, officially launches the E-Resource Centres in partnership with Kenya National Library Services (KNLS). Looking on are CCK Director General, Francis Wangusi (front left) and KNLS CEO, Mr. Atuti (back left)

capacity building and awareness; policy, legal and regulatory environment; and financing and investment. To achieve this, CCK will work with a cross section of institutions. It is envisaged that with access high quality broadband there shall be positive growth in investments, education and training, access to online government services and increased job creation. As more Kenyans access the cyber world, the risks of cybercrime proportionately increase. To curb this, CCK facilitated the establishment of the Kenya Computer

Incidence Response Team Coordination Centre (KE-CIRT/CC) whose role is to respond to and manage cyber security incidents on a national level in collaboration with local stakeholders. Further, CCK is currently setting up the Public Key Infrsaucture (PKI) which will provide a platform for licensing and certification electronic signatures. Once the PKI is operational, the take up of electronic commerce in the country will be catalyzed. Information and entertainment is big business, and this can be seen in the

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CCK gives back through Corporate Social Responsibility programmes

CCK Staff touching a child’s heart at the Mater Heart Run

CCK Board Chairman, Ngene Gituku, flags off the Talanta FC bus at the CCK Centre

Children and administrators of Tumshangilieni Mtoto Home in Kangemi receive foodstuff and other necessities from CCK Staff

growth experienced in the country’s Broadcasting sector. Kenya currently has 109 FM stations and 14 TV channels. One of the major challenges in this sector is the scarcity of frequencies. This challenge is not specific to Kenya only but it is a global phenomenon. As a solution, the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) during the Regional Radio Conference in 2006 passed a resolution to migrate all television broadcasting to the digital platform by June 2015. This move shall allow prudent use of frequencies and shall enable deployment of other vital communication services such as broadband. TV viewers will on the other hand have access to more channels, better sound and picture quality as well as enjoy interactive TV. To achieve this move, CCK has been working with all the relevant

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stakeholders to migrate the country to this platform before the deadline. As ICTs continue to permeate the society, consumers form a vital cornerstone in its successful growth. Given the technical nature of ICTs, consumers often experience challenges in the purchase and use of various communications services. To ensure consumers are well informed to make proper decisions regarding ICT services, CCK continuously carries out awareness campaigns on their rights and responsibilities as well as where to seek redress. CCK has carried out a number of consumer awareness campaigns to address various issues, they include; ChukuaHatua (which focused on the rights and responsibilities of telecommunication consumers), Kaa Macho (which focused on what consumers

need to look out for when engaging courier operators), digital migration (which focused on what consumers needed to do to migrate to digital TV broadcasting), SIM Registration (informing the public on the need to register their SIM Cards), Anti-Counterfeit (highlighting the dangers of counterfeit mobile phones) Mobile Number Portability (educating consumers of their ability to switch network operators without losing their number or contacts) among others. In addition, CCK carries out workshops and interactive forums in liaison with stakeholders on emerging ICT issues such as electronic waste and child online protection. Corporate Social Responsibility Over and above the mandated roles, CCK, as a corporate citizen, gives back to the community through its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs. CCK’s CSR

policy overarching aim is to contribute to the betterment of the industry and the lives of those around us. The Policy focuses on community relations, national disaster intervention programmes and support to industry related initiatives. CCK takes part in various CSR activities across the year including sponsoring the Mater Heart Run, Sports Person of the Year Awards (SOYA), Kalasha Awards, Media Council of Kenya Journalists Awards, DEMO Africa and Kenya International Film Festival, among others. During the festive season, CCK staff members spend time in at least three homes for the needy where they donate food stuffs and other items specific to each home. CCK has over the last decade supported Tumshangilieni Mtoto wa Africa in Kangemi, a

home which carters to abandoned and street children. Other organizations CCK has visited include; Nyumba ya Wazee in Kasarani, New Life home in Kilimani, Upper Muthaiga Hospital formerly Mathari Hospital, Langata Women’s Prison, SOS Children’s Home in Buru Buru and Nyumbani Children’s Home in Karen among others. To support talented Kenyan youth, CCK took up the sponsorship of a football team, Talanta FC, in July 2012 under the National Youth Talent Academy (NYTA). CCK shall sponsor the team for three years at a cost of Ksh17million per year. The sponsorship covers the team’s game programmes and operational expenses. The engagement is a partnership between the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Ministry of Sports, Culture and the Arts.

The team has so far performed very well in the Kenyan league and is currently playing in Division 1. CCK’s sponsorship of the team provides a means of livelihood to the players and their management team. CCK encourages other corporate organizations to support the youth through such initiatives that ensure the future of our youth is promising.

Tel: +254-20-4242000 Mobile 0703 042000 Twitter- @cck_kenya Facebook- CCKenya Email: info@cck.go.ke Complaints: chukuahatua@cck.go.ke Website www.cck.go.ke

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CCK gives back through Corporate Social Responsibility programmes

CCK Staff touching a child’s heart at the Mater Heart Run

CCK Board Chairman, Ngene Gituku, flags off the Talanta FC bus at the CCK Centre

Children and administrators of Tumshangilieni Mtoto Home in Kangemi receive foodstuff and other necessities from CCK Staff

growth experienced in the country’s Broadcasting sector. Kenya currently has 109 FM stations and 14 TV channels. One of the major challenges in this sector is the scarcity of frequencies. This challenge is not specific to Kenya only but it is a global phenomenon. As a solution, the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) during the Regional Radio Conference in 2006 passed a resolution to migrate all television broadcasting to the digital platform by June 2015. This move shall allow prudent use of frequencies and shall enable deployment of other vital communication services such as broadband. TV viewers will on the other hand have access to more channels, better sound and picture quality as well as enjoy interactive TV. To achieve this move, CCK has been working with all the relevant

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stakeholders to migrate the country to this platform before the deadline. As ICTs continue to permeate the society, consumers form a vital cornerstone in its successful growth. Given the technical nature of ICTs, consumers often experience challenges in the purchase and use of various communications services. To ensure consumers are well informed to make proper decisions regarding ICT services, CCK continuously carries out awareness campaigns on their rights and responsibilities as well as where to seek redress. CCK has carried out a number of consumer awareness campaigns to address various issues, they include; ChukuaHatua (which focused on the rights and responsibilities of telecommunication consumers), Kaa Macho (which focused on what consumers

need to look out for when engaging courier operators), digital migration (which focused on what consumers needed to do to migrate to digital TV broadcasting), SIM Registration (informing the public on the need to register their SIM Cards), Anti-Counterfeit (highlighting the dangers of counterfeit mobile phones) Mobile Number Portability (educating consumers of their ability to switch network operators without losing their number or contacts) among others. In addition, CCK carries out workshops and interactive forums in liaison with stakeholders on emerging ICT issues such as electronic waste and child online protection. Corporate Social Responsibility Over and above the mandated roles, CCK, as a corporate citizen, gives back to the community through its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs. CCK’s CSR

policy overarching aim is to contribute to the betterment of the industry and the lives of those around us. The Policy focuses on community relations, national disaster intervention programmes and support to industry related initiatives. CCK takes part in various CSR activities across the year including sponsoring the Mater Heart Run, Sports Person of the Year Awards (SOYA), Kalasha Awards, Media Council of Kenya Journalists Awards, DEMO Africa and Kenya International Film Festival, among others. During the festive season, CCK staff members spend time in at least three homes for the needy where they donate food stuffs and other items specific to each home. CCK has over the last decade supported Tumshangilieni Mtoto wa Africa in Kangemi, a

home which carters to abandoned and street children. Other organizations CCK has visited include; Nyumba ya Wazee in Kasarani, New Life home in Kilimani, Upper Muthaiga Hospital formerly Mathari Hospital, Langata Women’s Prison, SOS Children’s Home in Buru Buru and Nyumbani Children’s Home in Karen among others. To support talented Kenyan youth, CCK took up the sponsorship of a football team, Talanta FC, in July 2012 under the National Youth Talent Academy (NYTA). CCK shall sponsor the team for three years at a cost of Ksh17million per year. The sponsorship covers the team’s game programmes and operational expenses. The engagement is a partnership between the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Ministry of Sports, Culture and the Arts.

The team has so far performed very well in the Kenyan league and is currently playing in Division 1. CCK’s sponsorship of the team provides a means of livelihood to the players and their management team. CCK encourages other corporate organizations to support the youth through such initiatives that ensure the future of our youth is promising.

Tel: +254-20-4242000 Mobile 0703 042000 Twitter- @cck_kenya Facebook- CCKenya Email: info@cck.go.ke Complaints: chukuahatua@cck.go.ke Website www.cck.go.ke

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Transformative Posta @ Kenya’s 50 Years Philatelists collect stamps for their work of art, shape, theme; for instance, Prof. Wangare Maathai- 2004Nobel Peace Laureate, Promulgamation of the new Constitution 2010, as a source of information and means of socialising, historical attachment to different values such as; cultural, sentimental and monetary. EMS and parcel services provide alternatives to PCK customers in their distribution needs both in the local and international destinations. EMS Courier is an express means offered at a premium cost for sending items to and from 285 outlets countrywide, within three hours, overnight and same day and internationally to over 3,000 destinations in the 191 Universal Postal Union (UPU) member countries. Posta Parcels is a non-urgent delivery service, whose charges are determined by size, weight or distance and most recommended for bulk items in packages of 250gms minimum and 50kgs maximum. Security is guaranteed through registration and insurance.

From LEFT: Dr Enock Kinara (Postmaster-General), Mr Josephat Ole Tiampati (Principal Secretary ICT), Dr Fred Matiang’i (Cabinet Secretary ICT), Dr Cirus Maina (Chairman of the PCK Board) and Mr Samuel Poghisio (Former Minister Min. of Information and Communication) during the launch of PostaPesa at the GPO Banking Hall on 30th July 2013

The Postal Corporation of Kenya (PCK) was established under an Act of Parliament (PCK Act 1998) and operates as a commercial public enterprise. The corporation’s mandate includes provision of accessible, affordable and reliable postal services to all parts of Kenya as a public postal licensee where basic letter communication through the Post Office forms part of the basic human rights as enshrined in the 1948 United Nations Charter. Posta strives to deliver superior communication, distribution and financial solutions to customers and create value for stakeholders both locally and internationally. Posta has now embraced ICT. This, among others, supports Kenya’s e-commerce developmentefforts in a three dimensional way: • Electronic- where buyers make online orders on our top-level “Dot. Post”

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• •

domain Financial: Where our PostaPesa will facilitate online payments and The physical: where our EMS courier and parcel services will do the last mile (delivery) of the purchased goods.

Posta @ 50 Posta has doubled its efforts in the provision of communication and distribution services through mail and EMS courier locally and internationally. Mail services are more accessible with over 400,000 postal boxes spread out strategically in major and remote locations countrywide. In the recent past we have enhanced our efficiency levels through postcodes such as 00100 for GPO- Nairobi, acting as differentiators for offices, towns or regions and enabling the installation of more postal boxes. Stamps and related materials are not only

Posta’s financial payment solutions include money orders, electronic money transferPostaPay and agency services which form the basis of a modernisation strategy that is hinged on innovation and creativity that led to our investment in an e-payment platform worth US$1 million. On July 30, 2013, Posta unveiled its successful e-payment platform, PostaPesa, “Where all money meets” for both government and corporates. PostaPesa will switch payments to be delivered through over 600 outlets countrywide, covering all the 47counties. The service has the advantage of online visibility, which allows customers to monitor all the transactions. It is efficient and of high integrity.

Commemorative stamps depicting the Late Nobel Laureate Prof Wangari Maathai and The promulgation of Kenya’s New Constitution in 2010

affixed for postage but also collected as a hobby such as; used and mint stamps, souvenir sheets and folders, maximum cards, stamp packs and booklets, first day covers, postal stationery, cancellations and stamp artworks.

PostaPesa PostaPesa, ‘Where All Money Meets’, through partnership offers an expansive solution for both private and public sector businesses such as banks, learning institutions, bill payments, insurance companies, subscription fees and government in and outpayments. It also enables Posta to transact several operations electronically they include agency banking, mobile money transfers, card-based

Postmaster-General, Postal Corporation of Kenya, Dr Enock Kinara, receives the top award from President Uhuru Kenyatta during the prize-giving ceremony at the Nairobi International Trade Fair 2013. Posta won first prize in the category of Quality Assurance and Standards

transactions, e-commerce and online disbursements in agency services as well as for utility bills. “This has created a shared infrastructure and with the Central Bank of Kenya’s planned National Payment System integration. We are better placed to offer the required platform,” says Dr. Enock Kinara, the Postmaster-General and Chief Executive Officer. “We are also the first African Postal Operator to adopt Dot.post, UPU’s top-level (www. postakenya.post) domain. We are, therefore, well- placed to run e-commerce websites (e-duka),” he adds. Dr Kinara, who featured prominently on the list of “Transformative CEOs with Golden Hands”, is keen to give Posta a new corporate image and culture to make it a vibrant business entity that is fast and efficient. Growth Strategy Posta is aiming at raising its revenues to Ksh20 billion over the three-year plan period, up from the current Ksh3.5 billion to meet the targets of its 2013-2016 Corporate Strategic Plan. To achieve the ambitious target, it has realigned its operations and adopted profit centre models to enhance efficiency, develop new products, and diversify its sources of income.This is in addition to strengthening its marketing programmes

Dr Matiang’i transacts at the new PostaPesa service platform at GPO’s Posta outlet

and creating physical infrastructure for improved service delivery and investing in its ICT systems. PCK has come a long way from selling stamps and delivering mail to the multiline business that includes Posta Parcel, EMS Worldwide Courier, PostaPay, Direct Mail Marketing, Posta Dispatch and now, PostaPesa.

P.O.Box 34567 GPO Nairobi 00100 Kenya Tel: 020 3242000/ 3000 Call Centre: 020 3246000 Email: corporatecallcentre@posta.co.ke www.postakenya.post

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Transformative Posta @ Kenya’s 50 Years Philatelists collect stamps for their work of art, shape, theme; for instance, Prof. Wangare Maathai- 2004Nobel Peace Laureate, Promulgamation of the new Constitution 2010, as a source of information and means of socialising, historical attachment to different values such as; cultural, sentimental and monetary. EMS and parcel services provide alternatives to PCK customers in their distribution needs both in the local and international destinations. EMS Courier is an express means offered at a premium cost for sending items to and from 285 outlets countrywide, within three hours, overnight and same day and internationally to over 3,000 destinations in the 191 Universal Postal Union (UPU) member countries. Posta Parcels is a non-urgent delivery service, whose charges are determined by size, weight or distance and most recommended for bulk items in packages of 250gms minimum and 50kgs maximum. Security is guaranteed through registration and insurance.

From LEFT: Dr Enock Kinara (Postmaster-General), Mr Josephat Ole Tiampati (Principal Secretary ICT), Dr Fred Matiang’i (Cabinet Secretary ICT), Dr Cirus Maina (Chairman of the PCK Board) and Mr Samuel Poghisio (Former Minister Min. of Information and Communication) during the launch of PostaPesa at the GPO Banking Hall on 30th July 2013

The Postal Corporation of Kenya (PCK) was established under an Act of Parliament (PCK Act 1998) and operates as a commercial public enterprise. The corporation’s mandate includes provision of accessible, affordable and reliable postal services to all parts of Kenya as a public postal licensee where basic letter communication through the Post Office forms part of the basic human rights as enshrined in the 1948 United Nations Charter. Posta strives to deliver superior communication, distribution and financial solutions to customers and create value for stakeholders both locally and internationally. Posta has now embraced ICT. This, among others, supports Kenya’s e-commerce developmentefforts in a three dimensional way: • Electronic- where buyers make online orders on our top-level “Dot. Post”

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• •

domain Financial: Where our PostaPesa will facilitate online payments and The physical: where our EMS courier and parcel services will do the last mile (delivery) of the purchased goods.

Posta @ 50 Posta has doubled its efforts in the provision of communication and distribution services through mail and EMS courier locally and internationally. Mail services are more accessible with over 400,000 postal boxes spread out strategically in major and remote locations countrywide. In the recent past we have enhanced our efficiency levels through postcodes such as 00100 for GPO- Nairobi, acting as differentiators for offices, towns or regions and enabling the installation of more postal boxes. Stamps and related materials are not only

Posta’s financial payment solutions include money orders, electronic money transferPostaPay and agency services which form the basis of a modernisation strategy that is hinged on innovation and creativity that led to our investment in an e-payment platform worth US$1 million. On July 30, 2013, Posta unveiled its successful e-payment platform, PostaPesa, “Where all money meets” for both government and corporates. PostaPesa will switch payments to be delivered through over 600 outlets countrywide, covering all the 47counties. The service has the advantage of online visibility, which allows customers to monitor all the transactions. It is efficient and of high integrity.

Commemorative stamps depicting the Late Nobel Laureate Prof Wangari Maathai and The promulgation of Kenya’s New Constitution in 2010

affixed for postage but also collected as a hobby such as; used and mint stamps, souvenir sheets and folders, maximum cards, stamp packs and booklets, first day covers, postal stationery, cancellations and stamp artworks.

PostaPesa PostaPesa, ‘Where All Money Meets’, through partnership offers an expansive solution for both private and public sector businesses such as banks, learning institutions, bill payments, insurance companies, subscription fees and government in and outpayments. It also enables Posta to transact several operations electronically they include agency banking, mobile money transfers, card-based

Postmaster-General, Postal Corporation of Kenya, Dr Enock Kinara, receives the top award from President Uhuru Kenyatta during the prize-giving ceremony at the Nairobi International Trade Fair 2013. Posta won first prize in the category of Quality Assurance and Standards

transactions, e-commerce and online disbursements in agency services as well as for utility bills. “This has created a shared infrastructure and with the Central Bank of Kenya’s planned National Payment System integration. We are better placed to offer the required platform,” says Dr. Enock Kinara, the Postmaster-General and Chief Executive Officer. “We are also the first African Postal Operator to adopt Dot.post, UPU’s top-level (www. postakenya.post) domain. We are, therefore, well- placed to run e-commerce websites (e-duka),” he adds. Dr Kinara, who featured prominently on the list of “Transformative CEOs with Golden Hands”, is keen to give Posta a new corporate image and culture to make it a vibrant business entity that is fast and efficient. Growth Strategy Posta is aiming at raising its revenues to Ksh20 billion over the three-year plan period, up from the current Ksh3.5 billion to meet the targets of its 2013-2016 Corporate Strategic Plan. To achieve the ambitious target, it has realigned its operations and adopted profit centre models to enhance efficiency, develop new products, and diversify its sources of income.This is in addition to strengthening its marketing programmes

Dr Matiang’i transacts at the new PostaPesa service platform at GPO’s Posta outlet

and creating physical infrastructure for improved service delivery and investing in its ICT systems. PCK has come a long way from selling stamps and delivering mail to the multiline business that includes Posta Parcel, EMS Worldwide Courier, PostaPay, Direct Mail Marketing, Posta Dispatch and now, PostaPesa.

P.O.Box 34567 GPO Nairobi 00100 Kenya Tel: 020 3242000/ 3000 Call Centre: 020 3246000 Email: corporatecallcentre@posta.co.ke www.postakenya.post

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CHAPTER 12 Media and Marketing

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CHAPTER 12 Media and Marketing

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Kenya Broadcasting Corporation

Leonard Mambo Mbotela

Elizabeth Obege

Africans with vital information about unfolding events on the war front. As the station gained popularity, the colonial administration created the first radio broadcast service for Africans in 1953 and christened it African Broadcasting Services. The reforms offered Kenyans an opportunity to sample radio programmes in Kiswahili, Luo, Kikuyu, Nandi, Luhya, Kamba and Arabic. With improved programming, African Broadcasting Services was renamed Kenya Broadcasting Services in 1954 and expanded to form regional stations, namely Sauti ya Mvita in Mombasa, Mount Kenya Station in Nyeri and Lake Station in Kisumu. DVBT Centre

The Kenya Broadcasting Corporation (KBC) is Kenya’snational broadcaster, which operates one television station and 20 radio channels broadcasting in English, Kiswahili and vernaculars on FM and AM frequencies. KBC was established by an Act of Parliament CAP 221 of the laws of Kenya to provide independent and impartial broadcasting services of information, education and entertainment. KBC’s vision is to be Kenya’s most reliable and trusted broadcaster, while its mission is to transmit objective, informative, educative and entertaining content to the public through high quality broadcasts. As part of its principal objectives, the Corporation is committed to satisfying

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her customers by providing high quality broadcasts. The national broadcaster produces a wide variety of high quality programmes, including news, features, documentaries and local dramas, delivering them to an audience of over 40 million Kenyans. The national broadcaster’s headquarters is located in Nairobi, with two other stations in Mombasa and Kisumu to serve the Coastal and Western regions respectively. KBC owns and maintains assets in form of broadcast transmitters, masts and satellites in 29 transmission sites across the country. This vast telecommunication network gives the station a unique edge over her competitors, particularly with regard to the dissemination of her broadcasts at the

grassroots level across the country. KBC’s Humble Beginnings From humble beginnings in 1928 when Kenya was a British colony, white settlers established an English radio broadcasting station to keep abreast of news from their home country and other parts of the world. In September, 1931 the British colonial government reached an agreement with the Imperial and International Communication Limited Company, which was to take over the responsibility of broadcasting for a 25 year term. The Company was later renamed ‘Cable and Wireless Limited’. During World War II, between 1939 and 1945, the station launched its first radio broadcasts targeting

Moreover, in 1954, the colonial government appointed a commission to probe the feasibility of the creation of a public television broadcasting corporation, which failed. The colonial administration revisited the issue in 1959 through the Proud Commission, which reported that the public television broadcasting corporation could be possible as a fully-fledged commercial outfit. The Proud Commission’s emphatic defence led to the establishment of the Kenya Broadcasting Corporation (KBC) in 1959. It was formed to spearhead television broadcasting in Kenya, besides taking over the fledgling radio broadcasting services by the state controlled Kenya Broadcasting Services. By 1960, it became evident that Kenya’s independence was inevitable. Consequently, the colonial administration contracted a consortium of eight companies

Paul Indulu

to set up and operate the proposed public television station in 1960 and 1961. The eight companies, seven from Europe and North America, formed Television Network Limited, which created the Kenya Broadcasting Corporation as an autonomous public broadcasting system.

Official Launch In 1962, a television transmission station and recording studio was set up in Limuru, transmitting to a radius of 24 kilometres. However, the KBC television station was officially launched in 1963 by an Act of Parliament CAP 221 of the laws of Kenya.

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Kenya Broadcasting Corporation

Leonard Mambo Mbotela

Elizabeth Obege

Africans with vital information about unfolding events on the war front. As the station gained popularity, the colonial administration created the first radio broadcast service for Africans in 1953 and christened it African Broadcasting Services. The reforms offered Kenyans an opportunity to sample radio programmes in Kiswahili, Luo, Kikuyu, Nandi, Luhya, Kamba and Arabic. With improved programming, African Broadcasting Services was renamed Kenya Broadcasting Services in 1954 and expanded to form regional stations, namely Sauti ya Mvita in Mombasa, Mount Kenya Station in Nyeri and Lake Station in Kisumu. DVBT Centre

The Kenya Broadcasting Corporation (KBC) is Kenya’snational broadcaster, which operates one television station and 20 radio channels broadcasting in English, Kiswahili and vernaculars on FM and AM frequencies. KBC was established by an Act of Parliament CAP 221 of the laws of Kenya to provide independent and impartial broadcasting services of information, education and entertainment. KBC’s vision is to be Kenya’s most reliable and trusted broadcaster, while its mission is to transmit objective, informative, educative and entertaining content to the public through high quality broadcasts. As part of its principal objectives, the Corporation is committed to satisfying

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her customers by providing high quality broadcasts. The national broadcaster produces a wide variety of high quality programmes, including news, features, documentaries and local dramas, delivering them to an audience of over 40 million Kenyans. The national broadcaster’s headquarters is located in Nairobi, with two other stations in Mombasa and Kisumu to serve the Coastal and Western regions respectively. KBC owns and maintains assets in form of broadcast transmitters, masts and satellites in 29 transmission sites across the country. This vast telecommunication network gives the station a unique edge over her competitors, particularly with regard to the dissemination of her broadcasts at the

grassroots level across the country. KBC’s Humble Beginnings From humble beginnings in 1928 when Kenya was a British colony, white settlers established an English radio broadcasting station to keep abreast of news from their home country and other parts of the world. In September, 1931 the British colonial government reached an agreement with the Imperial and International Communication Limited Company, which was to take over the responsibility of broadcasting for a 25 year term. The Company was later renamed ‘Cable and Wireless Limited’. During World War II, between 1939 and 1945, the station launched its first radio broadcasts targeting

Moreover, in 1954, the colonial government appointed a commission to probe the feasibility of the creation of a public television broadcasting corporation, which failed. The colonial administration revisited the issue in 1959 through the Proud Commission, which reported that the public television broadcasting corporation could be possible as a fully-fledged commercial outfit. The Proud Commission’s emphatic defence led to the establishment of the Kenya Broadcasting Corporation (KBC) in 1959. It was formed to spearhead television broadcasting in Kenya, besides taking over the fledgling radio broadcasting services by the state controlled Kenya Broadcasting Services. By 1960, it became evident that Kenya’s independence was inevitable. Consequently, the colonial administration contracted a consortium of eight companies

Paul Indulu

to set up and operate the proposed public television station in 1960 and 1961. The eight companies, seven from Europe and North America, formed Television Network Limited, which created the Kenya Broadcasting Corporation as an autonomous public broadcasting system.

Official Launch In 1962, a television transmission station and recording studio was set up in Limuru, transmitting to a radius of 24 kilometres. However, the KBC television station was officially launched in 1963 by an Act of Parliament CAP 221 of the laws of Kenya.

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KBC’s digital centre, officially unveiled by former President Mwai Kibaki, started with one transmitter handling 16 channels. In 2010, another new transmitter was installed to support eight channels under the Pay-TV service format. With advancing digital technologies, developed European nations upgraded from DVB-T to DVB-T2 the same year, prompting the Kenya government to rethink its strategy. Plans were immediately set in motion to introduce the DVB-T2 platform in the Kenyan market. By January, 2013 KBC’s DVB-T2 digital centre had incorporated multiplexing technologies, enabling it to combine and stream multiple analogue message signals or digital data into one signal over a shared medium.

Vitimbi Crew on set

KBC DVBT Centre

The station began earning its revenue from advertising, annual license fees on receiver sets and government grants. On July 1, 1964 after Kenya’s independence in 1963, the Corporation’s name was changed from Kenya Broadcasting Corporation to Voice of Kenya (VOK) through an Act of Parliament.

Frequency Improvement In 1989, KBC signed a contract with Japan Telecommunication Engineering Consultancy Service (JTEC) for the improvement and expansion of the national medium wave frequency radio broadcasting network. Two years later, KBC signed a contract with Marubeni Corporation of Tokyo, Japan for the upgrading of medium wave transmitting stations and construction of new ones. The station launched an intensive

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Hezekiah Ochuka controlled the station for six hours.

Others who preceded him included Job Isaac Mwamto, Amina Fakhii, Khadija Ali, and Stephen Kikumu, who was one of the pioneer broadcasters. In the English Service, broadcasters who pioneered the service were Hassan Mazoa, Sammy Lui, Peter Njoroge and Elizabeth Omolo. The KBC veterans in the 1970s were Abdulhaq and George Opiyo.

Other landmark events effectively covered by KBC include, the 1992-1997 politically motivated tribal clashes, the 1998 US Embassy bombing in Nairobi, the Goldenberg and Anglo Leasing grand corruption scandals, the 2007-2008 post election violence, International Criminal Court (ICC) proceedings, the promulgation of the new constitution in August 2010, the March 4t, 2013 General Election, and the inauguration of Uhuru Kenyatta as Kenya’s 4th President and of his Deputy William Ruto.

Landmark Milestones From the nation’s independence in 1963, KBC has actively captured and documented historic events with zeal, professionalism and unrivalled experience. The historic events that shaped Kenya’s destiny span across five decades, witnessing the eras of four presidents, from the late founding President Jomo Kenyatta, retired Presidents Daniel arap Moi and Mwai Kibaki to incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta.

After taking over the station’s administration from the colonialists, the Kenyan government converted VOK into a department of the Ministry of Information, Broadcasting and Tourism, which was later renamed Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. It was mandated to inform, educate and entertain in its new role as the state broadcaster. In 1970 a new television station was opened in Mombasa to relay programmes and produce local dramas, music, cultural and other programmes touching on coastal issues. Eight years later, colour broadcast television was introduced to Kenya, transitioning from the black and white standards. In 1989, the Voice of Kenya reverted back to the Kenya Broadcasting Corporation through an Act of Parliament.

time been synonymous with KBC’s Idhaa ya Taifa (Swahili Service).

Radio Taifa Studio today

modernisation project in 1993 to upgrade its transmission station, construct new ones and improve on switching and routing network. The Embu Sub-Service Station started its audio broadcasts in 1995, while 1996 saw the commissioning of Metro FM as an urban music radio station. But in September 2000, Metro FM was transformed into a sports and entertainment channel. KBC launched Coro FM in December, 2000 transmitting broadcasts in Kikuyu to Nairobi and the Mount Kenya region. The national broadcaster unveiled Pwani FM in 2001 to cater for the Coast region. In December, 2011 Metro FM was restructured and relaunched as Venus FM. The national broadcaster’s most recent radio stations include Nosim FM (Maasai) launched in May, 2011, Minto FM (Kisii) in July, 2011,

Kitwek FM (Kalenjin) on August 8, 2011, Mwago FM (Meru) in September, 2011, Mayienga FM (Luo) in October, 2011, Mwatu FM (Kamba) on August 17, 2012 and finally Ingo FM (Luhya) in November, 2012. The Corporation however kick-started its illustrious career in radio broadcasting with the English Service in 1928, Western Service (Pokot and Teso) in 1952, Radio Taifa formerly known as Idhaa Ya Taifa (Kiswahili) in 1953, in addition to Eastern Service (Turkana in 1972, Rendille in 1972, Burji in 1979, Borana in 1979 and Somali in 1979). Sterling Presenters Since its inception, KBC has helped mould most of Kenya’s accomplished journalists before the liberalisation of the airwaves in Kenya. One such journalist is Leonard Mambo Mbotela whose name has for a long

During the pre and post independence periods, KBC extensively covered the struggle for self rule by Africans, the 1963 independence, the assassination of popular leaders namely Pio Gama Pinto, J.M. Kariuki, Tom Mboya and Robert Ouko. These mysterious murders led to the clamour for political reforms and agitation for democratic governance in the early 1990s, all highlighted by KBC. At the peak of the agitation for multi-party politics and the Saba Saba political protests, KBC struggled to redeem its image and change the public perception that it was the mouthpiece of former President Moi by providing equal for the opposition parties. The national broadcaster’s influence is best highlighted by its coverage of the failed August 1, 1982 coup, during which a group of Kenya Air Force soldiers raided the Voice of Kenya radio station at midnight and announced that they had overthrown the government. The group, led by Senior Private

The history of broadcasting in Kenya is anchored on KBC with notable radio icons such as Leonard Mambo Mbotela, Elizabeth Omollo, Amina Fakhii, Peter Njoroge, and Sammy Lui, all renowned for their historic high quality broadcasts, influencing the contemporary the industry. KBC’s Channel One television has quality programmes ranging from comedy, news, sports; development tailored concepts as well as coverage of parliamentary proceedings. It is also credited with promoting the preservation of culture and the development of local film and music. In the 1990s, KBC partnered with Multichoice and commenced satellite pay television services. The Digital Migration In December, 2009 the government launched a Digital Video Broadcasting – Terrestrial, commonly referred to as DVB-T pilot project at KBC ahead of the planned 2015 global transition from analogue to digital television. KBC’s DVB-T pilot project, within the ICT and Technical Services Department (ICTTS), is the backbone of the Digital Television Committee (DTC) appointed by the Ministry of Information and Communication to spearhead the nation’s digital migration.

The digital advancement paved way for the transmission of 23 channels on one microwave frequency and streaming of 17 other channels on a satellite feed to eight diverse transmission sites in Nairobi and its environs. To date, KBC is highly regarded as a referral and training centre for digital migration across the continent. Future Plans With the introduction of devolved governments in the new constitutional dispensation, KBC plans to establish digital sub-stations across the 47 counties to inform, educate and entertain members of the public at the grassroots level. KBC is also seeking the ISO quality management certification, which has seen it conduct and maintain comprehensive internal audit programmes. The Corporation has introduced systems of documenting, reviewing and approving product designs that meet applicable safety, regulatory and customer requirements. This means that each procedure and work instruction at KBC must be documented and thus becomes the springboard for continuous improvement. The systems have been accepted for use by over 80 countries across the world as effective means of achieving product quality and environmental stewardship. As Kenya celebrates 50 years of independence, KBC has made history possible as a link between the pre and the post independence eras by keeping every moment alive and energising the future.

Tel: +254 (0)20 2223757, +254 (0)20 2221630/44 Email: md@kbc.co.ke Website: www.kbc.co.ke

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KBC’s digital centre, officially unveiled by former President Mwai Kibaki, started with one transmitter handling 16 channels. In 2010, another new transmitter was installed to support eight channels under the Pay-TV service format. With advancing digital technologies, developed European nations upgraded from DVB-T to DVB-T2 the same year, prompting the Kenya government to rethink its strategy. Plans were immediately set in motion to introduce the DVB-T2 platform in the Kenyan market. By January, 2013 KBC’s DVB-T2 digital centre had incorporated multiplexing technologies, enabling it to combine and stream multiple analogue message signals or digital data into one signal over a shared medium.

Vitimbi Crew on set

KBC DVBT Centre

The station began earning its revenue from advertising, annual license fees on receiver sets and government grants. On July 1, 1964 after Kenya’s independence in 1963, the Corporation’s name was changed from Kenya Broadcasting Corporation to Voice of Kenya (VOK) through an Act of Parliament.

Frequency Improvement In 1989, KBC signed a contract with Japan Telecommunication Engineering Consultancy Service (JTEC) for the improvement and expansion of the national medium wave frequency radio broadcasting network. Two years later, KBC signed a contract with Marubeni Corporation of Tokyo, Japan for the upgrading of medium wave transmitting stations and construction of new ones. The station launched an intensive

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Hezekiah Ochuka controlled the station for six hours.

Others who preceded him included Job Isaac Mwamto, Amina Fakhii, Khadija Ali, and Stephen Kikumu, who was one of the pioneer broadcasters. In the English Service, broadcasters who pioneered the service were Hassan Mazoa, Sammy Lui, Peter Njoroge and Elizabeth Omolo. The KBC veterans in the 1970s were Abdulhaq and George Opiyo.

Other landmark events effectively covered by KBC include, the 1992-1997 politically motivated tribal clashes, the 1998 US Embassy bombing in Nairobi, the Goldenberg and Anglo Leasing grand corruption scandals, the 2007-2008 post election violence, International Criminal Court (ICC) proceedings, the promulgation of the new constitution in August 2010, the March 4t, 2013 General Election, and the inauguration of Uhuru Kenyatta as Kenya’s 4th President and of his Deputy William Ruto.

Landmark Milestones From the nation’s independence in 1963, KBC has actively captured and documented historic events with zeal, professionalism and unrivalled experience. The historic events that shaped Kenya’s destiny span across five decades, witnessing the eras of four presidents, from the late founding President Jomo Kenyatta, retired Presidents Daniel arap Moi and Mwai Kibaki to incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta.

After taking over the station’s administration from the colonialists, the Kenyan government converted VOK into a department of the Ministry of Information, Broadcasting and Tourism, which was later renamed Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. It was mandated to inform, educate and entertain in its new role as the state broadcaster. In 1970 a new television station was opened in Mombasa to relay programmes and produce local dramas, music, cultural and other programmes touching on coastal issues. Eight years later, colour broadcast television was introduced to Kenya, transitioning from the black and white standards. In 1989, the Voice of Kenya reverted back to the Kenya Broadcasting Corporation through an Act of Parliament.

time been synonymous with KBC’s Idhaa ya Taifa (Swahili Service).

Radio Taifa Studio today

modernisation project in 1993 to upgrade its transmission station, construct new ones and improve on switching and routing network. The Embu Sub-Service Station started its audio broadcasts in 1995, while 1996 saw the commissioning of Metro FM as an urban music radio station. But in September 2000, Metro FM was transformed into a sports and entertainment channel. KBC launched Coro FM in December, 2000 transmitting broadcasts in Kikuyu to Nairobi and the Mount Kenya region. The national broadcaster unveiled Pwani FM in 2001 to cater for the Coast region. In December, 2011 Metro FM was restructured and relaunched as Venus FM. The national broadcaster’s most recent radio stations include Nosim FM (Maasai) launched in May, 2011, Minto FM (Kisii) in July, 2011,

Kitwek FM (Kalenjin) on August 8, 2011, Mwago FM (Meru) in September, 2011, Mayienga FM (Luo) in October, 2011, Mwatu FM (Kamba) on August 17, 2012 and finally Ingo FM (Luhya) in November, 2012. The Corporation however kick-started its illustrious career in radio broadcasting with the English Service in 1928, Western Service (Pokot and Teso) in 1952, Radio Taifa formerly known as Idhaa Ya Taifa (Kiswahili) in 1953, in addition to Eastern Service (Turkana in 1972, Rendille in 1972, Burji in 1979, Borana in 1979 and Somali in 1979). Sterling Presenters Since its inception, KBC has helped mould most of Kenya’s accomplished journalists before the liberalisation of the airwaves in Kenya. One such journalist is Leonard Mambo Mbotela whose name has for a long

During the pre and post independence periods, KBC extensively covered the struggle for self rule by Africans, the 1963 independence, the assassination of popular leaders namely Pio Gama Pinto, J.M. Kariuki, Tom Mboya and Robert Ouko. These mysterious murders led to the clamour for political reforms and agitation for democratic governance in the early 1990s, all highlighted by KBC. At the peak of the agitation for multi-party politics and the Saba Saba political protests, KBC struggled to redeem its image and change the public perception that it was the mouthpiece of former President Moi by providing equal for the opposition parties. The national broadcaster’s influence is best highlighted by its coverage of the failed August 1, 1982 coup, during which a group of Kenya Air Force soldiers raided the Voice of Kenya radio station at midnight and announced that they had overthrown the government. The group, led by Senior Private

The history of broadcasting in Kenya is anchored on KBC with notable radio icons such as Leonard Mambo Mbotela, Elizabeth Omollo, Amina Fakhii, Peter Njoroge, and Sammy Lui, all renowned for their historic high quality broadcasts, influencing the contemporary the industry. KBC’s Channel One television has quality programmes ranging from comedy, news, sports; development tailored concepts as well as coverage of parliamentary proceedings. It is also credited with promoting the preservation of culture and the development of local film and music. In the 1990s, KBC partnered with Multichoice and commenced satellite pay television services. The Digital Migration In December, 2009 the government launched a Digital Video Broadcasting – Terrestrial, commonly referred to as DVB-T pilot project at KBC ahead of the planned 2015 global transition from analogue to digital television. KBC’s DVB-T pilot project, within the ICT and Technical Services Department (ICTTS), is the backbone of the Digital Television Committee (DTC) appointed by the Ministry of Information and Communication to spearhead the nation’s digital migration.

The digital advancement paved way for the transmission of 23 channels on one microwave frequency and streaming of 17 other channels on a satellite feed to eight diverse transmission sites in Nairobi and its environs. To date, KBC is highly regarded as a referral and training centre for digital migration across the continent. Future Plans With the introduction of devolved governments in the new constitutional dispensation, KBC plans to establish digital sub-stations across the 47 counties to inform, educate and entertain members of the public at the grassroots level. KBC is also seeking the ISO quality management certification, which has seen it conduct and maintain comprehensive internal audit programmes. The Corporation has introduced systems of documenting, reviewing and approving product designs that meet applicable safety, regulatory and customer requirements. This means that each procedure and work instruction at KBC must be documented and thus becomes the springboard for continuous improvement. The systems have been accepted for use by over 80 countries across the world as effective means of achieving product quality and environmental stewardship. As Kenya celebrates 50 years of independence, KBC has made history possible as a link between the pre and the post independence eras by keeping every moment alive and energising the future.

Tel: +254 (0)20 2223757, +254 (0)20 2221630/44 Email: md@kbc.co.ke Website: www.kbc.co.ke

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98.4 Capital FM The Best Mix of Music! sex, partying, fashion, technology and much more.

To wind down the weekend catch up with the only and Biggest Jazz Show in Kenya every Sunday (7pm-9pm).

‘Hits Not Homework’ plays the hottest and the latest hip-hop, dancehall, EDM and local tracks, coupled with music exclusives, interviews with your favourite artists and shout-outs between different high schools, colleges and universities & Kenya’s biggest count down Top 9 At 9. On Fridays we have a dj show dubbed ‘ The Heat’ on the same slot just to help kick start the weekend parties

News As the Company has grown, so has the News Department, confidently filling the competitive circle, where it has now earned the right to be one of the most respected news sources in the country. Speed, virtue, integral and expertise have played an integral part in this.

After the high-octane energy of ‘Hits Not Homework’, slow it down with ‘After Hours’ – our slow seductive way of winding down your evening. It will mend broken hearts, keep you in love and soothe your mind as you prepare to call it a night. For all you night owls and international audience in different time zones, ‘Urban Nights’ is definitely your show, with the hottest jams and Dj mixes. As your Official weekend Station, we give you an equally amazing line up of non-stop mixes to put you in the mood on Friday and Saturday nights. ‘We set the trends, and the others follow’. That’s one of the Capital FM’s philosophies, and remains Kenya’s most recognizable radio station, with its exceptional blend of music, energetic and witty radio personalities, fun interactive promotions and unique programming.

We remain relevant, entertaining, informative and interactive all day: morning to morning.

Launched in 1996, 98.4 Capital FM has created its own niche in the Kenyan radio market with its stand out style. Capital FM is a brand unlike any other in the Kenyan market that continues to excite, entertain, stimulate and reward its listeners. Capital FM has the most loyal listeners of all stations, who have in turn been rewarded with consistent programming that continues to be a blueprint for the rest of the Kenyan radio market.

If you love ROCK!, want to know about the latest fashion and style, gadgets, hangouts cool drinks and hot outfits, our mid-morning ‘Fuse’ show (10am – 2pm) will take care of you – the young and upcoming socialite.

Programming If you should ever traverse the airwaves moving from frequency to frequency, our guarantee is that you will not find a fresher, edgier sound than Capital FM Kenya. Capital FM Programmes have their finger on the pulse of the nation; our shows are informative, fun and definitely set the trend. With Kenya’s most energetic, witty and lively presenters, we are often imitated, but never duplicated. In this era of high competition in the Kenyan radio market, stations continue to try and replicate the programming, style and format of Capital FM with little success.

The afternoon airwaves on Kenyan radio are ruled by ‘The Jam’ (3pm-7pm) a funfilled, raw, intelligent and sometimes cocky but always entertaining show, with the most unique style of music formatting each day – from the latest R&B, Slow Jams, 80’s classics, Neo Soul, 90’s hits and New Jack Swing.

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Our breakfast show ‘Capital in the Morning’ (6am- 10am) handles issues on the economy, society and the political scene. Its witty, fastpaced and full of laughs.

Right after lunch capitalfm offers you a one hour Dj mix show dubbed Radio Active every weekday (2pm-3pm) to help you unwind as you sit back and enjoy the mixes from the capital mix masters .

‘Hits Not Homework’ comes next (7pm10pm), targeted at the young and young at heart, this show has attitude and energy, and gives the youth the chance to voice their opinions on everything from relationships,

Watch out for the best syndicated countdown shows, including Rick Dees, dance nation and many more! The best of the best call Capital FM Home! For all you sports lovers we have not forgotten about you every Saturday (2pm5pm) capital airs a high energy sports show that fuses music and sports dubbed ‘Saturday Music & Sports’ keeping updated on what has been happening in the sports world. Right after this there is a entire hip-hop show ‘ The Cypher’ (5pm-7pm) for all you hiphop lovers playing you the best of local and international hip-hop. All this I followed by a show that takes us all around the world especially regions we never thought produced music “The World Groove Show” (7pm-9pm). This is followed by nonstop dj mixes to get you in the party mood. Sunday mornings are kicked of with an inspirational music dj mix show (8am-10am) followed by “The Lounge’ and entire 2 hour show playing you the best of neo soul music with also exclusive artist interviews from around the world. And for the Football fanatics “FootBall Sundays” ( noon – 2pm) a show that only talks about local and international football.

Comprising of a formidable team of journalists, editors and news presenters, the Newsroom’s main task is to give out the information collected in a responsible, ethical and timely fashion. The objective of our indepth news reports every top of the hour and informative features is to keep Kenyans abreast of the goings-on around them. Information is power. As Kenyans become increasingly aware of their rights, more information is needed. And Capital News team is here, fully loaded to meet their needs. Sales and Marketing The Capital Sales Team is client-driven, working as consultant rather than just regular sales representatives or account managers. Want to know more about our competitive rates, our account managers will be your perfect guides. Marketing in Capital FM is the nerve centre of the organization. Capital Marketing goes beyond the call of duty to link the client, the listener and the station. Capital Marketing keeps our award-winning brand strong and recognizable. As part of our Corporate Social Responsibility, we initiate projects that uphold humanity and the rights of the less fortunate. We also sponsor organizations that do so. Capital Creative The 98.4 Capital Creative provides an integrated service available to all advertisers, advertising agencies and promotions companies alike, forming a strategic arm of 98.4 Capital FM’s commercial production and promotions division. They have consistently managed to keep up with high quality commercials and the best on-air promotions for the biggest brands in Kenya. The Creative Services department at 98.4 Capital FM is innovative, competent and will give your brand that extra edge needed to make an impact in the market. Events C.I.A. (Capital Interactive Agents) is the unique arm of Capital FM that is charged with representing the brand on-ground. C.I.A.

creates, develops, manages and executes on-ground activations for the station and our clients and advertisers. C.I.A. creates and manages opportunities for the listeners to experience the brand (98.4 Capital FM) and its attributes (The Best Mix of Music) on a one-on-one basis. It offers experiential, on-site marketing to our clients and advertisers. C.I.A. consistently creates and develops cutting-edge promotions and activations that are unique and specific to each brand. From brand parties, to in-store promotions, road shows, cocktails, corporate parties, sports activations launches, concerts etc, we do it all! While Capital FM delivers brand equity on air, C.I.A. delivers brand volumes. We make sure your target market interacts with, samples, and experiences your brand, redefining experiential marketing in Kenya through the creation of powerful and effective brand experiences! Capital Digital Media The world has become a global village, and Capital FM has found a way to connect all listeners worldwide through the Capital Digital Media. This interactive media service connects the Capital FM family to friend and fans all over the world by use of its website: www.capitalfm.co.ke In line with the Capital Group’s Mission ‘To

responsibly entertain, educate and inform a dynamic audience’, Capital’s Digital Media allows its audiences to make use of the powerful tool that is the Internet to access information ranging from:

• News (www.capitalfm.co.ke/news) where

one can have access to breaking local and international news when it happens; • Business (www.capitalfm.co.ke/ business) with access to business news and features from industry experts; • Radio (www.capitalfm.co.ke/radio) where one can stream live radio, download Dj Mixes, enter radio contests, win tickets to events and much more. For Kenyans in the Diaspora, the website further serves the purpose of being one of the few links they have with home. The best part of it is that website users can not only listen to Capital FM from anywhere in the world, but they can also access breaking Kenyan news as well. With interactive and multimedia tools like live chat that allows listeners and presenters to interact, blogs, www.capitalfm.co.ke is truly a community on the web, and a grand marketing tool that reaches a global audience who access our website. Capital Digital Media truly has a global presence that few companies in Kenya can boast of. Tel: 020-2210020 www.capitalfm.co.ke

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98.4 Capital FM The Best Mix of Music! sex, partying, fashion, technology and much more.

To wind down the weekend catch up with the only and Biggest Jazz Show in Kenya every Sunday (7pm-9pm).

‘Hits Not Homework’ plays the hottest and the latest hip-hop, dancehall, EDM and local tracks, coupled with music exclusives, interviews with your favourite artists and shout-outs between different high schools, colleges and universities & Kenya’s biggest count down Top 9 At 9. On Fridays we have a dj show dubbed ‘ The Heat’ on the same slot just to help kick start the weekend parties

News As the Company has grown, so has the News Department, confidently filling the competitive circle, where it has now earned the right to be one of the most respected news sources in the country. Speed, virtue, integral and expertise have played an integral part in this.

After the high-octane energy of ‘Hits Not Homework’, slow it down with ‘After Hours’ – our slow seductive way of winding down your evening. It will mend broken hearts, keep you in love and soothe your mind as you prepare to call it a night. For all you night owls and international audience in different time zones, ‘Urban Nights’ is definitely your show, with the hottest jams and Dj mixes. As your Official weekend Station, we give you an equally amazing line up of non-stop mixes to put you in the mood on Friday and Saturday nights. ‘We set the trends, and the others follow’. That’s one of the Capital FM’s philosophies, and remains Kenya’s most recognizable radio station, with its exceptional blend of music, energetic and witty radio personalities, fun interactive promotions and unique programming.

We remain relevant, entertaining, informative and interactive all day: morning to morning.

Launched in 1996, 98.4 Capital FM has created its own niche in the Kenyan radio market with its stand out style. Capital FM is a brand unlike any other in the Kenyan market that continues to excite, entertain, stimulate and reward its listeners. Capital FM has the most loyal listeners of all stations, who have in turn been rewarded with consistent programming that continues to be a blueprint for the rest of the Kenyan radio market.

If you love ROCK!, want to know about the latest fashion and style, gadgets, hangouts cool drinks and hot outfits, our mid-morning ‘Fuse’ show (10am – 2pm) will take care of you – the young and upcoming socialite.

Programming If you should ever traverse the airwaves moving from frequency to frequency, our guarantee is that you will not find a fresher, edgier sound than Capital FM Kenya. Capital FM Programmes have their finger on the pulse of the nation; our shows are informative, fun and definitely set the trend. With Kenya’s most energetic, witty and lively presenters, we are often imitated, but never duplicated. In this era of high competition in the Kenyan radio market, stations continue to try and replicate the programming, style and format of Capital FM with little success.

The afternoon airwaves on Kenyan radio are ruled by ‘The Jam’ (3pm-7pm) a funfilled, raw, intelligent and sometimes cocky but always entertaining show, with the most unique style of music formatting each day – from the latest R&B, Slow Jams, 80’s classics, Neo Soul, 90’s hits and New Jack Swing.

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Our breakfast show ‘Capital in the Morning’ (6am- 10am) handles issues on the economy, society and the political scene. Its witty, fastpaced and full of laughs.

Right after lunch capitalfm offers you a one hour Dj mix show dubbed Radio Active every weekday (2pm-3pm) to help you unwind as you sit back and enjoy the mixes from the capital mix masters .

‘Hits Not Homework’ comes next (7pm10pm), targeted at the young and young at heart, this show has attitude and energy, and gives the youth the chance to voice their opinions on everything from relationships,

Watch out for the best syndicated countdown shows, including Rick Dees, dance nation and many more! The best of the best call Capital FM Home! For all you sports lovers we have not forgotten about you every Saturday (2pm5pm) capital airs a high energy sports show that fuses music and sports dubbed ‘Saturday Music & Sports’ keeping updated on what has been happening in the sports world. Right after this there is a entire hip-hop show ‘ The Cypher’ (5pm-7pm) for all you hiphop lovers playing you the best of local and international hip-hop. All this I followed by a show that takes us all around the world especially regions we never thought produced music “The World Groove Show” (7pm-9pm). This is followed by nonstop dj mixes to get you in the party mood. Sunday mornings are kicked of with an inspirational music dj mix show (8am-10am) followed by “The Lounge’ and entire 2 hour show playing you the best of neo soul music with also exclusive artist interviews from around the world. And for the Football fanatics “FootBall Sundays” ( noon – 2pm) a show that only talks about local and international football.

Comprising of a formidable team of journalists, editors and news presenters, the Newsroom’s main task is to give out the information collected in a responsible, ethical and timely fashion. The objective of our indepth news reports every top of the hour and informative features is to keep Kenyans abreast of the goings-on around them. Information is power. As Kenyans become increasingly aware of their rights, more information is needed. And Capital News team is here, fully loaded to meet their needs. Sales and Marketing The Capital Sales Team is client-driven, working as consultant rather than just regular sales representatives or account managers. Want to know more about our competitive rates, our account managers will be your perfect guides. Marketing in Capital FM is the nerve centre of the organization. Capital Marketing goes beyond the call of duty to link the client, the listener and the station. Capital Marketing keeps our award-winning brand strong and recognizable. As part of our Corporate Social Responsibility, we initiate projects that uphold humanity and the rights of the less fortunate. We also sponsor organizations that do so. Capital Creative The 98.4 Capital Creative provides an integrated service available to all advertisers, advertising agencies and promotions companies alike, forming a strategic arm of 98.4 Capital FM’s commercial production and promotions division. They have consistently managed to keep up with high quality commercials and the best on-air promotions for the biggest brands in Kenya. The Creative Services department at 98.4 Capital FM is innovative, competent and will give your brand that extra edge needed to make an impact in the market. Events C.I.A. (Capital Interactive Agents) is the unique arm of Capital FM that is charged with representing the brand on-ground. C.I.A.

creates, develops, manages and executes on-ground activations for the station and our clients and advertisers. C.I.A. creates and manages opportunities for the listeners to experience the brand (98.4 Capital FM) and its attributes (The Best Mix of Music) on a one-on-one basis. It offers experiential, on-site marketing to our clients and advertisers. C.I.A. consistently creates and develops cutting-edge promotions and activations that are unique and specific to each brand. From brand parties, to in-store promotions, road shows, cocktails, corporate parties, sports activations launches, concerts etc, we do it all! While Capital FM delivers brand equity on air, C.I.A. delivers brand volumes. We make sure your target market interacts with, samples, and experiences your brand, redefining experiential marketing in Kenya through the creation of powerful and effective brand experiences! Capital Digital Media The world has become a global village, and Capital FM has found a way to connect all listeners worldwide through the Capital Digital Media. This interactive media service connects the Capital FM family to friend and fans all over the world by use of its website: www.capitalfm.co.ke In line with the Capital Group’s Mission ‘To

responsibly entertain, educate and inform a dynamic audience’, Capital’s Digital Media allows its audiences to make use of the powerful tool that is the Internet to access information ranging from:

• News (www.capitalfm.co.ke/news) where

one can have access to breaking local and international news when it happens; • Business (www.capitalfm.co.ke/ business) with access to business news and features from industry experts; • Radio (www.capitalfm.co.ke/radio) where one can stream live radio, download Dj Mixes, enter radio contests, win tickets to events and much more. For Kenyans in the Diaspora, the website further serves the purpose of being one of the few links they have with home. The best part of it is that website users can not only listen to Capital FM from anywhere in the world, but they can also access breaking Kenyan news as well. With interactive and multimedia tools like live chat that allows listeners and presenters to interact, blogs, www.capitalfm.co.ke is truly a community on the web, and a grand marketing tool that reaches a global audience who access our website. Capital Digital Media truly has a global presence that few companies in Kenya can boast of. Tel: 020-2210020 www.capitalfm.co.ke

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Magnate Ventures Limited Using innovation to keep you visible

Standard Chartered Bank Digital branch, Junction Mall.

Stanley Kinyanjui, Managing Director

The solution was a specially designed display that indicated the name of a street and had sizeable rectangular slots with the names of the businesses and companies that were along the said street. It out-rightly solved the problem of backhanded competition for visibility at road intersections. But perhaps most impressive, eye-catching and unashamedly fun was the electronic outdoor billboard that was recentlyset up in one of the busiest roads in the city. It had live advertising that enabled companies to put up ads similar to the ones on television.

MD Stanley Kinyanjui at the Magnate Centre

Vision To provide innovative advertising and communication channels to customers, while enhancing employee welfare, realising growth in shareholder returns and making a positive impact on the community and environment. Mission To be the undisputed regional market leader in advertising and communication solutions that excite every customer through a competent, focused and motivated team. Even in this digital era of constant technological advances where advertising agencies and brands are constantly searching for new and creative ways to bring sites to life, the wide format billboard

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is still regarded as one of the most effective mediums of outdoor advertisings available. In Kenya, if you are on the lookout for creative outdoor advertising, quite a number of highly inventive and incredibly innovative billboards bearing the name ‘Magnate Ventures’ will most surely catch your eye. With over 1000 billboards spread throughout the country, each of them creative in their own unique way, it will be correct in saying that Magnate Ventures Limited is Kenya’s outdoor advertising company of choice. Established in 1996, Magnate Ventures specialises in strategic advertising development, printing, branding, supply, manufacture, installation and maintenance

of indoor, outdoor signage and promotional materials. Its fundamental objective is to deliver highly visible and visually attractive images of customer products and services through creative artistic impression and strategic positioning. By maintaining constant touch with other developed markets and strategic partners, the company has been able to keep abreast with new technological changes in outdoor & indoor advertising and signage. One of the most innovative signage the company came up with was the multidirectional sign that is synonymous at the intersection of almost every road and street junction in the city.

“Our tagline reads, ’keeping you visible.’ We always aim to keep our clients visible, that is why we’re putting up one of the most innovative signs in the city in the next few days,” says Stanley Kinyanjui, the Managing Director, Magnate Ventures Limited. Since its first year of operation, Magnate Ventures’focus has been on multi-skilling its staff through training and development to ensure they are equipped with new skills and can therefore be in line with the ever changing trends in the market. Additionally, there is no compromise in the acquisition and use of the latest machinesin the market, a trend that increases efficiency in production and reduces delivery time which results in cost cutting and satisfied customers.

State of the art Point of Purchase fabrication factory

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Magnate Ventures Limited Using innovation to keep you visible

Standard Chartered Bank Digital branch, Junction Mall.

Stanley Kinyanjui, Managing Director

The solution was a specially designed display that indicated the name of a street and had sizeable rectangular slots with the names of the businesses and companies that were along the said street. It out-rightly solved the problem of backhanded competition for visibility at road intersections. But perhaps most impressive, eye-catching and unashamedly fun was the electronic outdoor billboard that was recentlyset up in one of the busiest roads in the city. It had live advertising that enabled companies to put up ads similar to the ones on television.

MD Stanley Kinyanjui at the Magnate Centre

Vision To provide innovative advertising and communication channels to customers, while enhancing employee welfare, realising growth in shareholder returns and making a positive impact on the community and environment. Mission To be the undisputed regional market leader in advertising and communication solutions that excite every customer through a competent, focused and motivated team. Even in this digital era of constant technological advances where advertising agencies and brands are constantly searching for new and creative ways to bring sites to life, the wide format billboard

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is still regarded as one of the most effective mediums of outdoor advertisings available. In Kenya, if you are on the lookout for creative outdoor advertising, quite a number of highly inventive and incredibly innovative billboards bearing the name ‘Magnate Ventures’ will most surely catch your eye. With over 1000 billboards spread throughout the country, each of them creative in their own unique way, it will be correct in saying that Magnate Ventures Limited is Kenya’s outdoor advertising company of choice. Established in 1996, Magnate Ventures specialises in strategic advertising development, printing, branding, supply, manufacture, installation and maintenance

of indoor, outdoor signage and promotional materials. Its fundamental objective is to deliver highly visible and visually attractive images of customer products and services through creative artistic impression and strategic positioning. By maintaining constant touch with other developed markets and strategic partners, the company has been able to keep abreast with new technological changes in outdoor & indoor advertising and signage. One of the most innovative signage the company came up with was the multidirectional sign that is synonymous at the intersection of almost every road and street junction in the city.

“Our tagline reads, ’keeping you visible.’ We always aim to keep our clients visible, that is why we’re putting up one of the most innovative signs in the city in the next few days,” says Stanley Kinyanjui, the Managing Director, Magnate Ventures Limited. Since its first year of operation, Magnate Ventures’focus has been on multi-skilling its staff through training and development to ensure they are equipped with new skills and can therefore be in line with the ever changing trends in the market. Additionally, there is no compromise in the acquisition and use of the latest machinesin the market, a trend that increases efficiency in production and reduces delivery time which results in cost cutting and satisfied customers.

State of the art Point of Purchase fabrication factory

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The company’s management, led by Mr Kinyanjui is passionate about new ideas. It is why there is a dedicated department responsible for research and innovation. Magnate Ventures was the first in the region to introduce the 12 by 10 double sided billboards, an innovation that propelled the company to the top of the market within a short time. “When you are innovative, you rise above the others,” he says. Currently Magnate Ventures’ operations are locally run, but the company has a vision of going regional and further towards central Africa in the next two years. The company has already opened an office in Juba, South Sudan, and there are ongoing projects in the other East African countries.

Modern large format printing facilities.

Magnate Ventures is seemingly ahead of its time. Its signage department has now partnered with a South African company to roll-out a point-of-sale unit that will be responsible for churning out display units and materials that will go on the counters, among others. Additionally, it has partnered with both Samsung and LG to drive more innovative solutions on the digital platform. This will enable the company capture more audience that spends time in social places. To take advantage of the great opportunities that have arisen in infrastructure and real estate, Magnate Ventures has diversified by establishing a Projects Division. Being a Class A1 registered electrical contractor and also registered under Class NCA1 by the National Construction Authority, Magnate Ventures has already successfully implemented several electrical and civil construction projects.

Regional shop branding, Airtel Rwanda.

Innovative bus shelter

To ensure that clients are provided with quality products and services and are content, the company has implemented the requirements of ISO 9001-2008 Quality Management systems. This makes Magnate Ventures the first Outdoor Advertising Company in the region to be ISO certified.

Tel: +254 (20) 2010509 / 2350739 Mobile: (+254) 0722 204400 | 0733 601010 Email: info@magnate-ventures.com www.magnate-ventures.com

Mall branding, Junction Mall

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Instore branding

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The company’s management, led by Mr Kinyanjui is passionate about new ideas. It is why there is a dedicated department responsible for research and innovation. Magnate Ventures was the first in the region to introduce the 12 by 10 double sided billboards, an innovation that propelled the company to the top of the market within a short time. “When you are innovative, you rise above the others,” he says. Currently Magnate Ventures’ operations are locally run, but the company has a vision of going regional and further towards central Africa in the next two years. The company has already opened an office in Juba, South Sudan, and there are ongoing projects in the other East African countries.

Modern large format printing facilities.

Magnate Ventures is seemingly ahead of its time. Its signage department has now partnered with a South African company to roll-out a point-of-sale unit that will be responsible for churning out display units and materials that will go on the counters, among others. Additionally, it has partnered with both Samsung and LG to drive more innovative solutions on the digital platform. This will enable the company capture more audience that spends time in social places. To take advantage of the great opportunities that have arisen in infrastructure and real estate, Magnate Ventures has diversified by establishing a Projects Division. Being a Class A1 registered electrical contractor and also registered under Class NCA1 by the National Construction Authority, Magnate Ventures has already successfully implemented several electrical and civil construction projects.

Regional shop branding, Airtel Rwanda.

Innovative bus shelter

To ensure that clients are provided with quality products and services and are content, the company has implemented the requirements of ISO 9001-2008 Quality Management systems. This makes Magnate Ventures the first Outdoor Advertising Company in the region to be ISO certified.

Tel: +254 (20) 2010509 / 2350739 Mobile: (+254) 0722 204400 | 0733 601010 Email: info@magnate-ventures.com www.magnate-ventures.com

Mall branding, Junction Mall

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Instore branding

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Publisher With Local Base and Global Cause

>> RWANDA SHUTS DOWN SECURITY GIANT...PG 44

Volume 042

Door to Region, Window on World

Kenyan Diplomacy @ 50

Cabinet Secretary for Foreign Affairs and International Trade AMB. AMINA MOHAMMED shares her perspectives >> NELSON MANDELA'S DEFINING MOMENT..PG 26 Kenya KSh350

Incorporated in 2008, Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited (GVP) is the publisher of Best of Kenya, an annual book that positions Kenya as a visitor and investor destination, and Diplomat East Africa, a highend monthly magazine of regional diplomacy and politics. These two titles are owned by the company. However, because it is a reputable publishing firm, GVP has been outsourced to publish Industry Today, the bi-monthly magazine of the umbrella Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM) and Sokoni, also a bimonthly magazine of the Marketing Society of Kenya (MSK). The GVP team GVP has an able, experienced and competent team of writers, editors and designers who work painstakingly round the clock to ensure that the copy that goes into the four publications and the design of the journals and book are of the highest quality and world class standards.

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It is why the company was outsourced by KAM and MSK in the first place and why it has been able to publish corporate books, booklets and newsletters for the Brand Kenya Board. The Board is tasked with instilling a sense of national pride and patriotism in Kenyans as well as marketing the country as a visitor and investor destination. GVP is proud to have been contracted by roofing giant Mabati Rolling Mills (MRM) to research, write, design, edit and publish its insightful Golden Jubilee commemorative book Sheltering Africa and Beyond: A Dream Galvanised. GVP also publishes MRM’s newsletter Fanaka. Best of Kenya books Best of Kenya Volume I, which was published in 2009, dwelt at great length on introducing Kenya to the world as a country of unique geography and climate, beauty and splendour where businesses thrive and whose people are resilient and hospitable.

Volume II embraced Vision 2030, the government’s blueprint for transforming Kenya into a middle income country with a high quality of life for its citizens by 2030. Volume III celebrates Kenya’s Golden Jubilee of independence. Like Best of Kenya, Industry Today and Sokoni are carefully written, edited and designed to world-class standards. The same goes for any publication put out by GVP. That is in keeping with its motto – Local base, Global cause. Contact details: Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited Vision Plaza, Ground Floor, Suite 19, Mombasa Road Telephone: +254 20 2525253/4/5 Cellphone: + 254 722401739, +254 722787345 Website: www.gvpedia.com, www.gvp.co.ke E-mail: info@gvp.co.ke

Uganda USh9000

Tanzania TSh7500

Rwanda RWFr3000

Burundi BUFr6000

South Africa R30

Rest of Africa US$4

USA $4

UK £3

Canada $5

Rest of Europe €3.5

A Safal Group Company

A PUBLICATION OF THE KENYA ASSOCIATION OF TRAVEL AGENTS (KATA)

October-November Issue

Today

AN MRM QUARTERLY MAGAZINE A Magazine of the Kenya Association of Manufacturers

VOLUNTEERISM: LET’S ALL NURTURE THE SPIRIT OF SELFLESS GIVING

&

Kenya @

Providing Eco-Friendly

Investment

The Challenge to EAC Integration KAM’s Industrial Revolution ...pg 24 ...pg 34 DR. MANU PROPAGATES INNOVATION THROUGH KENYATTA UNIVERSITY

Best of Kenya

179


Publisher With Local Base and Global Cause

>> RWANDA SHUTS DOWN SECURITY GIANT...PG 44

Volume 042

Door to Region, Window on World

Kenyan Diplomacy @ 50

Cabinet Secretary for Foreign Affairs and International Trade AMB. AMINA MOHAMMED shares her perspectives >> NELSON MANDELA'S DEFINING MOMENT..PG 26 Kenya KSh350

Incorporated in 2008, Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited (GVP) is the publisher of Best of Kenya, an annual book that positions Kenya as a visitor and investor destination, and Diplomat East Africa, a highend monthly magazine of regional diplomacy and politics. These two titles are owned by the company. However, because it is a reputable publishing firm, GVP has been outsourced to publish Industry Today, the bi-monthly magazine of the umbrella Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM) and Sokoni, also a bimonthly magazine of the Marketing Society of Kenya (MSK). The GVP team GVP has an able, experienced and competent team of writers, editors and designers who work painstakingly round the clock to ensure that the copy that goes into the four publications and the design of the journals and book are of the highest quality and world class standards.

Best of Kenya

178

It is why the company was outsourced by KAM and MSK in the first place and why it has been able to publish corporate books, booklets and newsletters for the Brand Kenya Board. The Board is tasked with instilling a sense of national pride and patriotism in Kenyans as well as marketing the country as a visitor and investor destination. GVP is proud to have been contracted by roofing giant Mabati Rolling Mills (MRM) to research, write, design, edit and publish its insightful Golden Jubilee commemorative book Sheltering Africa and Beyond: A Dream Galvanised. GVP also publishes MRM’s newsletter Fanaka. Best of Kenya books Best of Kenya Volume I, which was published in 2009, dwelt at great length on introducing Kenya to the world as a country of unique geography and climate, beauty and splendour where businesses thrive and whose people are resilient and hospitable.

Volume II embraced Vision 2030, the government’s blueprint for transforming Kenya into a middle income country with a high quality of life for its citizens by 2030. Volume III celebrates Kenya’s Golden Jubilee of independence. Like Best of Kenya, Industry Today and Sokoni are carefully written, edited and designed to world-class standards. The same goes for any publication put out by GVP. That is in keeping with its motto – Local base, Global cause. Contact details: Global Village Publishers (EA) Limited Vision Plaza, Ground Floor, Suite 19, Mombasa Road Telephone: +254 20 2525253/4/5 Cellphone: + 254 722401739, +254 722787345 Website: www.gvpedia.com, www.gvp.co.ke E-mail: info@gvp.co.ke

Uganda USh9000

Tanzania TSh7500

Rwanda RWFr3000

Burundi BUFr6000

South Africa R30

Rest of Africa US$4

USA $4

UK £3

Canada $5

Rest of Europe €3.5

A Safal Group Company

A PUBLICATION OF THE KENYA ASSOCIATION OF TRAVEL AGENTS (KATA)

October-November Issue

Today

AN MRM QUARTERLY MAGAZINE A Magazine of the Kenya Association of Manufacturers

VOLUNTEERISM: LET’S ALL NURTURE THE SPIRIT OF SELFLESS GIVING

&

Kenya @

Providing Eco-Friendly

Investment

The Challenge to EAC Integration KAM’s Industrial Revolution ...pg 24 ...pg 34 DR. MANU PROPAGATES INNOVATION THROUGH KENYATTA UNIVERSITY

Best of Kenya

179


CHAPTER 13 Transport and Logistics

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CHAPTER 13 Transport and Logistics

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180

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Kenya Civil Aviation Authority: Driving Sector from the Front into Achieving Vision 2030 Goal With an assurance of safety and security, a vibrant civil aviation system will enable existing airline operators to increase capacity on existing routes and open new ones. This will also allow new players into the industry and by extension, the counties.

The modernisation of Air Traffic Management Systems cannot be over-emphasised. The authority is continuously investing in the sector. It entails the installation of modern Communication, Navigation and Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ ATM) equipment to facilitate the safe and efficient air traffic flow in Kenyan airspace. Improving communications between pilots and air traffic controllers will ease the flow and accuracy of information, boosting the safety of operations. Additionally, the implementation of new navigation procedures and technologies such as the Global Navigation Satellite Services (GNSS) and Performance-Based Navigation (PBN), will save more time and fuel and enable more direct flights to and from airports. The efficiency of the recent replacement of seven old radars is evidence enough. Major improvements have been registered in the management of air traffic, ensuring safety and security of air operations.

Mandate

Strategic Achievements

To plan, develop, manage, regulate and operate a safe, economically sustainable and efficient civil aviation system in Kenya, in accordance with the provisions of the Civil Aviation Act, 2013.

• • •

Vision To be a model of excellence in civil aviation

Mission To develop, regulate and manage a safe, efficient and effective civil aviation system in Kenya

• •

Core Values • Commitment to Safety and Security • Customer Focus • Commitment to Fairness and Equity • Commitment to Staff • Creativity and Innovativeness • Respect for Diversity

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Achieved an effective and sustainable safety and security oversight system. Developed an effective and sustainable air transport system and established a modern CNS/ATM Systes. Ensured safe, orderly and expeditious flow of air traffic. Attracted and retained competent, motivated and performance-driven human capital. Became a financially sustainable authority by ensuring collection and appropriate usage of revenue. Enhanced Customer Service through publication of KCAA Corporate Service Charter. Established an international aviation training centre of excellence by revamping the facilities and capacity at the East African School of Aviation by acquisition of training simulators and achieving ICAO train air-plus status. Became ISO certified to ensure quality service provision.

Established on 24 October 2002 by the Civil Aviation (Amendment) Act, the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (KCAA) works towards the regulation and oversight of aviation safety & security; economic regulation and provision of air navigation services, and the training of personnel. The establishment of a vibrant and highly competitive civil aviation industry is critical for national development. It’s why KCAA is implementing a programme to transform itself to provide quality services to the growing aviation industry. This entails aligning the structure of the organisation to its strategy, recruitment, training and resourcing the organisation appropriately. It will improve performance and ability to create values by delivering responsive and innovative aviation solutions based on international standards and practices consistent with safety and security for the flying public, and sustainability of the industry.

The re-organisation of the airspace is aimed at improving the capacity to handle safely more aircraft within Kenyan airspace. With the management and increase of approach sectors from one to two, optimum traffic flow and improved safety will be achieved. The re-organised airspace will be implemented for 24 hours after the completion of safety audits. Achieving international safety and security compliance is the authority’s main objective, and requires capacity-building to deliver quality regulatory oversight services and compliance of the industry. The project entails implementing actions towards achieving and sustaining international requirements, which are critical for attracting more air traffic into Kenya’s airspace and having Kenya-registered airlines operate in the airspaces of other countries. The KCAA is working with its international partners towards improving the human resource capacity to deliver oversight services; resolution of issues of safety and security; and continuously update

its regulatory system based on changes developed by ICAO. The establishment of direct flights between the United States of America and Kenya requires achievement of the International Air Safety Assessment (IASA) Category 1 status. This will be done with ongoing support by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of the United States under the Safe Skies for Africa Programme and in harmony with the East African Community’s Civil Aviation Safety Oversight Agency (EACCASSOA) and the African Civil Aviation Commission (AFCAC).

KAA Complex, Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, Nairobi Tel. +254 020 827470-75 P.O. Box 30163 -00100 Nairobi Email: info@kcaa.or.ke www.kcaa.or.ke

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Kenya Civil Aviation Authority: Driving Sector from the Front into Achieving Vision 2030 Goal With an assurance of safety and security, a vibrant civil aviation system will enable existing airline operators to increase capacity on existing routes and open new ones. This will also allow new players into the industry and by extension, the counties.

The modernisation of Air Traffic Management Systems cannot be over-emphasised. The authority is continuously investing in the sector. It entails the installation of modern Communication, Navigation and Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ ATM) equipment to facilitate the safe and efficient air traffic flow in Kenyan airspace. Improving communications between pilots and air traffic controllers will ease the flow and accuracy of information, boosting the safety of operations. Additionally, the implementation of new navigation procedures and technologies such as the Global Navigation Satellite Services (GNSS) and Performance-Based Navigation (PBN), will save more time and fuel and enable more direct flights to and from airports. The efficiency of the recent replacement of seven old radars is evidence enough. Major improvements have been registered in the management of air traffic, ensuring safety and security of air operations.

Mandate

Strategic Achievements

To plan, develop, manage, regulate and operate a safe, economically sustainable and efficient civil aviation system in Kenya, in accordance with the provisions of the Civil Aviation Act, 2013.

• • •

Vision To be a model of excellence in civil aviation

Mission To develop, regulate and manage a safe, efficient and effective civil aviation system in Kenya

• •

Core Values • Commitment to Safety and Security • Customer Focus • Commitment to Fairness and Equity • Commitment to Staff • Creativity and Innovativeness • Respect for Diversity

Best of Kenya

182

Achieved an effective and sustainable safety and security oversight system. Developed an effective and sustainable air transport system and established a modern CNS/ATM Systes. Ensured safe, orderly and expeditious flow of air traffic. Attracted and retained competent, motivated and performance-driven human capital. Became a financially sustainable authority by ensuring collection and appropriate usage of revenue. Enhanced Customer Service through publication of KCAA Corporate Service Charter. Established an international aviation training centre of excellence by revamping the facilities and capacity at the East African School of Aviation by acquisition of training simulators and achieving ICAO train air-plus status. Became ISO certified to ensure quality service provision.

Established on 24 October 2002 by the Civil Aviation (Amendment) Act, the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (KCAA) works towards the regulation and oversight of aviation safety & security; economic regulation and provision of air navigation services, and the training of personnel. The establishment of a vibrant and highly competitive civil aviation industry is critical for national development. It’s why KCAA is implementing a programme to transform itself to provide quality services to the growing aviation industry. This entails aligning the structure of the organisation to its strategy, recruitment, training and resourcing the organisation appropriately. It will improve performance and ability to create values by delivering responsive and innovative aviation solutions based on international standards and practices consistent with safety and security for the flying public, and sustainability of the industry.

The re-organisation of the airspace is aimed at improving the capacity to handle safely more aircraft within Kenyan airspace. With the management and increase of approach sectors from one to two, optimum traffic flow and improved safety will be achieved. The re-organised airspace will be implemented for 24 hours after the completion of safety audits. Achieving international safety and security compliance is the authority’s main objective, and requires capacity-building to deliver quality regulatory oversight services and compliance of the industry. The project entails implementing actions towards achieving and sustaining international requirements, which are critical for attracting more air traffic into Kenya’s airspace and having Kenya-registered airlines operate in the airspaces of other countries. The KCAA is working with its international partners towards improving the human resource capacity to deliver oversight services; resolution of issues of safety and security; and continuously update

its regulatory system based on changes developed by ICAO. The establishment of direct flights between the United States of America and Kenya requires achievement of the International Air Safety Assessment (IASA) Category 1 status. This will be done with ongoing support by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of the United States under the Safe Skies for Africa Programme and in harmony with the East African Community’s Civil Aviation Safety Oversight Agency (EACCASSOA) and the African Civil Aviation Commission (AFCAC).

KAA Complex, Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, Nairobi Tel. +254 020 827470-75 P.O. Box 30163 -00100 Nairobi Email: info@kcaa.or.ke www.kcaa.or.ke

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Fly540 Kenya

FlySAX

East Africa’s premier low-cost airline

East Africa’s leading safari airline

Mr. Don Smith, CEO Fly540 Kenya and FlySAX with two0 of the Airline’s pilots

café in Langata House at Wilson Airport. Also, we pride ourselves on pioneering new and previously unservised destinations such as Kitale, Kakamega and Wajir.

Fly540 Kenya is East Africa’s premier lowcost airline; and FlySAX is a leading safari airline. Best of Kenya spoke to Mr. Don Smith, CEO of Fly540 Kenya and FlySAX on the airline’s remarkable niche in Kenya. Herewith excerpts: Where do you fly? Both Fly540 Kenya and Fly SAX are based in Nairobi, operating from the Jomo Kenyatta International and Wilson airports. From here, Fly540 passengers can travel to seven destinations across three countries Eldoret, Kisumu, Lamu, Lodwar, Malindi and Mombasa, in Kenya, Juba in South Sudan, and Zanzibar in Tanzania. The most popular Fly540 route is between Nairobi and Mombasa, with five flights from the capital to the port city every day. With SAX, we take our passengers to the best safari and beach destinations in Kenya, including Amboseli, Kakamega, Kilimanjaro, Kitale, Lamu, Maasai Mara, Nanyuki, Ukunda, Wajir and Watamu. We have recently launched flights to the Comoro Islands. How long have you been flying? Fly540 Kenya took to the skies in November, 2006, with flights between Nairobi and Mombasa using a 48-seat ATR 42-320

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We are able to deliver great service, thanks to the dedication of our staff. Our cabin crew and ground staff as well as our team of experienced engineers and technicians have had extensive training, both regionally and internationally, and are licensed by the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority to practise.

turbo-prop aircraft. Due to the instant popularity of our value-for-money flights, we soon expanded our fleet and increased our destinations network with more domestic routes, and then, in 2010, commenced our international flights with services to Tanzania and South Sudan. We launched SAX in 2012 after the promulgation of the new Constitution of Kenya. Our maiden flight was from Nairobi to the Maasai Mara.

Who flies with you? Most of our passengers with SAX are holiday-makers: many are from Kenya or elsewhere on the continent, but we also have a lot of international travellers. With Fly540, our passenger base is much broader. We’ll have business travellers going to a meeting, retailers transporting their goods, families going to visit friends and relatives, and holiday-makers all on the same flight! As a low-cost airline, we cater for all travellers.

Why is a low-cost airline like Fly540 good for people in Kenya? The availability of low-cost air travel gives the people of Kenya more freedom and options – whether this is for work or pleasure. Fly540 was the first low-cost airline in Africa to provide intra-country flights, and domestic flights outside of South Africa. Previously, it was a choice between a prohibitively costly flight or a long and uncomfortable journey by road. When we started flying, it was the first time that the general public in Kenya could affordably and conveniently travel by air. What makes you different from your competitors? The key difference between travelling with Fly540 Kenya and another airline is the cost. We’re a low cost airline and so our prices are significantly lower than those of other airlines flying to the same destinations. At the same

Do you have any partnerships? Technical Expertise

time, we believe that affordable travel should still be enjoyable and so we provide our passengers with certain comforts that are not offered by all low-cost airlines – such as serving complimentary refreshments on all flights and giving 20kg of baggage allowance per person at no extra cost. Similarly, with SAX, we aim to provide our passengers with a smooth and comfortable service, which is why we have a dedicated sales and check-in area, alongside our own

We recently expanded our Fly540 Kenya flight network by forming a partnership with Qatar Airways, an award-winning global airline based in Doha, Qatar. This deal was our first ever international interline agreement, which is beginning with an inbound service for passengers arriving in Kenya – providing them with direct access and quick transit times to a range of destinations that weren’t previously accessible through a single itinerary. We also utilise our relationships with hotels and other travel providers at the destinations

we serve to offer our passengers great packages, which are available on the Fly540 Kenya website (www.fly540.com) and also by signing-up through the website to receive special offers by SMS and email. How do you contribute to the economy of Kenya? We directly contribute to the economy as an employer: for Fly540 and SAX combined, we have over 300 staff in Nairobi and many more elsewhere in Kenya. More importantly, with affordable air travel, everyone in Kenya can participate in the business world – enabling the growth of local businesses as well as an increase in productivity with quicker transport of both people and freight. Fly540 Kenya also supports economic development in Kenya by increasing aviation connectivity in providing flights to areas previously not connected by scheduled services. At the same time, improving travel within Kenya – through the availability of our own flights as well as through partnerships such as our agreement with Qatar Airways – helps to attract greater inward investment from abroad with an increase in business visitors and tourists. Your website says that you work with local communities: How important is this to you? We are passionate about supporting the local communities of the destinations we serve. Not only are we obligated as a business, but giving something back to society empowers our workers to connect with their local communities and become proud employees of the company that they represent. We provide extensive financial and physical support to social charities and organisations

– such as orphanages, hospices and schools – and also environmental, such as the Mount Kenya Trust. Equally, we know it is important to invest in those closer home. Every year, we provide apprenticeships and training to 50 people without any, or only with minimal, qualifications – half of whom end up being employed by Fly540 after completion of the programme. What is the future of aviation in Africa? Aviation in Africa is set to grow exponentially. As the continent continues to develop, there is an ever-increasing demand for air travel from within Africa and also outside, which is demonstrated by international airlines forming partnerships with local carriers. In addition, with the establishment of low-cost airlines, such as Fly540 Kenya, enabling ordinary people to travel by air, this demand is broadening. Kenya, in particular, will benefit from this expansion as it is a key hub for travellers coming into the continent. As a result, we are very excited about the future of aviation in Africa, and we look forward to welcoming many more passengers and taking them to new and exciting destinations with Fly540 Kenya and SAX! Contact us Fly 540 +254 728 540 540, +254 710 540 540, +254 727 532 275, +254 737 540 540, +254 734 540 540 +254 733 540 540, info@fly540.com Fly Sax JKIA: 0702 305 305, 0711 305 305, 0714 305 305 Email: reservations@fly-sax.com Wilson Airport: 0704 305 305, or 0706 305 305

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Fly540 Kenya

FlySAX

East Africa’s premier low-cost airline

East Africa’s leading safari airline

Mr. Don Smith, CEO Fly540 Kenya and FlySAX with two0 of the Airline’s pilots

café in Langata House at Wilson Airport. Also, we pride ourselves on pioneering new and previously unservised destinations such as Kitale, Kakamega and Wajir.

Fly540 Kenya is East Africa’s premier lowcost airline; and FlySAX is a leading safari airline. Best of Kenya spoke to Mr. Don Smith, CEO of Fly540 Kenya and FlySAX on the airline’s remarkable niche in Kenya. Herewith excerpts: Where do you fly? Both Fly540 Kenya and Fly SAX are based in Nairobi, operating from the Jomo Kenyatta International and Wilson airports. From here, Fly540 passengers can travel to seven destinations across three countries Eldoret, Kisumu, Lamu, Lodwar, Malindi and Mombasa, in Kenya, Juba in South Sudan, and Zanzibar in Tanzania. The most popular Fly540 route is between Nairobi and Mombasa, with five flights from the capital to the port city every day. With SAX, we take our passengers to the best safari and beach destinations in Kenya, including Amboseli, Kakamega, Kilimanjaro, Kitale, Lamu, Maasai Mara, Nanyuki, Ukunda, Wajir and Watamu. We have recently launched flights to the Comoro Islands. How long have you been flying? Fly540 Kenya took to the skies in November, 2006, with flights between Nairobi and Mombasa using a 48-seat ATR 42-320

Best of Kenya

184

We are able to deliver great service, thanks to the dedication of our staff. Our cabin crew and ground staff as well as our team of experienced engineers and technicians have had extensive training, both regionally and internationally, and are licensed by the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority to practise.

turbo-prop aircraft. Due to the instant popularity of our value-for-money flights, we soon expanded our fleet and increased our destinations network with more domestic routes, and then, in 2010, commenced our international flights with services to Tanzania and South Sudan. We launched SAX in 2012 after the promulgation of the new Constitution of Kenya. Our maiden flight was from Nairobi to the Maasai Mara.

Who flies with you? Most of our passengers with SAX are holiday-makers: many are from Kenya or elsewhere on the continent, but we also have a lot of international travellers. With Fly540, our passenger base is much broader. We’ll have business travellers going to a meeting, retailers transporting their goods, families going to visit friends and relatives, and holiday-makers all on the same flight! As a low-cost airline, we cater for all travellers.

Why is a low-cost airline like Fly540 good for people in Kenya? The availability of low-cost air travel gives the people of Kenya more freedom and options – whether this is for work or pleasure. Fly540 was the first low-cost airline in Africa to provide intra-country flights, and domestic flights outside of South Africa. Previously, it was a choice between a prohibitively costly flight or a long and uncomfortable journey by road. When we started flying, it was the first time that the general public in Kenya could affordably and conveniently travel by air. What makes you different from your competitors? The key difference between travelling with Fly540 Kenya and another airline is the cost. We’re a low cost airline and so our prices are significantly lower than those of other airlines flying to the same destinations. At the same

Do you have any partnerships? Technical Expertise

time, we believe that affordable travel should still be enjoyable and so we provide our passengers with certain comforts that are not offered by all low-cost airlines – such as serving complimentary refreshments on all flights and giving 20kg of baggage allowance per person at no extra cost. Similarly, with SAX, we aim to provide our passengers with a smooth and comfortable service, which is why we have a dedicated sales and check-in area, alongside our own

We recently expanded our Fly540 Kenya flight network by forming a partnership with Qatar Airways, an award-winning global airline based in Doha, Qatar. This deal was our first ever international interline agreement, which is beginning with an inbound service for passengers arriving in Kenya – providing them with direct access and quick transit times to a range of destinations that weren’t previously accessible through a single itinerary. We also utilise our relationships with hotels and other travel providers at the destinations

we serve to offer our passengers great packages, which are available on the Fly540 Kenya website (www.fly540.com) and also by signing-up through the website to receive special offers by SMS and email. How do you contribute to the economy of Kenya? We directly contribute to the economy as an employer: for Fly540 and SAX combined, we have over 300 staff in Nairobi and many more elsewhere in Kenya. More importantly, with affordable air travel, everyone in Kenya can participate in the business world – enabling the growth of local businesses as well as an increase in productivity with quicker transport of both people and freight. Fly540 Kenya also supports economic development in Kenya by increasing aviation connectivity in providing flights to areas previously not connected by scheduled services. At the same time, improving travel within Kenya – through the availability of our own flights as well as through partnerships such as our agreement with Qatar Airways – helps to attract greater inward investment from abroad with an increase in business visitors and tourists. Your website says that you work with local communities: How important is this to you? We are passionate about supporting the local communities of the destinations we serve. Not only are we obligated as a business, but giving something back to society empowers our workers to connect with their local communities and become proud employees of the company that they represent. We provide extensive financial and physical support to social charities and organisations

– such as orphanages, hospices and schools – and also environmental, such as the Mount Kenya Trust. Equally, we know it is important to invest in those closer home. Every year, we provide apprenticeships and training to 50 people without any, or only with minimal, qualifications – half of whom end up being employed by Fly540 after completion of the programme. What is the future of aviation in Africa? Aviation in Africa is set to grow exponentially. As the continent continues to develop, there is an ever-increasing demand for air travel from within Africa and also outside, which is demonstrated by international airlines forming partnerships with local carriers. In addition, with the establishment of low-cost airlines, such as Fly540 Kenya, enabling ordinary people to travel by air, this demand is broadening. Kenya, in particular, will benefit from this expansion as it is a key hub for travellers coming into the continent. As a result, we are very excited about the future of aviation in Africa, and we look forward to welcoming many more passengers and taking them to new and exciting destinations with Fly540 Kenya and SAX! Contact us Fly 540 +254 728 540 540, +254 710 540 540, +254 727 532 275, +254 737 540 540, +254 734 540 540 +254 733 540 540, info@fly540.com Fly Sax JKIA: 0702 305 305, 0711 305 305, 0714 305 305 Email: reservations@fly-sax.com Wilson Airport: 0704 305 305, or 0706 305 305

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Best of Kenya

187


CHAPTER 14 Farming

Best of Kenya

188

A grand parade for the best of Kenyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Breeds during the Brookside Livestock Breeders show and sale held at the ASK Showground at Jamhuri park.

Best of Kenya

189


CHAPTER 14 Farming

Best of Kenya

188

A grand parade for the best of Kenyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Breeds during the Brookside Livestock Breeders show and sale held at the ASK Showground at Jamhuri park.

Best of Kenya

189


Brookside Livestock Breeders Show and Sale held in the country that evidently epitomises the success of the company’s support for the dairy sector.

Brookside Dairy, A Farmer’s True Partner

Dubbed the crème de la crème of agricultural shows in the region, the event is the company’s most profound contribution to the livestock industry, bringing together over 30,000 livestock farming players under one roof. Now in its eighth year, the show gives all the stakeholders an opportunity to meet and share knowledge and experiences. Over the years, Brookside Dairy Limited has been the title sponsors for the event that is organized by both Brookside and the Livestock Show Trust, which is made up of various livestock breed societies, the event provides the ultimate platform for both farmer and governments to get contacts of where they can source better breeds to improve their livestock. It is usually three days of informative, knowledgeable and constructive sessions under the patronage of local and international judges with the highlight of the day being a grand parade of the finest livestock specimens.

Extension services; Farmers being trained how to make Silage

These farmers benefit from regular field extension programs aimed at empowering them to produce more milk in the right quality and thereby earn more money from their dairy businesses. Other benefits include: •

A grand parade for the best of Kenya’s Breeds during the Brookside Livestock Breeders show and sale held at the ASK Showground at Jamhuri park.

• •

Upon its inception in 1993, Brookside Dairy has been aggressive in cementing partnerships with Dairy farmers across the country to ensure the satisfaction of the Brookside’s production needs. With a raw milk supplier base of over 150,000 dairy farmers, the company processes over 700,000 litres of milk daily. In the year 1997, Brookside started sponsoring Dairy training courses where farmers were invited quarterly to our Gicheha farm in Ruiru in order to increase on their milk production since most of our suppliers were producing an average of 3-5 litres per cow per day In the year 2012, Brookside graduated from the farmer’s field days to setting up model farms for demonstration where farmers can learn modern farming practices. We are in the process of setting up a model demonstration farm in every county. Due to intense training, farmers are currently producing an average of 10 litres per cow per day with some cows producing up to 45 litres per day with some large scale farmers producing an average of 2500 litres to 4000 litres per day Now marking 20 years of existence, the company boasts of a legacy of helping

Best of Kenya

190

improve the standards of the livestock sector and upgrading the livelihoods of thousands of small-scale dairy farmers. Brookside has been in the forefront in promoting the livestock industry in Kenya and especially the Dairy industry. While most other agricultural activities are largely seasonal, dairy farming assures the farmer of a daily source of income, unlike other agricultural production that provides income once a year and in some cases more than a year. We invest in dairy training courses across the country thus creating opportunities for young farmers and other people who are interested in venturing into dairy farming. Over the years, Brookside has remained faithful to its prominent role of a provider of a ready and reliable market for the farmers milk. To this end, the company has developed an efficient raw milk supply cahian that includes collection from the farm gates, bulking and chilling at strategically placed stations before onward transit to the company’s processing plants in Ruiru and Industrial area, Nairobi. This maket dominance has been augemented in the setting up of major cooling plants

in Kiganjo, Nakuru, Eldoret, Ol Kalou , Nyahururu and Kinangop among others still being planned and over 180 collection routes Brookside has extended its milk collection to non traditional dairy farming areas such as Taita Taveta , West pokot, Nyanza and western Kenya. Other than individual suppliers supplying Brookside, strong relationships exist with over 150 farmer groups made up of self help groups, cooperatives and limited companies. The company has the largest raw milk collection network in the region The company trains over 20,000 farmers every year with farmers benefitting greatly not only from the course on agriculture - which offers trains them on the quality of animal feeds and farm management skills, but also in financial management training offered by Brookside Dairy’s financial partners. Brookside was the first dairy in the region to introduce guaranteed pricing contracts, giving farmers clear price transparency and a guaranteed market for their milk. But while the Brookside Dairy name has become synonymous with dairy farming in the region, it is the award-winning biennial

Regular Education through Dairy Training Courses that are conducted countrywide Creating a guaranteed market for farmers’ milk Loan Facilities- enabling farmers to access loans from leading financial institutions through a check-off system. Farmers are not only accessing loan facilities but this has changed the way they transact their business as they are now more efficient but they have been able to commercialize and modernize their farms with some installing equipments milking machines , .feed mixer,farm tank for cooling milk Countrywide milk collection network;Through our network of strategically placed milk collection and cooling facilities we’ve made it easier for farmers to deliver their milk to us at its freshest and with minimal wastages Farm inputs and feeds on credit; We offer farmers various farm inputs including animal feeds on credit which we deliver to their doorsteps. This convenience allows farmers time to

Brookside Tanker offloading milk.

concentrate on real farming that will go towards creating more wealth from their farms. Support for Cooperatives;- We encourage farmers to establish cooperative societies and then assist them with the provision of cooling facilities that go hand in hand in ensuring quality milk with minimal loss to the farmer. Prompt and attractive payment for milk delivered. We offer among the most competitive prices for milk delivered and have launched promotional initiatives like the Brooksaidika campaign to promote the benefits of partnering with

us. Our payments are prompt which enables farmers to meet their financial obligations and further develop their businesses. Corporate Social Investment projects; We help improve infrastructure in areas where we operate including roads, cattle dips, schools etc Brookside Dairy’s constantly reviews these partnerships so as to bring out the best in the farmers as it focuses on growing the region’s dairy sub- sector to become the best performing in the world.

Brookside Dairy Ltd.

Brookside Dairy Tanzania Ltd

Dar es Salaam

Brookside Dairy Uganda Ltd

P.O Box 236-00232 Ruiru, Kenya Tel : 020-3542480 Tel landline : (020) 2506210/8 Cell : 0735 222 264 or 0722 130 000 Email : maziwa@brookside.co.ke www.brookside.co.ke

Arusha Branch, Mbaunda road P.O Box 3100, Arusha, Tanzania Tel : (+255) 272 507 134/6 Cell : (+255) 732 972 2820 Email : info@brookside.co.tz

Plot 135 Mikocheni Light, Industrial Area P.O Box 3100, Arusha, Tanzania Tel : (+255) 222 774 761 Email : info@brookside.co.tz

Old Port Bell Road P.O Box 40092, Kampala, Uganda Tel: (+256) (+41) 4380468, 4380469, 4236902 (+256) 414 236909/380468/9 Email: info@brooksideuganda.ug

Best of Kenya

191


Brookside Livestock Breeders Show and Sale held in the country that evidently epitomises the success of the company’s support for the dairy sector.

Brookside Dairy, A Farmer’s True Partner

Dubbed the crème de la crème of agricultural shows in the region, the event is the company’s most profound contribution to the livestock industry, bringing together over 30,000 livestock farming players under one roof. Now in its eighth year, the show gives all the stakeholders an opportunity to meet and share knowledge and experiences. Over the years, Brookside Dairy Limited has been the title sponsors for the event that is organized by both Brookside and the Livestock Show Trust, which is made up of various livestock breed societies, the event provides the ultimate platform for both farmer and governments to get contacts of where they can source better breeds to improve their livestock. It is usually three days of informative, knowledgeable and constructive sessions under the patronage of local and international judges with the highlight of the day being a grand parade of the finest livestock specimens.

Extension services; Farmers being trained how to make Silage

These farmers benefit from regular field extension programs aimed at empowering them to produce more milk in the right quality and thereby earn more money from their dairy businesses. Other benefits include: •

A grand parade for the best of Kenya’s Breeds during the Brookside Livestock Breeders show and sale held at the ASK Showground at Jamhuri park.

• •

Upon its inception in 1993, Brookside Dairy has been aggressive in cementing partnerships with Dairy farmers across the country to ensure the satisfaction of the Brookside’s production needs. With a raw milk supplier base of over 150,000 dairy farmers, the company processes over 700,000 litres of milk daily. In the year 1997, Brookside started sponsoring Dairy training courses where farmers were invited quarterly to our Gicheha farm in Ruiru in order to increase on their milk production since most of our suppliers were producing an average of 3-5 litres per cow per day In the year 2012, Brookside graduated from the farmer’s field days to setting up model farms for demonstration where farmers can learn modern farming practices. We are in the process of setting up a model demonstration farm in every county. Due to intense training, farmers are currently producing an average of 10 litres per cow per day with some cows producing up to 45 litres per day with some large scale farmers producing an average of 2500 litres to 4000 litres per day Now marking 20 years of existence, the company boasts of a legacy of helping

Best of Kenya

190

improve the standards of the livestock sector and upgrading the livelihoods of thousands of small-scale dairy farmers. Brookside has been in the forefront in promoting the livestock industry in Kenya and especially the Dairy industry. While most other agricultural activities are largely seasonal, dairy farming assures the farmer of a daily source of income, unlike other agricultural production that provides income once a year and in some cases more than a year. We invest in dairy training courses across the country thus creating opportunities for young farmers and other people who are interested in venturing into dairy farming. Over the years, Brookside has remained faithful to its prominent role of a provider of a ready and reliable market for the farmers milk. To this end, the company has developed an efficient raw milk supply cahian that includes collection from the farm gates, bulking and chilling at strategically placed stations before onward transit to the company’s processing plants in Ruiru and Industrial area, Nairobi. This maket dominance has been augemented in the setting up of major cooling plants

in Kiganjo, Nakuru, Eldoret, Ol Kalou , Nyahururu and Kinangop among others still being planned and over 180 collection routes Brookside has extended its milk collection to non traditional dairy farming areas such as Taita Taveta , West pokot, Nyanza and western Kenya. Other than individual suppliers supplying Brookside, strong relationships exist with over 150 farmer groups made up of self help groups, cooperatives and limited companies. The company has the largest raw milk collection network in the region The company trains over 20,000 farmers every year with farmers benefitting greatly not only from the course on agriculture - which offers trains them on the quality of animal feeds and farm management skills, but also in financial management training offered by Brookside Dairy’s financial partners. Brookside was the first dairy in the region to introduce guaranteed pricing contracts, giving farmers clear price transparency and a guaranteed market for their milk. But while the Brookside Dairy name has become synonymous with dairy farming in the region, it is the award-winning biennial

Regular Education through Dairy Training Courses that are conducted countrywide Creating a guaranteed market for farmers’ milk Loan Facilities- enabling farmers to access loans from leading financial institutions through a check-off system. Farmers are not only accessing loan facilities but this has changed the way they transact their business as they are now more efficient but they have been able to commercialize and modernize their farms with some installing equipments milking machines , .feed mixer,farm tank for cooling milk Countrywide milk collection network;Through our network of strategically placed milk collection and cooling facilities we’ve made it easier for farmers to deliver their milk to us at its freshest and with minimal wastages Farm inputs and feeds on credit; We offer farmers various farm inputs including animal feeds on credit which we deliver to their doorsteps. This convenience allows farmers time to

Brookside Tanker offloading milk.

concentrate on real farming that will go towards creating more wealth from their farms. Support for Cooperatives;- We encourage farmers to establish cooperative societies and then assist them with the provision of cooling facilities that go hand in hand in ensuring quality milk with minimal loss to the farmer. Prompt and attractive payment for milk delivered. We offer among the most competitive prices for milk delivered and have launched promotional initiatives like the Brooksaidika campaign to promote the benefits of partnering with

us. Our payments are prompt which enables farmers to meet their financial obligations and further develop their businesses. Corporate Social Investment projects; We help improve infrastructure in areas where we operate including roads, cattle dips, schools etc Brookside Dairy’s constantly reviews these partnerships so as to bring out the best in the farmers as it focuses on growing the region’s dairy sub- sector to become the best performing in the world.

Brookside Dairy Ltd.

Brookside Dairy Tanzania Ltd

Dar es Salaam

Brookside Dairy Uganda Ltd

P.O Box 236-00232 Ruiru, Kenya Tel : 020-3542480 Tel landline : (020) 2506210/8 Cell : 0735 222 264 or 0722 130 000 Email : maziwa@brookside.co.ke www.brookside.co.ke

Arusha Branch, Mbaunda road P.O Box 3100, Arusha, Tanzania Tel : (+255) 272 507 134/6 Cell : (+255) 732 972 2820 Email : info@brookside.co.tz

Plot 135 Mikocheni Light, Industrial Area P.O Box 3100, Arusha, Tanzania Tel : (+255) 222 774 761 Email : info@brookside.co.tz

Old Port Bell Road P.O Box 40092, Kampala, Uganda Tel: (+256) (+41) 4380468, 4380469, 4236902 (+256) 414 236909/380468/9 Email: info@brooksideuganda.ug

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Board to Expand Area Under Irrigation, Enhance Food Security

Stimulus Programme and Expanded Irrigation Programme. The National Irrigation Board embarked on rehabilitation and expansion of existing irrigation schemes as well as construction of new irrigation. There are currently 120 irrigation projects all over the country being implemented by the board with support from the government and donors. Future plans of the board The government, through National Irrigation Board, is promoting irrigation-based farming for both food and cash crops. It targets to exploit the agricultural potential in ASAL areas by putting an additional 1 million acres under irrigation in the next five years. Recent studies indicate that 1.5 million acres can be developed with the available water resources with minimum storage, but with the use of better Irrigation methods that eliminate water wastage. If we stick to the targets set by Vision 2030 of 80,000 acres to be developed annually, if adequately funded, it will take 12.5 years from July, 2013 to develop the 1million acres.

Introduction The National Irrigation Board was established in 1966 through an Act of Parliament (Cap 347) to develop, promote and improve irrigated agriculture. This is to be achieved through sustainable exploitation of available irrigation and drainage potential in Kenya in order to promote food security, create wealth and employment, improving the living standards of Kenyans. The board is among the first public institutions established by the independent government and has operated under several ministries. In the current government, it is under the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries. Despite various challenges, the board has played a key role in enhancing food security and it is committed to achieving its core mandate. Presently, the board is in charge of seven (7) national irrigation schemes and is undertaking 120 irrigation projects spread all over the country. Our Vision

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To be the leading institution in the development of effective and efficient irrigation and drainage projects and schemes in Kenya Our Mission To develop, promote and improve irrigated agriculture through sustainable exploitation of available irrigation and drainage potential in Kenya in order to ensure food security, create wealth and employment thereby improving the living standard of Kenyans. STRATEGIC ISSUES IN NIB To effectively attain the organisation’s vision and mission, the following strategies and objectives have been put in place to spearhead the irrigation and drainage operations; • Irrigation development and expansion - Accelerating irrigation expansion and development • Operation and maintenance services - Improving performance of irrigation and drainage infrastructure through rehabilitation - Improving provision of operation and

maintenance services and increasing efficiency in water utilisation • Long-term sustainability of public irrigation schemes - Strengthening capacity of farmers and farmer organisations for management of irrigation systems - Improving land tenure systems - Improving financial sustainability of all irrigation schemes - Improving efficiency and productivity of staff • Improving land, water and agricultural productivity - Improving agricultural and land productivity in irrigation schemes NIB schemes/ projects The board, since its establishment in 1966 has been in charge of operations of seven (7) national irrigation schemes and it is striving to expand services beyond these traditional schemes. The schemes include:

The Jubilee coalition government manifesto recognised this dilemma in both funding and the target and set out to develop the 1million acres in five years (“a green revolution”). Thus reducing the period by seven years but maintaining the principles set out in Vision 2030. The fundamentals in realising the said target can be collapsed into two sub-categories of intervention namely; • Rapid upscaling of the ongoing expanded irrigation programme where the government intends to develop 50,000 acres annually. • Transformation of the Galana/Kulalu ranch into a large scale irrigation scheme under the national food security programme dubbed ’’the green revolution’’ by putting 1million acres of the 1.75million acre ranch under irrigation.

National Irrigation Board P.O. Box 30372, 00100 Nairobi

Other than the traditional irrigation schemes given above, the Government of Kenya has in the recent years enhanced funding for irrigation development through the Economic Best of Kenya

193


Board to Expand Area Under Irrigation, Enhance Food Security

Stimulus Programme and Expanded Irrigation Programme. The National Irrigation Board embarked on rehabilitation and expansion of existing irrigation schemes as well as construction of new irrigation. There are currently 120 irrigation projects all over the country being implemented by the board with support from the government and donors. Future plans of the board The government, through National Irrigation Board, is promoting irrigation-based farming for both food and cash crops. It targets to exploit the agricultural potential in ASAL areas by putting an additional 1 million acres under irrigation in the next five years. Recent studies indicate that 1.5 million acres can be developed with the available water resources with minimum storage, but with the use of better Irrigation methods that eliminate water wastage. If we stick to the targets set by Vision 2030 of 80,000 acres to be developed annually, if adequately funded, it will take 12.5 years from July, 2013 to develop the 1million acres.

Introduction The National Irrigation Board was established in 1966 through an Act of Parliament (Cap 347) to develop, promote and improve irrigated agriculture. This is to be achieved through sustainable exploitation of available irrigation and drainage potential in Kenya in order to promote food security, create wealth and employment, improving the living standards of Kenyans. The board is among the first public institutions established by the independent government and has operated under several ministries. In the current government, it is under the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries. Despite various challenges, the board has played a key role in enhancing food security and it is committed to achieving its core mandate. Presently, the board is in charge of seven (7) national irrigation schemes and is undertaking 120 irrigation projects spread all over the country. Our Vision

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To be the leading institution in the development of effective and efficient irrigation and drainage projects and schemes in Kenya Our Mission To develop, promote and improve irrigated agriculture through sustainable exploitation of available irrigation and drainage potential in Kenya in order to ensure food security, create wealth and employment thereby improving the living standard of Kenyans. STRATEGIC ISSUES IN NIB To effectively attain the organisation’s vision and mission, the following strategies and objectives have been put in place to spearhead the irrigation and drainage operations; • Irrigation development and expansion - Accelerating irrigation expansion and development • Operation and maintenance services - Improving performance of irrigation and drainage infrastructure through rehabilitation - Improving provision of operation and

maintenance services and increasing efficiency in water utilisation • Long-term sustainability of public irrigation schemes - Strengthening capacity of farmers and farmer organisations for management of irrigation systems - Improving land tenure systems - Improving financial sustainability of all irrigation schemes - Improving efficiency and productivity of staff • Improving land, water and agricultural productivity - Improving agricultural and land productivity in irrigation schemes NIB schemes/ projects The board, since its establishment in 1966 has been in charge of operations of seven (7) national irrigation schemes and it is striving to expand services beyond these traditional schemes. The schemes include:

The Jubilee coalition government manifesto recognised this dilemma in both funding and the target and set out to develop the 1million acres in five years (“a green revolution”). Thus reducing the period by seven years but maintaining the principles set out in Vision 2030. The fundamentals in realising the said target can be collapsed into two sub-categories of intervention namely; • Rapid upscaling of the ongoing expanded irrigation programme where the government intends to develop 50,000 acres annually. • Transformation of the Galana/Kulalu ranch into a large scale irrigation scheme under the national food security programme dubbed ’’the green revolution’’ by putting 1million acres of the 1.75million acre ranch under irrigation.

National Irrigation Board P.O. Box 30372, 00100 Nairobi

Other than the traditional irrigation schemes given above, the Government of Kenya has in the recent years enhanced funding for irrigation development through the Economic Best of Kenya

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CHAPTER 15 Education and Training

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CHAPTER 15 Education and Training

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Two Centuries of Learning …and still going strong

In 1985, former President Daniel arap Moi introduced the 8-4-4 system of education, eight years of primary, four years of secondary and four years of university education. Since inception, the 8-4-4 system has been subjected to several changes. Several commissions have been setup to come up with recommendations that would better the system. The Wanjigi Report of 1983, the Kamunge Report of 1985, the Mungai Report of 1995, the Ndegwa Report of 1991, the Koech Report of 1999 and the Muya report of 2000 are notable examples. Most of the recommendations were either rejected or implemented in part. For instance, Moi rejected the Koech Report. But the Kamunge and Muya reports, which proposed the reduction of examinable subjects were implemented in secondary schools but ignored at the primary school level. Public education has since then been based on the system, with some private schools however, offering something similar to the British system with ordinary level exams, (the “O-levels”) taken at the end of four years of secondary school and advanced levels (“A-levels”), taken after two years of high school.

History, drawn from the travels of famous explorers such as John Rebmann and Ludwig Krapf, reveals that native Kenyans had access to education as far back as the 19th century. The Swahili manuscript, Utendi wa Tambuka (Book of Heraclius) attests to this. Missionaries, who had earlier docked at Mombasa and interacted with the locals, set up one of the earliest schools in the country at Rabai in 1846, and with the construction of the railway line interiorly towards Nairobi, they continued to further expand their work to the rest of the country. The arrival of British settlers saw the number of Kenyans who had exposure to education increase, and quite a good number were

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fortunate enough to proceed abroad for further education. Kenya’s first President, Mzee Jomo Kenyatta, and Mwai Kibaki were among the lot who studied abroad during the colonial era. Many more followed over the years and at independence in 1963, nearly one million African children were enrolled in various newly founded elementary schools across the country. Before 1963, education was based on the colonial system of 7-4-2-3, which consisted of seven years of primary, four years of secondary, two years of high school and 3–5 years of university education. The system required that children begin their

primary education around the age of seven and complete at the age of 13, after sitting for a regional examination known as the East African Certificate of Primary Education (EACPE). This was after Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania decided for the first time to integrate in 1967 – the union only lasted for decade, but has since been revived. Those who passed very well proceeded to secondary school, and after four years, sat for the East African Certificate of Education (EACE) examination, later renamed KCE after the collapse of the EAC in 1977. The highest level of education that qualified one to join university was attained after two years of high school, and passing the East African Advanced Certificate of Education (EAACE) examination.

As the years progressed, the system has gotten better and much bigger as more and more efforts to further expand it to accommodate the rapid growth of the population, continues to take effect. The growth has been remarkable. By coming up with the Kenya Education Sector Support Programme, the government has made education the focus of its attention and consequently established the National Assessment Centre (NAC), which monitors learning achievements around the country. Primary Education Primary education, which invariably starts at age six and consists of eight years of schooling, is free in public schools. Though most schools are public, the number of private schools, though small as yet, is on the increase. It ends with a final examination, the Kenya

Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE). Enrolment levels are high, both for boys and girls, partly because it is free and also because of mentality among Kenyans that “education is key.” This makes it harder for children to get slots in secondary schools because they are fewer than primary schools. Secondary School Secondary schools, many of which are public, offer four comprehensive years. The private schools charge high fees and many offer O-levels, followed by A-levels or the International Baccalaureate. While their enrolment solely depends on merit, a large number of those who qualify are unable to join because of lack of school fees, which is out of the reach of many Kenyan households. Plans to make secondary education free are still in the pipeline. The end of secondary education is marked by an examination, the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KSCE). All national exams are set up by the Kenya National Examinations Council (KNEC).The average grade is based on performance in eight subjects, where a candidate sits for more than eight subjects. The average grade is based on the best eight subjects. University matriculation is based on the best

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Two Centuries of Learning …and still going strong

In 1985, former President Daniel arap Moi introduced the 8-4-4 system of education, eight years of primary, four years of secondary and four years of university education. Since inception, the 8-4-4 system has been subjected to several changes. Several commissions have been setup to come up with recommendations that would better the system. The Wanjigi Report of 1983, the Kamunge Report of 1985, the Mungai Report of 1995, the Ndegwa Report of 1991, the Koech Report of 1999 and the Muya report of 2000 are notable examples. Most of the recommendations were either rejected or implemented in part. For instance, Moi rejected the Koech Report. But the Kamunge and Muya reports, which proposed the reduction of examinable subjects were implemented in secondary schools but ignored at the primary school level. Public education has since then been based on the system, with some private schools however, offering something similar to the British system with ordinary level exams, (the “O-levels”) taken at the end of four years of secondary school and advanced levels (“A-levels”), taken after two years of high school.

History, drawn from the travels of famous explorers such as John Rebmann and Ludwig Krapf, reveals that native Kenyans had access to education as far back as the 19th century. The Swahili manuscript, Utendi wa Tambuka (Book of Heraclius) attests to this. Missionaries, who had earlier docked at Mombasa and interacted with the locals, set up one of the earliest schools in the country at Rabai in 1846, and with the construction of the railway line interiorly towards Nairobi, they continued to further expand their work to the rest of the country. The arrival of British settlers saw the number of Kenyans who had exposure to education increase, and quite a good number were

Best of Kenya

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fortunate enough to proceed abroad for further education. Kenya’s first President, Mzee Jomo Kenyatta, and Mwai Kibaki were among the lot who studied abroad during the colonial era. Many more followed over the years and at independence in 1963, nearly one million African children were enrolled in various newly founded elementary schools across the country. Before 1963, education was based on the colonial system of 7-4-2-3, which consisted of seven years of primary, four years of secondary, two years of high school and 3–5 years of university education. The system required that children begin their

primary education around the age of seven and complete at the age of 13, after sitting for a regional examination known as the East African Certificate of Primary Education (EACPE). This was after Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania decided for the first time to integrate in 1967 – the union only lasted for decade, but has since been revived. Those who passed very well proceeded to secondary school, and after four years, sat for the East African Certificate of Education (EACE) examination, later renamed KCE after the collapse of the EAC in 1977. The highest level of education that qualified one to join university was attained after two years of high school, and passing the East African Advanced Certificate of Education (EAACE) examination.

As the years progressed, the system has gotten better and much bigger as more and more efforts to further expand it to accommodate the rapid growth of the population, continues to take effect. The growth has been remarkable. By coming up with the Kenya Education Sector Support Programme, the government has made education the focus of its attention and consequently established the National Assessment Centre (NAC), which monitors learning achievements around the country. Primary Education Primary education, which invariably starts at age six and consists of eight years of schooling, is free in public schools. Though most schools are public, the number of private schools, though small as yet, is on the increase. It ends with a final examination, the Kenya

Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE). Enrolment levels are high, both for boys and girls, partly because it is free and also because of mentality among Kenyans that “education is key.” This makes it harder for children to get slots in secondary schools because they are fewer than primary schools. Secondary School Secondary schools, many of which are public, offer four comprehensive years. The private schools charge high fees and many offer O-levels, followed by A-levels or the International Baccalaureate. While their enrolment solely depends on merit, a large number of those who qualify are unable to join because of lack of school fees, which is out of the reach of many Kenyan households. Plans to make secondary education free are still in the pipeline. The end of secondary education is marked by an examination, the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KSCE). All national exams are set up by the Kenya National Examinations Council (KNEC).The average grade is based on performance in eight subjects, where a candidate sits for more than eight subjects. The average grade is based on the best eight subjects. University matriculation is based on the best

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eight and performance in subjects relevant to the degree courses chosen. University After the first public university was established in 1970 (University of Nairobi), seven more public and over 20 private universities, have been set up. Although the public universities are reputable the world over, some parents prefer sending their children overseas and to private universities. The lapse is largely caused by the stringent and inflexible admission requirements in the public institutions, and also students belonging to the higher socioeconomic strata, who often prefer foreign Universities. Less than a third of the children who sit for the KCSE exam actually make it to the public universities. The rest enroll under the selfsponsored parallel degree programme. College education and vocational institutions There are many private and government post-secondary school institutions. Despite the term â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;collegesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, these establishments do not award degrees. Degrees are only awarded by universities. They award certificates, diplomas and higher diplomas. Private institutions, however, have in the recent past, been awarding degrees. This is the culmination of a partnership between a college and a university. They offer courses such as accounting, secretarial studies, nursing, teacher training, computer studies, media-related studies, design, culinary studies, foreign languages, tourism and technical skills. In order of credibility or accreditation, national polytechnics - which take in applicants with education below secondary school level, rank first, followed by government training institutes, teacher training colleges and finally, private institutions.

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eight and performance in subjects relevant to the degree courses chosen. University After the first public university was established in 1970 (University of Nairobi), seven more public and over 20 private universities, have been set up. Although the public universities are reputable the world over, some parents prefer sending their children overseas and to private universities. The lapse is largely caused by the stringent and inflexible admission requirements in the public institutions, and also students belonging to the higher socioeconomic strata, who often prefer foreign Universities. Less than a third of the children who sit for the KCSE exam actually make it to the public universities. The rest enroll under the selfsponsored parallel degree programme. College education and vocational institutions There are many private and government post-secondary school institutions. Despite the term â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;collegesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, these establishments do not award degrees. Degrees are only awarded by universities. They award certificates, diplomas and higher diplomas. Private institutions, however, have in the recent past, been awarding degrees. This is the culmination of a partnership between a college and a university. They offer courses such as accounting, secretarial studies, nursing, teacher training, computer studies, media-related studies, design, culinary studies, foreign languages, tourism and technical skills. In order of credibility or accreditation, national polytechnics - which take in applicants with education below secondary school level, rank first, followed by government training institutes, teacher training colleges and finally, private institutions.

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Brookhouse School ‘Learn to excel’

www.brookhouse.ac.ke

Brookhouse occupies a unique place in the educational landscape of East Africa. In 2013 the school was invited to join ‘The G-20’, a prestigious group of eminent schools around the world, including Eton, Exeter and Wellington; a great honour that signals the role that Brookhouse is playing in setting standards of excellence in international education. Located in the leafy Nairobi suburb of Lang’ata, 15 minutes from the city centre, and 30 minutes from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, Brookhouse provides a first-class international education for over 750 children, aged from two – 19 years. The international mix of students from 45 nations engenders an attitude of tolerance and respect within a real family atmosphere. Key to its ethos, it is a member of Round Square, a global family of schools that includes Gordonstoun and Felsted in the UK,

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Daly College and the Doon School in India and Deerfield and Hotchkiss in the USA. This allows Brookhouse students to travel all over the world to attend international Round Square conferences and global exchanges that extend and develop the wider perspective of each student, giving them greater confidence as they grow as global citizens. Brookhouse first opened its doors in 1981 and celebrated 30 years of commitment to international education in 2011. In 2001 it became the first British curriculum school in Kenya to meet the rigorous accreditation standards of the Council of International Schools (CIS), and since then has added IAPS accreditation for its Prep section. Brookhouse offers the British IGCSE system and A-levels, and graduates proceed to the finest universities around the world. The school also offer a university Foundation

Year programme accredited by the Northern Consortium of UK Universities, and exciting BTEC courses in Music, Music Technology and Art & Design for pupils who wish to focus their academic pathway on the Creative Arts.

heritage of Africa. It celebrates its role as a provider of international education within the African context, nurturing young people to develop the kind of international focus necessary for them to contribute effectively on the world stage.

Brookhouse is also a provider of quality boarding in East Africa, with a purposebuilt on-site facility. The Boarding House, in two separate sections for boys and girls, has accommodation in self-contained flats, housing small groups of students who are of the same age. Full laundry and catering facilities are of the highest standards, Boarding House parents ensure a family atmosphere is maintained by combining clear boundaries with a caring approach to the welfare of each child.

Brookhouse boasts outstanding academic results each year, with students excelling in the annual UK Cambridge and Edexcel examinations. However, central to the Round Square philosophy that makes Brookhouse unique is the school’s willingness to embrace a wider challenge other than just the delivery of an academic curriculum. The school takes seriously its responsibility to mould young people into respectful, sensible and humble young adults, who embrace their responsibilities before they demand their rights, who contribute to society rather than seize opportunities only for themselves. This

As part of the school ethos, Brookhouse is very proud of the cultural traditions and

desire to create an environment that fosters ‘servant leadership’ and a sense of humble commitment in each child has led the school to develop a unique curriculum approach. The daily Citizenship lesson, which encourages an ethical world view for all students, is valued as equal to traditional subjects such as Mathematics, Physics and French. Brookhouse balances this progressive curriculum with traditional expectations of behaviour from all its pupils. Manners, courtesy and respect are at the core of this value system and the school maintains a strong sense of discipline to enable pupils to thrive within a structured environment.

retains the services of only the finest staff available, including such talented artistes as Ian Mbugua and Eric Wainaina, who are members of the teaching staff. So if your son or daughter is a budding artist, actor or musician, future scientist, doctor or engineer, they may, indeed, find a home for their talents at Brookhouse, where academic excellence and sporting prowess thrive right alongside a celebration of Kenya’s ability to lead the region in the provision of international education.

Tel: (+254) 020 243 0261 Email: info@brookhouse.ac.ke

Such quality education is achieved through constant reinvestment in outstanding facilities, including the best performance auditorium in eastern Africa The school

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Brookhouse School ‘Learn to excel’

www.brookhouse.ac.ke

Brookhouse occupies a unique place in the educational landscape of East Africa. In 2013 the school was invited to join ‘The G-20’, a prestigious group of eminent schools around the world, including Eton, Exeter and Wellington; a great honour that signals the role that Brookhouse is playing in setting standards of excellence in international education. Located in the leafy Nairobi suburb of Lang’ata, 15 minutes from the city centre, and 30 minutes from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, Brookhouse provides a first-class international education for over 750 children, aged from two – 19 years. The international mix of students from 45 nations engenders an attitude of tolerance and respect within a real family atmosphere. Key to its ethos, it is a member of Round Square, a global family of schools that includes Gordonstoun and Felsted in the UK,

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Daly College and the Doon School in India and Deerfield and Hotchkiss in the USA. This allows Brookhouse students to travel all over the world to attend international Round Square conferences and global exchanges that extend and develop the wider perspective of each student, giving them greater confidence as they grow as global citizens. Brookhouse first opened its doors in 1981 and celebrated 30 years of commitment to international education in 2011. In 2001 it became the first British curriculum school in Kenya to meet the rigorous accreditation standards of the Council of International Schools (CIS), and since then has added IAPS accreditation for its Prep section. Brookhouse offers the British IGCSE system and A-levels, and graduates proceed to the finest universities around the world. The school also offer a university Foundation

Year programme accredited by the Northern Consortium of UK Universities, and exciting BTEC courses in Music, Music Technology and Art & Design for pupils who wish to focus their academic pathway on the Creative Arts.

heritage of Africa. It celebrates its role as a provider of international education within the African context, nurturing young people to develop the kind of international focus necessary for them to contribute effectively on the world stage.

Brookhouse is also a provider of quality boarding in East Africa, with a purposebuilt on-site facility. The Boarding House, in two separate sections for boys and girls, has accommodation in self-contained flats, housing small groups of students who are of the same age. Full laundry and catering facilities are of the highest standards, Boarding House parents ensure a family atmosphere is maintained by combining clear boundaries with a caring approach to the welfare of each child.

Brookhouse boasts outstanding academic results each year, with students excelling in the annual UK Cambridge and Edexcel examinations. However, central to the Round Square philosophy that makes Brookhouse unique is the school’s willingness to embrace a wider challenge other than just the delivery of an academic curriculum. The school takes seriously its responsibility to mould young people into respectful, sensible and humble young adults, who embrace their responsibilities before they demand their rights, who contribute to society rather than seize opportunities only for themselves. This

As part of the school ethos, Brookhouse is very proud of the cultural traditions and

desire to create an environment that fosters ‘servant leadership’ and a sense of humble commitment in each child has led the school to develop a unique curriculum approach. The daily Citizenship lesson, which encourages an ethical world view for all students, is valued as equal to traditional subjects such as Mathematics, Physics and French. Brookhouse balances this progressive curriculum with traditional expectations of behaviour from all its pupils. Manners, courtesy and respect are at the core of this value system and the school maintains a strong sense of discipline to enable pupils to thrive within a structured environment.

retains the services of only the finest staff available, including such talented artistes as Ian Mbugua and Eric Wainaina, who are members of the teaching staff. So if your son or daughter is a budding artist, actor or musician, future scientist, doctor or engineer, they may, indeed, find a home for their talents at Brookhouse, where academic excellence and sporting prowess thrive right alongside a celebration of Kenya’s ability to lead the region in the provision of international education.

Tel: (+254) 020 243 0261 Email: info@brookhouse.ac.ke

Such quality education is achieved through constant reinvestment in outstanding facilities, including the best performance auditorium in eastern Africa The school

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Makini Schools Designed to excel, keen to lead

Happy pupils hold trophies aloft

build friendly and considerate relationships with one another and with teaching and nonteaching staff. Currently, Makini Schools comprise preschool, a primary school, a secondary section and a commercial college in Nairobi, as well as a primary school started in January 2012 in Kibos, near Kisumu on Lake Victoria. But 30 years ago, it began as a nursery school with just eight pupils under the late Dr. Pius Okelo and Dr. Mary Okelo, the founding directors. Dr. Okelo is now a deservedly celebrated and much-decorated icon locally and globally. Makini is recognized for its consistent excellent performance in national examinations and co-curricular activities, making it a household name in Kenya and East Africa. From 1985 – the year Makini enrolled its first candidates for the Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) examination - results have been impressive.

Makini’s guiding philosophy is to provide holistic education based on Christian values in a supportive and pleasant environment. Makini excels in academic performance, with impressive results in national examinations and outstanding accomplishments in sports and co-curricular activities. This is not by default but by design, in keeping with the Makini Schools’ motto – Fanya kwa Makini – Kiswahili for Work with Diligence. Makini has an excellent Board of Directors comprising highly esteemed, professional

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people as well as a supportive Parents’ Teachers’ Association (PTA). Both are very involved in policy formation and the guidance of the school. The teaching staff is well-qualified and highly motivated. Teachers are friendly, caring and enjoy their work. Teaching is pupilcentred. Lessons are inter-active with a view to fostering a love for learning. .Progress is carefully monitored and teachers work closely with parents. Makini is all about innovation. It was Makini

that first introduced computers as an educational tool at primary level in Kenya. The success of Makini is such that many schools, not only in Kenya but also in other countries, turn to it for best practices, a service offered free of charge. It is a tribute to Makini’s mentoring programme that many former teachers have gone on to establish their own schools. Makini believes in building high self-esteem in children and confidence in their abilities and strengths. It also encourages them to

It was the start of a history of solid achievements of which the Makini community is proud. Makini consistently heads the examination lists and has produced top pupils in KCPE exams. It made history by becoming the first – and so far only – school in Kenya to produce the top girl in the country three times in a row. Since 2000, Makini has been the top school in the country seven times. Makini performs equally well in co-curricular activities. Pupils have represented Kenya on the national and international scenes in sports such as rugby, swimming, motor

Dr Mary Okelo

cross, golf and tae-kwondo, thus leading to the establishment of the Makini Sports Academy registered in 2011. Students also regularly win in the annual National Music and Drama festivals and the Nairobi International fair as well at art competitions and maths symposia. The secondary section also does well in academic and co-curricular activities. It was chosen to launch The Global Travel and Tourism Partnership (GTTP) programme – the 2nd in Africa. The President’s Award scheme has also seen many students achieving their gold, silver and bronze awards . The college training for provides professional qualifications offered by ACCA, CIM and CIPR. It has become a trail-blazer and is the first institution in East Africa to offer the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) programme. It collaborates with Certiport and Microsoft. An accredited CISCO Networking Centre, it offers Cisco-based courses, including Digital Marketing by CIM. Makini has won the African Enterprise Award and was the only educational institution among the Top 100 mid-sized companies in Kenya in 2008 - 2010. It was selected as a case study of success at Columbia University, USA, for their MBA programme. It was the only Kenyan school to participate in the Global Fund Project and facilitated many seminars on HIV/Aids awareness and prevention. Educational outings form an integral part of our school life. There are visits to parks and

museums, complemented by talks by artists, authors and motivational speakers. There are annual trips to countries in Africa and other parts of the world. The atmosphere at Makini is a happy and purposeful one. Pupils are cheerful, polite, articulate and self-confident. They believe that once in Makini, they will achieve their goals. Consequently, the school produces high achievers in all fields. The school takes its social responsibility seriously. It was the first Green Apple school in East Africa. Makini also sponsors needy children. Students are encouraged to give community service. They support various children’s homes and raise funds for many charitable causes such as Lupus & Diabetes Awareness, Hope for Cancer Kids, Dettol Heart Run, etc. They contribute to famine relief programmes and sponsor environmental projects and tree-planting initiatives. Makini promotes the spiritual development of the children and fosters tolerance for different religions by encouraging children to follow the religion of their choice. The development and training of staff is an integral component of school life. They are encouraged to upgrade their skills and qualifications and up-date themselves in their respective areas. Makini conducts regular in-house seminars and workshops.

Tel: (+254) 020 3874950 www.makinischool.com

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Makini Schools Designed to excel, keen to lead

Happy pupils hold trophies aloft

build friendly and considerate relationships with one another and with teaching and nonteaching staff. Currently, Makini Schools comprise preschool, a primary school, a secondary section and a commercial college in Nairobi, as well as a primary school started in January 2012 in Kibos, near Kisumu on Lake Victoria. But 30 years ago, it began as a nursery school with just eight pupils under the late Dr. Pius Okelo and Dr. Mary Okelo, the founding directors. Dr. Okelo is now a deservedly celebrated and much-decorated icon locally and globally. Makini is recognized for its consistent excellent performance in national examinations and co-curricular activities, making it a household name in Kenya and East Africa. From 1985 – the year Makini enrolled its first candidates for the Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) examination - results have been impressive.

Makini’s guiding philosophy is to provide holistic education based on Christian values in a supportive and pleasant environment. Makini excels in academic performance, with impressive results in national examinations and outstanding accomplishments in sports and co-curricular activities. This is not by default but by design, in keeping with the Makini Schools’ motto – Fanya kwa Makini – Kiswahili for Work with Diligence. Makini has an excellent Board of Directors comprising highly esteemed, professional

Best of Kenya

202

people as well as a supportive Parents’ Teachers’ Association (PTA). Both are very involved in policy formation and the guidance of the school. The teaching staff is well-qualified and highly motivated. Teachers are friendly, caring and enjoy their work. Teaching is pupilcentred. Lessons are inter-active with a view to fostering a love for learning. .Progress is carefully monitored and teachers work closely with parents. Makini is all about innovation. It was Makini

that first introduced computers as an educational tool at primary level in Kenya. The success of Makini is such that many schools, not only in Kenya but also in other countries, turn to it for best practices, a service offered free of charge. It is a tribute to Makini’s mentoring programme that many former teachers have gone on to establish their own schools. Makini believes in building high self-esteem in children and confidence in their abilities and strengths. It also encourages them to

It was the start of a history of solid achievements of which the Makini community is proud. Makini consistently heads the examination lists and has produced top pupils in KCPE exams. It made history by becoming the first – and so far only – school in Kenya to produce the top girl in the country three times in a row. Since 2000, Makini has been the top school in the country seven times. Makini performs equally well in co-curricular activities. Pupils have represented Kenya on the national and international scenes in sports such as rugby, swimming, motor

Dr Mary Okelo

cross, golf and tae-kwondo, thus leading to the establishment of the Makini Sports Academy registered in 2011. Students also regularly win in the annual National Music and Drama festivals and the Nairobi International fair as well at art competitions and maths symposia. The secondary section also does well in academic and co-curricular activities. It was chosen to launch The Global Travel and Tourism Partnership (GTTP) programme – the 2nd in Africa. The President’s Award scheme has also seen many students achieving their gold, silver and bronze awards . The college training for provides professional qualifications offered by ACCA, CIM and CIPR. It has become a trail-blazer and is the first institution in East Africa to offer the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) programme. It collaborates with Certiport and Microsoft. An accredited CISCO Networking Centre, it offers Cisco-based courses, including Digital Marketing by CIM. Makini has won the African Enterprise Award and was the only educational institution among the Top 100 mid-sized companies in Kenya in 2008 - 2010. It was selected as a case study of success at Columbia University, USA, for their MBA programme. It was the only Kenyan school to participate in the Global Fund Project and facilitated many seminars on HIV/Aids awareness and prevention. Educational outings form an integral part of our school life. There are visits to parks and

museums, complemented by talks by artists, authors and motivational speakers. There are annual trips to countries in Africa and other parts of the world. The atmosphere at Makini is a happy and purposeful one. Pupils are cheerful, polite, articulate and self-confident. They believe that once in Makini, they will achieve their goals. Consequently, the school produces high achievers in all fields. The school takes its social responsibility seriously. It was the first Green Apple school in East Africa. Makini also sponsors needy children. Students are encouraged to give community service. They support various children’s homes and raise funds for many charitable causes such as Lupus & Diabetes Awareness, Hope for Cancer Kids, Dettol Heart Run, etc. They contribute to famine relief programmes and sponsor environmental projects and tree-planting initiatives. Makini promotes the spiritual development of the children and fosters tolerance for different religions by encouraging children to follow the religion of their choice. The development and training of staff is an integral component of school life. They are encouraged to upgrade their skills and qualifications and up-date themselves in their respective areas. Makini conducts regular in-house seminars and workshops.

Tel: (+254) 020 3874950 www.makinischool.com

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Capacity statement and previous assignments The mandate of the Institute allows it to offer curriculum- based consulting services in basic and tertiary education and training. Further, the mandate allows the Institute to enter into arrangements with other similar institutions and professional organisations, within or outside Kenya. KICD, therefore, has close professional links with NGOs, schools, colleges, publishers and other government departments.

Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development

OPPORTUNITIES The Institute has an opportunity to serve the East African region and the rest of Africa because of its experience, expertise and effectiveness in service delivery. The effectiveness has been further enhanced by the establishment of the Education Resource Centre (ERC), which will go along way in strengthening the development of practical, quality and relevant curricula and curriculum support materials that conform to the ideals of Kenya as a nation, as entrenched in Kenya Vision 2030 and the Constitution of Kenya, as well as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

• • • •

E-learning initiative The Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development has embraced contemporary technology in its endeavour to integrate curriculum implementation using ICT’s. In this line the institute has: •

This means that the ERC is capable of addressing the needs of other African countries. In this regard, the following opportunities are available: •

for children and youth out of school, and adults.

To Provide Quality Curricular and Curriculum Support Materials Responsive to the Needs of the Society VISION A Centre of excellence in Transformative and Globally competitive Curricular INTRODUCTION The Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development was established by the KICD Act of 2013. The Institute develops curriculum and curriculum support materials in all levels of education except the university. These levels include early childhood education and development, special needs education, primary education, secondary education, teacher education, technical and vocational education and training (TIVET), and non-formal education

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A running TV channel under the brand name EDU channel. Apart from teaching programmes targeting schools, the channel has enhanced its programme line up to include entertainment and news segments. Recently, the institute acquired state of the art studio equipment aimed at boosting the channel’s quality of production and programming; Radio broadcasting programmes targeting both teachers and students. The radio broadcasts cover the whole syllabus right from the fundamentals at the primary level up to the secondary level. A programme time table is available on the KICD website; Elimika: This is an online teacher training portal that targets curriculum implementers at the grassroots. It is also available on the KICD website; and Digital content delivered on secondary medium for portability and ease

CLIENT ORGANISATION Kenya Prisons Services

KICD TV Studios with state of the art equipment

MISSION

Development of curriculum and curriculum support materials for countries in East African, especially to address needs of the marginalised communities within the East African Community;

Training of curriculum specialists in countries like South Sudan and Somalia; Training youth on the Uwezo Fund management to facilitate its prudent use; Development of programmes targeting specific talents; and Development of curriculum and curriculum support materials for integration of ICT into education.

According to the Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development Act, 2013, “curriculum” means all planned learning programmes that facilitate formal, nonformal and informal learning.

FUNCTIONS OF THE INSTITUTE According to the KICD Act, the Institute’s functions include: • Advising the Government on matters pertaining to curriculum development; • Evaluating, veting and approving, for application in Kenya, any local and foreign curricula and curriculum support materials in relation to the levels of education and training; • Implementing the policies relating to curriculum development in basic and tertiary education and training; • Developing, reviewing and approving

• •

• •

programmes, curricular and curriculum support materials that meet international standards for all levels of education; Initiating and conducting research to inform curriculum policies, review and development; Printing, publishing and disseminating information relating to curricula for basic and tertiary education and training; Collecting, documenting and cataloguing information on curricula, curriculum support materials and; Innovations and dissemination of information to education institutions; Promoting equity and access to quality curricula and curriculum support materials; Offering consultancy services in basic and tertiary education and training and Incorporating national values, talents development and leadership values into curriculum development.

World Society Protection of Animals (WASPA) International Labour Organisation (ILO)

Modern Printing machines that produce high quality publications.

Radio Outside broadcasting van

of access. This is now available in installable suites akin to office applications. Dissemination modes The e-learning content is available at designated and licensed dealerships comprising 256 outlets across East Africa. KCD has a bookshop within the institute

PROJECT Prisons staff training curriculum. Content development for infusion and integration into the national curriculum on the protection of animals. Content development for infusion and integration into the national curriculum on worst forms of child labour.

Ministry for Youth Affairs and Sports (MOYA), in collaboration with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO)

Curriculum development for youth polytechnics and other Vocational training centres.

Mindset networks - South Africa, in collaboration with the United States Agency for International Development

Tafakari-an e-learning project that entails the production of video, multimedia and print material for mathematics and sciences.

Kenya Maritime Authority (KMA)

Curriculum development for seafarers.

Public Procurement Oversight Authority (PPOA) Police Reforms Implementation Committee -Ministry of State for Provincial Administration and Internal Security

Development of training manuals and evaluation tools. Development of a new curriculum for the training of police service recruits and cadets.

The Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC)

Development of voter education curriculum.

The Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC)

National training of trainers on voter education.

The Government of Botswana

Training of curriculum specialists in Botswana.

Refugee Education Trust (RET) Save the Children -UK

Building the capacities of facilitators on accelerated learning in Dadaab refugee camp. Building the capacities of teachers of out-of-school refugee children and youth in Dadaab refugee camp.

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Capacity statement and previous assignments The mandate of the Institute allows it to offer curriculum- based consulting services in basic and tertiary education and training. Further, the mandate allows the Institute to enter into arrangements with other similar institutions and professional organisations, within or outside Kenya. KICD, therefore, has close professional links with NGOs, schools, colleges, publishers and other government departments.

Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development

OPPORTUNITIES The Institute has an opportunity to serve the East African region and the rest of Africa because of its experience, expertise and effectiveness in service delivery. The effectiveness has been further enhanced by the establishment of the Education Resource Centre (ERC), which will go along way in strengthening the development of practical, quality and relevant curricula and curriculum support materials that conform to the ideals of Kenya as a nation, as entrenched in Kenya Vision 2030 and the Constitution of Kenya, as well as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

• • • •

E-learning initiative The Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development has embraced contemporary technology in its endeavour to integrate curriculum implementation using ICT’s. In this line the institute has: •

This means that the ERC is capable of addressing the needs of other African countries. In this regard, the following opportunities are available: •

for children and youth out of school, and adults.

To Provide Quality Curricular and Curriculum Support Materials Responsive to the Needs of the Society VISION A Centre of excellence in Transformative and Globally competitive Curricular INTRODUCTION The Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development was established by the KICD Act of 2013. The Institute develops curriculum and curriculum support materials in all levels of education except the university. These levels include early childhood education and development, special needs education, primary education, secondary education, teacher education, technical and vocational education and training (TIVET), and non-formal education

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A running TV channel under the brand name EDU channel. Apart from teaching programmes targeting schools, the channel has enhanced its programme line up to include entertainment and news segments. Recently, the institute acquired state of the art studio equipment aimed at boosting the channel’s quality of production and programming; Radio broadcasting programmes targeting both teachers and students. The radio broadcasts cover the whole syllabus right from the fundamentals at the primary level up to the secondary level. A programme time table is available on the KICD website; Elimika: This is an online teacher training portal that targets curriculum implementers at the grassroots. It is also available on the KICD website; and Digital content delivered on secondary medium for portability and ease

CLIENT ORGANISATION Kenya Prisons Services

KICD TV Studios with state of the art equipment

MISSION

Development of curriculum and curriculum support materials for countries in East African, especially to address needs of the marginalised communities within the East African Community;

Training of curriculum specialists in countries like South Sudan and Somalia; Training youth on the Uwezo Fund management to facilitate its prudent use; Development of programmes targeting specific talents; and Development of curriculum and curriculum support materials for integration of ICT into education.

According to the Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development Act, 2013, “curriculum” means all planned learning programmes that facilitate formal, nonformal and informal learning.

FUNCTIONS OF THE INSTITUTE According to the KICD Act, the Institute’s functions include: • Advising the Government on matters pertaining to curriculum development; • Evaluating, veting and approving, for application in Kenya, any local and foreign curricula and curriculum support materials in relation to the levels of education and training; • Implementing the policies relating to curriculum development in basic and tertiary education and training; • Developing, reviewing and approving

• •

• •

programmes, curricular and curriculum support materials that meet international standards for all levels of education; Initiating and conducting research to inform curriculum policies, review and development; Printing, publishing and disseminating information relating to curricula for basic and tertiary education and training; Collecting, documenting and cataloguing information on curricula, curriculum support materials and; Innovations and dissemination of information to education institutions; Promoting equity and access to quality curricula and curriculum support materials; Offering consultancy services in basic and tertiary education and training and Incorporating national values, talents development and leadership values into curriculum development.

World Society Protection of Animals (WASPA) International Labour Organisation (ILO)

Modern Printing machines that produce high quality publications.

Radio Outside broadcasting van

of access. This is now available in installable suites akin to office applications. Dissemination modes The e-learning content is available at designated and licensed dealerships comprising 256 outlets across East Africa. KCD has a bookshop within the institute

PROJECT Prisons staff training curriculum. Content development for infusion and integration into the national curriculum on the protection of animals. Content development for infusion and integration into the national curriculum on worst forms of child labour.

Ministry for Youth Affairs and Sports (MOYA), in collaboration with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO)

Curriculum development for youth polytechnics and other Vocational training centres.

Mindset networks - South Africa, in collaboration with the United States Agency for International Development

Tafakari-an e-learning project that entails the production of video, multimedia and print material for mathematics and sciences.

Kenya Maritime Authority (KMA)

Curriculum development for seafarers.

Public Procurement Oversight Authority (PPOA) Police Reforms Implementation Committee -Ministry of State for Provincial Administration and Internal Security

Development of training manuals and evaluation tools. Development of a new curriculum for the training of police service recruits and cadets.

The Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC)

Development of voter education curriculum.

The Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC)

National training of trainers on voter education.

The Government of Botswana

Training of curriculum specialists in Botswana.

Refugee Education Trust (RET) Save the Children -UK

Building the capacities of facilitators on accelerated learning in Dadaab refugee camp. Building the capacities of teachers of out-of-school refugee children and youth in Dadaab refugee camp.

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to enable stakeholders purchase various curriculum support materials, which include syllabuses, teachers’ handbooks and digital content.

NACECE RESOURCE CENTRE Away from the hustle and bustle of the city centre is Nacece Resource Centre (NRC), a hotel and conference centre offering an ideal and serene environment suitable for meetings and conferences. It is located within the Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development (KICD).

In order to move with the current trends, the institute has developed a web based platform eShop to disseminate the materials. Teachers and stakeholders can now access the materials at the click of a button by visiting www.kicd.ac.ke and choosing the eShop option on the menu bar.

The centre offers a wide range of services, including a the modern auditorium hall hosting up to 450 persons, modern conferencing, comfortable accommodation and quality catering services. The auditorium hall is fitted with a multilingual delegate system with a capacity to translate up to five languages. There are 10 other breakaway seminar rooms fitted with WiFi services.

The institute has developed digital content for 12 subjects in secondary schools for Forms 1 – 4. Content in the following subjects has been rolled out; English, Mathematics, Computer studies, Biology, Physics, Business studies, History and government, Home science, Kiswahili, Agriculture, Chemistry and Geography.

To complement the conference facility is TAASISI Restaurant, which serves both local and international cuisines for up to 350 pax at one sitting, 62 spacious single rooms, 12 twin-bed rooms and six double room ensuite bathrooms, for assured comfort and relaxation of our customers.

With regards to primary schools, the institute has developed digital content for classes 1 to 8. The institute’s initiative to develop primary school digital content went a long way in supplementing the Jubilee Government manifesto of introducing laptops to Standard One children beginning January 2014.

Other facilities include a well-equipped gymnasium and a business centre. The centre has open grounds ideal for exhibitions, weddings, cocktails, organisational banquets, Christmas parties and many more open-air functions.

Advantages of e-learning • The e-learning programme has enabled teachers and learners access curriculum support materials within their localities. • The content is highly interactive thus creating an interesting learning environment. • Through Elimika, teachers are able to log on and receive induction without the need for costly seminars. • E-learning content is dynamic. It can be changed time and again to reflect the emerging needs of the learners and society at large. • Schools that have integrated this programme in teaching and learning have posted better results over time. In future, the institute intends to develop Wap enabled content for mobile phones as well as web based real time teaching and learning.

The NRC has mainstreamed disability with facilities such as lifts fitted with sound applications as well as ramps on all door steps. We have a courtesy van available to ferry clients to and from the CBD on request. Next time you have an event, think NRC.

For more information contact: Desai Road off Muranga Road, P.O. BOX 30231,00100 NAIROBI Tel: +254 020 3749904-5,2100806, +254 729327 331, 788 88333, Fax: +254 020 3639402,3639130 Email: info@kicd.ac.ke, nrcreservations@gmail.com, www.kicd.ac.ke

Inside view of the Nacece Resource Centre (NRC)

Print and publications Recently, KICD acquired a state-of-the-art printing press that will enable the institute produce publications in house. Apart from developing in house materials, the Print and Publication section is open to outside jobs at a fair rate.

A fitness centre within NRC boasts modern equipment

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Outside view of the National Centre for Early Childhood Education, Nacece Resource Centre (NRC)

KICD auditorium: Has a sitting capacity of 500 and is fitted with multilingual translation system for conferences and seminars

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to enable stakeholders purchase various curriculum support materials, which include syllabuses, teachers’ handbooks and digital content.

NACECE RESOURCE CENTRE Away from the hustle and bustle of the city centre is Nacece Resource Centre (NRC), a hotel and conference centre offering an ideal and serene environment suitable for meetings and conferences. It is located within the Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development (KICD).

In order to move with the current trends, the institute has developed a web based platform eShop to disseminate the materials. Teachers and stakeholders can now access the materials at the click of a button by visiting www.kicd.ac.ke and choosing the eShop option on the menu bar.

The centre offers a wide range of services, including a the modern auditorium hall hosting up to 450 persons, modern conferencing, comfortable accommodation and quality catering services. The auditorium hall is fitted with a multilingual delegate system with a capacity to translate up to five languages. There are 10 other breakaway seminar rooms fitted with WiFi services.

The institute has developed digital content for 12 subjects in secondary schools for Forms 1 – 4. Content in the following subjects has been rolled out; English, Mathematics, Computer studies, Biology, Physics, Business studies, History and government, Home science, Kiswahili, Agriculture, Chemistry and Geography.

To complement the conference facility is TAASISI Restaurant, which serves both local and international cuisines for up to 350 pax at one sitting, 62 spacious single rooms, 12 twin-bed rooms and six double room ensuite bathrooms, for assured comfort and relaxation of our customers.

With regards to primary schools, the institute has developed digital content for classes 1 to 8. The institute’s initiative to develop primary school digital content went a long way in supplementing the Jubilee Government manifesto of introducing laptops to Standard One children beginning January 2014.

Other facilities include a well-equipped gymnasium and a business centre. The centre has open grounds ideal for exhibitions, weddings, cocktails, organisational banquets, Christmas parties and many more open-air functions.

Advantages of e-learning • The e-learning programme has enabled teachers and learners access curriculum support materials within their localities. • The content is highly interactive thus creating an interesting learning environment. • Through Elimika, teachers are able to log on and receive induction without the need for costly seminars. • E-learning content is dynamic. It can be changed time and again to reflect the emerging needs of the learners and society at large. • Schools that have integrated this programme in teaching and learning have posted better results over time. In future, the institute intends to develop Wap enabled content for mobile phones as well as web based real time teaching and learning.

The NRC has mainstreamed disability with facilities such as lifts fitted with sound applications as well as ramps on all door steps. We have a courtesy van available to ferry clients to and from the CBD on request. Next time you have an event, think NRC.

For more information contact: Desai Road off Muranga Road, P.O. BOX 30231,00100 NAIROBI Tel: +254 020 3749904-5,2100806, +254 729327 331, 788 88333, Fax: +254 020 3639402,3639130 Email: info@kicd.ac.ke, nrcreservations@gmail.com, www.kicd.ac.ke

Inside view of the Nacece Resource Centre (NRC)

Print and publications Recently, KICD acquired a state-of-the-art printing press that will enable the institute produce publications in house. Apart from developing in house materials, the Print and Publication section is open to outside jobs at a fair rate.

A fitness centre within NRC boasts modern equipment

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Outside view of the National Centre for Early Childhood Education, Nacece Resource Centre (NRC)

KICD auditorium: Has a sitting capacity of 500 and is fitted with multilingual translation system for conferences and seminars

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form their own opinions, and develop their creative and critical capacities.”

Kenya National Library Service

However, a country with effective library and information service will achieve continuity in learning and reading Public libraries go beyond formal education and they are the heart of personal and community development. Knls promotes reading by providing access to relevant information materials to all communities. Libraries play a major role in stimulating public interest in books and in promoting reading for knowledge, information and enjoyment – thus knls is indeed a “peoples university”. The Constitution of Kenya 2010 recognizes libraries as vehicles for cultural and national expression. Therefore knls has deemed it critical that with the reshaping of the educational, technological and economic policies, the society needs to more intentionally call upon the trusted, welcoming and content rich settings for libraries to support the national development agenda.

The Cabinet Secretary, Dr. Hassan Wario takes a look at some of the books available at the knls Narok Library

This fact has been crystalized further with the development of the Kenya’s Vision 2030, when the nation expects to have transformed into an industrialized country. knls provides a wide range of library and information services to all and our library clients include babies, school going children, teenagers, youth, adults and senior citizens. Availing accessible library and information services to the citizens, opens up for them windows to the world and inspires them to explore and achieve, and contribute to improving their quality of life.

Upcoming Kenya National Library Service Headquarters at Community, Upperhill

Profile Kenya National Library Service (knls) is an ISO 9001-2008 certified corporate body of the Kenya government that was established by an Act of Parliament, Cap 225 of the Laws of Kenya in April 1965 to provide library and information services to the Kenyan public. The Act gives the Board responsibility to manage both the National Library of Kenya and the Public library system. The National Library of Kenya is charged with the preservation of the documentary heritage which it develops through collection of legal deposits and publication of the Kenya National Bibliography. Under the Public Library System, the objective of the Board is to provide access to library and information services to the Kenyan publics with a view to promoting a positive and sustained reading culture. There are 60 branch libraries that have been established in thirty-two counties, twenty-one of which are based at the county headquarters.

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In an effort to enhance access to library and information services to all Kenyans, the board aspires to establish libraries in all counties in collaboration with the county governments. In all its undertakings, the knls Board is guided by the vision and mission statements which are outlined as: “The hub of information and knowledge for development” and “To enable access to information for knowledge and transformation of livelihoods” respectively. Kenya National Library is also the accredited agency in the country for; • Provision of the International Standard Book Number (ISBN) to the local publishers and individual authors. The number identifies the book internationally and it also helps to market the book to the renounced online book sellers like the Amazon. • Provision of International Standard Music Number (ISMN). This is a unique number that is assigned to all notated

music publications. Just like the ISBN, each ISMN identifies a single edition of notated music. The value of public libraries as local centres of information should be stipulated in all local community development agenda. This is more so because, any library is synonymous with information and hence knowledge. The old adage “information is power” cannot also be wished away while discussing issues of community and empowerment. Hence, it cannot be better said about the public libraries than the way UNESCO Manifesto puts it, i.e. “Public libraries help promote literacy and the pure enjoyment of reading. They are places where people can go to get information, whether it’s for leisure, for study or for work. They are the local gateway to knowledge, providing a basic condition for lifelong learning, independent decision-making and cultural development of the individual and societal groups. In this way they help people

Children having fun with Books at the knls Nakuru Library during school holidays

Information is principally essential for socialeconomic development and proper political governance, especially in today’s knowledge driven economy. Accessibility - our opening hours: Unless in known insecurity prone areas, where closing time may be dictated by the situation on the ground, all the knls libraries are open to the public as follows: Monday to Friday - 8.00am to 6.30pm Saturday - 8.30am to 5.00pm

knls Headquarters Mumias Road/Ol Donyo Sabuk Road Junction Address: P.O Box 30573 00100, Nairobi, Kenya Tel: +254 20 7786710 Email: knls@knls.ac.ke Website: www.knls.ac.ke

Readers queuing as they await the opening of Buru Buru Library

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form their own opinions, and develop their creative and critical capacities.”

Kenya National Library Service

However, a country with effective library and information service will achieve continuity in learning and reading Public libraries go beyond formal education and they are the heart of personal and community development. Knls promotes reading by providing access to relevant information materials to all communities. Libraries play a major role in stimulating public interest in books and in promoting reading for knowledge, information and enjoyment – thus knls is indeed a “peoples university”. The Constitution of Kenya 2010 recognizes libraries as vehicles for cultural and national expression. Therefore knls has deemed it critical that with the reshaping of the educational, technological and economic policies, the society needs to more intentionally call upon the trusted, welcoming and content rich settings for libraries to support the national development agenda.

The Cabinet Secretary, Dr. Hassan Wario takes a look at some of the books available at the knls Narok Library

This fact has been crystalized further with the development of the Kenya’s Vision 2030, when the nation expects to have transformed into an industrialized country. knls provides a wide range of library and information services to all and our library clients include babies, school going children, teenagers, youth, adults and senior citizens. Availing accessible library and information services to the citizens, opens up for them windows to the world and inspires them to explore and achieve, and contribute to improving their quality of life.

Upcoming Kenya National Library Service Headquarters at Community, Upperhill

Profile Kenya National Library Service (knls) is an ISO 9001-2008 certified corporate body of the Kenya government that was established by an Act of Parliament, Cap 225 of the Laws of Kenya in April 1965 to provide library and information services to the Kenyan public. The Act gives the Board responsibility to manage both the National Library of Kenya and the Public library system. The National Library of Kenya is charged with the preservation of the documentary heritage which it develops through collection of legal deposits and publication of the Kenya National Bibliography. Under the Public Library System, the objective of the Board is to provide access to library and information services to the Kenyan publics with a view to promoting a positive and sustained reading culture. There are 60 branch libraries that have been established in thirty-two counties, twenty-one of which are based at the county headquarters.

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In an effort to enhance access to library and information services to all Kenyans, the board aspires to establish libraries in all counties in collaboration with the county governments. In all its undertakings, the knls Board is guided by the vision and mission statements which are outlined as: “The hub of information and knowledge for development” and “To enable access to information for knowledge and transformation of livelihoods” respectively. Kenya National Library is also the accredited agency in the country for; • Provision of the International Standard Book Number (ISBN) to the local publishers and individual authors. The number identifies the book internationally and it also helps to market the book to the renounced online book sellers like the Amazon. • Provision of International Standard Music Number (ISMN). This is a unique number that is assigned to all notated

music publications. Just like the ISBN, each ISMN identifies a single edition of notated music. The value of public libraries as local centres of information should be stipulated in all local community development agenda. This is more so because, any library is synonymous with information and hence knowledge. The old adage “information is power” cannot also be wished away while discussing issues of community and empowerment. Hence, it cannot be better said about the public libraries than the way UNESCO Manifesto puts it, i.e. “Public libraries help promote literacy and the pure enjoyment of reading. They are places where people can go to get information, whether it’s for leisure, for study or for work. They are the local gateway to knowledge, providing a basic condition for lifelong learning, independent decision-making and cultural development of the individual and societal groups. In this way they help people

Children having fun with Books at the knls Nakuru Library during school holidays

Information is principally essential for socialeconomic development and proper political governance, especially in today’s knowledge driven economy. Accessibility - our opening hours: Unless in known insecurity prone areas, where closing time may be dictated by the situation on the ground, all the knls libraries are open to the public as follows: Monday to Friday - 8.00am to 6.30pm Saturday - 8.30am to 5.00pm

knls Headquarters Mumias Road/Ol Donyo Sabuk Road Junction Address: P.O Box 30573 00100, Nairobi, Kenya Tel: +254 20 7786710 Email: knls@knls.ac.ke Website: www.knls.ac.ke

Readers queuing as they await the opening of Buru Buru Library

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CHAPTER 16 University Education

A section of KeMU graduates celebrating after being conferred with their respective degrees at a past KeMU Congregation

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CHAPTER 16 University Education

A section of KeMU graduates celebrating after being conferred with their respective degrees at a past KeMU Congregation

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Higher Education Loans Board Working with you to finance higher education now and in the future

The CEO of Higher Education Loans Board (HELB) Mr. Charles M. Ringera exchanges the MOU with Hon Joseph Gachoki Gitari - MP Kirinyaga Central Constituency after the launch of a partnership with Kirinyaga Central Constituency which forms part of the chains of partnerships that HELB is negotiating with all the constituencies

The Higher Education Loans Board (HELB) was established in 1995 by an Act of Parliament. It is a state corporation within the ambit of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology. Vision A loan available for every Kenyan enrolled in higher education. Mission To provide affordable loans to Kenyans pursuing higher education through adequate mobilisation and prudent management of resources. The mandate of the Higher Education Loans Board includes: • Disburse loans and bursaries to needy Kenyan students pursuing higher education • Recover all outstanding university loans given to Kenyan students since 1974. • Establish a viable and sustainable revolving fund.

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Source funds to disburse to Kenyans pursuing higher education. Higher education within the description of the Kenya qualification framework includes universities and tertiary colleges spread across the country.

So far, HELB has disbursed loans to 383,342 students totalling to KShs41.8 billion. Over the years, HELB budget financing has mainly been from the Exchequer at 40% and Loan recovery at 60%. This has not sufficiently catered for the students’ needs as the amount disbursed that ranges from KShs35,000 to KShs60,000 has not been sufficient to cater for the maintenance cost of the Governmentsponsored students, given the ever increasing cost of living while for the selfsponsored students the amount allocated is not sufficient to cater for even one semester fees which ranges from KShs120,000 for humanities degree programmes to

KShs450,000 for specialised science courses like medicine and engineering. In the years 2012-2013, HELB supported over 120,000 students in various colleges at a cost in excess of KShs5.4 billion, with loan recoveries contributing KShs3.35 billion while Government capitation amounted to KShs2.47 billion. Sources of Funding The Exchequer: In line with the Constitution, under Section 43(f); it is the right of every Kenyan to be facilitated to access education by the Government. Therefore, The National Treasury continues to be the biggest funder of higher education through direct capitation. As the population continues to grow, this will continue to grow into the foreseeable future. Loan Recoveries: The most guaranteed strategy of making the Fund self-sustaining and financially independent is to sharpen debt management skills. As seen from

HELB CEO Mr. Charles M. Ringera

HELB staff attend to clients during a Public exhibition. Loans Recovery is key in the financing of Higher Education in Kenya

above table, loan recoveries continue to grow strongly at double digits as the Board pursues various loan compliance mechanism strategies.

HELB has a solution: HELB-Corporate Funds to be lent to students and repayable at the current interest rate of 4% with a grace period of 5 years and a repayment period not exceeding 10 years. This way it will form a strong national revolving fund that upon maturity will be used to support future generations.

During the 2013 – 2018 planning cycle, to enhance compliance in loan repayment, the Board will be: • Seeking partnerships with institutions like NHIF, NSSF, IRA, CBK, TELCOS, and the Registrar of Persons and Immigrations. • Harvesting information on past loanees on social media. • Amendments of the Act to make Compliance as part and parcel of Chapter 6 of the Constitution. • Make HELB compliance a mandatory requirement in recruitments and provision of goods and services. Donors: HELB is exploring ways of partnering with donors from our development partners who have a passion to advance education in developing countries like Kenya while getting a minimum return on their investment. The donor may indicate areas of study or origin that they would prefer the financed students to be from. We currently partner with USAID funded FunzoKenya Afya Elimu Fund, Ford Foundation-Kenya University ASAL Scholarship Fund. Foundations Corporate: There are numerous corporates foundations supporting learning in various institutions of learning today in the country. However such support is not sustainable as it is given as bursaries and not repaid back. As such corporates have year on year had to invest in new funds to support education.

To this end we have signed up the Visa Oshwal and the Nation Media Sport Scholarship programme. The Board is at an advanced stage with KCB and HF Foundation targeting universities and technical institutions respectively. Universities’ Financial Aid Offices: A number of universities have continued to run bottomless foundations whose very survival depends on the ability of the university to generate funds to support the programme. HELB has firmed up an MoU with Kenyatta University while discussions with other universities are at an advanced stage to manage their scholarships as loans to vulnerable members of society on a more sustainable basis. County Governments/Constituency: HELB has now developed a comprehensive mechanism to manage county and constituency kitties on a sustainable basis across the entire country. The specific county or constituency fund will be dedicated to students from those counties and constituencies in an effort to improve the human capital of the region on sustainable basis. The Board has prepared a comprehensive programme of engaging the counties and constituencies.

Loan Repayment Methods To enhance customer service, the Board has innovated different ways of loan repayment. Bank Deposit by employer or self: All payments should be made payable to Higher Education Loans Board by crossed cheques, local or international money orders, bankers drafts, direct transfers (EFT) standing orders or cash deposits into the HELB collection bank accounts. Mobile Payments Services - M-pesa: Pesapoint and Equity Bank /ATMs

Higher Education Loans Board Anniversary Tower, University Way P.O. Box 69489 -00400 Nairobi, Kenya Tel. + 254711052000, 20 227800 Website:www.helb.co.ke

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Higher Education Loans Board Working with you to finance higher education now and in the future

The CEO of Higher Education Loans Board (HELB) Mr. Charles M. Ringera exchanges the MOU with Hon Joseph Gachoki Gitari - MP Kirinyaga Central Constituency after the launch of a partnership with Kirinyaga Central Constituency which forms part of the chains of partnerships that HELB is negotiating with all the constituencies

The Higher Education Loans Board (HELB) was established in 1995 by an Act of Parliament. It is a state corporation within the ambit of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology. Vision A loan available for every Kenyan enrolled in higher education. Mission To provide affordable loans to Kenyans pursuing higher education through adequate mobilisation and prudent management of resources. The mandate of the Higher Education Loans Board includes: • Disburse loans and bursaries to needy Kenyan students pursuing higher education • Recover all outstanding university loans given to Kenyan students since 1974. • Establish a viable and sustainable revolving fund.

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Source funds to disburse to Kenyans pursuing higher education. Higher education within the description of the Kenya qualification framework includes universities and tertiary colleges spread across the country.

So far, HELB has disbursed loans to 383,342 students totalling to KShs41.8 billion. Over the years, HELB budget financing has mainly been from the Exchequer at 40% and Loan recovery at 60%. This has not sufficiently catered for the students’ needs as the amount disbursed that ranges from KShs35,000 to KShs60,000 has not been sufficient to cater for the maintenance cost of the Governmentsponsored students, given the ever increasing cost of living while for the selfsponsored students the amount allocated is not sufficient to cater for even one semester fees which ranges from KShs120,000 for humanities degree programmes to

KShs450,000 for specialised science courses like medicine and engineering. In the years 2012-2013, HELB supported over 120,000 students in various colleges at a cost in excess of KShs5.4 billion, with loan recoveries contributing KShs3.35 billion while Government capitation amounted to KShs2.47 billion. Sources of Funding The Exchequer: In line with the Constitution, under Section 43(f); it is the right of every Kenyan to be facilitated to access education by the Government. Therefore, The National Treasury continues to be the biggest funder of higher education through direct capitation. As the population continues to grow, this will continue to grow into the foreseeable future. Loan Recoveries: The most guaranteed strategy of making the Fund self-sustaining and financially independent is to sharpen debt management skills. As seen from

HELB CEO Mr. Charles M. Ringera

HELB staff attend to clients during a Public exhibition. Loans Recovery is key in the financing of Higher Education in Kenya

above table, loan recoveries continue to grow strongly at double digits as the Board pursues various loan compliance mechanism strategies.

HELB has a solution: HELB-Corporate Funds to be lent to students and repayable at the current interest rate of 4% with a grace period of 5 years and a repayment period not exceeding 10 years. This way it will form a strong national revolving fund that upon maturity will be used to support future generations.

During the 2013 – 2018 planning cycle, to enhance compliance in loan repayment, the Board will be: • Seeking partnerships with institutions like NHIF, NSSF, IRA, CBK, TELCOS, and the Registrar of Persons and Immigrations. • Harvesting information on past loanees on social media. • Amendments of the Act to make Compliance as part and parcel of Chapter 6 of the Constitution. • Make HELB compliance a mandatory requirement in recruitments and provision of goods and services. Donors: HELB is exploring ways of partnering with donors from our development partners who have a passion to advance education in developing countries like Kenya while getting a minimum return on their investment. The donor may indicate areas of study or origin that they would prefer the financed students to be from. We currently partner with USAID funded FunzoKenya Afya Elimu Fund, Ford Foundation-Kenya University ASAL Scholarship Fund. Foundations Corporate: There are numerous corporates foundations supporting learning in various institutions of learning today in the country. However such support is not sustainable as it is given as bursaries and not repaid back. As such corporates have year on year had to invest in new funds to support education.

To this end we have signed up the Visa Oshwal and the Nation Media Sport Scholarship programme. The Board is at an advanced stage with KCB and HF Foundation targeting universities and technical institutions respectively. Universities’ Financial Aid Offices: A number of universities have continued to run bottomless foundations whose very survival depends on the ability of the university to generate funds to support the programme. HELB has firmed up an MoU with Kenyatta University while discussions with other universities are at an advanced stage to manage their scholarships as loans to vulnerable members of society on a more sustainable basis. County Governments/Constituency: HELB has now developed a comprehensive mechanism to manage county and constituency kitties on a sustainable basis across the entire country. The specific county or constituency fund will be dedicated to students from those counties and constituencies in an effort to improve the human capital of the region on sustainable basis. The Board has prepared a comprehensive programme of engaging the counties and constituencies.

Loan Repayment Methods To enhance customer service, the Board has innovated different ways of loan repayment. Bank Deposit by employer or self: All payments should be made payable to Higher Education Loans Board by crossed cheques, local or international money orders, bankers drafts, direct transfers (EFT) standing orders or cash deposits into the HELB collection bank accounts. Mobile Payments Services - M-pesa: Pesapoint and Equity Bank /ATMs

Higher Education Loans Board Anniversary Tower, University Way P.O. Box 69489 -00400 Nairobi, Kenya Tel. + 254711052000, 20 227800 Website:www.helb.co.ke

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The University of Nairobi A Centre of Excellence Kenya’s first and best is also the region’s highest ranked among universities of the world

Vice-Chancellor Prof. George Magoha with the trophy for Excellent mark during the government performance contracting assesment

The visionary University of Nairobi Towers at the Main Campus will house increasing academic activities

administrative and support staff. About 12,000 of enrolled students are postgraduates and the remaining pursue undergraduate studies.

seen it take its services to the public.

Alumni With a strong 117,000-plus alumnus, an alumni association is in place to reunite former students with the alma mater and help in developing the University. Contribution The University of Nairobi has contributed to the development of high-level manpower in the country and indeed the entire world. At the moment, the University graduates about 7,500 in a wide range of courses students annually.

A section of the Administration Block of the Main Campus of the University of Nairobi

The University of Nairobi dates back to 1956, with the establishment of the Royal Technical College, which admitted its first students for technical courses in April of the same year. At Kenya’s Independence in 1963, the idea of an inter-territorial university saw the creation of the University of East Africa and the Royal Technical College became a constituent College of the University. In 1970, through respective Acts of Parliament, the three East African states created a University each. Thus, the University of Nairobi was born. In 1983 the University of Nairobi underwent a major restructuring exercise that created six

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colleges each headed by a principal. These colleges are: • The College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences • The College of Architecture and Engineering • The College of Biological and Physical Sciences • The College of Health Sciences • The College of Education and External Studies • The College of Humanities and Social Sciences Vision A world class University committed to world class excellence

Mission To provide quality university education and training and to embody the aspirations of the Kenyan people and the global community through the creation, preservation, integration, transmission and utilisation of knowledge. Student and Staff Population Currently, the University of Nairobi has about 68,000 students pursuing different levels of degrees and diplomas both on fulltime and part-time bases through the following modes: face-to- face, distance learning, open learning and, most recently, e-learning. These students are served by a 1,500-strong academic staff and about 2,500 technical,

Expansion of Infrastructure The increase in student admissions and number of courses offered has prompted the University to upgrade its infrastructure in order to cope with rising numbers and enable the institution to realise its full potential. Faculties/Schools/Institutes The University of Nairobi offers various academic programmes to meet a variety of needs. The degree and diplomas as well as certificate programmes are offered in the following faculties — schools, institutes and centres. •

Research Activities Research remains the core in evaluating the performance of both students and staff. Academic members of staff are involved in numerous research activities on their own or with collaborating partners. The University of Nairobi is open and welcomes collaborations and exchanges with other centres of excellence worldwide in areas of mutual interest. As a University, we shall continue to support research in pursuance of our goals. Corporate Social Responsibility The University of Nairobi runs an active social responsibility programme that has

• • • • • • • • • • •

The Centre for Biotechnology & Bioinformatics The Open and Distance e-Learning Centre The Faculty of Arts The Faculty of Agriculture The Faculty of Veterinary Medicine The Institute of Anthropology, African and Gender Studies The Institute for Development Studies The Institute of Diplomacy and International Studies The Institute of Nuclear Science The Institute for Tropical and Infectious Diseases The Population Studies Research Institute The Wangari Maathai Institute for

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Peace and Environmental Studies The School of Mathematics The School of Computing and Informatics The School of Biological Sciences The School of Physical Sciences The School of the Arts and Design The School of the Built Environment The School of Engineering The School of Business The School of Economics The School of Journalism and Mass Communication The School of Law The School of Continuing & Distance Education The School of Education The School of Dental Sciences The School of Medicine The School of Nursing Sciences The School of Pharmacy The School of Public Health

Admission Requirements The admission requirements are set out and approved by the Senate.

Vice-Chancellor P.O Box 30197 00100 Nairobi Tel: 254-02-318262 Fax: 254-020-216030/212604 Email: vc@uonbi.ac.ke www.uonbi.ac.ke

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The University of Nairobi A Centre of Excellence Kenya’s first and best is also the region’s highest ranked among universities of the world

Vice-Chancellor Prof. George Magoha with the trophy for Excellent mark during the government performance contracting assesment

The visionary University of Nairobi Towers at the Main Campus will house increasing academic activities

administrative and support staff. About 12,000 of enrolled students are postgraduates and the remaining pursue undergraduate studies.

seen it take its services to the public.

Alumni With a strong 117,000-plus alumnus, an alumni association is in place to reunite former students with the alma mater and help in developing the University. Contribution The University of Nairobi has contributed to the development of high-level manpower in the country and indeed the entire world. At the moment, the University graduates about 7,500 in a wide range of courses students annually.

A section of the Administration Block of the Main Campus of the University of Nairobi

The University of Nairobi dates back to 1956, with the establishment of the Royal Technical College, which admitted its first students for technical courses in April of the same year. At Kenya’s Independence in 1963, the idea of an inter-territorial university saw the creation of the University of East Africa and the Royal Technical College became a constituent College of the University. In 1970, through respective Acts of Parliament, the three East African states created a University each. Thus, the University of Nairobi was born. In 1983 the University of Nairobi underwent a major restructuring exercise that created six

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colleges each headed by a principal. These colleges are: • The College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences • The College of Architecture and Engineering • The College of Biological and Physical Sciences • The College of Health Sciences • The College of Education and External Studies • The College of Humanities and Social Sciences Vision A world class University committed to world class excellence

Mission To provide quality university education and training and to embody the aspirations of the Kenyan people and the global community through the creation, preservation, integration, transmission and utilisation of knowledge. Student and Staff Population Currently, the University of Nairobi has about 68,000 students pursuing different levels of degrees and diplomas both on fulltime and part-time bases through the following modes: face-to- face, distance learning, open learning and, most recently, e-learning. These students are served by a 1,500-strong academic staff and about 2,500 technical,

Expansion of Infrastructure The increase in student admissions and number of courses offered has prompted the University to upgrade its infrastructure in order to cope with rising numbers and enable the institution to realise its full potential. Faculties/Schools/Institutes The University of Nairobi offers various academic programmes to meet a variety of needs. The degree and diplomas as well as certificate programmes are offered in the following faculties — schools, institutes and centres. •

Research Activities Research remains the core in evaluating the performance of both students and staff. Academic members of staff are involved in numerous research activities on their own or with collaborating partners. The University of Nairobi is open and welcomes collaborations and exchanges with other centres of excellence worldwide in areas of mutual interest. As a University, we shall continue to support research in pursuance of our goals. Corporate Social Responsibility The University of Nairobi runs an active social responsibility programme that has

• • • • • • • • • • •

The Centre for Biotechnology & Bioinformatics The Open and Distance e-Learning Centre The Faculty of Arts The Faculty of Agriculture The Faculty of Veterinary Medicine The Institute of Anthropology, African and Gender Studies The Institute for Development Studies The Institute of Diplomacy and International Studies The Institute of Nuclear Science The Institute for Tropical and Infectious Diseases The Population Studies Research Institute The Wangari Maathai Institute for

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Peace and Environmental Studies The School of Mathematics The School of Computing and Informatics The School of Biological Sciences The School of Physical Sciences The School of the Arts and Design The School of the Built Environment The School of Engineering The School of Business The School of Economics The School of Journalism and Mass Communication The School of Law The School of Continuing & Distance Education The School of Education The School of Dental Sciences The School of Medicine The School of Nursing Sciences The School of Pharmacy The School of Public Health

Admission Requirements The admission requirements are set out and approved by the Senate.

Vice-Chancellor P.O Box 30197 00100 Nairobi Tel: 254-02-318262 Fax: 254-020-216030/212604 Email: vc@uonbi.ac.ke www.uonbi.ac.ke

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Kenya Methodist University A Christian Inspired Dream Come True!

Vice Chancellor, Prof Alfred Mutema receiving the Re-inspection Certificate from the Commission for University Education (CUE) Secretary/CEO Prof David Some. The certification is an indicator of the quality of governance and leadership, management practices, quality of academic programmes and research activities in the University

trendsetters in their respective professions, both locally and internationally. These graduates serve in private and civil society, making a difference to those whom they serve.

Kenya Methodist University Administration Block

KeMU’s ambitious dream is to raise professionals of integrity for the transformation of our society and the world at large. What started as a dream of the Methodist Church in Kenya has grown into a national symbol of higher education and excellence. Kenya Methodist University (KeMU) has grown to be a leading premier university in Kenya whose vision is to raise talented scholars who are destined to become the next generation of professional and transformational leaders in today’s dynamic global market. KeMU is cognisant that the nation of Kenya has embarked on an ambitious plan to transform its economy into a middle income society. Ambitiously so, KeMU has always adopted the notion that the university must make bold and courageous steps to positively transform the society we live in through its graduates, and therefore has wholeheartedly embraced this national agenda.

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Established in 1997 out of a sincere desire to provide a holistic approach to higher education by the Methodist Church in Kenya, our mission is to contribute to the transformation of our society by providing high quality education that promotes excellence in scholarship, research and selfless service to the community.

recognition and respect for other creations. This philosophy is based on the core mission areas of Teaching, Research and Service.

Our main campus is located in Meru, bordering the Mount Kenya Forest, and adjacent to a national migratory path for the elephants, which seasonally grace the campus. This unique setting, a few kilometres from the Equator, offers an exceptional environment of beauty and ambience for our students, staff and visitors. It is also a serene environment that is conducive for serious scholarly activities and intellectual growth. KeMU’S Philosophy The Methodist Church in Kenya took cognisance of the philosophy to foster the intellectual, spiritual and physical development of the wholesome individual in order to recognise and utilise the available opportunities for the enhancement of human capital development with the appropriate

Growth and Development From a humble beginning of only two academic programmes and a total of seven (7) pioneering students, KeMU has continued to grow and develop in terms of student numbers, staffing and infrastructure to cater for the ever increasing demand for higher education in Kenya and the region. The academic programmes are re-organised within two (2) Schools and three (3) Faculties namely: School of Business and Economics, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Education and Social Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology and Faculty of Computing and Informatics.

Central to this is our motto “Laborare est Orare” (to work is to pray), which embodies the university’s work philosophy of excellence in all we do, as a service to God.

Notably, the University prides itself on having a worldwide network of over 15,000 alumni to date (2013), many of whom are

To meet the nation’s educational demands the University has strategically established six campuses across the country in Meru, Nairobi, Mombasa, Nyeri, Nakuru and Kisii. Currently, the University has a total student population of over 11,000 with a blend of over 20 nationalities and this is expected to grow. The planning and the implementation of activities in the universities are student centred and the University is continually working to improve the services offered by students’ affairs. These include medical services, athletics and sports facilities, counselling, chaplaincy services, and others. To bolster our students experience and enrich the academic programmes, KeMU aggressively seeks out partners and collaborators from all sectors. From local industry partners and institutions to universities in the United States of America, Germany, England, Malaysia, Norway and others, the University continues to adopt the best practices approach in learning, teaching and administration. Though a humble beginner, the University has never shied away from setting the pace for higher education in Kenya and in the region. In 2011, the University became the very first private university to launch a Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery degree (MBChB) programme for training of medical doctors as well as other innovative health related programmes such as Health Systems Management. Such programmes have been established in response to the dire shortage of Human Resource for Health. The University has won major awards,

consultancies and research grants in diverse fields and disciplines. Among the awards is Best Institution of Higher Learning in the Use of ICT 2012 by the Computer Society of Kenya (CSK), Overall Library of the Year award, 2012. Best Institution with the Highest Percentage of Registered Student Laptops for the Year 2012 by the Kenya Education Network, a leader in the use of e-journals, and first place winner in drama (2013), among others. Strategy and Relevance KeMU desires to be a world class university offering competitive and market driven programmes and services, and is constantly remaking herself in an effort to meet the demands of the every changing demands of the work environment. In order to do so, the University has adopted Performance Contracting that is matched to the Universities Strategic Plan which in turn is tailored to address the national agenda for growth, employment and development. These plans provide a clear roadmap for the growth and development of the University in view of the need to respond to education needs through provision of quality academic programmes that are accessible, relevant and affordable. The University continues to be strategic and innovative in the designing, development, management and implementation of projected programmes. The University has been a leader in the innovation of learning modes such as evening part time and distance learning studies. Through such efforts, KeMU has played a significant role in making education accessible in the urban and rural areas, especially to the non traditional markets. Further, the homogenisation of the academic curricula and testing has helped synergise the students’ expectations with

Rev Joseph Ntombura Mwaine, BA, MA (Cantab) Chancellor

Prof Alfred Mutema, PhD., MBS., Vice Chancellor

the programmes offered and the market expectations. This allows students the flexibility to move between any one of our campuses across the country, further enriching their educational experience. Future Outlook As we move into the future, KeMU will continue to be a key player in the education sector in transforming our society by producing professionals who are knowledgeable and competent, with the ability to create sustainable wealth and employment. The University’s graduates will continue to fit into the labour market and industries in various sectors of development at national and international levels. We believe the unique experience of a Christian Best of Kenya

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Kenya Methodist University A Christian Inspired Dream Come True!

Vice Chancellor, Prof Alfred Mutema receiving the Re-inspection Certificate from the Commission for University Education (CUE) Secretary/CEO Prof David Some. The certification is an indicator of the quality of governance and leadership, management practices, quality of academic programmes and research activities in the University

trendsetters in their respective professions, both locally and internationally. These graduates serve in private and civil society, making a difference to those whom they serve.

Kenya Methodist University Administration Block

KeMU’s ambitious dream is to raise professionals of integrity for the transformation of our society and the world at large. What started as a dream of the Methodist Church in Kenya has grown into a national symbol of higher education and excellence. Kenya Methodist University (KeMU) has grown to be a leading premier university in Kenya whose vision is to raise talented scholars who are destined to become the next generation of professional and transformational leaders in today’s dynamic global market. KeMU is cognisant that the nation of Kenya has embarked on an ambitious plan to transform its economy into a middle income society. Ambitiously so, KeMU has always adopted the notion that the university must make bold and courageous steps to positively transform the society we live in through its graduates, and therefore has wholeheartedly embraced this national agenda.

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Established in 1997 out of a sincere desire to provide a holistic approach to higher education by the Methodist Church in Kenya, our mission is to contribute to the transformation of our society by providing high quality education that promotes excellence in scholarship, research and selfless service to the community.

recognition and respect for other creations. This philosophy is based on the core mission areas of Teaching, Research and Service.

Our main campus is located in Meru, bordering the Mount Kenya Forest, and adjacent to a national migratory path for the elephants, which seasonally grace the campus. This unique setting, a few kilometres from the Equator, offers an exceptional environment of beauty and ambience for our students, staff and visitors. It is also a serene environment that is conducive for serious scholarly activities and intellectual growth. KeMU’S Philosophy The Methodist Church in Kenya took cognisance of the philosophy to foster the intellectual, spiritual and physical development of the wholesome individual in order to recognise and utilise the available opportunities for the enhancement of human capital development with the appropriate

Growth and Development From a humble beginning of only two academic programmes and a total of seven (7) pioneering students, KeMU has continued to grow and develop in terms of student numbers, staffing and infrastructure to cater for the ever increasing demand for higher education in Kenya and the region. The academic programmes are re-organised within two (2) Schools and three (3) Faculties namely: School of Business and Economics, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Education and Social Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology and Faculty of Computing and Informatics.

Central to this is our motto “Laborare est Orare” (to work is to pray), which embodies the university’s work philosophy of excellence in all we do, as a service to God.

Notably, the University prides itself on having a worldwide network of over 15,000 alumni to date (2013), many of whom are

To meet the nation’s educational demands the University has strategically established six campuses across the country in Meru, Nairobi, Mombasa, Nyeri, Nakuru and Kisii. Currently, the University has a total student population of over 11,000 with a blend of over 20 nationalities and this is expected to grow. The planning and the implementation of activities in the universities are student centred and the University is continually working to improve the services offered by students’ affairs. These include medical services, athletics and sports facilities, counselling, chaplaincy services, and others. To bolster our students experience and enrich the academic programmes, KeMU aggressively seeks out partners and collaborators from all sectors. From local industry partners and institutions to universities in the United States of America, Germany, England, Malaysia, Norway and others, the University continues to adopt the best practices approach in learning, teaching and administration. Though a humble beginner, the University has never shied away from setting the pace for higher education in Kenya and in the region. In 2011, the University became the very first private university to launch a Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery degree (MBChB) programme for training of medical doctors as well as other innovative health related programmes such as Health Systems Management. Such programmes have been established in response to the dire shortage of Human Resource for Health. The University has won major awards,

consultancies and research grants in diverse fields and disciplines. Among the awards is Best Institution of Higher Learning in the Use of ICT 2012 by the Computer Society of Kenya (CSK), Overall Library of the Year award, 2012. Best Institution with the Highest Percentage of Registered Student Laptops for the Year 2012 by the Kenya Education Network, a leader in the use of e-journals, and first place winner in drama (2013), among others. Strategy and Relevance KeMU desires to be a world class university offering competitive and market driven programmes and services, and is constantly remaking herself in an effort to meet the demands of the every changing demands of the work environment. In order to do so, the University has adopted Performance Contracting that is matched to the Universities Strategic Plan which in turn is tailored to address the national agenda for growth, employment and development. These plans provide a clear roadmap for the growth and development of the University in view of the need to respond to education needs through provision of quality academic programmes that are accessible, relevant and affordable. The University continues to be strategic and innovative in the designing, development, management and implementation of projected programmes. The University has been a leader in the innovation of learning modes such as evening part time and distance learning studies. Through such efforts, KeMU has played a significant role in making education accessible in the urban and rural areas, especially to the non traditional markets. Further, the homogenisation of the academic curricula and testing has helped synergise the students’ expectations with

Rev Joseph Ntombura Mwaine, BA, MA (Cantab) Chancellor

Prof Alfred Mutema, PhD., MBS., Vice Chancellor

the programmes offered and the market expectations. This allows students the flexibility to move between any one of our campuses across the country, further enriching their educational experience. Future Outlook As we move into the future, KeMU will continue to be a key player in the education sector in transforming our society by producing professionals who are knowledgeable and competent, with the ability to create sustainable wealth and employment. The University’s graduates will continue to fit into the labour market and industries in various sectors of development at national and international levels. We believe the unique experience of a Christian Best of Kenya

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institution helps instill greater ethical and moral practices in our graduates. The University will also continue to invest in and undertake research that will enhance innovation, contribute to employment creation and enhance a market that is attractive to Kenya’s educated and trained youth. In this endeavor, KeMU continues to work with relevant partners and stakeholders in order to contribute towards the achievement of Kenya’s Vision 2030 objectives, in which it is envisaged that Kenyans will enjoy a high quality of life in a middle income economy. We shall continue to adopt and tailor our programmes to the changing times. At KeMU, we believe that this is not just a dream, but an attainable Vision, with our youth and innovators of today as the pillars of this Vision. KeMU students enjoying a light moment at the Main Campus

The recent establishment of an “Enterprise” arm within the University is strategic in enhancing the services offered by the institution, as well as in providing a stimulus and test bed for our students and staff. In this context, the Kenya Methodist University will continue to be viewed as a microcosm of the national, regional, and global agenda whose mandate is to contribute to making the world a better place for mankind. Our slogan “The Future is Here” is an expression of optimism and enthusiasm for the things that are yet to come. As a growing institution, we have remained vibrant in developing and seeking new ways to serve the learning community. KeMU will therefore, do everything within its means to support this much-needed transformation of our society. We welcome you to this premier University as you search for knowledge and transformation. Our Programmes The University offers various Certificate, Diploma, Undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in its two schools and three faculties namely:School of Medicine and Health Sciences Master of Science in Health Systems Management Master of Science in Nursing Education Master of Public Health Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery (MBChB) Bachelor of Science in Human Nutrition and Dietetics Bachelor of Science in Health Systems Management Bachelor of Science in Medical Laboratory Science

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Panoramic view of the Main Campus seen from the Science Block. The University strongly believes in the provision of a conducive study environment for all. The area by the lake is a Wi-Fi hotspot and very popular with students for their quiet/group study times or simply to unwind. The beautiful Main Campus borders Mt. Kenya forest and occassionaly wild African elephants come to graze by the campus fence giving students an unparalleled experience

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Diploma in Clinical Medicine, Surgery and Community Health Diploma in Pharmaceutical Technology Diploma in Medical Laboratory Sciences School of Business and Economics Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration and Management Master of Business Administration Master of Science in Finance and Investment Bachelor of Business Administration Diploma in Business Administration Diploma in Business Management Faculty of Science and Technology Master of Science in Agriculture and Rural Development Bachelor of Science in Information Sciences Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry Diploma in Applied Biology

Diploma in Animal Health Diploma in Horticulture Faculty of Computing and Informatics Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Computer Science Bachelor of Business Information Technology Bachelor of Science in Information Science Diploma in Computer Information Systems Diploma in Business Information Technology Diploma in Information Science Certificate in Computer Packages Certificate in Records Management Faculty of Education and Social Sciences Master of Arts in Mission Studies Master of Arts in Religious Studies Master of Education in Leadership and Educational Management Master of Arts in Counselling Master of Education in Guidance and

Counselling Bachelor of Arts in Communication and Journalism Bachelor of Education (Primary Option) Bachelor of Education (Science) Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood and Development) Bachelor of Education (Arts) Bachelor of Arts in Counselling Bachelor of Education and Counselling Bachelor of Theology Diploma in Counselling Diploma in Crime Management Diploma in Education and Counselling Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management Diploma in Theology Certificate in Hospitality Management Certificate in Theology Certificate in Methodism

First year medical students in the Anatomy Lab, Main Campus, Meru Our Campuses The University has campuses spread across the country. These are:-

Modes of Study The University has tailored its programmes to suit different categories of learners. The modes of study include:• Full Time • Open and Distance Learning • Part-Time • School Based

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institution helps instill greater ethical and moral practices in our graduates. The University will also continue to invest in and undertake research that will enhance innovation, contribute to employment creation and enhance a market that is attractive to Kenya’s educated and trained youth. In this endeavor, KeMU continues to work with relevant partners and stakeholders in order to contribute towards the achievement of Kenya’s Vision 2030 objectives, in which it is envisaged that Kenyans will enjoy a high quality of life in a middle income economy. We shall continue to adopt and tailor our programmes to the changing times. At KeMU, we believe that this is not just a dream, but an attainable Vision, with our youth and innovators of today as the pillars of this Vision. KeMU students enjoying a light moment at the Main Campus

The recent establishment of an “Enterprise” arm within the University is strategic in enhancing the services offered by the institution, as well as in providing a stimulus and test bed for our students and staff. In this context, the Kenya Methodist University will continue to be viewed as a microcosm of the national, regional, and global agenda whose mandate is to contribute to making the world a better place for mankind. Our slogan “The Future is Here” is an expression of optimism and enthusiasm for the things that are yet to come. As a growing institution, we have remained vibrant in developing and seeking new ways to serve the learning community. KeMU will therefore, do everything within its means to support this much-needed transformation of our society. We welcome you to this premier University as you search for knowledge and transformation. Our Programmes The University offers various Certificate, Diploma, Undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in its two schools and three faculties namely:School of Medicine and Health Sciences Master of Science in Health Systems Management Master of Science in Nursing Education Master of Public Health Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery (MBChB) Bachelor of Science in Human Nutrition and Dietetics Bachelor of Science in Health Systems Management Bachelor of Science in Medical Laboratory Science

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Panoramic view of the Main Campus seen from the Science Block. The University strongly believes in the provision of a conducive study environment for all. The area by the lake is a Wi-Fi hotspot and very popular with students for their quiet/group study times or simply to unwind. The beautiful Main Campus borders Mt. Kenya forest and occassionaly wild African elephants come to graze by the campus fence giving students an unparalleled experience

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Diploma in Clinical Medicine, Surgery and Community Health Diploma in Pharmaceutical Technology Diploma in Medical Laboratory Sciences School of Business and Economics Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration and Management Master of Business Administration Master of Science in Finance and Investment Bachelor of Business Administration Diploma in Business Administration Diploma in Business Management Faculty of Science and Technology Master of Science in Agriculture and Rural Development Bachelor of Science in Information Sciences Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry Diploma in Applied Biology

Diploma in Animal Health Diploma in Horticulture Faculty of Computing and Informatics Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Computer Science Bachelor of Business Information Technology Bachelor of Science in Information Science Diploma in Computer Information Systems Diploma in Business Information Technology Diploma in Information Science Certificate in Computer Packages Certificate in Records Management Faculty of Education and Social Sciences Master of Arts in Mission Studies Master of Arts in Religious Studies Master of Education in Leadership and Educational Management Master of Arts in Counselling Master of Education in Guidance and

Counselling Bachelor of Arts in Communication and Journalism Bachelor of Education (Primary Option) Bachelor of Education (Science) Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood and Development) Bachelor of Education (Arts) Bachelor of Arts in Counselling Bachelor of Education and Counselling Bachelor of Theology Diploma in Counselling Diploma in Crime Management Diploma in Education and Counselling Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management Diploma in Theology Certificate in Hospitality Management Certificate in Theology Certificate in Methodism

First year medical students in the Anatomy Lab, Main Campus, Meru Our Campuses The University has campuses spread across the country. These are:-

Modes of Study The University has tailored its programmes to suit different categories of learners. The modes of study include:• Full Time • Open and Distance Learning • Part-Time • School Based

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Kenyatta University Transforming Higher Education... Enhancing Lives

Site of the shooting range at Templer Barracks, Kahawa which was initially used for target training

well-being of society nationally, and in the wider East African region through quality teaching, research, professionalism and community social responsibility initiatives. It hopes that the spirit of selflessness and commitment shown by its founders will inspire it towards service, excellence and a life beyond self.

FRONT VIEW

One of KU’s most remarkable growth parameters has been in student enrolment from only 15,000 in 2005 to the current 70,000, making it Kenya’s leading university in student numbers. Best of Kenya spoke to Prof Mugenda, Ph.D, Vice-Chancellor, Kenyatta University on the status today; its on-going strategic initiatives; and her vision for it. The excerpts:

Kenyatta University: Main Entrance

Kenyatta University is a premier institution in East Africa set on more than 1,000 acres of a beautifully landscaped environment, 16 kilometres from the Nairobi’s city centre on the Nairobi-Thika Superhighway. The University is committed to generating, disseminating, and preserving knowledge and working with other critical stakeholders to bring this knowledge to bear on the world’s great challenges. •

Our Mission: To provide quality education and training, promote scholarship and innovation for sustainable individual and societal development. Our Vision: To be a dynamic, inclusive and competitive centre of excellence in teaching, research and service to humanity. Our Identity: A community of scholars committed to the generation and dissemination of knowledge and cultivation of creativity for the welfare of society. Our Philosophy: Sensitivity and responsiveness to societal needs and the right of every person to knowledge.

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From Bullets to Books: The Making of a University Kenyatta University holds a unique place in the entire education sector in Kenya, and, indeed, the region, at large. It began its long road to university status in 1965, when the British handed over the site to what previously constituted the Templer Barracks at Kahawa to the Kenya Government. The Government converted the barracks into a college which became Kenyatta College, offering secondary and teacher training education leading to the award of Secondary Teacher 1 (S1) and Secondary Teacher Advanced Level (SA) certificates. Following an Act of Parliament in 1970, Kenyatta College became a constituent college of the University of Nairobi and its name was changed to Kenyatta University College. The institution admitted its first batch of 200 students in 1972 to pursue studies leading to the Bachelor of Education (BEd) degree of the University of Nairobi. In 1975, the Teacher Training Education Programmes, S1 and SA, were phased out to pave the way for the Bachelor of

Education Degree Programme and a twoyear Undergraduate Diploma in Education. The Road to Autonomy: In July 1978, the entire Faculty of Education of the University of Nairobi – which had previously been the country’s main source of gradu