69027 BAY PL, SISTERS, OR 97759

Page 1

Sisters, Oregon

69027 Bay Place 4 BD

3.5 BA

12.45 AC

5,343 SF

www.BayPlaceSisters.com FLOOR PLAN | DIGITAL PROPERTY BOOK | 3D WALKTHROUGH | PHOTOS | VIDEO


PROPERTY HIGHLIGHTS

69027 Bay Place Sisters, Oregon 97759

4 BD •

• • • •

• • • • • •

3.5 BA

12.45 AC

5,343 SF

Cascade Mountain Views: Mt. Washington, Black Butte, Mt. Jefferson from great room/main living area Built in 1994, remodeled in 2008 12.45 acres (2 parcels/tax lots, one single-family residence) 5,343 square feet main home Total 4 bedrooms, 3 ½ baths • Main home: 3 bedrooms 2 ½ baths • Guest area over detached garage: 1 bedroom, 1 bath, kitchenette, laundry, balcony Great room with floor-to-ceiling fireplace Family room, office/den, wine cellar Garage- parking for 2 cars, plus ample paved parking for RV/boat Detached garage: 1,008 square feet. Built in 1999 Barn with Loft: 2,688 square feet. Built in 2000 Direct access to hundreds of acres of public and protected lands


69027 Bay Place Sisters, Oregon 97759 HOME AND PROPERTY FEATURES www.BayPlaceSisters.com

FEATURES OF THE HOME & PROPERTY ● Built in 1994 ● 12.45 acres (2 parcels/tax lots, one single-family residence) ● 5,343 square feet ● Main home has 3 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths ● Guest area above the detached garage has one bedroom, a kitchenette, 1 full bath, and stacked washer/dryer ● Specialty Rooms - Family room, office/den, wine cellar ● Garage- parking for 2 cars, plus ample parking for RV/boat ● Outbuildings ○ Detached garage with upstairs guest area: 1,008 square feet. Built in 1999 ○ Lo barn: 2,688 square feet. Built in 2000. Gravel driveways. ○ Storage shed ○ Covered loafing shed PROPERTY HIGHLIGHTS ● 12.45 total acres located in Wild Horse Ridge with access to public lands for hiking and riding trails ● Mountain views of Mt. Washington, Black Butte, Three Fingered Jack, and Mt. Jefferson, with views of the Three Sisters and City of Sisters from top SW corner of the property ● Detached 2-car garage with upstairs guest area and full bath ● Pull-thru barn and horse stalls (2) with hay and lo storage ● 3 new, fully-fenced paddocks and loafing shed ● 2.5 miles (approximately 7 minutes) to downtown Sisters, restaurants, shopping and all that the charming town of Sisters has to offer! (See our list of Community features, Skiing, Trails & Adventure below)

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed

Home & Property Features Page 1 of 9


Improvements ● Granite kitchen countertops ● New stainless steel appliances in kitchen ● Living room windows replaced ● All bathroom toilets replaced ● Various code requirements due to the age of the home when last purchased ● Deck will be stripped and refinished with oil-based stain, scheduled mid-August ● Stove chimney pipe replaced/rebuilt ● Hot and cold water piped to exterior apartment close to barn ● Paved barn circular driveway ● Loafing shed “run-in” shelter ● Property surveyed and marked at four corners of property HOA/CC&Rs - See Utility List for contact information ● CC&Rʼs: ○ https://s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/westerntitle.com/wp-content/upload s/2021/11/02012223/wild_horse_ridge_ccrs.pdf ● HOA: ○ See Utilities List. ZONING ● County Zoning - RR 10: https://deschutescounty.municipalcodeonline.com/book?type=ordinances#name= CHAPTER_18.60_RURAL_RESIDENTIAL_ZONE;_RR-10 ● AS - Airport Safety Combing Zone https://deschutescounty.municipalcodeonline.com/book?type=ordinances#name= CHAPTER_18.80_AIRPORT_SAFETY_COMBINING_ZONE;_A-S

UTILITIES, HEATING & COOLING ● See Utilities List for a complete list and contact information: ○ Well log for private on-site well ○ Pressure tank to regulate interior water pressure ○ Septic information for private on-site standard septic system ● Water heater

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed

Home & Property Features Page 2 of 9


Hot water circulation pump for instant hot water at faucets throughout house Wood burning fireplaces upstairs and downstairs Wood stove in kitchen/breakfast nook 2 Trane furnaces ○ Upstairs: Heat and heat pump for A/C ● Humidifier ● Wired for Honeywell Thermostat ● ● ● ●

INCLUDED & EXCLUDED ITEMS Included ● Kitchen appliances ● Laundry appliances - washer/dryer ● Furnished guest area above detached garage, including stacking washer/dryer Excluded ● Personal property and landscaping pots/yard decor MAIN HOME EXTERIOR FEATURES ● Timber-framed northwest style home ● Wood siding ● Wood front door with patina inlay and sidelights ● Covered front patio with seating areas ● Paved driveways ● Roof ○ Main house - metal ○ Detached garage - metal ○

● ● ● ● ●

Pull-thru barn - metal

Frost-free hydrants Landscaping Rain Bird Sprinkler system Pull-thru barn with roll up doors Loafing shed

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed

Home & Property Features Page 3 of 9


MAIN HOME INTERIOR FEATURES ● Timber-framed vaulted ceilings ● Wood trim, wood-cased double-pane windows ● Mexican saltillo (terracotta) tile flooring throughout entryway and eat-in kitchen ● Granite countertops in kitchen ● Appliances included (stainless steel): ○ KitchenAid dishwasher ○ GE double oven ○ GE microwave ○ JennAir 5 burner glass top range with downdra ○ GE refrigerator ○ Whirlpool washer ○ Whirlpool dryer MAIN LEVEL Main entryway ● Solid wood front door with sidelights ● Mexican saltillo (terracotta) tile ● Timber-framed vaulted ceiling ● Wall sconces ● Coat closet Half bathroom ● Mexican saltillo (terracotta) tile flooring ● Pedestal sink ● Built in cabinets/storage Great room ● Timber-framed vaulted ceiling ● Oak flooring ● Track lighting ● Wood burning fireplace with Ochoco stone floor-to-ceiling surround and wood mantle ● French doors to back deck

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed

Home & Property Features Page 4 of 9


Primary bedroom with en suite bathroom ● Oak flooring ● Seating area and window seat with view of water feature ● Walk in closet with built-ins ● French doors to private deck ● En suite bathroom ○ Tile flooring ○ Walk -in tile shower ○ Soaking tub ○ Double vanity with tile countertop ○ Built-in storage cabinet Formal dining area ● Oak flooring ● Timber-framed vaulted ceiling ● Chandelier ● Skylights ● Dry bar with storage and display cabinets Kitchen ● Mexican saltillo (terracotta) tile flooring ● Skylights ● Timber-framed vaulted ceiling ● Granite countertops ● Butcher block kitchen island ● Breakfast bar can seat 2 ● Wood cabinets ● 2 appliance garages ● Trash compactor ● Instant hot water dispenser ● Wine rack ● Waterford (certified) wood burning stove ● Kitchen appliances included: ○ GE double oven ○ JennAir 5 burner glass top range with downdra ○ KitchenAid dishwasher ○ GE refrigerator with ice maker

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed

Home & Property Features Page 5 of 9


○ GE microwave Breakfast nook ● Mexican saltillo (terracotta) tile flooring ● Timber-framed vaulted ceiling ● Skylights ● Chandelier ● Window seat ● Pantry storage with two sets of double doors with patina inlay Mud room ● Exposed aggregate concrete flooring ● Two storage closets ● Tiled dog shower ● Vanity sink and cabinet storage Laundry room ● Mexican saltillo (terracotta) tile flooring ● Exterior door to back deck ● Broom closet ● Fold-down ironing table ● Sink vanity with storage cabinets ● Upper and lower storage cabinets ● Included appliances: ○ Whirlpool washer ○ Whirlpool dryer Attached 2 car garage ● Two, single-car garage doors Stairwell ● Carpet ● Wood hand railing DAYLIGHT WALK-OUT BASEMENT Family room ● Carpet

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed

Home & Property Features Page 6 of 9


● ● ● ●

Access to lower back patio Wood burning fireplace with Ochoco stone surround Built-in shelving and display cabinets Built-in speakers

Wine cellar ● Mexican saltillo (terracotta) tile flooring ● Humidifier (currently not in use, sold in as-is condition) Equipment room ● 2 Trane furnaces ● Hot water heater with recirculating pump ● Humidifier ● Well pressure tank Sauna ● “Finnleo” brand Storage closet underneath the stairs Linen closet Bedroom 1 ● Carpet ● Walk- in closet/storage space ● Attached office ○ French doors ○ Library shelving ○ Carpet Bathroom ● Tile flooring ● Single vanity with tile countertop ● Glass standing shower ● Storage closet

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed

Home & Property Features Page 7 of 9


Detached 2 car garage ● 1,008 square feet ● Parking for 2 cars ● Gravel driveway ● Concrete flooring ● Tack room ● Hot water washing station ● Upstairs guest area, plus full bath ○ Comes fully furnished, including washer/dryer Bedroom 2 ● Carpet ● Walk-in closet EXTERIOR FEATURES Grounds ● Mountain views of Mt. Washington, Black Butte, Three Fingered Jack, and Mt. Jefferson, with views of the Three Sisters and City of Sisters from top SW corner of the property ● Paved and gravel driveways ● Deck to be stripped and refinished with oil-based stain, scheduled for mid-August ● Landscaping includes a water feature, stone walkways and mature plants ● 3 horse paddocks (dry)

OUTBUILDINGS Pull-thru horse barn ● 2,688 square feet ● Gravel driveway ● 2 roll-up doors ● Concrete floor ● 2 horse stalls with dirt flooring (room for more stalls if desired) ○ Size: 12ʼ by 12ʼ ● Storage lo

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed

Home & Property Features Page 8 of 9


Storage Shed Loafing shed ● 12ʼ by 36ʼ COMMUNITY ● 2.5 miles (typically 7 minutes) to downtown Sisters shops, restaurants, schools, post office, seasonal farmerʼs market, and events ● 2.2 miles (typically 5 minutes) to Sisters Elementary School (this property is in the Sisters School District) - New Elementary School will be located between Sisters Middle School and Sisters High School in 2024 ● 3.4 miles (typically 8 minutes) to Sisters Middle School ● 3.4 miles (typically 9 minutes) to Sisters High School ● 20.9 miles (typically 31 minutes) to Cascade Shopping Village in North Bend ● 22.8 miles (typically 33 minutes) to the Redmond Municipal Airport Skiing, Trails & Adventure: ● 23.5 miles (typically 30 minutes) to the Sisters HooDoo Ski Area: https://skihoodoo.com/ ● 45.7 miles (typically 1 hour, 5 minutes) to Mount Bachelor, Ski & Sports Lodge & Red Chair Li Parking: https://www.mtbachelor.com/ ● All Trails in Oregon: https://www.alltrails.com/parks/us/oregon/deschutes-national-forest ● Sisters - Nearby public lands for access to numerable local hiking and off-road biking trails including the Peterson Ridge Trail system: https://www.sisterstrails.org ● Sisters & Central Oregon - Multiple on-road bike routes including the Oregon Scenic Bikeway: https://www.sisterstrails.org ● Sisters Park & Recreation District: https://sistersrecreation.com/ ● Bend Trail System: https://bendtrails.org/ Bend Park & Recreation: https://www.bendparksandrec.org/

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed

Home & Property Features Page 9 of 9


UTILITIES


UTILITIES LIST 69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR 97759 HOA – yes - WILD HORSE RIDGE HOA DBA INDIAN RIDGE, INC. (2/4/2022) Attn: Kim Davis, Treasurer E: davis331@live.com P: (541) 645- 0059 Transfer Fee: None Dues: $200.00 per year *Make checks payable to Indian Ridge, Inc.* CC&Rs – yes - Wild Horse Ridge https://ek8xnhspqff.exactdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/02012223/wild_horse_ridge_ccrs.pdf Zoning RR10 Rural Residential https://deschutescounty.municipalcodeonline.com/book?type=ordinances#name=CHAPTER_18.60_RU RAL_RESIDENTIAL_ZONE;_RR-10 AS Airport Safety Combining Zone https://deschutescounty.municipalcodeonline.com/book?type=ordinances#name=CHAPTER_18.80_AIR PORT_SAFETY_COMBINING_ZONE;_A-S Alarm / Security System – Wired for system, but not currently active. Watchdog Security (541) 617-6199 https://watchdogbend.com Garbage & Recycling Service – Republic Services for home service (541) 548-4984 https://www.republicservices.com/locations/oregon Northwest Transfer Station in Sisters for drop off (541) 388-6599 / (541) 317-3163 www.co.deschutes.or.us Sisters Recycling - 328 Sisters Park Drive, Sisters, OR 97759 Electricity Service – Central Electric Cooperative Sisters Office (541) 549-5698 www.cec.coop

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed Utilities List - Page 1 of 3


Water Service – Private onsite well - see Well section of Home Book for well log and backflow test Sewer Provider – On-site Private Septic, 1000 gallon concrete tank, standard system Propane Tank - none Internet/Cable TV/Phone Service – Current Provider: Century Link - landline & internet - https://www.centurylink.com/home/ Options: Yellowknife Wireless - internet provider http://www.ykwc.com/ 136 NW Greenwood Ave, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 385-0111 Per Yellowknife: Upload download speeds- 12 x 3, or 15 x 6, 22 x 6 (pricing found online) Per Yellowknife, router already on site (needs new,) transfer fee of $50 and new 1-year contract Dish - (800) 333-3474 Direct TV – (800) 531-5000 DirectTV.com

Fireplace/Chimney Services – A Kleene Sweep (541) 388-7999 147 SE Evergreen, Redmond, OR 97756 CCB# 153811 Cascade Chimney Service (541) 388-3981 17243 Azusa Road, Bend, OR 97707 CCB#196712 HVAC Service ● Central Oregon Heating and Cooling (541) 203-3844 https://www.coheating.com/ Mail Service – ● ●

Mailbox Bank at Barclay Lane on cul-de-sac at Barclay Drive near the Sisters Eagle Airport and the Sisters Community Garden Key from Seller and new/additional keys from Post Office

Post Office, Sisters -

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed Utilities List - Page 2 of 3


(541) 549-0412 694 N. Larch Street, Sisters, OR 97759 Pony Express (541) 549-1538 (boxes, FedEx & UPS service) 160 S. Oak Street, Sisters, OR 97759 Newspapers – Sisters Nugget Newspaper (541) 549-9941 442 E. Main Ave. Sisters, Oregon Mail to: PO Box 698, Sisters, OR 97759 https://nuggetnews.com Bend Bulletin 1777 SW Chandler Avenue, Bend, OR 97702 Mail to: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708-6020 Home delivery – (541) 385-5800 or 1-800-503-3933 Main line: (541) 382-1811 circ@bendbulletin.com County Services – Deschutes County - (541) 388-6570 Keys & Openers – provided by seller Keys Garage Door OpenersMailbox Key – mailbox bank, key from seller

For a full list of services for your property, please see your countyʼs property report and review your information from your title & escrow company. In Deschutes County, call (541) 388-6570, or visit www.DIAL.org to view your property report and Service Providers online. Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed Utilities List - Page 3 of 3


MAPS


PUBLIC LANDS AND TRAILS 69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR 97759 Direct access to public lands and trails from the end of Bay Drive ● ●

Deschutes County public land is shaded light green Deschutes Land Trust protected land is outlined in light green

Trailer your horses or ride to dozens of trail heads to national forest See Peterson Ridge Trail System map in Local Attractions section for more trails

National Forest 160+ acres

Direct Access Community Easement



Deschutes National Forest

Deschutes National Forest

Deschutes National Forest

Deschutes National Forest





69027 BAY PL, SISTERS, OR 97759 Wild Horse Ridge Lot 12, Parcels 252370 & 135832

Source: Esri, Maxar, E arthstar Geographics, and the GIS User Community, Deschutes County GIS

0 Date: 7/10/2023

162.5

± 325

1 i nc h = 3 76 feet

650 ft


whychus canyon preserve trail map + rules of use

Whychus Canyon Preserve Rules: —Dogs must be kept on physical leash AT ALL TIMES. Please clean up after your pet. —Pedestrian travel only: no bike, horse, or motorized vehicle use.

deschuteslandtrust.org

—Stay on roads and trails and respect restrictions as posted. —Removal or disturbance of plants, wildlife, and historical artifacts is prohibited. —Catch and release fishing with barbless hooks is permitted subject to applicable state regulations. —Commercial use and private events are prohibited. —No hunting, motorized vehicles, camping, campfires, smoking, or unmanned aircraft use.


whychus canyon preserve suggested routes Wagon Road and Meadow Loop: This route follows a portion of the historic Santiam Wagon Road. Interpretive signs along the way share the story of the Wagon Road east of the Cascades and the role it played in the settlement of Central Oregon. This fairly flat trail is lovely in the spring when desert wildflowers begin to bloom. From the trailhead, follow signs to Wagon Road + Meadow Trails. When you see a Santiam Wagon Road interpretive sign on the right, veer off of the road and follow the dirt Wagon Road Trail. After 1.1 miles, you’ll reach a junction. Turn left and follow the trail through juniper and pine forest until you reach another junction after 0.4 miles. Turn left to continue on the Meadow Trail 1 mile back to the trailhead. Total Distance: 2.5 mile loop. Long Canyon Route: Head down into the canyon to Whychus Creek, then stroll along the creek before heading back to the top of the canyon. This beautiful hike is challenging and involves steep trails with 300 feet of elevation gain/loss. Enjoy stunning displays of spring wildflowers, mountain views, and tranquil creekside breaks. From the trailhead, follow signs to Rim + Creek Trails. At the first junction, turn left and walk .3 mile to a stone bench and overlook. The trail will begin to head down into the canyon for .8 miles. You’ll reach an intersection midway down the slope. Follow signs for the Creek Trail to reach the valley floor and walk downstream along Whychus Creek for 0.8 miles. At the next junction, continue straight through a sagebrush meadow for another 0.7 miles. The trail will then turn and begin to climb out of the canyon. Enjoy another scenic overlook before reaching the next junction at the top of the canyon. Follow signs for Meadow Trails and Trailhead for 1.5 miles back to the trailhead. Total Distance: 4.9 mile loop. Mid Canyon Route: This route is for those looking for a quicker route that still dips into the Whychus Creek canyon without all the elevation gain/loss. Enjoy stunning displays of spring wildflowers and mountain views with 150 feet of elevation gain/loss. From the trailhead, follow signs to Rim + Creek Trails. At the first junction, turn right and head down a steep route into the canyon for 0.4 miles. At the next junction, follow signs for the Rim Trail and turn right. After 0.7 miles along a rolling mid-canyon trail, you will reach a scenic overlook and bench with views into the northern portion of Whychus Canyon Preserve. Continue past the overlook to the next junction and turn right. After 0.2 miles you’ll reach another intersection. Turn left to add a quick 0.4 mile detour to another overlook. Or, turn right and follow signs for Meadow Trails and Trailhead for 1.5 miles back to the trailhead. Total Distance: 3.0 mile loop.

Georeferenced Map Download a georeferenced map of Whychus Canyon Preserve to help with navigation. Scan the QR code to the right to download.

210 nw irving, suite 102 ∙ bend, oregon 97703 (541) 330-0017 ∙ deschuteslandtrust.org



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City of Sisters: Comprehensive Plan Map MCKINNEY RANCH RD

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FLOOR PLAN


69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR Main Building: Above Grade Finished Area 4316.37 sq ft

GARAGE 24'10" x 22'7" 558 sq ft

BEDROOM 15'9" x 15'3" 239 sq ft PATIO CLO

CL

CLOSET 9'5" x 15'3" 144 sq ft

MUDROOM 10'11" x 16'3" 97 sq ft

BATH

BATH 9'8" x 9'2" 68 sq ft

SAUNA

PANTRY

CL

LAUNDRY 9'2" x 8' 73 sq ft

BREAKFAST 14'8" x 10'6" 154 sq ft

CLO

F/P

STORAGE

F/P DINING 16' x 18'5" 270 sq ft

LIVING 18'10" x 20'9" 361 sq ft

HALL

UTILITY 9'8" x 7'11" 77 sq ft WINE CELLAR 9'8" x 6'5" 62 sq ft

OFFICE 15'10" x 15'2" 240 sq ft

DN

F/P BALCONY

FAMILY 19' x 23'7" 375 sq ft

KITCHEN 13'4" x 15'3" 186 sq ft

BALCONY

CLO

UP

HALL

FOYER 10'9" x 8'10" 95 sq ft

STORAGE 15'9" x 7' 110 sq ft

BATH CLOSET 4'7" x 5'5" 25 sq ft

PRIMARY 15'8" x 25'9" 365 sq ft

DEN 9'6" x 20'2" 191 sq ft

BATH 182 sq ft

BALCONY

N

Main Floor Finished Area 2352.86 sq ft

0

9

N

Bottom Floor Finished Area 1963.51 sq ft

18 ft

White regions are excluded from total floor area in iGUIDE floor plans. All room dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification.

PREPARED: 2023/07/16


69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR Main Floor

Finished Area 2352.86 sq ft Unfinished Area 616.96 sq ft

BALCONY

BALCONY

PATIO

BALCONY

PRIMARY 25'9" x 15'8" 365 sq ft

F/P

LAUNDRY 8' x 9'2" 73 sq ft

DINING 18'5" x 16' 270 sq ft

PANTRY

9

18 ft

GARAGE 22'7" x 24'10" 558 sq ft

F/P

KITCHEN 15'3" x 13'4" 186 sq ft

BREAKFAST 10'6" x 14'8" 154 sq ft

N

0

CLOSET

BATH 5'5" x 4'7" 25 sq ft

DN

BATH 16'7" x 14'3" 182 sq ft

CL

BATH 13'2" x 5'4"

MUDROOM 16'3" x 10'11" 97 sq ft

HALL

FOYER 8'10" x 10'9" 95 sq ft

CLO

LIVING 20'9" x 18'10" 361 sq ft

PREPARED: 2023/07/16

White regions are excluded from total floor area in iGUIDE floor plans. All room dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification.


69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR Bottom Floor

Finished Area 1963.51 sq ft Unfinished Area 82.38 sq ft

FAMILY 23'7" x 19' 375 sq ft

SAUNA

STORAGE 7' x 15'9" 110 sq ft

OFFICE 15'2" x 15'10" 240 sq ft

BEDROOM 15'3" x 15'9" 239 sq ft

F/P CL

HALL

UP

CLO STORAGE DEN 20'2" x 9'6" 191 sq ft

WINE CELLAR 6'5" x 9'8" 62 sq ft

BATH 9'2" x 9'8" 68 sq ft

UTILITY 7'11" x 9'8" 77 sq ft

CLOSET 15'3" x 9'5" 144 sq ft

CLO

5

10 ft

N

0

PREPARED: 2023/07/16

White regions are excluded from total floor area in iGUIDE floor plans. All room dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification.


69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR Property Details Room Measurements

Floor Area Information

Only major rooms are listed. Some listed rooms may be excluded from total interior floor area

Floor areas include footprint area of interior walls. All displayed floor areas are rounded to two

(e.g. garage). Room dimensions are largest length and width; parts of room may be smaller.

decimal places. Total area is computed before rounding and may not equal to sum of displayed

Room area is not always equal to product of length and width.

floor areas.

Main Building MAIN FLOOR

Main Building MAIN FLOOR

Bath: 5'4" x 13'2" | 58 sq ft

Finished Area: 2352.86 sq ft

Bath: 14'3" x 16'7" | 182 sq ft

Unfinished Area: 616.96 sq ft

Bath: 4'7" x 5'5" | 25 sq ft Breakfast: 14'8" x 10'6" | 154 sq ft

BOTTOM FLOOR

Dining: 16' x 18'5" | 270 sq ft

Finished Area: 1963.51 sq ft

Foyer: 10'9" x 8'10" | 95 sq ft

Unfinished Area: 82.38 sq ft

Garage: 24'10" x 22'7" | 558 sq ft Kitchen: 13'4" x 15'3" | 186 sq ft Laundry: 9'2" x 8' | 73 sq ft

ANSI Z765-2021, Main Building

Living: 18'10" x 20'9" | 361 sq ft

Above Grade Finished Area: 4316.37 sq ft

Mudroom: 10'11" x 16'3" | 97 sq ft

Above Grade Unfinished Area: 699.34 sq ft

Primary: 15'8" x 25'9" | 365 sq ft

Below Grade Finished Area: N/A Below Grade Unfinished Area: N/A

BOTTOM FLOOR Bath: 9'8" x 9'2" | 68 sq ft Bedroom: 15'9" x 15'3" | 239 sq ft Closet: 9'5" x 15'3" | 144 sq ft Den: 9'6" x 20'2" | 191 sq ft Family: 19' x 23'7" | 375 sq ft Office: 15'10" x 15'2" | 240 sq ft Storage: 15'9" x 7' | 110 sq ft Utility: 9'8" x 7'11" | 77 sq ft Wine Cellar: 9'8" x 6'5" | 62 sq ft

White regions are excluded from total floor area in iGUIDE floor plans. All room dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification.


69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR Definitions

iGUIDE Method of Measurement

Interior Area is a per floor calculation, made by measuring to the inside surface of the exterior walls. The footprint of all interior walls and staircases is typically

included.

Excluded Area is a sum of the area of all rooms (measured to the inside surface of room walls) that are excluded from the Interior Area for a floor and the

footprint of corresponding walls. Prescribed area exclusions can vary from region to region. Examples of exclusions are spaces open to below, garages, cold cellars, crawl and reduced height spaces. Exterior Wall Footprint is the sum of the estimated area of the perimeter wall segments bounding both Interior and Excluded Areas.

Exterior Area is a per floor calculation, made by measuring to the outside surface of the exterior walls and is represented by the sum of the Interior Area and

the Exterior Wall Footprint.

Grade is the ground level at the perimeter of the exterior finished surface of a house. A floor is considered to be above grade if its floor level is everywhere

above grade.

Total Interior Area is the sum of all Interior Areas. Total Excluded Area is the sum of all Excluded Areas. Total Exterior Area is the sum of all Exterior Areas. Finished Area is a per floor calculation made by adding all enclosed areas in a house that are suitable for year-round use based upon their location, embodying

walls, floors, and ceilings and which are similar to the rest of the house. Footprint of walls is attributed to finished area only when the walls are bounding finished areas. Unfinished Area is a per floor calculation made by adding all enclosed areas that do not meet the criteria for Finished Area. Exceptions are outdoor and

non-walkable areas, for example porches or areas open to below. Footprint of walls is attributed to unfinished area only when the walls are exclusively bounding unfinished areas. Notes

For exterior walls that are adjacent to the outside of the property, where typically only the interior side has measurement data, an estimation of the exterior wall thickness (as directly measured at the property) is used to calculate its footprint. Considerations are not made for varying wall thickness along the perimeter. Disclaimer All dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification. PDF Floor Plans A. RECA RMS 2017: Color is used to indicate all included areas. Excluded and not reported areas are shown in white. Walls are always shown in black. B. ANSI Z765 2021: Color is used to indicate all finished areas. Unfinished and not reported areas are shown in white. Walls are always shown in black.

More Information About the Standards A. RECA RMS 2017: https://www.reca.ca/licensees-learners/tools-resources/residential-measurement-standard B. ANSI Z765 2021: https://www.homeinnovation.com/z765 White regions are excluded from total floor area in iGUIDE floor plans. All room dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification.


69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR Main Building: Above Grade Finished Area 4316.37 sq ft

GARAGE 24'10" x 22'7" 558 sq ft

BEDROOM 15'9" x 15'3" 239 sq ft PATIO CLO

CL

CLOSET 9'5" x 15'3" 144 sq ft

MUDROOM 10'11" x 16'3" 97 sq ft

BATH

BATH 9'8" x 9'2" 68 sq ft

SAUNA

PANTRY

CL

LAUNDRY 9'2" x 8' 73 sq ft

BREAKFAST 14'8" x 10'6" 154 sq ft

CLO

F/P

STORAGE

F/P DINING 16' x 18'5" 270 sq ft

LIVING 18'10" x 20'9" 361 sq ft

HALL

UTILITY 9'8" x 7'11" 77 sq ft WINE CELLAR 9'8" x 6'5" 62 sq ft

OFFICE 15'10" x 15'2" 240 sq ft

DN

F/P BALCONY

FAMILY 19' x 23'7" 375 sq ft

KITCHEN 13'4" x 15'3" 186 sq ft

BALCONY

CLO

UP

HALL

FOYER 10'9" x 8'10" 95 sq ft

STORAGE 15'9" x 7' 110 sq ft

BATH CLOSET 4'7" x 5'5" 25 sq ft

PRIMARY 15'8" x 25'9" 365 sq ft

DEN 9'6" x 20'2" 191 sq ft

BATH 182 sq ft

BALCONY

N

Main Floor Finished Area 2352.86 sq ft

0

9

N

Bottom Floor Finished Area 1963.51 sq ft

18 ft

White regions are excluded from total floor area in iGUIDE floor plans. All room dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification.

PREPARED: 2023/07/16


69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR Main Floor

Finished Area 2352.86 sq ft Unfinished Area 616.96 sq ft

BALCONY

BALCONY

PATIO

BALCONY

PRIMARY 25'9" x 15'8" 365 sq ft

F/P

LAUNDRY 8' x 9'2" 73 sq ft

DINING 18'5" x 16' 270 sq ft

PANTRY

9

18 ft

GARAGE 22'7" x 24'10" 558 sq ft

F/P

KITCHEN 15'3" x 13'4" 186 sq ft

BREAKFAST 10'6" x 14'8" 154 sq ft

N

0

CLOSET

BATH 5'5" x 4'7" 25 sq ft

DN

BATH 16'7" x 14'3" 182 sq ft

CL

BATH 13'2" x 5'4"

MUDROOM 16'3" x 10'11" 97 sq ft

HALL

FOYER 8'10" x 10'9" 95 sq ft

CLO

LIVING 20'9" x 18'10" 361 sq ft

PREPARED: 2023/07/16

White regions are excluded from total floor area in iGUIDE floor plans. All room dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification.


69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR Bottom Floor

Finished Area 1963.51 sq ft Unfinished Area 82.38 sq ft

FAMILY 23'7" x 19' 375 sq ft

SAUNA

STORAGE 7' x 15'9" 110 sq ft

OFFICE 15'2" x 15'10" 240 sq ft

BEDROOM 15'3" x 15'9" 239 sq ft

F/P CL

HALL

UP

CLO STORAGE DEN 20'2" x 9'6" 191 sq ft

WINE CELLAR 6'5" x 9'8" 62 sq ft

BATH 9'2" x 9'8" 68 sq ft

UTILITY 7'11" x 9'8" 77 sq ft

CLOSET 15'3" x 9'5" 144 sq ft

CLO

5

10 ft

N

0

PREPARED: 2023/07/16

White regions are excluded from total floor area in iGUIDE floor plans. All room dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification.


69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR Property Details Room Measurements

Floor Area Information

Only major rooms are listed. Some listed rooms may be excluded from total interior floor area

Floor areas include footprint area of interior walls. All displayed floor areas are rounded to two

(e.g. garage). Room dimensions are largest length and width; parts of room may be smaller.

decimal places. Total area is computed before rounding and may not equal to sum of displayed

Room area is not always equal to product of length and width.

floor areas.

Main Building MAIN FLOOR

Main Building MAIN FLOOR

Bath: 5'4" x 13'2" | 58 sq ft

Finished Area: 2352.86 sq ft

Bath: 14'3" x 16'7" | 182 sq ft

Unfinished Area: 616.96 sq ft

Bath: 4'7" x 5'5" | 25 sq ft Breakfast: 14'8" x 10'6" | 154 sq ft

BOTTOM FLOOR

Dining: 16' x 18'5" | 270 sq ft

Finished Area: 1963.51 sq ft

Foyer: 10'9" x 8'10" | 95 sq ft

Unfinished Area: 82.38 sq ft

Garage: 24'10" x 22'7" | 558 sq ft Kitchen: 13'4" x 15'3" | 186 sq ft Laundry: 9'2" x 8' | 73 sq ft

ANSI Z765-2021, Main Building

Living: 18'10" x 20'9" | 361 sq ft

Above Grade Finished Area: 4316.37 sq ft

Mudroom: 10'11" x 16'3" | 97 sq ft

Above Grade Unfinished Area: 699.34 sq ft

Primary: 15'8" x 25'9" | 365 sq ft

Below Grade Finished Area: N/A Below Grade Unfinished Area: N/A

BOTTOM FLOOR Bath: 9'8" x 9'2" | 68 sq ft Bedroom: 15'9" x 15'3" | 239 sq ft Closet: 9'5" x 15'3" | 144 sq ft Den: 9'6" x 20'2" | 191 sq ft Family: 19' x 23'7" | 375 sq ft Office: 15'10" x 15'2" | 240 sq ft Storage: 15'9" x 7' | 110 sq ft Utility: 9'8" x 7'11" | 77 sq ft Wine Cellar: 9'8" x 6'5" | 62 sq ft

White regions are excluded from total floor area in iGUIDE floor plans. All room dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification.


69027 Bay Place, Sisters, OR Definitions

iGUIDE Method of Measurement

Interior Area is a per floor calculation, made by measuring to the inside surface of the exterior walls. The footprint of all interior walls and staircases is typically

included.

Excluded Area is a sum of the area of all rooms (measured to the inside surface of room walls) that are excluded from the Interior Area for a floor and the

footprint of corresponding walls. Prescribed area exclusions can vary from region to region. Examples of exclusions are spaces open to below, garages, cold cellars, crawl and reduced height spaces. Exterior Wall Footprint is the sum of the estimated area of the perimeter wall segments bounding both Interior and Excluded Areas.

Exterior Area is a per floor calculation, made by measuring to the outside surface of the exterior walls and is represented by the sum of the Interior Area and

the Exterior Wall Footprint.

Grade is the ground level at the perimeter of the exterior finished surface of a house. A floor is considered to be above grade if its floor level is everywhere

above grade.

Total Interior Area is the sum of all Interior Areas. Total Excluded Area is the sum of all Excluded Areas. Total Exterior Area is the sum of all Exterior Areas. Finished Area is a per floor calculation made by adding all enclosed areas in a house that are suitable for year-round use based upon their location, embodying

walls, floors, and ceilings and which are similar to the rest of the house. Footprint of walls is attributed to finished area only when the walls are bounding finished areas. Unfinished Area is a per floor calculation made by adding all enclosed areas that do not meet the criteria for Finished Area. Exceptions are outdoor and

non-walkable areas, for example porches or areas open to below. Footprint of walls is attributed to unfinished area only when the walls are exclusively bounding unfinished areas. Notes

For exterior walls that are adjacent to the outside of the property, where typically only the interior side has measurement data, an estimation of the exterior wall thickness (as directly measured at the property) is used to calculate its footprint. Considerations are not made for varying wall thickness along the perimeter. Disclaimer All dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification. PDF Floor Plans A. RECA RMS 2017: Color is used to indicate all included areas. Excluded and not reported areas are shown in white. Walls are always shown in black. B. ANSI Z765 2021: Color is used to indicate all finished areas. Unfinished and not reported areas are shown in white. Walls are always shown in black.

More Information About the Standards A. RECA RMS 2017: https://www.reca.ca/licensees-learners/tools-resources/residential-measurement-standard B. ANSI Z765 2021: https://www.homeinnovation.com/z765 White regions are excluded from total floor area in iGUIDE floor plans. All room dimensions and floor areas must be considered approximate and are subject to independent verification.


COUNTY & TAX INFO


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PLAT




PLOT PLAN






HOA


INDIAN RIDGE, INC. Wild Horse Ridge Homeowners Association Minutes of Annual HOA Meeting June 19, 2021

PRESIDENT’S GREETING AND CALL TO ORDER Jeff Snyder • Annual meeting was held at 10:00 a.m. at the home of Rick and Noelle Fredland, 68879 Chestnut Drive, Sisters, OR. 97759, on Saturday, June 19, 2021. • Roll call was done and a quorum was established with robust attendance of 94% including proxys. Lots represented in person or by proxy: 1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,32, 33. Lots with no response: 6,8A,17,31. VICE-PRESIDENT UPDATE Robert Hamerly • All new residents were present and it was a pleasure meeting Mike and Kari Schneider, Kent and Cathy Wilson, Ian Tomlinson, Bill and Meg Anderson. SECRETARY’S REPORT Chrissy Snyder • The Minutes of the Annual 2020 HOA Meeting Revision A were approved without any corrections. • Dues for 2021 – 2022 were confirmed at $200.00, with an additional Road Project Assessment of $500.00. The due date for this $700.00 payment is June 1st with a delinquency of date of July 1, 2021. Late fees will begin accruing as of August 1, 2021. Send your check payable to Indian Ridge, Inc.: P.O. Box 793, Sisters, OR 97759. . TREASURER’S REPORT Kim Davis • Financials were reviewed: Cash on hand as of May 31, 2021 is $19,864.99. After our Road Project is completed, we will have $6 – 7K in Reserves. There is a potential need for funds based on winter plowing. ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW COMMITTEE REPORT Andy Anderson • Andy reviewed all the approved construction plans for the past year. • Meaning of “Outbuilding” was explained. Each lot is allowed three (3) outbuildings. A three-sided, roofed structure (often called a horse run-in or ramada) is not considered an outbuilding. • Homeowners need to contact Andy and obtain approval by the Arch. Committee before beginning any painting, re-modeling, or new construction. • Meg Anderson has volunteered to be on this committee. Thank you, Meg!! ROAD COMMITTEE REPORT Kevin Hodgson • Summer 2021 Road Project will begin the Week of August 9th. Work will begin at the top of Barclay Drive where the corner heads south. The project starts with sweeping, gravel, and asphalt overlay. One week later, rock will be placed at the road shoulder for support. Tri-County will provide traffic control however, if you’re


• •

thinking of taking a holiday, this might be a great week to do it! The total for this project is $54K and costs are shared by our neighboring HOA. Bob Riede has volunteered to be on the Road committee!! Rick Fredland has volunteered to be on the Road committee!!

NEW BUSINESS Jeff Snyder • Emergency Exit Update was given. • Fire Prevention: Trees along the roadway belong to each lot owner (not the HOA’s responsibility) and need to be maintained and trimmed at the lot owner’s expense to allow for vehicle and fire truck clearance. Check with an arborist regarding the best time of year to trim. Keep tree trunks free of “ladder fuel”. • There is suggestion of raising our annual dues in order to avoid future emergency funding requests. A study will be done, specifically for road maintenance, to see what future yearly expenditures look like and we can then consider an appropriate new annual dues amount to vote on. • There is suggestion of better-clarifying the number of allowed outbuildings, in our CC & R’s. Jim Barnett has offered his attorney-at-law services to assist in making changes. Any changes in verbiage would be put to a vote • There is an outdated regulation regarding voting only by mail. Adding the ability to vote via e-mail is something we could clarify. This will be put to a vote. • There is an article in the C&R’s stating proposed changes must be given no less than thirty but not more than forty-five days prior to such proposal. A change has been suggested to allow the Board to declare an Emergency, without any time element, if appropriate. NEXT ANNUAL HOA MEETING & LOCATION • Next annual meeting will be on Saturday, June 18, 2022 at the home of Mark and Kristina May. Thank you for volunteering your home as a meeting place!! ADJOURNMENT • With no further business, the meeting was adjourned at Noon. 2021 - 2022 Board Members and Contact Information President: Jeff Snyder 541-550-9698 WildHorseRidge@Yahoo.com Vice President: Robert Hamerly 541-330-8767 Robert.Hamerly@GreenSavers.com Secretary: Chrissy Snyder 541-848-8897 EndoftheRoadRanch16@gmail.com Treasurer: Kim Davis 541-645-0059 Davis331@live.com Road Committee: Kevin Hodgson 206-940-5680 Hodgson@uw.edu Architectural Committee: Andy Anderson 541-549-0608 CaptMooney@live.com Board Member At Large: Ed Johnson 541-549-9905 ekjohn61@aol.com Respectfully Submitted, Chrissy Snyder Secretary, Wild Horse Ridge HOA 541-848-8897 End of the RoadRanch16@gmail.com


WELL


Oregon Water Resources Department Well Log Information System

Well Information

Well Log: DESC 8520

(Click to Collapse...)

Identification Type of Report: Water Well Type of Work: NEW Well Report: DESC 8520 View Log

 Main

 Help

 Return

 Contact Us

 

Groundwater Site

Well Label: Start Card: 53895 Original Report: Owner Well Nbr: Company Job Nbr: Primary Use: DOMESTIC Complete Date: 08/12/1993

Land Owner Name: TOMMY THOMPSON Company:

1010 SW ARDMORE Address:

Location

PORTLAND, OR 97205

(Click to Collapse...) Latitude/Longitude Latitude: 44.29933482 Longitude: -121.52177673 Horiz. Error: 250.00

ft.

Location County: DESC TRSQQ: WM15.00S10.00E3NENW Tax Map: Tax Lot: 1300 Lot: 12 Block: Subdivision: Street of Well: WM District: 11 Surface Elev:

Find address or place

 Well Report Mapping Tool

Tax Lots

Maxar, Microsoft | Oregon Water Resources Department and Bureau of Land Management | Respec

Note: Tax lot overlay available only for a few counties.

Well Construction

(Click to Collapse...) Construction

Start Date: 08/09/1993

Backfill

Filter Pack

Backfill Placement:

Filter Pack:

Completed Date: 08/12/1993

Backfill Material:

Filter Pack Material:

Drill Method: Rotary Air

Explosives Used:

Filter Pack Size:

Depth of Completed Well: 310.00

Explosive Type:

Est. Depth Drilled: 310.00

Explosive Amount:

Special Standards: Seal Placed Method: Abandonment Start Date: Abandonment Completed Date:

Bore Hole

Seal

No data matches search criteria.

No data matches search criteria. Casing/Liner

No data matches search criteria. Temporary Casing No data matches search criteria. Perforations

Abandonment Log No data matches search criteria.


No data matches search criteria. Screens No data matches search criteria.

Well Test

(Click to Collapse...) Well Test Temperature: 51 Lab Analysis: Lab Analysis Done By: Total Dissolved Solids: Water Quality Concerns:

Well Test Test Type

Yield (gpm)

Air

Drawdown

Drill Stem/ Pump Depth

20.0

Dura on (hr)

310

Calculated Specific Capacity (gpm/ ) 1.0

Analysis No data matches search criteria.

Static Water Level

(Click to Collapse...) Static Water Level Depth First Water: 238.00 Pre-Static Water Level:

Pre-Static Water Level Date: Post-Static Water Level: 240.0 Post-Static Water Level Date: 08/12/1993

Static Water Level No data matches search criteria.

Well Constructor Bonded Driller Name: JOHN V JOHNSON Bonded Driller Company: Bonded Driller Number: 595 Bonded Date Signed:

(Click to Collapse...) Unbonded Name:

Geologist Engineer:

Unbonded Company:

Geologist Date Signed:

Unbonded Number: Unbonded Date Signed: Other Name: Other Affiliation: Other License Nbr:



SEPTIC




WOOD STOVE


CC&RS




NOTICE REGARDING CERTAIN DISCRIMINATORY RESTRICTIONS, IF APPLICABLE Omitted from the attached document is any covenant or restriction that is based upon, but not necessarily limited to, race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, familial status, marital status, disability, handicap, national origin, ancestry, source of income, gender, gender identity, gender expression, medical condition or genetic information, as set forth in applicable state or federal law, except to the extent that such covenant or restriction is permitted by applicable law. Oregon Version 20150707







































































ZONING REGULATIONS


81st OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY--2021 Regular Session

Senate Bill 391 Sponsored by Senator DEMBROW (Presession filed.)

SUMMARY The following summary is not prepared by the sponsors of the measure and is not a part of the body thereof subject to consideration by the Legislative Assembly. It is an editor’s brief statement of the essential features of the measure as introduced.

Authorizes county to allow owner of lot or parcel within rural residential zone to construct one accessory dwelling unit on lot or parcel, subject to certain restrictions. Specifies that single-family dwelling and accessory dwelling on same lot or parcel are considered single unit for purposes of calculating exemptions from ground water rights requirements. Declares emergency, effective on passage. A BILL FOR AN ACT

1 2

Relating to accessory dwelling units in rural residential areas; and declaring an emergency.

3

Be It Enacted by the People of the State of Oregon:

4

SECTION 1. Section 2 of this 2021 Act is added to and made a part of ORS chapter 215.

5

SECTION 2. (1) As used in this section:

6

(a) “Accessory dwelling unit” has the meaning given that term in ORS 215.501.

7 8

(b) “Area zoned for rural residential use” has the meaning given that term in ORS 215.501.

9

(c) “Single-family dwelling” has the meaning given that term in ORS 215.501.

10

(d) “Vacation occupancy” has the meaning given that term in ORS 90.100.

11

(2) Consistent with a county’s comprehensive plan, a county may allow an owner of a lot

12

or parcel within an area zoned for rural residential use to construct one accessory dwelling

13

unit on the lot or parcel, provided:

14 15

(a) The lot or parcel is not located within an area designated as an urban reserve as defined in ORS 195.137;

16

(b) The lot or parcel is at least two acres in size;

17

(c) One single-family dwelling is sited on the lot or parcel;

18

(d) The existing single-family dwelling property on the lot or parcel is not subject to an

19

order declaring it a nuisance or subject to any pending action under ORS 105.550 to 105.600;

20

(e) The accessory dwelling unit will comply with all applicable laws and regulations re-

21 22 23 24 25

lating to sanitation and wastewater disposal and treatment; (f) The accessory dwelling unit will not include more than 900 square feet of useable floor area; (g) The accessory dwelling unit will be located no farther than 100 feet from the existing single-family dwelling;

26

(h) If the water supply source for the accessory dwelling unit or associated lands or

27

gardens will be a well using water under ORS 537.545 (1)(b) or (d), no portion of the lot or

28

parcel is within an area in which new or existing ground water uses under ORS 537.545 (1)(b)

29

or (d) have been restricted by the Water Resources Commission;

30

(i) No portion of the lot or parcel is within a designated area of critical state concern;

NOTE: Matter in boldfaced type in an amended section is new; matter [italic and bracketed] is existing law to be omitted. New sections are in boldfaced type. LC 2279


SB 391 (j) The lot or parcel is within a rural fire protection district organized under ORS chapter

1 2 3 4

478; (k) The lot or parcel and accessory dwelling unit comply with rules of the State Board of Forestry under ORS 477.015 to 477.061; and

5

(L) Statewide wildfire risk maps have been approved and the accessory dwelling unit

6

complies with the Oregon residential specialty code relating to wildfire hazard mitigation for

7

the mapped area.

8 9

(3)(a) A county may not permit both the existing single-family dwelling and the accessory dwelling unit allowed under this section to be used simultaneously for vacation occupancy:

10

(A) During more than one week per year; and

11

(B) Unless the county has been notified in advance.

12

(b) If a county allows the use of an accessory dwelling unit for vacation occupancy, the

13

county may impose conditions including:

14

(A) Requiring the owner to use the existing single-family dwelling as a primary residence.

15

(B) Requiring neighbor notification.

16

(C) Requiring a local point of contact for vacation occupants and neighbors.

17

(D) Registration with the county.

18

(4) A county that allows construction of an accessory dwelling unit under this section

19

may not approve:

20

(a) A subdivision, partition or other division of the lot or parcel so that the existing

21

single-family dwelling is situated on a different lot or parcel than the accessory dwelling unit.

22

(b) Construction of an additional accessory dwelling unit on the same lot or parcel.

23

(5) A county may require that an accessory dwelling unit constructed under this section

24

be served by the same water supply source or water supply system as the existing single-

25

family dwelling. If the accessory dwelling unit is served by a well, the construction of the

26

accessory dwelling unit shall maintain all setbacks from the well required by the Water Re-

27

sources Commission or Water Resources Department.

28

(6) An existing single-family dwelling and an accessory dwelling unit allowed under this

29

section are considered a single unit for the purposes of calculating exemptions under ORS

30

537.545 (1).

31

(7) Nothing in this section requires a county to allow any accessory dwelling units in

32

areas zoned for rural residential use or prohibits a county from imposing any additional re-

33

strictions on accessory dwelling units in areas zoned for rural residential use, including re-

34

strictions on the construction of garages and outbuildings that support an accessory dwelling

35

unit.

36

SECTION 3. This 2021 Act being necessary for the immediate preservation of the public

37

peace, health and safety, an emergency is declared to exist, and this 2021 Act takes effect

38

on its passage.

39

[2]


CHAPTER 18.60 RURAL RESIDENTIAL ZONE; RR-10 18.60.010 Purposes 18.60.020 Uses Permitted Outright 18.60.030 Conditional Uses Permitted 18.60.035 Destination Resorts 18.60.040 Yard And Setback Requirements 18.60.050 Stream Setback 18.60.060 Dimensional Standards 18.60.070 Limitations On Conditional Uses 18.60.080 Rimrock Setback 18.60.090 Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2 Sewer District Limited Use Combining Zone 18.60.010 Purposes The purposes of the Rural Residential Zone are to provide rural residential living environments; to provide standards for rural land use and development consistent with desired rural character and the capability of the land and natural resources; to manage the extension of public services; to provide for public review of nonresidential uses; and to balance the public's interest in the management of community growth with the protection of individual property rights through review procedures and standards. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991

18.60.020 Uses Permitted Outright The following uses and their accessory uses are permitted outright. A. A single-family dwelling, or a manufactured home subject to DCC 18.116.070. B. Utility facilities necessary to serve the area including energy facilities, water supply and treatment and sewage disposal and treatment. C. Community center, if shown and approved on the original plan or plat of the development. D. Agricultural use as defined in DCC Title 18. E. Class I and II road or street project subject to approval as part of a land partition, subdivision or subject to the standards and criteria established by DCC 18.116.230. F. Class III road or street project. G. Noncommercial horse stables as defined in DCC Title 18, excluding horse events. H H

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H. Horse events, including associated structures, involving: 1. Fewer than 10 riders; 2. Ten to 25 riders, no more than two times per month on nonconsecutive days; or 3. More than 25 riders, no more than two times per year on nonconsecutive days. Incidental musical programs are not included in this definition. Overnight stays by participants, trainers or spectators in RVs on the premises is not an incident of such horse events. I. Operation, maintenance, and piping of existing irrigation systems operated by an Irrigation District except as provided in DCC 18.120.050. J. Type 1 Home Occupation, subject to DCC 18.116.280. K. Accessory Dwelling Units, subject to DCC 18.116.350. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Amended by Ord. 91-005 §§30 & 31 on 3/4/1991 Amended by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 93-043 §8 on 8/25/1993 Amended by Ord. 94-008 §12 on 6/8/1994 Amended by Ord. 2001-016 §2 on 3/28/2001 Amended by Ord. 2001-039 §5 on 12/12/2001 Amended by Ord. 2004-002 §7 on 4/28/2004 Amended by Ord. 2019-009 §2 on 9/3/2019 Recorded by Ord. 2019-009 §2 on 9/3/2019

18.60.030 Conditional Uses Permitted The following uses may be allowed subject to DCC 18.128: A. Public park, playground, recreation facility or community center owned and operated by a government agency or nonprofit community organization. B. Dude ranch. C. Type 2 or Type 3 Home Occupation, subject to DCC 18.116.280. D. Personal use landing strip for airplanes and helicopter pads, including associated hangar, maintenance and service facilities. A personal use landing strip as used in DCC 18.60.030 means an airstrip restricted, except for aircraft emergencies, to use by the owner and, on an infrequent and occasional basis, by invited guests. No aircraft may be based on a personal-use landing strip other than those owned or controlled by the owner of the airstrip. Exceptions to the activities permitted under this definition may be granted through waiver action by the Aeronautics Division in specific instances. A personal-use landing strip lawfully existing as of September 1, 1975, shall continue to be permitted subject to any applicable regulations of the Aeronautics Division.


E. Planned development. F. Cluster development. G. Recreation-oriented facility requiring large acreage such as off-road vehicle track or race track, but not including a rodeo grounds. H. A disposal site which includes a land disposal site for which the Department of Environmental Quality has granted a permit under ORS 459.245, together with equipment, facilities or buildings necessary for its operation. I. Cemetery. J. Time-share unit or the creation thereof. K. Hydroelectric facility, subject to DCC 18.116.130 and 18.128.260. L. Bed and breakfast inn. M. Golf course. N. Excavation, grading and fill and removal within the bed and banks of a stream or river or in a wetland subject to DCC 18.120.050 and 18.128.270. O. Religious institutions or assemblies. P. Public Uses. Q. Semipublic Uses. R. Commercial horse stables. S. Private or public school, including all buildings essential to the operation of such a school. T. Manufactured home park or recreational vehicle park on a parcel in use as a manufactured home park or recreational vehicle park prior to the adoption of PL-15 in 1979 and being operated as of June 12, 1996 as a manufactured home park or recreational vehicle park , including expansion, conversion and combination of such uses on the same parcel, as configured on June 12, 1996. U. The full or partial conversion from a manufactured home park or recreational vehicle park described in DCC 18.60.030 (T) to a manufactured home park or recreational vehicle park on the same parcel, as configured on June 12, 1996. V. Wireless telecommunications facilities, except those facilities meeting the requirements of DCC 18.116.250(A) or (B). W. Surface mining of mineral and aggregate resources in conjunction with the operation and maintenance of irrigation systems operated by an Irrigation District, including the excavation and mining for facilities, ponds, reservoirs, and the off-site use, storage, and sale of excavated material. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Amended by Ord. 83-033 §5 on 6/15/1983 Amended by Ord. 86-018 §13 on 6/30/1986


Amended by Ord. 90-014 §22 on 7/12/1990 Amended by Ord. 91-005 §32 on 3/4/1991 Amended by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 92-004 §10 on 2/7/1992 Amended by Ord. 93-043 §§8A and 8B on 8/25/1993 Amended by Ord. 94-008 §13 on 6/8/1994 Amended by Ord. 96-021 §1 on 2/28/1996 Amended by Ord. 96-038 §2 on 6/12/1996 Amended by Ord. 97-017 §3 on 3/12/1997 Amended by Ord. 97-063 §3 on 11/12/1997 Amended by Ord. 2001-016 §2 on 3/28/2001 Amended by Ord. 2001-039 §5 on 12/12/2001 Amended by Ord. 2004-002 §8 on 4/28/2004 Amended by Ord. 2009-018 §2 on 11/5/2009 Amended by Ord. 2020-001 §5 on 4/21/2020 Amended by Ord. 2023-001 §8 on 5/30/2023

18.60.035 Destination Resorts Destination resorts may be allowed as a conditional use, subject to all applicable standards of the DR Zone. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. 92-004 §11 on 2/7/1992

18.60.040 Yard And Setback Requirements In an RR-10 Zone, the following yard and setbacks shall be maintained. A. The front setback shall be a minimum of 20 feet from a property line fronting on a local street right of way, 30 feet from a property line fronting on a collector right of way and 50 feet from an arterial right of way. B. There shall be a minimum side yard of 10 feet for all uses, except on the street side of a corner lot the side yard shall be 20 feet. C. The minimum rear yard shall be 20 feet. D. The setback from the north lot line shall meet the solar setback requirements in DCC 18.116.180. E. In addition to the setbacks set forth herein, any greater setbacks required by applicable building or structural codes adopted by the State of Oregon and/or the County under DCC 15.04 shall be met. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Amended by Ord. 83-037 §16 on 6/1/1983 Amended by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 94-008 §21 on 6/8/1994 Amended by Ord. 95-075 §1 on 11/29/1995


18.60.050 Stream Setback To permit better light, air, vision, stream or pollution control, protect fish and wildlife areas and to preserve the natural scenic amenities and vistas along streams and lakes, the following setback shall apply: A. All sewage disposal installations, such as septic tanks or septic drainfields, shall be set back from the ordinary high water mark along all streams or lakes a minimum of 100 feet, measured at right angles to the ordinary high water mark. In those cases where practical difficulties preclude the location of the facilities at a distance of 100 feet and the County Sanitarian finds that a closer location will not endanger health, the Planning Director or Hearings Body may permit the location of these facilities closer to the stream or lake, but in no case closer than 25 feet. B. All structures, buildings or similar permanent fixtures shall be set back from the ordinary high water mark along all streams or lakes a minimum of 100 feet measured at right angles to the ordinary high water mark. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991

18.60.060 Dimensional Standards In an RR-10 Zone, the following dimensional standards shall apply: A. Lot Coverage. The main building and accessory buildings located on any building site or lot shall not cover in excess of 30 percent of the total lot area. B. Building Height. No building or structure shall be erected or enlarged to exceed 30 feet in height, except as allowed under DCC 18.120.040. C. Minimum lot size shall be 10 acres, except planned and cluster developments shall be allowed an equivalent density of one unit per 7.5 acres. Planned and cluster developments within one mile of an acknowledged urban growth boundary shall be allowed a five-acre minimum lot size or equivalent density. For parcels separated by new arterial rights of way, an exemption shall be granted pursuant to DCC 18.120.020. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 §4.120 on 11/1/1979 Amended by Ord. 92-055 §6 on 8/17/1992 Amended by Ord. 93-034 §1 on 6/30/1993

18.60.070 Limitations On Conditional Uses The following limitations shall apply to uses allowed by DCC 18.60.030:


A. The Planning Director or Hearings Body may require establishment and maintenance of fire breaks, the use of fire resistant materials in construction and landscaping, or may attach other similar conditions or limitations that will serve to reduce fire hazards or prevent the spread of fire to surrounding areas. B. The Planning Director or Hearings Body may limit changes in the natural grade of land, or the alteration, removal or destruction of natural vegetation in order to prevent or minimize erosion or pollution. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991

18.60.080 Rimrock Setback Setbacks from rimrock shall be as provided in DCC 18.116.160. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Amended by Ord. 86-053 §13 on 6/30/1986

18.60.090 Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2 Sewer District Limited Use Combining Zone A. Uses Permitted Outright. In the Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2 Sewer District Limited Use Combining Zone, uses shall be permitted as follows, the following uses and their accessory uses are allowed outright: 1. Agricultural use as defined in DCC Title 18. 2. Propagation or harvesting of a forest product. 3. Ground application of treated effluent. B. Uses Permitted Subject to Site Plan Review. In the Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2 Sewer District Limited Use Combining Zone, uses shall be permitted as follows, the following uses and their accessory uses are permitted subject to applicable provisions of DCC 18.116, Supplementary Provisions, and DCC 18.124, Site Plan Review: 1. Sewage Treatment Facility. 2. Treated Effluent Ponds. C. Uses Permitted Conditionally. In the Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2 Sewer District Limited Use Combining Zone, Wireless telecommunications facilities, except those facilities meeting the requirements of DCC 18.116.250(A) or (B), and their accessory uses are permitted conditionally subject to the applicable provisions of DCC 18.128, Conditional Uses. D. Definitions. For the purpose of this section, the use Sewage Treatment Facility includes any buildings or structures associated with the operations of a sewer treatment plant including, but not limited to, treatment station or pump station.


E. Special Conditions. Pursuant to Deschutes County Comprehensive Plan Section 5.10, an application for site plan review to establish a sewage treatment facility must include a conservation easement and a plan of implementing the conservation easement that provides standards and implementation methods for managing the conservation easement, along with a recorded road maintenance agreement between Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2 Sewer District and the Beaver Special Road District, with the site plan review application. The road maintenance agreement between the applicant and the Beaver Special Road District shall include Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2 Sewer District’s pro rata share for the maintenance cost of Foster Road through Section 25. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. 2003-012 §1 on 6/2/2003 Amended by Ord. 2010-016 §1 on 4/26/2010 Amended by Ord. 2015-016 §3 on 3/28/2016


CHAPTER 18.80 AIRPORT SAFETY COMBINING ZONE; A-S 18.80.010 Purpose 18.80.020 Application Of Provisions 18.80.022 Definitions 18.80.024 Imaginary Surface And Noise Impact Boundaries 18.80.026 Notice Of Land Use And Permit Applications 18.80.028 Height Limitations 18.80.030 Redmond Municipal Airport 18.80.032 Bend Municipal Airport 18.80.034 Sunriver Airport 18.80.036 Sisters Eagle Air Airport 18.80.038 Cline Falls Airpark 18.80.040 Juniper Airpark 18.80.044 Land Use Compatibility 18.80.050 Uses Permitted Outright 18.80.054 Conditional Uses 18.80.056 Additional Requirements 18.80.058 Non-Conforming Uses 18.80.060 Variances 18.80.062 Dimensional Standards 18.80.064 Procedures 18.80.072 Water Impoundments 18.80.074 Wetland Mitigation, Creation, Enhancement And Restoration 18.80.076 Water Impoundment Notification 18.80.078 FAA Notification (Form 7460-1) 18.80 Table 1 Land Use Compatibility 18.80 Table 2 Noise Compatibility 18.80 Declaration Of Anticipated Noise 18.80.010 Purpose In any zone that is overlain by an Airport Safety Combining Zone (AS Zone), the requirements and standards of DCC 18.80.010 shall apply in addition to those specified in the ordinance for the underlying zone. If a conflict in regulations or standards occurs, the more restrictive provisions shall govern. The purpose of the AS Zone is to restrict incompatible land uses and airspace obstructions around airports in an effort to maintain an airport’s maximum benefit. The imaginary surfaces and zones; boundaries and their use limitations comprise the AS Zone. Any uses permitted outright or by conditional use in the underlying zone are allowed except as provided for in DCC 18.80.044, 18.80.050, 18.80.054, 18.80.056 and 18.80.058. The protection of each airport’s imaginary surfaces will be accomplished through the use of those


land use controls deemed necessary to protect the community it serves. Incompatible uses may include the height of trees, buildings, structures or other items and uses that would be subject to frequent aircraft over-flight or might intrude into areas used by aircraft. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.020 Application Of Provisions The provisions of DCC 18.80.020 shall only apply to unincorporated areas located under airport imaginary surfaces and zones, including approach surfaces, transitional surfaces, horizontal surfaces, conical surfaces and runway protection zones. While DCC 18.80 identifies dimensions for the entire imaginary surface and zone, parts of the surfaces and/or zones do not apply within the Redmond, Bend or Sisters Urban Growth Boundaries. The Redmond Airport is owned and operated by the City of Redmond, and located wholly within the Redmond City Limits. Imaginary surface dimensions vary for each airport covered by DCC 18.80.020. Based on the classification of each individual airport, only those portions (of the AS Zone) that overlay existing County zones are relevant. Public use airports covered by DCC 18.80.020 include Redmond Municipal, Bend Municipal, Sunriver and Sisters Eagle Air. Although it is a public-use airport, due to its size and other factors, the County treats land uses surrounding the Sisters Eagle Air Airport based on the ORS 836.608 requirements for private-use airports. The Oregon Department of Aviation is still studying what land use requirements will ultimately be applied to Sisters. However, contrary to the requirements of ORS 836.608, as will all public-use airports, federal law requires that the FAA Part 77 surfaces must be applied. The private-use airports covered by DCC 18.80.020 include Cline Falls Airpark and Juniper Airpark. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.022 Definitions A. Aircraft. Helicopters and airplanes, but not hot air balloons or ultralights. (Balloons are governed by FAR Part 30, and ultralights by FAR Part 103. Ultralights are basically unregulated by the FAA.) B. Airport. The strip of land used for taking off and landing aircraft, together with all adjacent land used in connection with the aircraft landing or taking off from the strip of land, including but not limited to land used for existing airport uses. C. Airport Direct Impact Area. The area located within 5,000 feet of an airport runway, excluding lands within the runway protection zone and approach surface. (Redmond, Bend, and Sunriver) D. Airport Elevation. The highest point of an airport's usable runway, measured in feet above mean sea level.


E. Airport Imaginary Surfaces (and zones). Imaginary areas in space and on the ground that are established in relation to the airport and its runways. For the Redmond, Bend, Sunriver and Sisters airports, the imaginary surfaces are defined by the primary surface, runway protection zone, approach surface, horizontal surface, conical surface and transitional surface. For the Cline Falls and Juniper airports, the imaginary areas are only defined by the primary surface and approach surface. F. Airport Noise Criterion. The State criterion for airport noise is an Average Day-Night Sound Level (DNL) of 55 decibels (dBA). The Airport Noise Criterion is not designed to be a standard for imposing liability or any other legal obligation except as specifically designated pursuant to OAR 340, Division 35. G. Airport Noise Impact Boundary. Areas located within 1,500 feet of an airport runway or within established noise contour boundaries exceeding 55 DNL. H. Airport Safety Combining Zone (AS Zone). A Deschutes County zone intended to place additional land use conditions on land impacted by the airport while retaining the existing underlying zone. The airport imaginary surfaces, impact areas, boundaries and their use limitations comprise the AS Zone. The AS Zone may apply to either public-use or private-use airports. I. Airport Secondary Impact Area. The area located between 5,000 and 10,000 feet from an airport runway. (Redmond, Bend, and Sunriver) J. Airport Sponsor. The owner, manager, or other person or entity designated to represent the interests of an airport. K. Airport Uses. Those uses described in OAR 660-013-0100 and 660-013-0110. L. Approach Surface. A surface longitudinally centered on the extended runway centerline and extending outward and upward from each end of the primary surface. For Redmond, Bend, Sunriver, and Sisters airports: 1. The inner edge of the approach surface is the same width as the primary surface and it expands uniformly to a width of: a. 1,250 feet for a utility runway having a visual approach; b. 1,500 feet for other than a utility runway having a visual approach; c. 2,000 feet for a utility runway having a non-precision instrument approach; d. 3,500 feet for a non-precision instrument runway, other than utility, having visibility minimums greater than threefourths statute mile; e. 4,000 feet for a non-precision instrument runway, other than utility, having visibility minimums at or below threefourths statute mile; and f. 16,000 feet for precision instrument runways.


2. The approach surface extends for a horizontal distance of a. 5,000 feet at a slope of 20 feet outward for each foot upward for all utility runways; b. 10,000 feet at a slope of 34 feet outward for each foot upward for all non-precision instrument runways, other than utility; and c. 10,000 feet at a slope of 50 feet outward for each one foot upward, with an additional 40,000 feet at slope of 40 feet outward for each one foot upward, for precision instrument runways. 3. The outer width of an approach surface will be that width prescribed in DCC 18.80.022(L)(3) for the most precise approach existing or planned for that runway end. For the Cline Falls and Juniper airports: 4. The inner edge of the approach surface is the same width as the primary surface and it expands uniformly to a width of 450 feet for that end of a private use airport with only visual approaches. The approach surface extends for a horizontal distance of 2,500 feet at a slope of 20 feet outward for each one foot upward. M. Average Day-Night Sound Level (DNL). Average day-night sound level is the FAA standard measure for determining the cumulative exposure of individuals to noise. DNL is the equivalent of noise levels produced by aircraft operations during a 24-hour period, with a ten-decibel penalty applied to the level measured during nighttime hours (10:00 p.m. to 7:00 am). N. Conical Surface. An element of the airport imaginary surfaces that extends outward and upward from the periphery of the horizontal surface at a slope of 20:1 for a horizontal distance of 4,000 feet and to a vertical height of 350 feet above the airport elevation. O. Department of Aviation. The Oregon Department of Aviation, formerly the Aeronautics Division of the Oregon Department of Transportation. P. FAA. Federal Aviation Administration. Q. FAA's Technical Representative. As used in DCC 18.80, the federal agency providing the FAA with expertise on wildlife and bird strike hazards as they relate to airports. This may include, but is not limited to, the USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services. R. FAR. Regulation issued by the FAA. S. FAR Part 77. Regulation, Part 77, “Objects Affecting Navigable Airspace,” establishes standards for determining obstructions to navigable airspace. T. Height. The highest point of a structure or tree, plant or other object of natural growth, measured from mean sea level. U. Horizontal Surface. A horizontal plane 150 feet above the established airport elevation, the perimeter of which is constructed by swinging arcs of specified radii from the center of each end of the primary surface of each runway of each airport and connecting the adjacent arcs by lines tangent to those arcs. The radius of each arc is:


1. 5,000 feet for all runways designated as utility. 2. 10,000 feet for all other runways. 3. The radius of the arc specified for each end of a runway will have the same arithmetical value. That value will be the highest determined for either end of the runway. When a 5,000-foot arc is encompassed by tangents connecting two adjacent 10,000-foot arcs, the 5,000-foot arc shall be disregarded on the construction of the perimeter of the horizontal surface. V. Non-precision Instrument Runway. A runway having an existing instrument approach procedure utilizing air navigation facilities with only horizontal guidance, or area type navigation equipment, for which a straight-in non-precision instrument approach has been approved, or planned, and for which no precision approach facilities are planned or indicated on an FAA-approved airport layout plan or other FAA planning document. W. Non-Towered Airport. An airport without an existing or approved control tower. X. Obstruction. Any structure or tree, plant or other object of natural growth that penetrates an imaginary surface. Y. Other than Utility Runway. A runway that is constructed for and intended to be used by turbine-driven aircraft or by propellerdriven aircraft exceeding 12,500 pounds gross weight. Z. Precision Instrument Runway. A runway having an existing instrument approach procedure utilizing air navigation facilities that provide both horizontal and vertical guidance, such as an Instrument Landing System (ILS) or Precision Approach Radar (PAR). It also means a runway for which a precision approach system is planned and is so indicated by an FAA-approved airport layout plan or other FAA planning document. AA. Primary Surface. A surface longitudinally centered on a runway. For the Redmond, Bend, Sunriver, and Sisters airports, when a runway has a specially prepared hard surface, the primary surface extends 200 feet beyond each end of that runway. When a runway has no specially prepared hard surface, or planned hard surface, the primary surface ends at each end of that runway. The elevation of any point on the primary surface is the same as the elevation of the nearest point on the runway centerline. The width of the primary surface is: 1. 250 feet for utility runways with only visual approaches, 2. 500 feet for utility runways having non-precision instrument approaches, 3. 500 feet for other than utility runways having non-precision instrument approaches with visibility minimums greater than three-fourths statute mile, and 4. 1,000 feet for non-precision instrument runways with visibility minimums at or below three-fourths statute mile, and for precision instrument runways. For the Cline Falls and Juniper airports, the primary surface ends at each end of a runway. The elevation of any point on the primary surface is the same as the elevation of the nearest point on the runway centerline. The width of the primary surface is 200


feet. AB. Public Assembly Facility. A permanent or temporary structure or facility, place or activity where concentrations of people gather in reasonably close quarters for purposes such as deliberation, education, worship, shopping, employment, entertainment, recreation, sporting events, or similar activities. Public assembly facilities include, but are not limited to, schools, religious institutions or assemblies, conference or convention facilities, employment and shopping centers, arenas, athletic fields, stadiums, clubhouses, museums, and similar facilities and places, but do not include parks, golf courses or similar facilities unless used in a manner where people are concentrated in reasonably close quarters. Public assembly facilities also do not include air shows, structures or uses approved by the FAA in an adopted airport master plan, or places where people congregate for short periods of time such as parking lots or bus stops. AC. Runway. A defined area on an airport prepared for landing and takeoff of aircraft along its length. AD. Runway Protection Zone (RPZ). An area off the runway end used to enhance the protection of people and property on the ground. The RPZ is trapezoidal in shape and centered about the extended runway centerline. The inner width of the RPZ is the same as the width of the primary surface. The outer width of the RPZ is a function of the type of aircraft and specified approach visibility minimum associated with the runway end. The RPZ extends from each end of the primary surface for a horizontal distance of: 1. 1,000 feet for utility runways. 2. 1,700 feet for other than utility runways having non-precision instrument approaches. 3. 2,500 feet for precision instrument runways. [NOTE: the outer width of the RPZ is specified by airport type in OAR 660, Division 13, Exhibit 4] AE. Significant. As it relates to bird strike hazards, "significant" means a level of increased flight activity by birds across an approach surface or runway that is more than incidental or occasional, considering the existing ambient level of flight activity by birds in the vicinity. AF. Structure. Any constructed or erected object, which requires a location on the ground or is attached to something located on the ground. Structures include but are not limited to buildings, decks, fences, signs, towers, cranes, flagpoles, antennas, smokestacks, earth formations and overhead transmission lines. Structures do not include paved areas. AG. Transitional Surface. Those surfaces that extend upward and outward at 90 degree angles to the runway centerline and the runway centerline extended at a slope of seven feet horizontally for each foot vertically from the sides of the primary and approach surfaces to the point of intersection with the horizontal and conical surfaces. Transitional surfaces for those portions of the precision approach surfaces which project through and beyond the limits of the conical surface, extend a distance of 5,000 feet measured horizontally from the edge of the approach surface and at a 90-degree angle to the extended runway centerline. AH. Utility Runway. A runway that is constructed for and intended to be used by propeller driven aircraft of 12,500 maximum gross weight and less. AI. Visual Runway. A runway intended solely for the operation of aircraft using visual approach procedures, where no straight-in instrument approach procedures or instrument designations have been approved or planned, or are indicated on an FAA-


approved airport layout plan or any other FAA planning document. AJ. Water Impoundment. Includes wastewater treatment settling ponds, surface mining ponds, detention and retention ponds, artificial lakes and ponds, and similar water features. A new water impoundment includes an expansion of an existing water impoundment except where such expansion was previously authorized by land use action approved prior to the effective date of this ordinance. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001 Amended by Ord. 2018-006 §10 on 11/20/2018 Amended by Ord. 2020-001 §10 on 4/21/2020

18.80.024 Imaginary Surface And Noise Impact Boundaries For the Redmond, Bend, Sunriver, and Sisters airports, the airport elevation, the airport noise impact boundary, and the location and dimensions of the runway, primary surface, runway protection zone, approach surface, horizontal surface, conical surface and transitional surface shall be delineated for each airport subject to this overlay zone and shall be made part of the official Zoning Map. All lands, waters and airspace, or portions thereof, that are located within these boundaries (including direct and secondary impact boundaries) or surfaces shall be subject to the requirements of this overlay zone. For the Cline Falls and Juniper airports, The airport elevation, the airport noise impact boundary, and the location and dimensions of the runway, primary surface and approach surface shall be delineated for each private use airport subject to this overlay zone and shall be made part of the official Zoning Map. All lands, waters and airspace, or portions thereof, that are located within these surfaces shall be subject to the requirements of this overlay zone. [ORS 836.608(2), (8); OAR 660-013-0050; OAR 660-013-0070(1)(b); OAR 660-0130155(2)] [ORS 836.619; OAR 660-013-0040(8); OAR 660-013-0070(1)] HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.026 Notice Of Land Use And Permit Applications Except as otherwise provided herein, written notice of applications for land use or limited land use decisions, including comprehensive plan or zoning amendments, in an area within this overlay zone, shall be provided to the airport sponsor and the Department of Aviation in the same manner as notice is provided to property owners entitled by law to written notice of land use or limited land use applications. [ORS 836.623(1); OAR 738-100-010; ORS 215.416(6); ORS 227.175(6)] For the Redmond, Bend, Sunriver, and Sisters airports: A. Notice shall be provided to the airport sponsor and the Department of Aviation when the property, or a portion thereof, that is subject to the land use or limited land use application is located within 10,000 feet of the sides or ends of a runway:


B. Notice of land use and limited land use applications shall be provided within the following timelines. 1. Notice of land use or limited land use applications involving public hearings shall be provided prior to the public hearing at the same time that written notice of such applications is provided to property owners entitled to such notice. 2. Notice of land use or limited land use applications not involving public hearings shall be provided at least 20 days prior to entry of the initial decision on the land use or limited land use application. 3. Notice of the decision on a land use or limited land use application shall be provided to the airport sponsor and the Department of Aviation within the same timelines that such notice is provided to parties to a land use or limited land use proceeding. 4. Notices required under DCC 18.80.026(B)(1-3) need not be provided to the airport sponsor or the Department of Aviation where the land use or limited land use application meets all of the following criteria: a. Would only allow structures of less than 35 feet in height; b. Involves property located entirely outside the approach surface; c. Does not involve industrial, mining or similar uses that emit smoke, dust or steam; land disposal sites or water impoundments; or radio, radiotelephone, television or similar transmission facilities or electrical transmission lines; and d. Does not involve wetland mitigation, enhancement, restoration or creation. For the Cline Falls and Juniper airports: C. Written notice of applications for land use or limited land use decisions, including comprehensive plan or zoning amendments, shall be provided to the airport sponsor and the Department of Aviation in the same manner and within the same timelines as notice is provided to property owners entitled by law to written notice of land use or limited land use applications. Where the application does not involve a public hearing, such notice shall be provided at least 20 days prior to entry of the initial decision on the land use or limited land use application. [ORS 215.416(6); ORS 227.175(6); OAR 738-100-010] D. Notice of the decision on a land use or limited land use application shall be provided to the airport sponsor and the Department of Aviation within the same timelines that such notice is provided to parties to a land use or limited land use proceeding. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001 Amended by Ord. 2023-001 §12 on 5/30/2023

18.80.028 Height Limitations All uses permitted by the underlying zone shall comply with the height limitations in DCC 18.80.028. When height limitations of the underlying zone are more restrictive than those of this overlay zone, the underlying zone height limitations shall control. [ORS 836.619;


OAR 660-013-0070] A. Except as provided in DCC 18.80.028(B) and (C), no structure or tree, plant or other object of natural growth shall penetrate an airport imaginary surface. [ORS 836.619; OAR 660-013-0070(1)] B. For areas within airport imaginary surfaces but outside the approach and transition surfaces, where the terrain is at higher elevations than the airport runway surfaces such that existing structures and permitted development penetrate or would penetrate the airport imaginary surfaces, a local government may authorize structures up to 35 feet in height. C. Other height exceptions or variances may be permitted when supported in writing by the airport sponsor, the Department of Aviation and the FAA. Applications for height variances shall follow the procedures for other variances and shall be subject to such conditions and terms as recommended by the Department of Aviation and the FAA (for Redmond, Bend and Sunriver.) HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.030 Redmond Municipal Airport The Redmond Municipal Airport is a Category 1, Commercial Service Airport. Its function is to accommodate scheduled major/national or regional commuter commercial air carrier service. The two approximately 7,040' long by 100’-150' wide, “other than utility” paved runways are located at an elevation of 3,077’. The proposed extension to runway 4-22 and the planned new parallel runway are both identified on the FAA-adopted Airport Layout Plan. Therefore, these improvements are used in the layout of the Airport Safety Combining Zone. The same safety zone dimensional standards used for Runway 4-22 will also apply to the planned parallel runway. A. Primary Surface - For Redmond, the primary surfaces are 1,000' wide by 7,440' long for Runway 10-28, 1,000’ wide by 9,100’ long for Runway 4-22, and 1,000’ wide by 7,400’ long for the proposed new parallel runway. B. Runway Protection Zone (RPZ) - Two different RPZs apply to the Redmond Airport because it has a total of three potential runways with two possible approaches. Runway 4-22 and the planned parallel runway will both have precision approaches. Runway 10-28 has a non-precision approach on each end. The precision RPZ forms a 1,000' wide by 2,500' long by 1,750' wide trapezoid while the non-precision RPZ forms a 500' wide by 1,700' long by 1,010' wide trapezoid. C. Approach Surface - The current ILS precision approach surface to runway 22, and the planned precision approaches to Runway 4 and future parallel runway 4-22, are 1,000' wide by 50,000' long by 16,000' wide, with an upward approach slope ratio of 50:1(one foot vertical for each 50 feet horizontal) for the first 10,000’, then a slope ratio of 40:1 for the remaining 40,000’. The non-precision approach surface is 500' wide by 10,000' long by 3,500' wide, with an upward approach slope ratio of 34:1. D. Horizontal Surface - The surface boundary is comprised of connected arcs drawn 10,000 feet outward and centered on the ends of the primary surface. The elevation of the horizontal surface for the Redmond Airport is 3,227 feet. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979


Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.032 Bend Municipal Airport Bend Municipal Airport is a Category 2, Business or High Activity General Aviation Airport. The 5,005 long by 75’ wide paved runway is located at an elevation is 3,453’. Imaginary surface dimensions for the Bend Airport are based on planned improved operational characteristics, and an upgrade from a “utility” to “other than utility” runway, but do not reflect any planned extension to the existing runway. A. Primary Surface - For Bend, the primary surface is 500' wide by 5,405' long. B. Runway Protection Zone (RPZ) –Both Runway #16 and #34 have, or are proposed to have non-precision approaches. Both RPZs begin 200-feet off the ends of the runway. The non-precision RPZs form 500' wide by 1,700' long by 1,010' wide trapezoids. C. Approach Surface - The non-precision approach surfaces are 500' wide by 10,000' long by 3,500' wide, with an upward approach slope ratio of 34:1(one-foot vertical for each 34 feet horizontal). D. Horizontal Surface - The surface boundary is comprised of connected arcs drawn 10,000 feet outward and centered on the ends of the primary surface. The height of the horizontal surface for the Bend Airport is 3,603 feet. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.034 Sunriver Airport The Sunriver Airport is a Category 4, Community General Aviation Airport. It is privately owned and open to the public. The 5,500' long by 65' wide paved runway is located at an elevation of 4,155’. The Sunriver Airport imaginary surfaces are based on the existing “utility” runway, not any planned improvements or airport upgrades. If and when planned airport improvements are identified through a master planning process, the County will have the option of adjusting the boundaries of the imaginary surfaces to reflect any planned changes. A. Primary Surface - For Sunriver, the primary surface is 500' wide by 5,900' long. B. Runway Protection Zone (RPZ) - The Sunriver Airport has two different approaches. Runway #18 has a non-precision approach, while Runway #36 has a visual approach. The non-precision RPZ forms a 500' wide by 1,700' long by 1,010' wide trapezoid. The visual RPZ is 500’ wide by 1,000’ long by 700’ wide. C. Approach Surface – The non-precision approach surface is 500' wide by 5,000' long by 2,000' wide, with an upward approach slope ratio of 20:1(one-foot vertical for each 20 feet horizontal). The visual approach is 500’ wide by 5,000’ long by 1,500 wide at the same 20:1 slope ratio.


D. Horizontal Surface - The surface boundary is comprised of connected arcs drawn 5,000 feet outward and centered on the ends of the primary surface. The elevation of the horizontal surface for the Sunriver Airport is 4,305 feet. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.036 Sisters Eagle Air Airport The Sisters Eagle Air Airport is a Category 4, Community General Aviation Airport. It is privately owned and open to the public. The 3,550' long by 50' wide paved runway is located at an elevation of 3,165’. A. Primary Surface - For Sisters, the primary surface is 250' wide by 3,950' long. B. Runway Protection Zone (RPZ) - The Sisters Airport has two similar visual approaches. The visual RPZ is 250’ wide by 1,000’ long by 700’ wide. C. Approach Surface – The visual approach surfaces are 250' wide by 5,000' long by 1,250' wide, with an upward approach slope ratio of 20:1(one-foot vertical for each 20 feet horizontal. D. Horizontal Surface - The surface boundary is comprised of connected arcs drawn 5,000 feet outward and centered on the ends of the primary surface. The elevation of the horizontal surface for the Sisters Airport is 3,315 feet. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.038 Cline Falls Airpark The Cline Falls Airpark is classified by the state as a privately owned, private-use airport that was the base for three or more aircraft as of December 31, 1994. Located at an elevation or 2,920’, the single dirt/turf runway is 3,000’ long by 100’ wide. A. Primary Surface - The primary surface is 200' wide by 3,000' long. B. Approach Surface - The dimensions of the visual approach surfaces are 200' wide by 2,500' long by 450' wide, with an upward approach slope ratio of 20:1 (one-foot vertical for each 20 feet horizontal). HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001


18.80.040 Juniper Airpark The Juniper Airpark is classified by the state as a privately owned, private-use airport that was the base for three or more aircraft as of December 31, 1994. Located at an elevation or 3,490’, the single turf runway is 2,640’ long by 100’ wide. A. Primary Surface - The primary surface is 200' wide by 2,640' long. B. Approach Surface - The dimensions of the visual approach surfaces are 250' wide by 2,500' long by 450' wide, with an upward approach slope ratio of 20:1 (one-foot vertical for each 20 feet horizontal). HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.044 Land Use Compatibility Applications for land use or building permits for properties within the boundaries of this overlay zone shall comply with the requirements of DCC 18.80 as provided herein. When compatibility issues arise, the Planning Director or Hearings Body is required to take actions that eliminate or minimize the incompatibility by choosing the most compatible location or design for the boundary or use. Where compatibility issues persist, despite actions or conditions intended to eliminate or minimize the incompatibility, the Planning Director or Hearings Body may disallow the use or expansion, except where the action results in loss of current operational levels and/or the ability of the airport to grow to meet future community needs. Reasonable conditions to protect the public safety may be imposed by the Planning Director or Hearings Body. [ORS 836.619; ORS 836.623(1); OAR 660-013-0080] A. Noise. Within airport noise impact boundaries, land uses shall be established consistent with the levels identified in OAR 660, Division 13, Exhibit 5 (Table 2 of DCC 18.80). Applicants for any subdivision or partition approval or other land use approval or building permit affecting land within airport noise impact boundaries, shall sign and record in the Deschutes County Book of Records, a Declaration of Anticipated Noise declaring that the applicant and his successors will not now, or in the future complain about the allowed airport activities at the adjacent airport. In areas where the noise level is anticipated to be at or above 55 DNL, prior to issuance of a building permit for construction of a noise sensitive land use (real property normally used for sleeping or as a school, religious institutions or assemblies, hospital, public library or similar use), the permit applicant shall be required to demonstrate that a noise abatement strategy will be incorporated into the building design that will achieve an indoor noise level equal to or less than 55 DNL. [NOTE: FAA Order 5100.38D provides that interior noise levels should not exceed 45 decibels in all habitable zones.] B. Outdoor lighting. No new or expanded industrial, commercial or recreational use shall project lighting directly onto an existing runway or taxiway or into existing airport approach surfaces except where necessary for safe and convenient air travel. Lighting for these uses shall incorporate shielding in their designs to reflect light away from airport approach surfaces. No use shall imitate airport lighting or impede the ability of pilots to distinguish between airport lighting and other lighting. C. Glare. No glare producing material, including but not limited to unpainted metal or reflective glass, shall be used on the exterior of structures located within an approach surface or on nearby lands where glare could impede a pilot's vision.


D. Industrial emissions. No new industrial, mining or similar use, or expansion of an existing industrial, mining or similar use, shall, as part of its regular operations, cause emissions of smoke, dust or steam that could obscure visibility within airport approach surfaces, except upon demonstration, supported by substantial evidence, that mitigation measures imposed as approval conditions will reduce the potential for safety risk or incompatibility with airport operations to an insignificant level. The review authority shall impose such conditions as necessary to ensure that the use does not obscure visibility. E. Communications Facilities and Electrical Interference. No use shall cause or create electrical interference with navigational signals or radio communications between an airport and aircraft. Proposals for the location of new or expanded radio, radiotelephone, and television transmission facilities and electrical transmission lines within this overlay zone shall be coordinated with the Department of Aviation and the FAA prior to approval. Approval of cellular and other telephone or radio communication towers on leased property located within airport imaginary surfaces shall be conditioned to require their removal within 90 days following the expiration of the lease agreement. A bond or other security shall be required to ensure this result. F. Limitations and Restrictions on Allowed Uses in the RPZ, Transitional Surface, Approach Surface, and Airport Direct and Secondary Impact Areas. For the Redmond, Bend, Sunriver, and Sisters airports, the land uses identified in DCC 18.80 Table 1, and their accessory uses, are permitted, permitted under limited circumstances, or prohibited in the manner therein described. In the event of conflict with the underlying zone, the more restrictive provisions shall control. As used in DCC 18.80.044, a limited use means a use that is allowed subject to special standards specific to that use. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001 Amended by Ord. 2018-006 §10 on 11/20/2018 Amended by Ord. 2020-001 §10 on 4/21/2020 Amended by Ord. 2020-007 §12 on 10/27/2020 Amended by Ord. 2021-013 §10 on 4/5/2022

18.80.050 Uses Permitted Outright Any uses permitted outright in the underlying zone with which the AS Zone is combined shall be allowed except as provided in DCC 18.80.044. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.054 Conditional Uses Uses permitted conditionally shall be those identified as conditional uses in the underlying zone with which the AS Zone is combined, and shall be subject to all conditions of the underlying zone except as provided in DCC 18.80.044.


HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.056 Additional Requirements As a condition of approval of any conditional use proposed within any AS Zone, the Planning Director or Hearings Body may require: A. An increase in required setbacks. B. Additional off-street parking and loading facilities and building standards. C. Limitations on signs or lighting, hours of operation, points of ingress and egress and building heights. D. Additional landscaping, screening and other improvements. E. Use of glare-resistant materials in construction or other methods likely to reduce operating hazards. F. Other conditions considered necessary to achieve compliance and policies of the comprehensive plan. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Amended by Ord. 80-221 §1 on 1/7/1980 Amended by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.058 Non-Conforming Uses A. These regulations shall not be construed to require the removal, lowering or alteration of any structure not conforming to these regulations. These regulations shall not require any change in the construction, alteration or intended use of any structure, the construction or alteration of which was begun prior to the effective date of this overlay zone. B. Notwithstanding DCC 18.80.058(A), the owner of any existing structure that has an adverse effect on air navigational safety as determined by the Department of Aviation shall install or allow the installation of obstruction markers as deemed necessary by the Department of Aviation, so that the structures become more visible to pilots. C. No land use or limited land use approval or other permit shall be granted that would allow a nonconforming use or structure to become a greater hazard to air navigation than it was on the effective date of this overlay zone. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.060 Variances


A. Any person desiring to erect or increase the height of any structure, or use not in accordance with provisions prescribed in DCC 18.80 may apply for a variance. B. Application for Variance must be accompanied by a determination from the Oregon Department of Aviation and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) as to the effect of the proposal on the safe and efficient use of navigable airspace. C. Any variance granted may be conditioned as to require the owner of the structure to install, operate and maintain obstruction markers, at the owner’s expense. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.062 Dimensional Standards A. Minimum lot size and setbacks shall be those indicated in the underlying zone with which the AS Zone is combined. B. Where an area is covered by more than one height limitation, the more restrictive shall prevail. C. The airport owners, or their agents, shall be permitted at mutually agreed upon times to enter onto private property to reduce the height of trees that exceed the height limitations herein established. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.064 Procedures An applicant seeking a land use or limited land use approval in an area within this overlay zone shall provide the following information in addition to any other information required in the permit application: A. A map or drawing showing the location of the property in relation to the airport imaginary surfaces. The Community Development Department shall provide the applicant with appropriate base maps upon which to locate the property. B. Elevation profiles and a site plan, both drawn to scale, including the location and height of all existing and proposed structures, measured in feet above mean sea level. And, additionally, if a height variance is requested: C. Letters of support from the airport sponsor, the Department of Aviation and for Redmond, Bend and Sunriver Airports, the FAA as well. The letter(s) shall include specific references to the particular variance and findings for approval.


HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 §1 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.072 Water Impoundments Any use or activity that would result in the establishment or expansion of a water impoundment shall comply with the requirements of DCC 18.80.072. (ORS 836.623(2); OAR 660-013-0080(1)(f)] A. No new or expanded water impoundments of one-quarter acre in size or larger are permitted: 1. Within an approach surface and within 5,000 feet from the end of a runway; or 2. On land owned by the airport sponsor that is necessary for airport operations. B. New or expanded water impoundments of one-quarter acre in size or larger are permitted: 1. Within 10,000 feet from the end or edge of a runway (outside an approach surface), or 2. Between 5,000 feet and 40,000 feet within an approach surface for an airport with a precision instrument approach, unless Deschutes County first adopts findings of fact, supported by substantial evidence in the record, that the impoundments are likely to result in a significant increase in hazardous movements of birds feeding, watering or roosting in areas across the runways or approach corridors. [NOTE: FAA Part 77 discourages water impoundments within 50,000 feet of a runway, within an approach surface.] [ORS 836.623(2)(c); OAR 660, Division 13, Exhibit 1, Section 3(b)(C)] C. Process. An application for approval of a new water impoundment shall be considered utilizing the review process applied to applications for conditional use permits. In addition to the parties required by law to be mailed written notice of the public hearing on the application, written notice of the hearing shall be mailed to the airport sponsor, the Seattle Airports District Office of the FAA, the FAA's technical representative, and the Oregon Department of Aviation. 1. Prior to filing its application, the applicant shall coordinate with the airport sponsor, the Department of Aviation, and the FAA (Seattle Airports District Office) and FAA's technical representative regarding the proposed water impoundment, its short and long term potential to significantly increase hazardous movements of birds feeding, watering or roosting in areas across runways or approach surfaces, and proposed mitigation. a. For water impoundments individually or cumulatively exceeding five acres in size on the subject property, the applicant shall prepare a draft bird strike study as provided in DCC 18.80.072(C)(1)(a). The airport sponsor, the Department of Aviation, and the FAA and FAA's technical representative shall have 45 days to review the study draft. Their comments shall be included and addressed in a final bird strike study.


b. For water impoundments that do not individually or cumulatively exceed five acres in size on the subject property, the bird strike study requirements in DCC 18.80.072(B)(2) may be reduced or waived upon agreement by the airport sponsor, the Department of Aviation, and the FAA and FAA's technical representative if the applicant can demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the airport sponsor, the Department of Aviation, and the FAA and FAA's technical representative that the proposed water impoundment, with appropriate short and long term mitigation, will not result in a significant increase in hazardous movements of birds feeding, watering or roosting in areas across runways or approach surfaces. As used herein, "appropriate mitigation" means small-scale measures of proven reliability that can be applied in perpetuity and that the applicant has the financial resources to support. c. An application shall not be deemed complete for land use review purposes until the applicant has filed with the Director the final bird strike study addressing comments from the airport sponsor, the Department of Aviation, and the FAA and FAA's technical representative. When no bird strike study is required, the application shall not be deemed complete until the applicant has filed with the Director correspondence or other proof demonstrating agreement among the airport sponsor, the Department of Aviation, and the FAA and FAA's technical representative that no bird strike study is required. 2. Bird Strike Study. A bird strike study required under DCC 18.80.072 shall contain at least the following information: a. A description of the proposed project, its location in relation to the airport, and the bird strike study area, which shall include at least the project site, the airport property, all lands within 10,000 feet from the end or edge of the airport runway, and other surrounding habitat areas which form the local bird ecosystem. b. A description of bird feeding, watering and roosting habitats in the bird strike study area, including discussion of feeding behavior and food sources and identification of loafing, watering, roosting and nesting area locations. c. A description of existing and planned airport operations and air traffic patterns and any available history of bird strike incidents. d. Wildlife surveys and documentation of existing bird species, populations, activities and flight patterns in the bird strike study area. The surveys shall address bird species and their composition; bird population estimates and densities per unit area; feeding behavior; food sources; seasonal use patterns; frequency of occurrence; location of loafing, roosting and nesting areas; and analysis of the relation of bird flight movements to airport traffic patterns and navigational safety. The airport sponsor shall provide approach and departure air space information up to five statutory miles from the airport. e. An evaluation of the anticipated effects of the proposal on the population density, behavior patterns, movements and species composition of birds within the bird strike study area and of the impact of these effects on air navigation and safety considering possible mitigation. f. Identification and evaluation of proposed and alternative short and long term mitigation measures that would prevent a significant increase in hazardous movements of birds feeding, watering or roosting in areas across runways and approach surfaces that otherwise might result from the proposed use. The evaluation shall discuss the proven reliability of proposed measures, their effectiveness over both the short and long term, their costs, and


the applicant's financial ability to assure their perpetual implementation, i.e. ongoing implementation for as long as a potential bird strike hazard persists. g. Such other information as is recommended by the FAA's technical representative or is required to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of DCC 18.80.072(C)(3). 3. Required Findings. The determination whether a proposed new water impoundment, with reasonable and practicable mitigation measures, is likely to significantly increase hazardous movements of birds feeding, watering or roosting in areas across runways or approach surfaces shall be based upon the proposal's potential, both in the short term and in the long term, to significantly increase bird strike hazards to air navigation, and the appropriateness, effectiveness and affordability of proposed mitigation measures or other conditions needed to reduce bird strike hazards. In determining compliance with this standard, the findings shall address each of the following factors: a. The demonstrated overall effectiveness and reliability of proposed measures and conditions, in both the short and long term and under similar circumstances and conditions, to avoid a significant increase in bird strike hazards to air navigation. Experimental measures or measures not based on accepted technology and industry practices shall be considered ineffective, inappropriate and of unproven reliability. b. The economic, social and environmental impacts of proposed measures to the neighboring community and the affected natural environment. c. The applicant's ability to pay for necessary short and long-term mitigation measures, including fallback measures that may be required if initially proposed mitigation measures prove ineffective, and to assure the perpetual implementation of those measures for as long as a potential bird strike hazard persists. An applicant's failure to demonstrate its financial ability to assure the perpetual implementation of necessary and appropriate measures shall render those measures unreasonable and impracticable for purposes of the application. d. The applicant's ability to accurately monitor the effectiveness of mitigation over time. e. The potential impacts to navigational safety and air travel if the applicant cannot perform necessary mitigation measures or maintain those measures in perpetuity, or if those measures prove to be ineffective at avoiding a significant increase in bird strike hazards to air navigation. f. The applicant's reclamation plan. 4. Mitigation Measures and Approval Conditions. A decision approving an application shall require, as conditions of approval, all measures and conditions deemed appropriate and necessary to prevent in perpetuity a significant increase in hazardous movements of birds feeding, watering or roosting in areas across runways and approach surfaces. a. Only customary measures based on accepted technology and industry practice may be considered and imposed as approval conditions. b. Serious consideration shall be given to all measures and conditions recommended by the Department of Aviation and the FAA and FAA's technical representative. Generally, such measures and conditions shall be attached to a decision approving an application unless findings are adopted, supported by substantial evidence, demonstrating


why such measures and conditions are not necessary to reduce bird hazard impacts resulting from the water impoundment to an insignificant level. c. A decision to approve shall require from the applicant a performance bond or other form of secure financial support. Such bond or security shall be in an amount sufficient to assure perpetual implementation of appropriate and necessary mitigation measures for as long as a potential bird strike hazard persists. d. A decision to approve shall require appropriate monitoring of the effectiveness of mitigation over time. Upon request, monitoring data and reports shall be made available to the airport sponsor, the Department of Aviation, and the FAA and FAA's technical representative. The decision shall allow for modifications to approval conditions should existing mitigation measures prove ineffective at preventing a significant increase in hazardous movements of birds feeding, watering or roosting in areas across runways and approach surfaces. Modifications to approval conditions shall be considered utilizing the review process applied to applications for conditional use permits. 5. Exemptions. The requirements of DCC 18.80.072 shall not apply to: a. Storm water management basins established by an airport identified under ORS 836.610(1). b. Seaplane landing areas within airports identified under ORS 836.610(1). c. Lands owned or managed by Sunriver Resort, Crosswater and their affiliates.

HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.074 Wetland Mitigation, Creation, Enhancement And Restoration A. Notwithstanding the requirements of DCC 18.80.072, wetland mitigation, creation, enhancement or restoration projects located within areas regulated under DCC 18.080.072 shall be allowed upon demonstration of compliance with this requirements of DCC 18.80.074. B. Wetland mitigation, creation, enhancement or restoration projects existing or approved on the effective date of this ordinance and located within areas regulated under DCC 18.80.072 are recognized as lawfully existing uses. C. To help avoid increasing safety hazards to air navigation near public use airports, the establishment of wetland mitigation banks in the vicinity of such airports but outside approach surfaces the areas regulated under DCC 18.80.072 is encouraged. D. Applications to expand wetland mitigation projects in existence as of the effective date of this ordinance, and new wetland mitigation projects, that are proposed within areas regulated under DCC 18.80.072 shall be considered utilizing the review process applied to applications for conditional use permits and shall be permitted upon demonstration that:


1. The affected wetlands provide unique ecological functions, such as critical habitat for threatened or endangered species or ground water discharge, and it is not practicable to provide the mitigation off-site; and 2. The wetland creation, enhancement or restoration is designed and will be maintained in perpetuity in a manner that will not increase hazardous movements of birds feeding, watering or roosting in areas across runways or approach surfaces. E. Wetland mitigation permitted under DCC 18.80.074(D) shall be designed and located to avoid creating a wildlife hazard or increasing hazardous movements of birds across runways or approach surfaces. F. Proposals for new or expanded wetland mitigation, creation, enhancement or restoration projects regulated under DCC 18.80.074 shall be coordinated with the airport sponsor, the Department of Aviation, the FAA and FAA's technical representative, the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife (ODFW), the Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL), the US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as part of the permit application. G. Exemptions. The requirements of DCC 18.80.74 shall not apply to activities related to the management or modification of golf courses owned or managed by Sunriver Resort, Crosswater and their affiliates. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.076 Water Impoundment Notification A. Deschutes County shall provide notice to the Oregon Department of Aviation when it, or its designee, receives an application for a comprehensive plan amendment, zone change or permit as defined in ORS 215.402 or 227.160 that, if approved, would result in a water impoundment larger than one-quarter acre within 10,000 feet of the Redmond, Bend, Sunriver or Sisters Airports. B. A final determination regarding a new water impoundment described in ORS 836.623 shall be made by local governments as provided in ORS 836.623. HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001

18.80.078 FAA Notification (Form 7460-1) A. Federal and State Notice. Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 77 requires that anyone proposing to construct anything which may obstruct the use of airspace by aircraft to provide a notice to that effect to the FAA. In addition, OAR 738.070.0060 requires notice also be sent to the Oregon Department of Aviation. Generally, construction proposals in the vicinity of airports may obstruct airspace. Notice to the


FAA and Oregon Department of Aviation is required for anything which may affect landing areas, either existing or planned, which are open to the public, or are operated by one of the armed forces. B. FAA Form 7460-1 "Notice of Proposed Construction or Alteration" is the notification form. It is to be submitted by the applicant directly to the FAA and Oregon Department of Aviation. Forms are available from the Oregon Department of Aviation or the Northwest Regional Office of the FAA. C. FAA Form 7460-1 should be submitted if the proposed construction or alteration meets the following criteria: 1. Anything over 200' AGL (above ground level at the site). 2. Proposals in the vicinity of an airport, if the proposal would be higher than a slope from the nearest point on a runway and increasing its elevation at a ratio of: Longest Runway

Proximity to Runway

Slope

> 3,200’

Within 20,000’

100 to 1

3,200’ or less

Within 10,000’

50 to 1

For a Heliport

Within 5,000’

25 to 1

D. For identification purposes, Deschutes County has established FAA Notification Areas around each of the public use airports within Deschutes County. The boundaries of these areas are based on the runway length. If a proposed construction project is located in one of these areas, the applicant shall determine if the height of the proposed project will require FAA notification as per DCC 18.80.076(C). In Deschutes County, each of the public-use airports has a runway longer than 3,200 feet. Therefore, each FAA notification area includes all land within 20,000 feet of each airport’s runway(s), and the slope to be used is 100 to 1. E. FAA notification is NOT required for any of the following construction or alteration: 1. Any object that would be shielded by existing structures of a permanent and substantial character or by natural terrain or topographic features of equal or greater height, and would be located in the congested area of a city, town, or settlement where it is evident beyond all reasonable doubt that the structure so shielded will not adversely affect safety in air navigation. 2. Any antenna structure of 20 feet or less in height except one that would increase the height of another antenna structure. 3. Any air navigation facility, airport visual approach or landing aid, aircraft arresting device, or meteorological device, of a type approved by the Administrator, or an appropriate military service on military airports, the location and height of which is fixed by its functional purpose. 4. Any construction or alteration for which notice is required by any other FAA regulation.


HISTORY Adopted by Ord. PL-15 on 11/1/1979 Repealed & Reenacted by Ord. 91-020 §1 on 5/29/1991 Amended by Ord. 2001-001 §2 on 1/22/2001 Amended by Ord. 2014-009 §2 on 8/6/2014

18.80 Table 1 Land Use Compatibility

Location: Use:

RPZ(1) Transitional Surface Approach Surface(8) Direct Impact Area Secondary Impact Area

Public Airport

L(2)

P

L(9)

P

P

Residential

N

N

L(10)

P

P

Commercial

N

L(14)

L(9)

P

P

Industrial

N

P

L(9)

P

P

Institutional

N

L(14)

L(9)

P

P

Farm Use

P(3)

P(3)

P(3)

P(3)

P(3)

Road/Parking

L(4)

P

P

P

P

Utility

L(5)

L(5)

L(5)

L(5)

L(5)

Parks/Open Space

L(6)

P

P

P

P

Golf Course (17)

L(7)

L(7)

L(7,9)

L(7)

L(7)

Athletic Field

N

N

L(9)

P

P

Land Disposal Site

N

N

N

N

N(16)

Waste Water Treatment Plant

N

N

N

N

L(15)

Mining

N

N

L(11)

L(11)

L(11)

Water Impoundment

N

N

N,L(12)

L(12)

L(12)

N

L(13)

L(13)

L(13)

Wetland Mitigation


Key to Table: P = Use is Permitted. L = Use is Allowed Under Limited Circumstances (see notes). N = Use is Not Allowed. Numbers in parentheses refer to notes on next page. Notes for Table 1: 1. No structures shall be allowed within the Runway Protection Zone. Exceptions shall be made only for structures accessory to airport operations whose location within the RPZ has been approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. 2. In the RPZ, public airport uses are restricted to those uses and facilities that require location in the RPZ. 3. Farming practices that minimize wildlife attractants are encouraged. 4. Roads and parking areas are permitted in the RPZ only upon demonstration that there are no practicable alternatives. Lights, guardrails and related accessory structures are prohibited. Cost may be considered in determining whether practicable alternatives exist. 5. In the RPZ, utilities, power lines and pipelines must be underground. In approach surfaces and in airport direct and secondary impact areas, the proposed height of utilities shall be coordinated with the airport sponsor and the Department of Aviation. 6. Public assembly facilities are prohibited within the RPZ. 7. Golf courses may be permitted only upon demonstration, supported by substantial evidence, that management techniques will be utilized to reduce existing wildlife attractants and avoid the creation of new wildlife attractants. Such techniques shall be required as conditions of approval. Structures are not permitted within the RPZ. For purposes of DCC 18.80, tee markers, tee signs, pin cups and pins are not considered to be structures. 8. Within 10,000 feet from the end of the primary surface of a non-precision instrument runway, and within 50,000 feet from the end of the primary surface of a precision instrument runway. 9. Public assembly facilities may be allowed in an approach surface only if the potential danger to public safety is minimal. In determining whether a proposed use is appropriate, consideration shall be given to: proximity to the RPZ; density of people per acre; frequency of use; level of activity at the airport; and other factors relevant to public safety. In general, high-density uses should not be permitted within airport approach surfaces, and non-residential structures should be located outside approach surfaces unless no practicable alternatives exist. 10. Residential densities within approach surfaces should not exceed the following densities: (1) within 500 feet of the outer edge of the RPZ, 1 unit/acre; (2) within 500 to 1,500 feet of the outer edge of the RPZ, 2 units/acre; (3) within 1,500 to 3,000 feet of the outer edge of the RPZ, 4 units/acre. 11. Mining operations involving the creation or expansion of water impoundments shall comply with the requirements of DCC 18.80 regulating water impoundments. 12. See DCC 18.80.072 regulating water impoundments. 13. See requirements in DCC 18.80.074. 14. Overnight accommodations, such as hotels, motels, hospitals and dormitories, are not permitted. 15. Due to land availability constraints, limited wastewater treatment plants within the Secondary Impact Area are permitted on lands owned or managed by the Sunriver Resort or Sunriver utilities.


16. Organic composting facility is permitted. 17. Since Sunriver Resort owns and controls the Sunriver Airport, golf courses operated as part of the Sunriver Resort, Crosswater and their affiliates are exempted.

18.80 Table 2 Noise Compatibility Yearly Day-Night Average Sound Levels (DNL) in decibels Land Uses

Below 65

65-70

70-75

75-80

80-85

Over 85

Residential, other than mobile homes and transient lodgings

Y

N(1)

N(1)

N

N

N

Mobile home parks

Y

N

N

N

N

N

Transient lodgings

Y

N(1)

N(1)

N(1)

N

N

Schools

Y

N(1)

N(1)

N

N

N

Hospitals and nursing homes

Y

25

30

N

N

N

Religious institutions or assemblies, auditoriums, and concert halls

Y

25

30

N

N

N

Governmental services

Y

Y

25

30

N

N

Transportation

Y

Y

Y(2)

Y(3)

Y(4)

Y(4)

Parking

Y

Y

Y(2)

Y(3)

Y(4)

N

Offices, business and professional

Y

Y

25

30

N

N

Wholesale and retail—building materials, Hardware and farm equipment

Y

Y

Y(2)

Y(3)

Y(4)

N

Retail trade—general

Y

Y

25

30

N

N

Utilities

Y

Y

Y(2)

Y(3)

Y(4)

N

Communication

Y

Y

25

30

N

N

Manufacturing general

Y

Y

Y(2)

Y(3)

Y(4)

N

Photographic and optical

Y

Y

25

30

N

N

Residential

Public Use

Commercial Use

Manufacturing and Production


Agriculture (except livestock) and forestry

Y

Y(6)

Y(7)

Y(8)

Y(8)

Y(8)

Livestock farming and breeding

Y

Y(6)

Y(7)

N

N

N

Mining and fishing, resource production and extraction

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Outdoor sports arenas and spectator sports

Y

Y(5)

Y(5)

N

N

N

Outdoor music shells, amphitheaters

Y

N

N

N

N

N

Nature exhibits and zoos

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Amusements, parks, resorts and camps

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Golf courses, riding stables and water recreation

Y

Y

25

30

N

N

Recreational

Numbers in parentheses refer to notes. *The designations contained in this table do not constitute a Federal determination that any use of land covered by the program is acceptable or unacceptable under Federal, State, or local law. The responsibility for determining the acceptable and permissible land uses and the relationship between specific properties and specific noise contours rests with the local authorities. FAA determinations under Part 150 are not intended to substitute federally determined land uses for those determined to be appropriate by local authorities in response to locally determined needs and values in achieving noise compatible land uses. Key to Table: SLUCM = Standard Land Use Coding Manual. Y (Yes) = Land Use and related structures compatible without restrictions. N (No) = Land Use and related structures are not compatible and should be prohibited. NLR = Noise Level Reduction (outdoor to indoor) to be achieved through incorporation of noise attenuation into the design and construction of the structure. 25, 30, or 35 = Land use and related structures generally compatible; measures to achieve NLR of 25, 30, or 35 dB must be incorporated into design and construction of structure. Notes for Table 2: 1. Where the community determines that residential or school uses must be allowed, measures to achieve outdoor to indoor Noise Level Reduction (NLR) of at least 25 dB and 30 dB should be incorporated into building codes and be considered in individual approvals. Normal residential construction can be expected to provide a NLR of 20 dB, thus, the reduction requirements are often stated as 5, 10 or 15 dB over standard construction and normally assume mechanical ventilation and


closed windows year round. However, the use of NLR criteria will not eliminate outdoor noise problems. 2. Measures to achieve NLR 25 dB must be incorporated into the design and construction of portions of these buildings where the public is received, office areas, noise sensitive areas or where the normal noise level is low. 3. Measures to achieve NLR of 30 dB must be incorporated into the design and construction of portions of these buildings where the public is received, office areas, noise sensitive areas or where the normal noise level is low. 4. Measures to achieve NLR 35 dB must be incorporated into the design and construction of portions of these buildings where the public is received, office areas, noise sensitive areas or where the normal level is low. 5. Land use compatible provided special sound reinforcement systems are installed. 6. Residential buildings require an NLR of 25. 7. Residential buildings require an NLR of 30. 8. Residential buildings not permitted.

18.80 Declaration Of Anticipated Noise As a condition of the grant of development approval pursuant to DCC 18.80, the undersigned, hereinafter referred to as Grantor hereby covenants and agrees that it shall not, by reason of their ownership or occupation of the following described real property, protest or bring suit or action against the _________________ [Name of Airport] or Deschutes County, for aviation-related noise, including property damage or personal injury from said noise connected when such activities conform to: 1. Airport activities lawfully conducted in connection with a pre-existing airport, as that term is defined in DCC 18.80.022(B), at the described airport; or 2. Airport activities that might be lawfully conducted in the future at the described airport under County or State permits or exemptions. The real property of Grantor subject to this covenant and agreement is situated in Deschutes County, State of Oregon, and described as set forth in that certain [Statutory Warranty Deed] dated [date], as record in [the Official Records of Deschutes County as instrument number 20xx-xxxxx] OR [Volume xx, Page xx of the Deschutes County Board of Records];. Grantor acknowledge that by virtue of such grant he/they have no remaining rights to complain or protest about the protected activities described above. This Declaration of Anticipated Noise runs with the land and is binding upon the heirs, successors and assigns of the undersigned’s interest in the described real property or any persons acquiring through he undersigned an interest in the described real property. Deschutes County requires the execution of this covenant and agreement by the Grantor as a pre-requisite to Deschutes County approving a partition, subdivision, or issuing a building permit for Grantor’s development on the above described real property, which real property is located within the noise impact boundary of the ______________ [Name of Airport]. This Declaration is executed for the protection and benefit of the ______________ [Name of Airport] and Deschutes County’s interest in said airport and to prevent development in adjacent lands to said airport which will interfere with the continued operation existent and development of said airport.


Dates this ____ day of ____, 20____________ Grantor [Name] [insert notarial certificate]


ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTS


SELLER DISCLOSURES


LOCAL ATTRACTIONS


Peterson Ridge Trail System 0

l

] !

Blazin Saddles Edgington Bike Shop Village Green City Park

G

Whychus Footbridge

14 ¬

13 ¬ 15 ¬

17A

18

33 ¬ 28 ¬

H !

Rodeo Grounds

20 ¬

Lazy Z Loop 22 ¬

E as t

23 ¬

25 ¬

Turkey Hollow connector

32 Midd le ¬ 30 31 ¬ ¬ 26 ¬ 24 ¬

k

Viewpoint

Livesa y Rd

Twist & Shout connector Hawk's Flight

12 16

Eagle Rock 2 Viewpoint

e W

t

11A

st

7

Old Stump connector

t

¬9 ¬ 10

12 ¬ 1/8 Miles

11 ¬

Ditch Loop

Little Bridge connector

15A

Pipeline

13 ¬ 15 ¬

Summer Range connector

PRT West

RT W 46 es 06

Boneyard connector

s

P RT Ea

¬P

Detail B

P RT

¬

Detail A

Powerline connector

8

0

T

Peterson Ridge Rd

100

Spirit Circle k

West

Telegraph connector

t es W T PR

k

Peterson Ridge Horse Trail

Link to georeferenced PDF. See Sisterstrails.com for details.

Summer Range connector

a

P RT

E

Running Elk connector

PRT

PRT

1620

F

15 1 4 q u ar ry

City of Sisters

16 ¬

¬ ¬¬¬ st

27 ¬

t es W

16 " )

Highway

G

¬

Top Rung connector

Campground

See Detail B

P RT

W hy ch PRT

y)

Trailhead

Pipeline

21 k¬

Peak View Hello Kitty connector

1610

PRT Exte n si o

2m 3. ( n

e on s ile

a -w

Horse camp

Road

Pe t er 16 son M Peterson Ridge 08 ill R Overlook d

k29

Whychus Creek Overlook T 34 P RT E a st Parking ! H

Bike shop

T Old Tra il

5 150

us

Information

Unimproved road

19 ¬

T

Restroom

Boneyard connector

¬

H !

! _ ] ! G ! Ê ! T H ! 9 !

Little Bridge connector

15A

k

Viewpoint

Shared road (gravel-cinder)

Double Ditch connector

ee Cr

k

Old Stump connector

10 ¬9 ¬ 12 11¬ ¬

11A

Whychus Creek Trail is a difficult foot trail, closed to all bikes and horses.

Junction number

Powerline connector

Ditch Loop

Parking and Primitive Camping T H ! Rd 220

¬1

Harrington Loop

Plantation

F

¬8 46 7 06 ¬

See Detail A

15B 17

T

H !

Quarry

¬5 ¬6

Eagle Rock Pass

¬

T

ast

1.4 2.8 3.3 3.8 4.1 5.6 6.8 7.8 10.3 12.3 14.3 14.8 05 5 16.8 1 18.8 20.8

20 £ [

Tin Can Alley connector

We st

Dog Crossing Tin Can Alley Powerline Old Stump Little Bridge Boneyard Summer Range Running Elk Double Ditch Turkey Hollow Twist & Shout Telegraph Hello Kitty Top Rung Merger of PRT-East / West

126

Three Creeks Brewing Co

Rd

2-3 5-6 7-8 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16 17-18 19-20 21-22 23-24 25-26 26-27 29-28 34

H !

B

Peters on Bu rn

3 151

Connector Name

V U

FivePine Lodge

Loop Distance (miles)

Junction

Whychus Creek trail

¬ Fivepine connector 4 ¬3 ¬

16 " )

The Peterson Ridge Mountain Bike and Hiking Trail was designed as a ladder system. It consists of two linear trails, the PRT West and PRT East trails, with numbered connectors marked by junction posts that allow riders and hikers to design their own riding or hiking experience. We have included a loop option guide showing the distances from our Sisters Trailhead.

Metolius Windigo trail

2

Rd

Rd gton

il Metolius W indi g o T ra

Description of Peterson Ridge Hiking and Biking Trail (PRT)

ng a t

Creekside Park/ T Campground ! H

Horse trail

TE PR

Brooks Scanlon Logging

9 !

¬1

Edg in

Sisters Cow Camp

Ê Horse Camp !

Park i

_ !

Difficult

Proposed trail

Parking for PRT and Scenic Bikeways

PRT

Wildwing Rd

Peterson Ridge Loop Options from Village Green Parking

! ] G !

Dog Walk connector

Elk Ranch Loop

0

! ] G !

Rd

SHS South Trail

88

Eurosports Bike Shop

S Elm St

Cree

Middle å School

y Dr rcla

S i s t e r s Chamber of Commerce

Sisters Ranger Station

k Rd G

15 " )

Pole

Ba

T

Three Creeks Rd

V U

! ] å T H !

Easy Moderate

H !

G School

242

0.5 Miles

eek Ford Cr

Sisters Park & Bike Park 242 Recreation High

Easiest (PRT Old Trail)

Indian

20 £ [

Jimerson Loop

Crossroads

E

Mountain bike/pedestrian trail

PR

nW hee

Pine St

Wa go

SHS to Tollgate Path

Sisters Tie Trail

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TRAIL GUIDE

Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce www.thesisterscountry.com Special thanks to



DAY USE OF USFS TRAILS

Wilderness Areas and US Forest Service Land Uses

Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce 291 East Main 541-549-0251 www.thesisterscountry.com


SISTERS COUNTRY TRAIL GUIDE

SISTERS RANGER DISTRICT SUMMER TRAILS

Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce 291 East Main 541-549-0251 www.thesisterscountry.com


SISTERS COUNTRY TRAIL GUIDE

SISTERS RANGER DISTRICT SUMMER TRAILS

Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce 291 East Main 541-549-0251 www.thesisterscountry.com


Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce 291 East Main 541-549-0251 www.thesisterscountry.com


SISTERS COUNTRY TRAIL GUIDE

SISTERS RANGER DISTRICT WINTER TRAILS

Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce 291 East Main 541-549-0251 www.thesisterscountry.com


SNO-PARK PERMITS

Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce 291 East Main 541-549-0251 www.thesisterscountry.com


SNO-PARKS

Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce 291 East Main 541-549-0251 www.thesisterscountry.com


SANTIAM PASS SNOWMOBILE TRAILS

www.thesisterscountry.com

866-549-0252


MCKENZIE PASS SNOWMOBILE TRAILS

www.thesisterscountry.com

866-549-0252


BEND AREA BRE

PUBS EOMAN RD

Bridge 99 Brewery

10 Barrel Brewing

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Bevel Craft Brewing

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Cascade Lakes Lodge

B E AR CREEK RD 97

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Monkless The Brasserie

Worthy Brewing

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Avid Cider

BEND Crux

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Immersion Brewing

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Old St Francis School

Goodlife Brewing

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Deschutes Brewery Bend Public House

Deschutes Brewery Bend Tasting Room

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Silver Moon Brewing

Spider City Brewing

Ale Apothecary

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Boneyard Beer

Galveston Pub

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Bend Brewing

10 Barrel Brewing

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Riverbend Brewing

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Craft Kitchen

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Oblivion Brewing

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Spider City Brewing

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Western Title & Escrow Co. has provided this information as a courtesy and assumes no liability for errors, omissions, or the positional accuracy of the data, and does not warranty the fitness of this product for any particular purpose. Prepared: 8/31/2020 Data credits: SalesGenie, Deschutes County, State of Oregon

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Bend Area Brew Pubs SISTERS

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Three Creeks Brewing

Vault Taphouse

E ANTLER AVE Wild Ride Brewery

126 7th St Brew House

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Sunriver Pub

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Porter Brewing Co.

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ADDRESS

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WEBSITE

Sunriver Sunriver Brewing - Sunriver Pub 57100 Beaver Dr # 4 (541) 593-3007 http://Sunriverbrewingcompany.Com Sisters Three Creeks Brewing 721 Desperado Ct (541) 549-1963 http://Threecreeksbrewing.Com Redmond Cascade Lakes Brewing Company - 7th Street Brewhouse 855 SW 7th St (541) 923-1795 https://cascadelakes.com Redmond Geist Beerworks 736 SW Umatilla Ave (541) 728-8663 http://geistbeerworks.com Redmond Initiative Brewing 424 NW 5th St (541) 527-4380 https://initiativebrew.com Redmond Kobold Brewing - Vault Taphouse 245 SW 6th St (541) 504-9373 http://koboldbrewing.com/ Redmond Porter Brewing Co. 611 NE Jackpine Ct # 2 (541) 504-7959 https://www.porterbrewingco.com Redmond Wild Ride Brewery 332 SW 5th St (541) 516-8544 http://Wildridebrew.Com Bend 10 Barrel Brewing - East 62970 18th St (541) 241-7733 http://10barrel.Com Bend 10 Barrel Brewing - West 1135 NW Galveston Ave # B (541) 678-5228 http://10barrel.Com Bend Avid Cider 550 SW Industial Way Suite 190 (541) 706-9240 https://www.avidcider.com/ Bend Bend Brewing 1019 NW Brooks St (541) 383-1599 http://Bendbrewingco.Com Bend Bevel Craft Brewing 911 SE Armour Rd (541) 972-3835 https://www.bevelbeer.com Bend Boneyard Beer Pub 1955 NE Divisions St (541) 241-7184 http://boneyardbeer.com/ Bend Bridge 99 Brewery 63063 Layton Ave # 102 (541) 280-1690 http://Bridge99brewery.Com Bend Cascade Lakes Brewing Company - Cascade Lakes Lodge 1441 SW Chandler Ave # 100 (541) 388-4998 https://cascadelakes.com Bend Craft Kitchen & Brewery 62988 Layton Ave # 103 (541) 668-1766 https://craftoregon.com Bend Crux Fermentation Project 50 SW Division St (541) 385-3333 http://Cruxfermentation.Com Bend Deschutes Brewery - Bend Public House 1044 NW Bond St (541) 382-9242 http://Deschutesbrewery.Com Bend Deschutes Brewery - Bend Tasting Room 901 SW Simpson Ave (541) 385-8606 http://Deschutesbrewery.Com Bend Goodlife Brewing Company 70 SW Century Dr (541) 728-0749 http://Goodlifebrewing.Com Bend Immersion Brewing 550 SW Industrial Way # 185 (541) 633-7821 http://Imbrewing.Com Bend McMenamins - Old St Francis School 700 NW Bond St (541) 382-5174 http://Mcmenamins.Com Bend Monkless Belgian Ales - The Brasserie 803 SW Industrial Way (541) 797-6760 https://www.monkless.com Bend Oblivion Brewing 63027 Plateau Dr # 4 (541) 241-2733 https://oblivionbrewing.net Bend Riverbend Brewing 2650 NE Division St (541) 550-7550 http://Riverbendbrewing.Com Bend Silver Moon Brewing 24 NW Greenwood Ave (541) 388-8331 http://Silvermoonbrewing.Com Bend Spider City Brewing - Brewery Tap Room 1177 SE 9th St https://spidercitybrewing.com Bend Spider City Brewing - Downtown Tasting Room 55 NW Minnesota Ave https://spidercitybrewing.com Bend Sunriver Brewing - Galveston Pub 1005 NW Galveston Ave # 150 (541) 408-9377 http://Sunriverbrewingcompany.Com Bend The Ale Apothecary - Tasting Room 30 SW Century Drive Suite 140 (541) 797-6265 https://thealeapothecary.com Bend Worthy Brewing 495 NE Bellevue Dr (541) 639-4776 http://Worthybrewing.Com


WELCOME TO SISTERS Brought To You By First American Title

FIRST AMERICAN TITLE 178 S. Elm Street, Suite 102 Sisters, OR 97759


QUICK REFERENCE Page 3 Now that you live in Sisters... Page 4 Did you know? Sisters Oregon Page 5 Sisters Oregon General Facts Page 6 Sisters Timeline Page 7 Sisters Attractions Page 8 Sisters Golf Courses Page 9 Sisters Parks Page 10 Going Wild in Sisters Page 11 Ski Resorts Page 12 Historic Buildings in Sisters Country Page 13 Coffee, Tea Shops & Bakeries Page 14 Recommended Restaurants Page 15 Breweries, Tap Houses & Bars Page 16 Area Wineries & Distillers Page 17 Arts and Culture Page 18 The Hidden Economy of Sisters

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Now that you live in Sisters... 1 2

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Go for a hike: Sisters main attraction is its stunning natural beauty and there are many things to explore if you want to get out in it.

Eat an ice cream cone: The tourist experience is not complete until you’ve walked the streets of Sisters enjoying a scrumptious ice cream cone. Gotta do it!

Drive the McKenzie Highway: Take Highway 242 out the west end of town (when open) up and over the Cascades to see some of the most spectacular scenery the Sisters Country has to offer, including the views from Dee Wright Observatory.

Ride a bike: You can take that McKenzie Highway trip on two wheels or just tool around town. Visit local bike shops for ideas for rides.

Go shopping: In Sisters you will find unique shops and art galleries that make shopping more than just retail therapy. It’s a cultural experience.

Get a massage: Visit one of several local spas to unwind from the tensions of your everyday life – or to recover from that hike or bike ride.

Take a Spa Day: From the shores of Suttle Lake to the campus at FivePine, you’ll find so many options for relaxation and recovery that will enhance your living to Sisters Country – and send you home feeling truly recharged and ready to get back into the race.

Enjoy a coffee drink: Sisters may be a small town, but it’s big time when it comes to coffee. You’ll have no problem finding your favorite drink – and a beautiful spot to sit down and enjoy it while playing family games, surfing the Web or – gasp!– getting a little work done (we promise we won’t tell)

Visit Camp Sherman: You simply must experience the peace and beauty of the Metolius River and the surrounding community, one of the most treasured places in Oregon.

Catch some live music: Whether it’s a music festival, a winter concert or a show at one of the local venues, you’ll find some great tunes in town all year round.

Dine out: Sisters Country has lots of great choices for breakfast, lunch and dinner – and to suit all tastes and budgets.

Take a class or participate in a camp: Sisters Park & Recreation District has a wide range of offerings for some organized fun.

Watch a movie: You can catch first-run movies at Sisters Movie House or rent a DVD for family movie night in your home.

Catch a fish: Whether you’re a seasoned fisherman or just getting your feet wet, you can find some great fishing in Sisters Country – and plenty of professional guidance to help you get a bite.

Visit one of the local lakes and rent a paddle boat, rowboat or a canoe. There’s nothing more relaxing than being on the water.

Just relax! 3


Did you know? Sisters Oregon

- The town of Sisters derives its name from the three prominent Cascade peaks that grace the southwestern skyline, collectively known as the Three Sisters. - Sisters was incorporated as a town in 1946 - Camp Polk was established as a military post in 1865 in response to the Paiute Indian wars that were raging throughout eastern Oregon during the 1860s and 70s. Named after the Oregon county from which the camp’s commanding officer hailed, it consisted of a group of cabins along the west bank of Squaw Creek, now called Whychus Creek, about 3 miles (5 km) northeast of Sisters. The troops spent the winter of 1865–66 there. After discovering that there was no Indian problem they left. Around 1870, the area was homesteaded by Samuel Hindeman who also ran the post office. The post office at Camp Polk was moved to the present site of Sisters in 1888, and the name was changed to Sisters after the Three Sisters mountains that dominate its western skyline. - Sisters and all of Oregon has no sales tax - Oregon is one of the only two States where you can’t pump your own gas (New Jersey being the other) - Sisters is known worldwide as holding the largest outdoor Quilt Show which is held on the second weekend of July - Sisters is also home to the “Biggest Little Show in the World”, Sisters Rodeo which is held the second weekend in June, since 1941 - The Sisters Folk Festival is an annual three-day roots music festival held the first weekend of September

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- Climate: Hottest month is July (avg. temp. 84.3/42.1 degrees Fahrenheit); coldest month is December (40.8/20.1 degrees Fahrenheit). Driest month is July; wettest month is January. Average annual precipitation is 14.18 inches. (Source: Oregon Climate Service/Oregon Economic & Community Development.) Average snowfall is 32 inches. - Roberts Field in Redmond connects Sisters with the rest of the country by air. The airport is a 20-mile drive to the east. It offers service from Portland, Seattle, Salt Lake City and San Francisco. - Sisters Eagle Air airport is an uncontrolled public airport at the northern outskirts of town, suitable for light general aviation aircraft. (Runway improvements were made in 2013 and a fueling station was added.) - Sisters is also known for their wonderful art galleries and outdoor artwork including: - “Running Horses” on the Lazy Z meadow east of town, by Brian Bain. - Bronze Wild Stallion by Lorenzo Ghiglieri on Cascade Avenue. - At Harold & Dorothy Barclay Park on Cascade Avenue is a bronze heron by Danae Miller, a sculpture by chainsaw artist J. Chester Armstrong, and a mural of quilts by Jerry Werner. - Within City Hall (520 E. Cascade Ave.) hangs a quilt by Jean Wells, celebrating a Sisters landscape. - Sisters has an exceptional selection of small grocery stores offering local and organic options. For the summer months, don’t miss the Sisters Farmers Market located in Fir Street Park. They are open every Friday from 2:00 – 5:00.


Sisters Oregon General Facts

Country

United States

Elevation

3,200 feet

State

Oregon

Weather

Winter, High 40 | Low 20 Summer, High 75 | Low 40

County

Deschutes

Rain Fall / Precipitation

Average Annual – Rainfall, 14.18 inches Average Annual – Snowfall, 32 inches

Incorporated

1946

Time Zone

Pacific Standard Time

Population

2,174 inside the city limits; approximately Coordinates 10,000 in the school district.

44.2908 N, 121.5489 W

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Sisters Timeline 7,700 years ago... Evidence of First Americans moving into Sisters Country, using these lands for huckleberry, root and nut gathering, fishing and hunting. 1825 Peter Skene Ogden of the Hudson Bay Co. camped by Why-Chus Creek two miles west of Squaw Flat. The next day he fed horses on meadows thought to be at Indian Ford. 1865 Captain Charles LaFollette and forty men from Company A, 1st Oregon Volunteer Infantry establish a military camp at Camp Polk.

1805 Lewis and Clark note the snow-capped peaks of the “Western Mountains,” (Cascade Range) including what is now Mt. Jefferson.

1859 A group of men from Lebanon, Oregon scout route for eastern road over Cascades; becomes Santiam Wagon Road, completed in 1865.

1870 Samuel Hindman and family, one of the first settlers in Central Oregon, establishes a homestead near the abandoned Camp Polk.

1895 Squaw Creek (Whychus Creek) Irrigation District organized. 1912 Hotel Sisters built. 1923 Fire starts in an unattended garage in Sisters. Fire destroys buildings on Cascade Avenue, including businesses and residences, one being the Sisters Drug Store and Post Office. 1937 Separate Sisters High School building built. (This brick building is now used as school district administration offices and is on the National Register of Historic Places.) 1951 Artificial propagation of steelhead trout in Squaw Creek (Whychus Creek). 1968 Sisters High School closed; students bussed to Redmond High School. 1975 Jean Wells and Cathi Howells begin the first annual Sisters Quilt Show; 11 quilts exhibited. The annual show is held the second Saturday of July. 1992 New Sisters High School (now Sisters Middle School) opens, taking old mascot name, Outlaws. 2002 Cache Mtn. Fire hits Black Butte Ranch, two homes lost. 2006 Squaw Creek renamed Whychus Creek. 2014 Cascade Avenue/Highway 20 undergoes complete renovation.

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1924 Fire starts in a defective flue in the Gist Hotel destroying buildings on both sides of Cascade Avenue between Fir and Spruce.

1940 The first annual (official) Sisters Rodeo held at the Creighton place, northeast of downtown.

1946 Sisters becomes an incorporated city.

1964 City of Sisters hit by major flood.

1971 Black Butte Ranch, the Brooks Resources resort, begins selling lots and Big Meadow Golf Course opens.

1978 City of Sisters passes ordinance requiring 1880s-style store fronts.

2003 New Sisters High School opens. B&B Complex Fire. 2006 Whychus Creek rerouted in natural channel through Camp Polk Reserve.


Sisters Attractions Scenery that'll take your breath away – time that makes memories.

Three Creek Lake

Camp Polk Preserve

Drive south on Elm Street (Road 16) about 20 miles and you'll run into a beautiful mountain lake at the foot of Tam McArthur Rim. Three Creek Lake offers non-motorized boating (rent a boat at the small store), fishing, swimming and picnic opportunities for the whole family (kids love to look for tadpoles). The 28-acre lake has planted rainbow trout and a self-sustaining population of brook trout. From here you can hike rugged Tam McArthur Rim or simply hang out on the beach or in a nearby campground and enjoy the peaceful environment of a 6,550-elevation alpine lake.

The Deschutes Land Trust acquired 145 acres of rare wetland/wet meadow habitat just north of Sisters and manages the site as a preserve. Camp Polk Meadow is the site of the first settlement in the Sisters Country. Camp Polk was established as a military encampment for the suppression of local Indians in 1865.

Dee Wright Observatory Standing atop the windswept McKenzie Pass, Dee Wright Observatory looks like the lonely lair of a robber baron. The observatory was named after a Civilian Conservation Corps foreman who worked on the site. The observatory offers a sweeping vista of the Cascades and overlooks the somber yet intriguing lava flows that dominate the pass. Interpretive signs offer a little education about the unusual geology of the area. The Pacific Crest Trail crosses the McKenzie Summit just west of the observatory. To get there; take Highway 242 west from Sisters (when passable).

Suttle Lake Suttle Lake is one of Sisters' understated natural wonders. It's not dramatic or spectacular, but it is one of the most soul-satisfying spots in the area. Some days the lake is calm and glassy, offering a lazy afternoon on Cinder Beach looking out on Mt. Washington. Other days the wind whips the lake into a whitecapped chop and windsurfers weave through the waves. In the fall it is a riot of color as the leaves turn with the early frost. Visit the Lodge, take a boat out for a lazy day of fishing or take a stroll around the lake. Follow Highway 20 west 16 miles from Sisters; turn left and follow the signs.

Head of the Metolius It's hard to believe that the mighty Metolius River starts from tiny springs in the shadow of Black Butte. Over the next five miles, more springs and tributary creeks build the river into a magnificent rushing torrent. The Head of the Metolius is one of the most serene and beautiful spots in Central Oregon. And it's very easy to get to. Just drive 10 miles west of Sisters to the entrance to Camp Sherman and follow the signs along Road 14. They'll point you to an expansive parking area where you can walk down a paved path about 300 yards to an overlook that treats you to a calendar shot of the headwaters and Mt. Jefferson.

The Land Trust is working in the area to restore riparian habitat along Whychus Creek in hopes of one day restoring steelhead runs in the creek. Guided tours are given throughout the spring and summer. For more information call 541.330.0017 or visit www.deschuteslandtrust.org.

Tumalo Falls Tumalo Falls is one of the more scenic areas in Central Oregon, and it's an easy drive west from downtown Bend. Take Highway 20 east to 3rd Avenue south. Turn right on Franklin Avenue and head west from downtown Bend to Galveston Road which turns into Skyliner Drive and leads to the gravel Tumalo Falls Road. There's an overlook (short walk) and interpretive site and a picnic area. If you want to make a hike of it – and you should – there are many trails in the area. Hike upstream along the creek and you'll run into more waterfalls.

Wizard Falls Fish Hatchery While you are in Camp Sherman, head further north to visit Wizard Falls Fish Hatchery. When you cross the bridge over the Metolius River and enter Wizard Falls, you know this is a special place. The clear, aquamarine color of the river water leads into a pristine grassy area and gentle paths winding through the 35-acre site. Various open tanks house the different fish species raised at the hatchery. Rainbow, brook, cutthroat and trophy trout, kokanee and Atlantic salmon are part of the three million fish on display. The hatchery hosts Kids' Fishing Day on the second Saturday in June. Wizard Falls is open from 8 a.m. until 7 p.m. Take Highway 20 west out of Sisters for 10 miles. At the Camp Sherman road sign, Road 14, turn right and travel 10 miles to the hatchery entrance.

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Sisters Golf Courses

Aspen Lakes Golf Course Faith Course 9 Holes (Public)

Aspen Lakes Golf Course Hope Course 9 Holes (Public)

Black Butte Ranch Golf Club Glaze Meadow Glaze Course 18 Holes over 6,574 yards with a par of 72 (Public)

Black Butte Ranch Golf Club Big Meadow Course 18 holes over 6,850 yards with a par of 72 (Public)

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16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters, OR 97759 541.549.4653

LOCATION : PHONE :

16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters, OR 97759 541.549.4653

LOCATION : PHONE :

13525 Hawksbeard Rd, Black Butte Ranch, OR 97759 541.595.1270

LOCATION : PHONE :

13525 Hawksbeard Rd, Black Butte Ranch, OR 97759 800.399.2322

LOCATION : PHONE :


Sisters Parks

Village Green Park

Sisters Skate Park

The Village Green Park is located two blocks south of downtown between Elm & Fir Streets. There is a covered gazebo, covered BBQ area with tables, playground equipment and many shade trees.

Skaters have their own skate park in Sisters, thanks to volunteer efforts by local youth and adult mentors. The park includes a large, deep “bowl,” an intermediate bowl, a backyard pool replica and a street scape element (railings, steps, curbs, etc). The intermediate bowl has lower sidewalls and is designed for less-experienced skaters. The skate park is located next to the Sisters Park & Recreation District Coffield Center, at the west end of the Sisters High School parking lot. Head west from downtown Sisters on Highway 242 (McKenzie Highway) and enter the Sisters High School campus.

Sisters Creekside Campground (Formerly Three Sisters Overnight Park) The Sisters Creekside Camp-ground is a municipal park with 60 sites (of which 25 sites are full hook-up sites) and a large grass area. The park is situated along Whychus Creek and within walking distance of downtown. The park is open April 12 through November 1 and is closed for the winter months. For information call Nicole Montalvo at the City Public Works Department, Monday through Friday, at 541.323.5220.

Creekside Park Creekside Park is located adjacent to Whychus Creek across the covered foot bridge from Sisters Creekside Campground. The grassy park has tables and small barbeque's for daytime use.

Harold & Dorothy Barclay Park Located on Cascade Avenue (Highway 20) in the center of downtown Sisters. Includes a public restroom.

Cliff Clemens Park On the north side of Sisters, approximately three blocks from downtown on Larch Street. Motor homes may park in this area during the daytime only. Large grassy area and play equipment.

Hyzer Pines Also next to the Sisters Park & Recreation District Coffield Center is the Hyzer Pines 18-hole disc golf course. There is no charge for playing. No alcohol or smoking are allowed on the property.

Fir Street Park Sisters' newest park is located at the corner of Fir Street and Main Avenue. This “pocket park” feature a splash play area with boulders, a performance stage with timber-frame pavilion and seating area, a picnic facility, restrooms, bike corrals, benches, a fire pit with seating, a drinking fountain and on-site parking.

Sit and relax or let the young ones play at a wide variety of Sisters parks.

Creekside Park, Village Green Park and Cliff Clemens Park are available for events for a fee. Electricity is available. Call 541.549.6022 for more information.

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Going Wild in Sisters

Golden-Mantled Ground Squirrel and Yellow-Pine Chipmunks Golden-mantled ground squirrels and yellow-pine chipmunks live all through the forest and can be seen wherever you hike. The streaks on a chipmunk's body go all the way to the nose, while on the goldenmantled they stop at the shoulders.

Butterflies Every year, the North American Butterfly Association conducts a butterfly count on Friday of the Fourth of July weekend. If you would like to participate, or would like to know the butterfly "hot-spots," call Sue Anderson at Natural Selection, 541.388.1549, or email a note to jim@northwestnaturalist.net.

Coyotes You can see coyotes just about anywhere you go in the Sisters area.

Badgers Like coyotes, badgers have also been persecuted because of their habit of digging holes as they pursue ground squirrels and gophers. They have also moved into clear-cuts in the forest.

Bobcats Hikers traveling along trails that run on the edge of the forest may get very lucky and see a bobcat.

Wild Turkeys The so-called "wild" turkeys you will see about anywhere around Sisters are not really wild. They're transplanted from the Willamette Valley where they were pests in feed lots and other agricultural areas.

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Mule Deer If you enjoy a morning walk around town, don't be surprised if you come face-to-face with at least 10 or so mule deer within the city limits.

Snakes Yes, we do have rattlesnakes in the Sisters area. Thankfully, the Pacific Rattlesnake is a more-or-less laid-back member of the pit viper family and if you give them your respect, they will most often do likewise. We also have non-lethal gopher snakes slithering under sagebrush and rim rock.

Elk Sisters Country is home to a substantial herd of Rocky Mountain Elk. They circulate though meadows and forests around Black Butte and points east. The herd consists of cows, calves and yearlings, and watching them move through the forest is a majestic sight. A mature cow elk weighs approximately 500 pounds and stands some four to five feet tall at the shoulder. Bull elk are much more elusive, tending to travel alone or in small bachelor groups.

Water Ouzel The ever-busy water ouzel – a songbird known as the dipper – can also be seen dropping into the cold streams and "flying" underwater in search of aquatic insects.


Sisters Ski Resorts

CENTRAL OREGON Mt. Bachelor Willamette Pass Resort Hoodoo

13000 SW Century Drive, Bend, OR 97702 800.829.2442 INFO : www.mtbachelor.com LOCATION : PHONE :

GPS Coordinates: N 43° 36.033 W 122° 02.200 541.345.7669 INFO : www.willamettepass.com LOCATION : PHONE :

20 Hwy 20, Sisters, OR 97759 541.822.3799 INFO : www.skihoodoo.com LOCATION : PHONE :

MOUNT HOOD Mt. Hood Meadows Ski & Snowboard Resort Timberline Lodge Mt. Hood Skibowl Cooper Spur Summit Ski Area

14040 Hwy 35, Mt. Hood, OR 97041 503.337.2222 INFO : www.skihood.com LOCATION : PHONE :

27500 E. Timberline Road, Timberline Lodge, OR 97028 503.272.3311 INFO : www.timberlinelodge.com LOCATION : PHONE :

87000 E Hwy 26, Government Camp, OR 97028 503.272.3206 INFO : www.skibowl.com LOCATION : PHONE :

10755 Cooper Spur Road, Mt Hood Parkdale, OR 97041 541.352.6692 INFO : www.cooperspur.com LOCATION : PHONE :

90255 Government Camp Loop Road, Government Camp, OR 97028 503.272.0256 INFO : www.summitskiarea.com LOCATION : PHONE :

SOUTHERN OREGON Mt. Ashland Ski Resort

693 Washington Street, Ashland, OR 97520 541.482.2897 INFO : www.mtashland.com LOCATION : PHONE :

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Historic Buildings in Sisters Hardy Allen House Southeast corner of Main Avenue and Larch Street. Early settler and stockman Hardy Allen and his wife Daisy moved to Sisters in 1905 and built this fine house in 1908 on the corner of Main Avenue and Fir Street. The house was scheduled for demolition in the 1980s but was saved by moving it to its current location. It was renovated in 1990 to match its historical appearance.

Hotel Sisters (Sisters Saloon) Northwest corner of Cascade Avenue and Fir Street. The Hotel Sisters was built in 1912 by businessman and Spanish-American War veteran John Dennis. The nicely modern facility boasted hot and cold water in each of its 19 guest rooms and featured heat from a hot air furnace in the basement. It is one of the most photographed buildings in Central Oregon.

Leithauser General Store (Sisters Bakery) The Leithauser General Store was built on Cascade Avenue between Larch and Spruce streets in 1925. The Leithauser family owned and operated the general store at that location until 1950, when a new store was built just to the west. The building has housed a barber shop, a variety store, a yarn mill and a bakery.

Old Sisters Library West side of Spruce Street between Cascade and Main Avenues (behind the Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center). The building was originally sited on Cascade Avenue, where local businesses and citizens purchased land for a library. Local mills donated lumber for the construction of the library building. The library opened in 1939, with shelf space for 1,000 books. The building was moved to its current location in 1980 and it was retired in 1990.

The Palace Southeast corner of Cascade Avenue and Elm Street. The original structure on the site was Sisters Drug Store, owned by the Aitken Family. The building was destroyed in the devastating fire of 1923. The Aitken family moved an existing structure to the corner and again set up shop.

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Sisters Coffee, Tea Shops & Bakeries

Sisters Coffee

Company 273 West Hood Avenue, Sisters

541.549.0527

Suttle Tea

450 East Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.549.8077

Fika Sisters Coffeehouse

201 East Sun Ranch Drive, Sisters

541.588.0311

Angeline’s Bakery

121 West Main Avenue, Sisters

541.549.9122

Sisters Bakery

251East Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.549.0361

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Sisters Recommended Restaurants

Chops Bistro

370 East Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.549.6015

The Open Door

303 West Hood Avenue, Sisters,

541.549.6076

The Porch

243 North Elm Street, Sisters,

541.549.3287

The Cottonwood Café

403 East Hood Avenue, Sisters

541.549.2699

Junes Asian Kitchen

291 East Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.549.6944

Brand 33 Restaurant

16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters

541.549.3663

Depot Café

250 West Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.549.2572

Sno Cap Ice Cream

380 West Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.549.6151

Rancho Viejo

150 East Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.549.3594

The Lodge Restaurant BBR

12930 Hawks Beard, Sisters

855.253.2558

Spoons

281 West Cascade Avenue, Sisters

549.719.0572

Takoda’s

425 Highway 20, Sisters

541.549.8620

Lakeside Bistro

13653 Hawksbeard Road, Black Butte Ranch

541.595.1264

Rainwater Café

161 East Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.904.0153

Sisters Saloon

190 East Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.549.7427

R Spot Take Out/Eatery

161 North Elm Street, Sisters

541.549.7768

Good Day Café

143 East Hood Avenue, Sisters

541.904.4051

Sisters Meat & Smokehouse

110 South Spruce Street, Sisters

541.719.1186

Martolli’s of Sisters Authentic Hand Tossed Pizza

220 West Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.549.8356

Food Cart Garden

223 East Hood Avenue corner of Hood & Fir, Sisters

541.549.2471

14


Sisters Breweries, Tap Houses & Bars

Three Creeks Brewing

721 Desperado Center, Sisters

541.549.1963

Hop N Brew

523 East Highway 20, Sisters

541.719.1295

Roberts Pub

13020 Hawksbeard Road, Black Butte Ranch

541.595.1520

Hardtails Bar and Grill

175 North Larch Street, Sisters

541.549.6114

Gallery Restaurant & Bar

171 West Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.549.2631

15


Area Wineries & Distillers

Cork Cellars

391 West Cascade Avenue, Sisters

541.549.2675

Faith Hope & Charity Vineards

70450 NW Lower Valley Drive, Terrebonne

541.526.5075

Maragas Winery

15523 SW Highway 97, Culver

541.546.5464

Crater Lake Spirits

19330 Pinehurst Road, Bend

541.318.0200

Gompers Distillery

611 NE Jackpine Court, #8, Redmond

541.488.2825

16


Sisters Arts and Culture

Sisters is proud of its reputation as an arts community and is home to a vast number of incredibly talented individuals. Many unique galleries featuring clay work, sculpture, photography, paintings, jewelry, fiber art and much more can be found throughout Sisters. And most recently Sisters Country is very proud of its growing collection of Public Art. Concerts featuring every genre of music highlight Sisters' calendar of events throughout the year. And don't miss the Sisters Movie House, showing first run films throughout the year. The Americana Project at Sisters schools teaches kids to appreciate, learn and perform music and create art. The My Own Two Hands celebration in April features musical performances, an art auction and displays throughout Sisters to help raise funds for the Americana Project activities. Sisters also hosts the Sisters Folk Festival every September. Thousands of fans from around the country venture to Sisters to hear local, regional, and nationally known performers. Americana, folk and blues can be heard throughout Sisters at various venues.

The Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show, is the largest outdoor quilt show in the world happens on the second Saturday in July every year through the Sisters Country. Mark your calendars! Sisters Art Works is a facility that nurtures new talent by offering workshops, office space, and performing space to aspiring artists as well as established professionals. The Sisters School Foundation created the Sisters Starry Nights Concert Series to help close the gap in funding left by severe budget cuts in 1996 that threatened valuable programs at the Sisters schools. Its first fundraising event was the Sisters Starry Nights concert series and they debuted in 1997. Among the acclaimed musicians who traveled to Sisters to participate in the Starry Nights are: Lyle Lovett, Kenny Loggins, Vince Gill, Amy Grant, Michael McDonald, Deana Carter, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, John Hiatt, Kim Carnes, T. Graham Brown, David Wilcox, Karla Bonoff, J.D. Souther, Kenny Rankin, Nicolette Larson, Stephen Bishop, Mark Collie, Jeff Hanna, Matraca Berg, Greg Barnhill, Gary Morris, LeeAnn Womack, Christopher Cross, Hal Ketchum, and Kathy Mattea. And comedians Mack and Jamie, Wayne Cotter, Michael Davis, Don McMillan, Kevin Meaney. The Sisters Starry Nights Concert Series is currently on hiatus but there are several other opportunities to support the school district.

17


The Hidden Economy of Sisters

Mostly hidden from the view of visitors, Sisters has a thriving hidden economy of manufacturers who are creating unique, high-quality products for users around the world. From bird-repelling devises to custom-quality guitars, Sisters' creative side extends into industry.

ENERGYneering Solutions Inc. (ESI) of Sisters manages some millions of dollars in renewable energy power plants in places as far-flung as Texas, Florida and California — all out of an office at the Sisters Airport. The firm, led by Benny and Julie Benson of Sisters, provides engineering and design for landfill gas (LFG) collection, biogas pretreatment systems, biogas-toenergy facilities, and biomass thermal facilities.

Bird Gard utilizes the innate power of the natural survival instincts of birds to effectively repel them. Digital recordings of distressed and alarmed birds, along with the sounds made by their natural predators are broadcast through high fidelity weather-resistant speakers. This triggers a primal fear and flee response Pest birds soon relocate to where they can feed without feeling threatened. www.birdgard.com

Close to home, ESI installed a biomass boiler at Sisters High School, a cost-saving innovation that has received statewide accolades. www.energyneeringsolutions.com

Rescue Response Gear specializes in technical rescue and rope access equipment, working with public and private industry providing rescue equipment, rope access equipment, rescue training and rope access training to fire departments; training facilities; public utility companies; tower erector companies and search and rescue organizations as well as federal, state, county and city agencies. www.rescueresponse.com For more than a quarter century, Metabolic Maintenance has been manufacturing nutraceuticals and supplements for health care professionals who want the best for their patients, using only the highestquality ingredients and processes. Products manufactured in their plant in the Sisters Industrial Park are based on the latest wellness research, with ingredients that are sourced from the finest suppliers and tested for purity and potency. www.metabolicmaintenance.com From their workshop in the music-loving town of Sisters, Oregon, Preston Thompson Guitars builds custom guitars and standard models based on vintage designs perfected by C.F. Martin Guitar in the 1930s. The choice of Grammy-winning flatpick and fingerstyle guitarists alike, Preston Thompson Guitars are among the best acoustic guitars available anywhere, renowned for superior tone, craftsmanship and materials. www.pktguitars.com

18

Ponderosa Forge & Ironworks From a start shoeing horses, Jeff Wester has built a blacksmithing shop that provides structural steel and artful accessories for the finest homes and commercial properties in Central Oregon. Through its website at www.ponderosaforge.com, Ponderosa Forge sells beautiful hand-forged iron work — fireplace screens and doors, door hinges, door handles, furniture and interior décor, wine racks and much more — all across the nation. Lakeview Millworks is a purveyor of fine doors and windows for a market that extends from the Pacific Northwest south into California and east as far as Minnesota. Lakeview Millworks, located in Town Square in the middle of downtown Sisters, has an extensive showroom featuring major window and door product lines. Lakeview Millworks is a distributor for the prestigious Kolbe Windows & Doors line — one of only three in the state of Oregon. The facility is a destination showroom for the entire region. www.lakeviewmillworks.com Catch Magazine is as an electronic gallery and forum dedicated to the art and passion of fly fishing. Sisters resident Todd Moen and his partner Brian O’Keefe designed and created the online periodical that features breathtaking digital photography, travel essays, and slide shows from exotic “fishing holes” around the globe, all in a Web format. The magazine has an international readership, even in places like Iraq and Afghanistan. www.catchmagazine.net.


The Place We Cross the Water:

Whychus Creek PRODUCED BY

T H E U P P E R D E S C H U T E S W AT E R S H E D C O U N C I L WRITTEN AND EDITED BY

KOLLEEN YAKE

CO-EDITED BY

RYAN HOUS TON

P H OTO G R A P H Y C O N S U LTA N T

JIM YUSKAVITCH

D E S I G N & I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y

CASEY CRISLER

ARTWORK & JOURNAL WRITING BY

SISTERS HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

FUNDED BY

Laird Norton Foundation Bonneville Environmental Foundation Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board

2008

w w w. R e s t o r e T h e D e s c h u t e s . o r g



T H E P L A C E W E C R O S S T H E W AT E R

Ways of Seeing: The Place We Cross the Water

“To walk along Whychus Creek is like walking on a rainbow.”

Cassie Huber

AGE 16

his is a story about a watershed. Told

Sisters High School student Cassie Huber

through many voices and with images

expressed, “To walk along Whychus Creek is like

created by many different hands, The Place We

walking on a rainbow.” With journal writing and

Cross the Water tells the story about the health of

students’ sketches penciled streamside, through

the Whychus Creek watershed. Relatively speak-

the brushstrokes of a painting born on a New

ing, the Whychus Creek watershed is healthy.

Year’s Day hike, punctuated by the vibrant

It has been spared from the large scale insults

images of the multi-faceted watershed itself, and

and violations that many watersheds throughout

woven with the stories of the restoration work of

the country have suffered. It does not have streams

many, this booklet reveals what happens when a

that are toxic or polluted beyond repair, it has not been completely deforested, and its creeks have not been cemented over by high rises or subdivisions. However, the watershed is not without its problems.

creek meanders through history as a creek, then PHOTO

N ATA L I E W E I G A N D

a canal, and then a creek again.

We all connect to special places in unique and personal ways, and The Place We Cross the Water invites multiple ways of

The purpose of this booklet is to explore the health of Whychus

learning about Whychus Creek and its watershed. The main

Creek, including the good and the bad, in creative and thoughtful

body of the booklet offers an inspiring overview of this Central

ways. The spirit of this publication dwells within the passionate

Oregon watershed. The accompanying ecological supplement

words and artwork of local community members and students

provides a more focused examination of the watershed indicators

who have connected to the creek in their own ways. We hope that

used to communicate about stream health. It is our hope that,

floating somewhere among the confluence of local inspiration and

whether read together or separately, these two resources create

watershed information, you too will find a personal connection to

inspired and informed ways of knowing The Place We Cross

Whychus Creek.

the Water.

3


4

WAY S O F S E E I N G

Who I Am I am Whychus Creek and I want my story to be heard. I begin in the icy glaciers of Middle Sister. Every year the snow melts and my energy is back. I provide habitat for fish and irrigation for my town of Sisters and I keep the riparian zone around my banks healthy and thriving. I am pure because my water comes from a pure and beautiful place. Once, a few decades ago, people came with bulldozers and straightened my body. They took away my meandering curves and changed the fish habitat. Now, the steelhead who used to thrive in my waters are gone, only a memory. I used to be called Squaw Creek but with the generations, my name has changed. To the other creeks, I send a message: no matter how much people take from you and damage you, just keep flowing because soon people realize that they need you. PHOTO

A series of glaciers in the Three Sisters Mountains provide the source of waters for Whychus Creek.

BRIAN HUDSPETH

Mackenzie Williams

AGE 16


T H E P L A C E W E C R O S S T H E W AT E R

5

WhyChus...creeks of mountain snow melt North Sister Middle Sister South Sister Broken Top braided creeks joining to rush over basalt and pool drop singing to winds thrumming through fir, pine and alder and yet it brings a quiet peace a place to rest the beating heart WhyChus

Glen Corbett

NEW YEAR’S DAY 2005


6

CREEK TO CANAL TO CREEK

Creek to Canal to Creek: Abandonment and Embrace

New life for an old creek

PHOTO

GREG LIEF

nce a creek, then effectively a canal, and now slowly

Born in Sisters in 1918, local homesteader Jesse Edgington once

emerging as a creek again, the 41 miles of Whychus

referred to this evolving perception of Whychus Creek: “As far as

Creek have evolved through a perceptual and literal history of

taking any care of Squaw Creek or anything like that, that was just

abandonment and embrace. Just as Whychus Creek’s name has

somebody else’s concern. I think that there is a vast amount of

been changed and changed back, the path and personality of the

caring now. People that are here see the potential of a stream

creek has been altered too. Referred to as Squaw Creek for over

going through town, a steady stream, not an off and on one.”2

a hundred years, records from the 1855 Pacific Railroad Reports indicate that Whychus was its historic name. Derived from the Sahaptin language, Whychus means: the place we cross the water.1

This creek to canal to creek story of Whychus Creek has been woven through its history. When Whychus was initially referred to as Whychus, it was a true creek that flowed and ran wild.

Whychus Creek has been referred to with different names as it

Not long after the name was changed to Squaw Creek in the late

has meandered through different eras, embodying shifts in per-

1800’s, the creek became used as a canal and its water was spread

ceptions about the value of the creek. As the creek has been named

across farmland. Diversions for irrigation began in 1871 and by

and renamed, it has been subsequently repressed and embraced.

1912, sections of Whychus Creek were parched, and hot, and dry.3


T H E P L A C E W E C R O S S T H E W AT E R

For almost 100 years, Whychus Creek was a virtual canal and it

its water. As it continues to hesitantly meander through meadows

was treated as such. As local historian and author Martin Winch

and rimrock canyons 20 miles downstream from the City of Sisters,

proclaims in The Biography of a

Whychus Creek then becomes a cool

Place, “The fishery notwithstand-

flowing creek again as it is recharged

ing, most persons had the attitude

and refreshed by Alder Springs. At its

that stream water running past your

mouth where it meets the Deschutes

land in its usual and accustomed

River, Whychus Creek summer flows

way was simply going to waste.”

can reach about 60% of their dynamic

4

However, by 2005, the same year

upstream counterparts. 5

when the final approval was

The perception of Whychus as once

given to change the name of the

a creek, then a canal, and, slowly a

creek from the derogatory word

creek again, is an outgrowth of the

Squaw back to it historical name,

community that surrounds the creek

Whychus, local organizations,

and either chooses to abandon or

community members, and land-

embrace it. Both the historical and on-

owners were working hard to

the-ground abandonment of Whychus

return Whychus Creek its waters. The actual path of the water of Whychus Creek from source to mouth also tells the story of a

7

Creek reflect the perception of its PHOTO

LESLEY JONES

Emerging out of the rimrock canyon walls, cold groundwater recharges the waters of Whychus Creek.

community at the time. The evolution of Whychus Creek from a creek to a canal to a creek exemplifies a shift

creek that becomes a canal that becomes a creek. Just below its

in cultural perspectives and values. The health, the mere exis-

headwaters in the icy glaciers of the Three Sisters, Whychus Creek

tence, of Whychus Creek and its surrounding watershed, depends

rushes as a dynamic and cold mountain stream around 180 cubic

upon the perception and vision of those who cross the water and

feet per second. After it drops dramatically through steep boulder

tell its story.

5

canyons surrounded by lush firs, the steepness of the stream channel decreases and Whychus winds through warm ponderosa pine forests. The majority of the waters of Whychus Creek are diverted out of the stream above the City of Sisters and, during the hot summer months, the streambed trickles with barely more than 10% of

When the majority of the water is diverted out of the creek during the hot summer months, the temperature in Whychus Creek becomes too hot for native fish.

PHOTO

JIM YUSKAVITCH


8

T H E WAY TO T H E M O U N TA I N

The Way to the Mountain: The Historic Path of Whychus

Glacial Beginnings

PHOTO

BRIAN HUDSPETH

he namesake and the largest stream in the watershed,

The landscape surrounding the headwaters of Whychus Creek

Whychus Creek, begins in the glaciers of the Three

has been created by a series of diverse glacial and volcanic events

Sisters Mountains. Appearing as the Three Sisters on 1856 maps,

in the Three Sisters Wilderness. Resting above Whychus Creek,

the peaks are also known as Faith, Hope, Charity. Other streams

seven glaciers—Bend, Prouty, Carver, Diller, Hayden, Thayer,

in the watershed include Soap Creek, the North and South Forks

and Villard—quietly sit as reminders of the last ice age 18,000

of Whychus Creek, Park Creek, Pole Creek, Indian Ford Creek,

years ago. At the present day confluence of Whychus Creek and

Three Creek, and Snow Creek. Known for its old-growth pon-

the North Fork of Whychus Creek, a magnificently thick glacier

derosa pine stands, ancient archaeological sites, and quiet corners

once stretched two miles wide to reach within six miles of present-

of beauty, the uppermost 15 miles of Whychus Creek have been

day Sisters. Meandering downstream from the headwaters, flows

designated as Wild and Scenic under the Oregon Wild and Scenic

from the melting glacier carved intricate webs of stream channels

Rivers Act of 1988.

and ridges. When the glacier receded, the present-day Whychus

1


T H E P L A C E W E C R O S S T H E W AT E R

Creek channel emerged from the deepest, longest, and most complex of them all. The path of the upper portions of Whychus Creek now drops down waterfalls to carve steep bedrock canyons, spread across broad alluvial valleys, explore water-carved caves, and wash across polished andesitic rock.1 The Wild and Scenic river corridor of Whychus and the entire Sisters Ranger District of the Deschutes National Forest are ceded lands of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs protected by treaty rights. Elders from the Tribes have referred to the creek as

the way to the mountain because people traveled along the creek as a route to higher elevations to pick berries, gather herbs, hunt deer, and pick pine nuts.1 According to an oral interview with Jesse PHOTO

Edgington, Native Americans from the Warm Springs Reservation

U.S. FOREST SERVICE

passed through his family’s ranch in 1936. “This family came, they

Just below the beautifully wild and most certainly scenic 15 miles

were going up to Santiam, to the Big Lake area for berries. . . The

of upper Whychus Creek, there are a number of factors that make

Indians have told us that the ranch was part of their heritage, that

Whychus decidedly less wild. A number of unscreened irrigation

the meadow there . . . should have been part of the reservation.”2

diversions and multiple fish passage barriers conspicuously fetter Whychus Creek just a few miles upstream from the City of Sisters. However, a decade of partnership-building among local conservation organizations, private landowners, Deschutes National Forest, and the Three Sisters Irrigation District has created a collaborative climate in which the process to remove barriers for migratory fish and restore prime fish habitat conditions has begun. Soon, spawning fish will be able to swim freely up the creek on their own way to the mountain.

Pine needles blanket the forest that envelops Whychus Creek.

PHOTO

N ATA L I E W E I

GAND

9


10

THE EBB AND FLOW OF IT

The Ebb and Flow of It: Flashy and Wild

“There’s one thing about the creek I’d like to mention. You said you’d like to know about the ebb and flow of it. Soap Creek used to have a beautiful fall where it comes into Squaw Creek... Later, something come along and undermined it and let Soap Creek wash out that material that had closed it. That was another color of the water—soapy. Soap Creek was soapy. And Squaw Creek was muddy and Park

PHOTO

GREG LIEF

Creek was muddy depending on time of year and what they were

When pregnant with snowmelt waters, Whychus Creek has

running through up there.”

flooded its banks many times. The 100-year flood event of

Jesse Edgington

1964 is infamous among Sisters residents and characterizes the

BORN IN SISTERS IN 1918

dramatic and wild nature of Whychus Creek. On December 18, 1964, warm rain began to pour over the upper Whychus

nherently, Whychus Creek is flashy and wild. The soil near

Creek watershed. Temperatures soared from zero into the 50s

the headwaters allows the snowmelt and rainfall to run off

in one week and over 20 inches of rain fell on a deep snowpack

quickly, bringing very high streamflows and dramatic floods.

in the mountains, creating a flash flood on Whychus Creek.

The amount of snow or rain that refreshes the arid Whychus Creek

Magnificent in size and speed, floodwaters completed the filling

watershed varies dramatically depending upon location. Over 11

of Lake Billy Chinook months ahead of schedule.4 According to

feet of precipitation can fall on the Three Sisters Mountains each

Jesse Edgington, “After we moved from the ranch, the bridge we

year, while only 14 inches may hit the ground in the town of Sisters.

crossed on was 12 feet above the creek and four to five feet above

1


T H E P L A C E W E C R O S S T H E W AT E R

the bank. That year the ice jammed some place and it came down the creek, picking it up as it came. It piled up against that bridge till it was clear up over the top of a car on top of that bridge.”2 Whychus again flashed its wild waters only 16 years later when it crested at 2000 cubic feet per second—the highest flow recorded— PHOTO

KYLE GORMAN

on December 25, 1980.4

After channelization, Whychus Creek flows beside Camp Polk Meadow.

The 1964 flood was a bit too dynamic for some. In an effort to

and dry than it had ever been, “more like a savannah with a stream

restrain and control the energy of Whychus Creek, local landowners

running beside it.”4 The combination of the flood and the bull-

and the Army Corps of Engineers straightened and deepened

dozers turned the creek into a virtual canal. Removing the natural

approximately 18 miles of Whychus Creek stretching from upstream

curves from the creek, stripping downed trees and logs from its

of Sisters down to the Jefferson County line at Rimrock Ranch.

banks, and scraping gravels and cobbles from its bed, the work

4

sought to subdue Whychus Creek.

In their effort to subdue Whychus, logs and trees that had been carried in by the floodwaters were cut up and removed. The Corps

The channelization, or canalization, of Whychus Creek that trans-

worked with landowners to remove gravel bars and push the cobble

pired on the ground exemplified the perception that the creek was

up into berms along the banks to control the creek. In Camp Polk,

better utilized as a canal than left to flow wild. The cultural ecol-

the creek was moved and straightened, or effectively canalized, in

ogy, or the relationship between the community and Whychus,

an attempt to make it behave. The meadow became more open

led the community to rearrange and reassemble the creek to better match the form and function of a canal. Although the subjugation of a creek as a canal was in line with perspectives and social values of the time, the channelization of Whychus Creek directly contrasted Aldo Leopold’s well known land ethic, “A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.” 6

Whychus Creek flooded its banks in November 2007, flowing into its floodplain and beyond.

PHOTO

U.S. FOREST SERVIC

E

11


12

THE EBB AND FLOW OF IT

Whychus Creek, The place I can picture from halfway around the world, A creek that defines my sense of home. I know its path. I have uncovered places only I know exist. This place, I hold inside me From halfway around the world. PHOTO

N ATA L I E W E I G A N D

Audrey Tehan

AGE 19


T H E P L A C E W E C R O S S T H E W AT E R

In the Water: The Evolution of a Creek

Keeping the creek cool he irrigation diversions that began in Whychus Creek in 1871 exposed and dewatered sections of the creek less than 50 years later. The removal of most of the streamflow had devastating effects on water quality, fish, and aquatic habitat conditions. For almost a century, Whychus Creek watered canals and farmland while its creekbed sat hot and dry. In 1904, The Oregonian newspaper noted, “the water from the mountain PHOTO

RYAN HOUS TON

Whychus Creek becomes parched and dry when its waters are diverted.

streams that has heretofore flowed through canyons and gulches and over barren rocks is being diverted to the fertile soil in the rich valleys and on the level plains.” 4 When the waters of Whychus Creek, Indian Ford Creek, or Pole Creek are reduced to thin rivulets in the summer, the hot sun takes its toll. The less water that remains in the creekbed, the more rapidly that water heats up and becomes inhospitable for native coldwater fish. Information gathered by local organizations over the last 10 years shows that, in some sections, the waters of

13


14

I N T H E W AT E R

Whychus Creek are too hot for native fish for up to two months

so far. A permanent and lasting shift toward re-embracing the

out of the year.

creek and restoring holistic watershed health will emerge as our

7

Water temperature is one of the most pressing water quality concerns throughout the Whychus Creek watershed. It is self evident that fish need water but the fish that are native to Whychus Creek and its tributaries, redband and steelhead trout, also need

connection to the creek deepens. In addition to ongoing community collaboration on flow restoration projects, individual voices and stewardship actions will play a critical role in the story of this creek and its watershed.

cold water. In order to stay cool during the critical summer months, Whychus Creek needs more water than it has seen for the past 100 years.8 While there are other factors that affect water quality and stream health, the unnaturally low stream flows in Whychus Creek greatly compromise stream conditions for native fish and other aquatic species. Beginning in 1996, local conservation groups began to work with private landowners and irrigation districts to create new ways to return water to Whychus Creek. Although the vast majority of the water in Whychus Creek continues to be diverted out of the creek during the hot summer months, collaborative work between conservation organizations, farmers, private landowners, and the irrigation district has resulted in the permanent protection of 10 cubic feet per second in the creek as of 2008. Through water leasing, an additional 10 cubic feet per second has been temporarily protected instream in 2008. With shifting perceptions, many voices are rising together to express a vast amount of caring for Whychus Creek and the return of its waters. But, the evolution of a creek to a canal to a creek is not over. Keeping Whychus Creek cool enough for native fish throughout its entire length will require more water than amounts restored

SKETCHBOOK ENTRY

DAN PURVIS

By participating in watershed restoration and education, Sisters High School students connect to their home creek in meaningful and relevant ways.


T H E P L A C E W E C R O S S T H E W AT E R

Returning to the Creek: Native Fish Come Home

PHOTO

BRIAN HUDSPETH

“Until between 1890 and 1900, Whychus Creek had been the primary

redband trout. Whychus Creek currently contains a native strain

steelhead spawning and rearing stream in the upper Deschutes Basin,

of Interior Columbia Basin redband trout that is on the United

with a capacity estimated at 9,000 adults. Thereafter, its excellent

States Forest Service Sensitive species list. Highly significant and

spawning gravels often went unused because there was too little water

rare for the Interior Columbia Basin, Whychus Creek has never

left in the stream bed after irrigation withdrawals and the remaining

had hatchery rainbow trout planted into it.1

water became too warm for fish.”

Martin Winch

LOCAL HISTORIAN & AUTHOR

Whychus, historically, had stream conditions that included a valuable mix of cobble, gravels, and sand, thus providing an incredibly healthy habitat for native fish. Cool temperatures, shaded pools, and side channels provided an excellent home for

efore it was poked and prodded, Whychus Creek pro-

coldwater redband trout and wild steelhead. Throughout the

vided prime spawning and rearing habitat for wild

upper Deschutes Basin, it is estimated that Whychus Creek his-

migratory steelhead and spring chinook salmon as well as for resident

torically provided 42% of the total steelhead spawning habitat.1

15


16

RETURNING TO THE CREEK

When relegated to a canal, Whychus proved to be much less

coming years. As a part of their federal relicensing agreement,

hospitable to fish.

Portland General Electric and the Confederated Tribes of Warm

Now, as water is being returned to wet and cool the streambed of Whychus, migratory steelhead may return to populate the creek once more. Listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, steelhead spend a large portion of their lives in rivers and streams and are particularly affected by human-induced changes to stream habitat. Steelhead require specific stream conditions in order to survive through their long journey downstream, out to the ocean, and back upstream hundreds of miles to spawn in their home waters. Throughout their life cycle, steelhead need downed trees, deep pools, abundant gravel, and good sources of food.

Springs worked with many local partners to provide fish passage and return native migratory steelhead back to Whychus Creek. The return of hundreds of thousands of steelhead to Whychus in 2007 and 2008 is just the beginning of a decade’s long movement to return wildness to the place we cross the water. Through time, we have crossed the water in many ways and now, with buckets and backpacks full of fish, we cross the water to bring back native fish. While it is still unknown if or how many of these fish will make a successful journey to return to spawn in Whychus Creek, many hands and a vast amount of caring has been dedicated to ushering their safe return.

First proposed by Portland General Electric in 1949, the Pelton Round Butte dams sit on the Deschutes River and have blocked fish passage for migratory steelhead between Whychus Creek and the ocean since 1964. Some optimistic estimates claim that, prior to the construction and operation of the Pelton Round Butte dam complex, there were up to 9,000 spawning steelhead in Whychus Creek.3 Between 1965 and 2006, there were none. In the spring of 2007, almost 200,000 steelhead fry were released into Whychus Creek and many more will be released in the

Community members volunteered to assist with the reintroduction of almost 200,000 steelhead fry into Whychus Creek in 2007.

PHOTO

JIM YUSKAVITCH


T H E P L A C E W E C R O S S T H E W AT E R

A Sense of Place: Connecting to Whychus

“We got off the school bus and stepped onto a sturdy old bridge. It seemed unusually warm for October; it felt more like late August. In small groups, we began to hike. We were surrounded by a large variety of plants—cottonwoods, aspen, willow, mountain alders, lodgepole pine, ponderosa pine, and douglas fir. Our leader stopped to show us horsetail—it made a popping noise when you pulled it apart—she said that it was an ancient plant that needed a lot of water to survive. As we continued to walk downstream, the types of plants surrounding us began to change a bit. The horsetail disappeared and we began to notice a few juniper trees, bitterbrush, and more pines.”

Sydney Randall

AGE 16 PHOTOS

KOLLEEN YAKE

ocal students have returned to Whychus Creek to

“Walking around the dusty trail beside the creek, I looked around

explore its twists and turns, cobbles and gravels, pine forests

and smiled. The beauty of the area made me feel good that I was

and pathways through streamside artwork and poetry. Whether

at last learning about what I could do to help Whychus Creek and

through coordinated projects with local conservation groups or

make it a better place for animals and fish. The creek bubbled along

on their own time, young adults have connected to their creek in

to my left and farther away from the creekbed large ponderosa pine

many different ways. By knowing Whychus Creek, crossing the

trees loomed high above me.”

creek and touching its waters, both literally and emotionally, students have grown an interest in its restoration and protection.

Kelsey Neilson

AGE 16

17


18

A SENSE OF PLACE

Dear future students: This project on Whychus Creek was pretty awesome. We dug up many willows along an old canal and transplanted them along a degraded section of Whychus Creek which we dubbed Broken Bridge Bend. Even though the weather wasn’t very good—it snowed and even hailed on us—and we were trampling through the woods, I feel like I have learned so much about this creek! It is a part of me now and I am glad that I played a small part in protecting it.

Erin Kanzig

AGE 16

To the eyes of a high school student, Whychus Creek possesses a myriad of quiet corners to reflect upon, photograph, and sketch. Discovering these quiet corners in their own ways, students create OURNA FIELD J

L

A LY S S A

ALDER

personal and individualized connections to Whychus Creek.

“Even though I have lived in Sisters my whole life, I never really knew this creek. Now, after spending time on Whychus Creek, I know where Beginning in 2006, students from Sisters High School have

I am from.”

adopted many degraded streamside sites. A pine-scented blend of

Audrey Tehan

afternoon hikes, sweaty restoration work, streamside sketching,

AGE 19

macroinvertebrate discovery, and a two-week escape from walls of the classroom, a multi-year stewardship program between Sisters High School and local conservation organizations has folded students into hands-on projects to connect with Whychus Creek while actively restoring it. These students are current and future stewards of the health of the creek and they have committed themselves in many important ways to the restoration and protection of Whychus.

STREAMSIDE SKETCH

LAUREN KOLBERG


T H E P L A C E W E C R O S S T H E W AT E R

A Vast Amount of Caring: Collective Stewardship

“Well I wonder, what their real plan is for Squaw Creek. I’ve been curious about it…”

Jesse Edgington

SISTERS HOMESTEADER

A PA I N T I N G O F T H E H E A D W AT E R S O F W H YC H U S C R E E K

M A R E N B U RC K , AG E 17

or the past decade, community members, students,

ly in design and many others are planned for the near future.

conservation organizations, agencies, and many others

While several years are often needed to fully design and imple-

have come together to restore water and wildness to Whychus Creek.

ment the type of large on-the-ground projects that are necessary

In addition to the protected instream water and native fish that

to restore stream health, the momentum has been building and

have been returned to Whychus, multiple degraded riparian areas have

the shift toward embracing and protecting Whychus as a creek is

been adopted by various organizations and community groups for

well-fueled and inspired. There is more caring and commitment

ongoing stewardship projects, restoration, and watershed education.

invested in the work necessary to restore water, native fish, and

Several large scale habitat restoration projects are also currently underway. These on-theground projects will restore riparian and instream habitat and bring benefits for fish and wildlife by 2010. More than five miles worth of restoration projects are current-

healthy habitat to Whychus Creek than at any time in the past. Together, we have chosen to embrace Whychus Creek and restore wildness to the place we cross the water. “I’d like to see Squaw Creek run.”

Jesse Edgington

19


20

T H E P L A C E W E C R O S S T H E W AT E R

Endnotes 1

Deschutes National Forest. Whychus Creek Wild and Scenic River Resource Assessment. Sisters, Oregon: U.S. Forest Service, 2007.

2

Edgington, Jesse. Oral interview with Maret Pajutee, 1998.

3

Nehlsen, Willa. Historic Salmon and Steelhead Runs of the Upper Deschutes River and Their Environments. Portland, Oregon: Portland General Electric, 1995.

4

Winch, Martin. Biography of a Place: Passages Through a Central Oregon Meadow. Bend, Oregon: Deschutes Historical Society, 2006.

5

Oregon Water Resources Department: www.wrd.state.or.us.

6

Leopold, Aldo. A Sand County Almanac. New York: Oxford University Press, 1948.

7

Jones, Lesley. Methodology for Evaluating the Effectiveness of Instream Flow Restoration to Reduce Temperature. Bend, Oregon: Unpublished technical report. Upper Deschutes Watershed Council, In preparation.

8

Watershed Sciences. Whychus Creek Stream Temperature Modeling: Various Flow Scenarios. Portland, Oregon: Unpublished technical report. Deschutes River Conservancy, 2008.

PHOTO

JIM YUSKAVITCH


The City of Sisters History The town of Sisters derives its name from the three prominent Cascade peaks that grace the southwestern skyline: Faith, Hope, and Charity, collectively known as the Three Sisters. A very old story suggests that the mountains were named in the 1840s by members of a Methodist mission based in Salem. Others credit trappers who frequented the region in the early part of the 19th century. The town was officially christened when the post office at Camp Polk, some three miles to the north, closed in 1888 and was moved to the future town of Sisters. The new post office was moved to a store owned by John Smith, and local residents were invited to submit names for the new facility. Local merchant Jacob Quilberg's entry was accepted by the US Postal Department, and the handful of wood frame buildings lying at the junction of the Santiam and McKenzie roads officially became known as Sisters. Sheep traffic over the Santiam wagon road was responsible for the early growth of settlement. Then on July 10, 1901, two enterprising brothers, Alex and Robert Smith, officially platted the City of Sisters. As the only town between Prineville and the mountains, the newly platted town grew quickly. By 1904 the Prineville Herald wrote of Sisters, "there are two good stores, a hotel, blacksmith shop, saloon, real estate office, livery barn and a splendid schoolhouse costing $1,800, and a short distance from town is a fine lumbering mill." By the turn of the century, cattle raising had replaced sheep herding as the main industry in the region. In Sisters, cattle raising focused around the vast holdings of the Black Butte Land & Livestock Company. The large firm, begun by Nick Lambert, centered around two stations, the A.S. Holmes Ranch and the Black Butte Ranch. The company lasted until about 1920. Replacing the cattle industry was the logging industry. Sawmills, large and small, prospered in the rich forest land surrounding the town. The first large operation was the Duckett & Spoo mill, built in 1914. Before then small operations were common in the area as early as 1890. New businesses continued to open their doors to serve the needs of the ever-growing number of settlers and the future of Sisters looked bright. But two fires in the 1920s threatened to reduce this blossoming community to little more than ashes and fond memories. In May of 1923, local store owner Frank Leithauser noticed smoke coming from an untended garage near the center of town. The garage housed equipment used for work on the McKenzie Highway. Flames spread quickly, igniting at least 10 of the town's wood frame structures in less than 20 minutes. There were fewer than 10 men in town to fight the blaze because everyone else was in nearby Redmond to attend a track meet. The flames moved west and attacked the town drug store owned by George Aitken. Above the store was Forest Service office space. In an attempt to save important documents, Mrs. Fred McKinney attempted to gain entry into the building, but she was driven back by the intense heat.


Mrs. McKinney suffered a scorched face and forearm, and all Forest Service documents in the building were destroyed. It was estimated that several hundred people from the area gathered to watch the blaze, which could be seen for miles. People in the surrounding countryside initially thought it was a forest fire. In September of 1924 the town was again set upon by flames. And although half of the town subsequently burned, the townspeople considered themselves lucky. Had the Hotel Sisters and the Sorensen service station across the street caught fire, it was widely believed that the entire town would have been destroyed. The total loss was estimated at $25,000. Like many towns, Sisters has had its ups and downs in subsequent years. in 1946 after several failed attempts the city was officially incorporated. In the 1980s, the city weathered a deep economic crisis and emerged as a tourist destination. The economic upswing was spurred by the redevelopment of the old Black Butte Land & Livestock holdings to the west and was further fueled by the establishment of Bend is a region wide tourist destination. Once again Sisters profited by its location as the last major stopping point before traveling over the Cascade Mountains.


















SCHOOLS


OREGON AT-A-GLANCE SCHOOL PROFILE Sisters Elementary School

2018-19

PRINCIPAL: Becky Stoughton | GRADES: K-4 | 611 E Cascade, Sisters 97759 | 541-549-8981

Students We Serve

School Environment

323

Academic Progress

CLASS SIZE

REGULAR ATTENDERS

INDIVIDUAL STUDENT PROGRESS

Median class size.

Students who attended more than 90% of their enrolled school days.

Year-to-year progress in English language arts and mathematics.

Student Enrollment

Increase from previous year

Increase from previous year

2

2%

DEMOGRAPHICS American Indian/Alaska Native Students

2%

Teachers

0%

21

86%

Asian Students

<1%

Teachers

0%

Black/African American Students

1%

Teachers

0%

Hispanic/Latino Students

7%

Teachers

0%

Students

2% 0%

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Students

1%

Teachers

0%

Oregon average

25

80%

Academic Success ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

MATHEMATICS

SCIENCE

Students meeting state grade-level expectations.

Students meeting state grade-level expectations.

Students meeting state grade-level expectations.

Multiracial Teachers

Oregon average

Decrease from previous year

Increase from previous year

8%

3%

58%

Coming in 2019-20

51%

White Students

87%

Teachers

100%

5%

5

Ever English Learners

Languages Spoken

12% 84% 34% Students with Disabilities

Required Vaccinations

Free/ Reduced Price Lunch

*<10 students or data unavailable

School Website: www.sisters.k12.or.us

Oregon average

Oregon average

49%

46%

School Goals

State Goals

Safe & Welcoming Environment

Sisters Elementary School has three goals that align with the school district. 1. Every student will be on track for their grade level · We have systems for identifying and supporting our lowest 20% of our students to achieve growth 2. We will support student mental health · We are focusing on Socio Emotional Learning and support systems for all students 3. We will provide options for our students · In connection with our community partners we are providing multiple options for our students including art, music, PE, science club, garden club and Chinese.

The Oregon Department of Education is partnering with school districts and local communities to ensure a 90% ontime, four year graduation rate by 2025. To progress toward this goal, the state will prioritize efforts to improve attendance, provide a well-rounded education, invest in implementing culturally responsive practices, and promote continuous improvement to close opportunity and achievement gaps for historically and currently underserved students.

Our school strives to ensure all students and their parents feel welcome to our school. We have routines and procedures in place that encourage parents to be a part of the educational process for their students while still maintaining a safe and secure building. We have bilingual staff in our office and building who collaborate to support our Spanish speaking families. Socio Emotional Learning (SEL) is a priority and we provide daily instruction and reinforcement in helping our students learn to be accepting and welcoming to all.

For more information please visit: www.oregon.gov/ode/reports-and-data/


OREGON AT-A-GLANCE SCHOOL PROFILE CONTINUED Sisters Elementary School

2018-19

PRINCIPAL: Becky Stoughton | GRADES: K-4 | 611 E Cascade, Sisters 97759 | 541-549-8981

Our Staff (rounded FTE)

17 Teachers

3

Outcomes REGULAR ATTENDERS

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

MATHEMATICS

American Indian/Alaska Native <10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

Asian <10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

Black/African American <10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

94%

Hispanic/Latino Multiracial <10 students or data unavailable Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander <10 students or data unavailable

Educational assistants

86%

White Free/Reduced Price Lunch

81%

1

Counselors

11% Average teacher turnover rate

79% % of licensed teachers with more than 3 years of experience

No

Same principal in the last 3 years

27% <10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

62% 48%

85%

Ever English Learner

27% <10 students or data unavailable

53% 39%

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

71%

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

Migrant <10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

Students with Disabilities

Talented and Gifted <10 students or data unavailable Female

88%

Male

85%

Non-Binary <10 students or data unavailable

58% 58% <10 students or data unavailable

42% 59% <10 students or data unavailable

About Our School BULLYING, HARASSMENT, AND SAFETY POLICIES

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

PARENT ENGAGEMENT

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

To ensure a safe and secure learning environment for all students, our school implements a PBIS plan and a safety plan. Our administration, counselor, teachers and school staff work with parents and students on a case-by-case basis to address conflict between students and to provide counseling and instruction in positive peer relationships. Our counselor and teachers provide regular, systematic Socio Emotional Learning (SEL) instruction that includes the topics of bullying and harassment. Students who display positive character traits are recognized for their efforts. Our safety plan is reviewed and updated annually and students and staff participate regularly in safety drills. Staff collaborates with our School Resource Officer as needs arise.

It is the goal of Sisters Elementary School to develop each child to their fullest potential. To accomplish this we provide every student with the opportunity to explore multiple disciplines that help them discover and understand their unique interests and abilities. We partner with community organizations to provide activities such as art, Chinese, after school strings, garden club and science club in addition to regularly offered music, physical education and Socio Emotional Learning (SEL).

We value our parents as collaborators and partners. We have an active SPTC (Sisters Parent Teacher Community) that hosts a variety of well attended curriculum nights throughout the year to engage families with the school. Additionally they sponsor three service projects offering our students ways to give back to their community. Twice a year our students showcase their art to our community as a part of our Studio 2 School Grant. This year we also engaged several families in our Latino Family Literacy afternoons and are seeking other ways to expand on our success.

Sisters Elementary School is fortunate to have a community that partners with their schools. We have collaborated with Sisters Folk Festival to implement a five year Studio 2 School grant to bring enriched arts education into our schools. We have an art teacher, artists in residence, and expanded music offerings as a result of this partnership. We also work with the Roundhouse Foundation, The Science Club, Seed to Table, and Sisters Educational Foundation to provide enhanced educational opportunities. Our students engage in three service learning projects throughout the year- a Halloween Candy drive for Operation Gratitude, a sock drive for our FAN program, and a PB&J drive collecting food for our local food bank sponsored by the Kiwanis.

Data are suppressed to protect confidential student information.

For more information please visit: www.oregon.gov/ode/reports-and-data/


OREGON AT-A-GLANCE SCHOOL PROFILE Sisters Middle School

2018-19

PRINCIPAL: Marshall Jackson | GRADES: 5-8 | 15200 McKenzie Hwy, Sisters 97759 | 541-549-2099

Students We Serve

School Environment

323

Academic Progress

CLASS SIZE

REGULAR ATTENDERS

INDIVIDUAL STUDENT PROGRESS

Median class size.

Students who attended more than 90% of their enrolled school days.

Year-to-year progress in English language arts and mathematics.

Student Enrollment

Decrease from previous year

Increase from previous year

1

3%

DEMOGRAPHICS American Indian/Alaska Native Students

1%

Teachers

0%

21

86%

Asian Students

1%

Teachers

0%

Black/African American Students

<1%

Teachers

0%

Hispanic/Latino Students

13%

Teachers

0%

Students

1% 0%

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Students

1%

Teachers

0%

Oregon average

25

80%

Academic Success ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

MATHEMATICS

SCIENCE

Students meeting state grade-level expectations.

Students meeting state grade-level expectations.

Students meeting state grade-level expectations.

Multiracial Teachers

Oregon average

Increase from previous year

Decrease from previous year

1%

9%

69%

Coming in 2019-20

41%

White Students

83%

Teachers

100%

5%

3

Ever English Learners

Languages Spoken

9%

89% 22%

Students with Disabilities

Required Vaccinations

Free/ Reduced Price Lunch

*<10 students or data unavailable

School Website: www.sisters.k12.or.us

Oregon average

Oregon average

54%

39%

School Goals

State Goals

Safe & Welcoming Environment

Sisters Middle School goals are focused on holistic wellness, intervention and enrichment offerings, and school-community relationships. During the 2019-2020 school year 100% of our students will have weekly SEL lessons and preventative care guidance lessons, will participate in a PIE (Proactive Interventions & Enrichment) period in their area of need or strength, and will participate in service learning projects.

The Oregon Department of Education is partnering with school districts and local communities to ensure a 90% ontime, four year graduation rate by 2025. To progress toward this goal, the state will prioritize efforts to improve attendance, provide a well-rounded education, invest in implementing culturally responsive practices, and promote continuous improvement to close opportunity and achievement gaps for historically and currently underserved students.

Students’ sense of security comes through well executed safety plans and the scaffolding of supports put in place for open communication and student wellness. Students, parents and families are welcomed in a variety of ways at Sisters Middle School. Positive relationship building starts at the beginning of the day when students and families are greeted as they enter the door. Parents are communicated with by phone, email, online learning platforms and in-person. The teachers communicate regularly with families and the principal sends monthly newsletters and coffee chats.

For more information please visit: www.oregon.gov/ode/reports-and-data/


OREGON AT-A-GLANCE SCHOOL PROFILE CONTINUED Sisters Middle School

2018-19

PRINCIPAL: Marshall Jackson | GRADES: 5-8 | 15200 McKenzie Hwy, Sisters 97759 | 541-549-2099

Our Staff (rounded FTE)

15 Teachers

2

Outcomes REGULAR ATTENDERS

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

MATHEMATICS

American Indian/Alaska Native <10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

Asian <10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

Black/African American <10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

Multiracial <10 students or data unavailable Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander <10 students or data unavailable

Educational assistants

Counselors

15% Average teacher turnover rate

89% % of licensed teachers with more than 3 years of experience

No

Same principal in the last 3 years

63%

72%

Ever English Learner

80%

Students with Disabilities

78%

23%

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

85%

White Free/Reduced Price Lunch

1

88%

Hispanic/Latino

71%

44%

53%

8%

53%

7%

<10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

60%

Migrant <10 students or data unavailable Talented and Gifted

93%

Female

87%

Male

85%

Non-Binary <10 students or data unavailable

<5% >95%

73% 65% <10 students or data unavailable

>95% 41% 40% <10 students or data unavailable

About Our School BULLYING, HARASSMENT, AND SAFETY POLICIES

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

PARENT ENGAGEMENT

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Our school has honed in on school safety by renovating the school to better ensure student safety within and around our school. Safety plan protocols and practices at SMS go above and beyond the required regulations. Our student handbook outlines the policies, procedures, and behavior matrices necessary to ensure the rights and safety of all students. Sisters Middle School enacts a PBIS plan school-wide. We also provides class sections such as Thrive and PIE which encompass academic and socialemotional supports. Further we have counseling services that are integrated to compliment all of the above.

Sisters Middle School offers a variety of opportunities for students to explore areas of interest to aide in providing a wellrounded, cultured education. Sports programming, strings, OSU SMILE Club, homework support, SOLE, ECOS, Leadership, Battle of the Books, Science Club, Outdoor School and Chess Club are just some of our extracurricular offerings.

Sisters Middle School strives to involve all parents in their child’s learning. Our parents volunteer in a myriad of ways to support all developmental areas during and after the school day. Our school provides many showcases, open houses and enrichment nights to foster home-school connections and parent learning.

Community engagement is the essence of Sisters School District. High leverage collaborations between the middle school and community have been in places for many years. Organizations such as the Sisters Folk Festival, Sisters Science Club, Seed to Table, Roundhouse Foundation, and Sisters Educational Foundation amongst others have partnered with our schools to enrich the offerings and experiences our school provides.

Data are suppressed to protect confidential student information.

For more information please visit: www.oregon.gov/ode/reports-and-data/


OREGON AT-A-GLANCE SCHOOL PROFILE Sisters High School

2018-19

PRINCIPAL: Joe Hosang | GRADES: 9-12 | 1700 W McKinney Butte Rd, Sisters 97759 | 541-549-4045

Students We Serve

School Environment

463

Academic Progress

CLASS SIZE

REGULAR ATTENDERS

ON-TRACK TO GRADUATE

Median size of classes in core subjects.

Students who attended more than 90% of their enrolled school days.

Students earning one-quarter of graduation credits in their 9th grade year.

Student Enrollment

Increase from previous year

Decrease from previous year

Increase from previous year

3

2%

1%

DEMOGRAPHICS American Indian/Alaska Native Students

2%

Teachers

0%

22

76%

90%

Asian Students

2%

Teachers

0%

Black/African American Students

<1%

Teachers

0%

Hispanic/Latino Students

6%

Teachers

0%

Multiracial Students

4%

Teachers

0%

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Students

1%

Teachers

0%

Oregon average

Oregon average

Oregon average

25

80%

85%

Academic Success ON-TIME GRADUATION

FIVE-YEAR COMPLETION

COLLEGE GOING

Students earning a diploma within four years. Cohort includes students who were first-time ninth graders in 2014-15. Increase from previous year

Students earning a high school diploma or GED within five years.

Students enrolling in a two or four year college within one year of completing high school, as reported by the National Student Clearinghouse.

Increase from previous year

Increase from previous year

7%

7%

2%

89%

94%

72%

White Students

84%

Teachers

100%

<5%

4

Ever English Learners

Languages Spoken

12% 93% 18% Students with Disabilities

Required Vaccinations

Free/ Reduced Price Lunch

*<10 students or data unavailable

School Website: www.sisters.k12.or.us

Oregon average

Oregon average

Oregon average

79%

85%

62%

School Goals

State Goals

Safe & Welcoming Environment

Sisters High School is determined to ensure all seniors will attain and demonstrate the necessary competencies that allow students to graduate and broadly prepare them to transition into college and the workplace. We will accomplish this by improving our attendance, implementing bi-weekly grade level teacher meetings, ensure all teachers improve their use of writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization and reading strategies.

The Oregon Department of Education is partnering with school districts and local communities to ensure a 90% ontime, four year graduation rate by 2025. To progress toward this goal, the state will prioritize efforts to improve attendance, provide a well-rounded education, invest in implementing culturally responsive practices, and promote continuous improvement to close opportunity and achievement gaps for historically and currently underserved students.

Our mission is to provide a caring community built on strong relationships, that sets and achieves high standards where learning is positive and engaging for all. Everything we do is built on relationships and building a community where we take care of each other in school and out of school.

For more information please visit: www.oregon.gov/ode/reports-and-data/


OREGON AT-A-GLANCE SCHOOL PROFILE CONTINUED Sisters High School

2018-19

PRINCIPAL: Joe Hosang | GRADES: 9-12 | 1700 W McKinney Butte Rd, Sisters 97759 | 541-549-4045

Our Staff (rounded FTE)

22 Teachers

6

Outcomes REGULAR ATTENDERS

ON-TRACK TO GRADUATE

American Indian/Alaska Native <10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

100%

Asian <10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

100%

Black/African American <10 students or data unavailable

<10 students or data unavailable

100%

<10 students or data unavailable

88%

<10 students or data unavailable

100%

91%

Hispanic/Latino

82%

Multiracial

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander <10 students or data unavailable

Educational assistants

White Free/Reduced Price Lunch

<10 students or data unavailable

Counselors

Students with Disabilities

90%

66%

8%

Average teacher turnover rate

88% % of licensed teachers with more than 3 years of experience

80% Data not available

71%

92%

64% 100%

<10 students or data unavailable

89%

Talented and Gifted

Male

89%

88% <10 students or data unavailable

Migrant <10 students or data unavailable

Female

<10 students or data unavailable

76%

Ever English Learner <10 students or data unavailable

2

ON-TIME GRADUATION

100%

<10 students or data unavailable

80%

95%

73%

Non-Binary <10 students or data unavailable

90%

84% Coming in 2019-20

89% Coming in 2019-20

About Our School ADVANCED COURSEWORK

CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

PARENT & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Our school offers various AP courses. Highlights Include: Biology, US History, Art, Chinese, Calculus, English Literature

Sisters High School has three amazing CTE Programs of Study, Culinary Arts, Health Services and Engineering Technologies with a learning area of Industrial and Engineering Systems. We are also developing our Flight Science program to become a full program of study as defined by Oregon Department of Education

We offer a wide range of co-curricular activities that foster the development of lifelong values of teamwork, leadership, dedication, sportsmanship, goal setting, maintaining composure, poise, developing a strong work, balancing busy schedules, and living a healthy lifestyle, which will ultimately assist our students in becoming contributing members of the community. Beyond wins and losses, the primary goal of our co-curricular activities is to build character.

Our community is very close and supportive of the students and instructional staff. We have many strong community partnerships that catapult our programs. Our educational community strives to ensure that every student is known, and taught, as an individual in order to enhance the learning environment. We are a community that embraces and values science and the arts. Our community and our partnerships are instrumental in the success of our programs: Americana, outdoor experiential education flight science, the luthier program, engineering, culinary arts, EMT/Health careers, and so many more.

We also offer dual-enrollment courses through two community colleges. Highlights include: Math 111 & 112, Writing 121, Health Occupations, Engineering and Design

Yes

Same principal in the last 3 years

Data are suppressed to protect confidential student information.

For more information please visit: www.oregon.gov/ode/reports-and-data/


DEMOGRAPHICS


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FOR CENTRAL OREGON

2020 CENTRAL OREGON ECONOMIC PROFILE 705 SW BONNETT WAY SUITE 1000 BEND, OR 97702 541.388.3236

EDCOINFO.COM #EDCOINFO @EDCOINFO


Table of Contents Welcome........................................................................................................ 2 Central Oregon Overview................................................................................ 3 Population..................................................................................................... 4 Move.............................................................................................................. 6 Relocate / Expand.......................................................................................... 7 Start................................................................................................................ 8 Entrepreneurial Support................................................................................. 9 Grow............................................................................................................... 10 Workforce...................................................................................................... 11 Delivering What Is Expected......................................................................... 12 Transportation............................................................................................... 13 Services / Infrastructure................................................................................ 14 Top Employers............................................................................................... 15 Foundations of Central Oregon’s Economy................................................... 16 Lifestyle......................................................................................................... 20 About EDCO................................................................................................... 21

Welcome to Central Oregon Where the commute times are short and breathtaking views await you at every turn. The region features dramatic snow-capped mountain ranges and high desert plateaus within Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties. Located halfway between San Francisco and Seattle, the hottest small metropolitan market in the U.S. is Central Oregon. In the last decade the region has seen some of the highest sustained GDP growth, job growth and population growth. With these factors in mind, The Milken Institute has named the region the best small metropolitan in the nation three years in a row – a feat no other location has ever received. Central Oregon is pulling extraordinary talent and capital, fostering a diverse and highly entrepreneurial business ecosystem. Lured by natural scenic beauty and big city amenities (world-class health care, education, dining) without big city costs or hassle, people are learning that having a true work-life balance is possible. Employees are happier; companies are more innovative and capital-efficient. All in a region dominated by small to mid-sized firms that compete globally – and win. Page 2 - Economic Development for Central Oregon


CENTRAL OREGON OVERVIEW Regional Population:

240,280

Regional Labor Force:

117,050

Bend-Redmond MSA GDP Per Capita:

$46,903

(2019 estimates from Portland State University)

(Seasonally adjusted total for Q1 2019 from Oregon Employment Department)

(2017 estimate from the Bureau of Economic Analysis) *Bureau of Economic Analysis data is only available for the Bend-Redmond MSA

Access to and from our region has never been easier with six national carriers flying 52+ segments daily to 10 international airports. The best part? Travel through the Redmond airport is a breeze. edcoinfo.com - Page 3


POPULATION

Central Oregon has been among the fastest growing regions anywhere in the U.S.

“Net migration is one

In-migration has been the dominating factor in the region’s

of Oregon’s competitive

growth with approximately 7,000 new residents moving to the

advantages as we have

area from all over the country every year. At the same time, the region’s ability to attract young families has resulted in strong

historically been able

birth rates.

to attract new residents

POPULATION CHANGES FOR CENTRAL OREGON

Area Oregon

Percent Change 2010 - 2018

Net Migration % 2010 - 2018

9.5%

75.8%

Counties Deschutes County

19.8%

90.4%

Jefferson County

8.5%

64%

Crook County

8.3%

119%

Source: Population Research Center, PSU, April 2019. (April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018)

Page 4 - Economic Development for Central Oregon

to the state, expanding the labor force.” Damon Runberg Regional Economist, State of Oregon Employment Department


PAGE TITLE HERE

NEW RESIDENTS, NEW IDEAS & NEW ENERGY

#6 FASTEST

POPULATION GROWTH IN THE U.S.

With over 4.5 million visitors flocking to Central Oregon each year, it proves a great introduction to our region’s culture, lifestyle and a great first impression for businesses. Central Oregon and the Bend-Redmond MSA continually top the nation in population growth. In fact Bend has been among the 15 fastest growing cities in the U.S. four of the last five years. While our population grows, so does our workforce. We’re cultivating a community that has consciously decided to

- U.S. CENSUS, 2018

live here and work towards making our region an even better place to live.

POPULATION TOTALS FOR CENTRAL OREGON

Bend

2000 3,421,399 19,184 115,367 52,029

La Pine

Not incorporated

Area Oregon Crook County Deschutes County

Redmond Sisters Unincorporated Jefferson County Tri-County Total

13,481 959 48,898 19,009 153,560

2010 3,837,300 21,020 157,905 76,740 1,660 26,225 2,040 51,240 21,750 200,675

2015 4,013,845 21,085 170,740 81,310 1,670 27,050 2,280 53,151 22,445 214,270

2017 4,141,000 22,105 182,930 86,765 1,730 28,265 2,540 63,630 23,190 228,225

2018 4,195,300 22,710 188,980 89,505 1,840 29,190 2,725 65,720 23,560 235,250

% Growth 2010-2018

9.3% 8.0% 19.7% 16.6% 10.8% 11.3% 33.6% 28.3% 8.3% 17.2%

Source: Population Research Center, PSU. 1990 and 2000 Census numbers are for April 1 of that year; 2013-2018 data are for July 1 of that year.

edcoinfo.com - Page 5


We guide employers outside the region through the relocation process as a resource for regional data, incentives, talent, site selection, and A-Z problem solving.

MOVE Business Cost Comparison Oregon offers more incentive programs to traded-sector businesses (companies that sell products or services outside the area) than Washington and California combined. Even without taking those incentives into consideration, Oregon is still a more cost-effective choice for doing business. Contact EDCO for a detailed look at the business costs in Central Oregon.

OR

CA

WA

Avg. Electricity Rate (¢/kWh)

6.91¢

11.23¢

5.24¢

Avg. Natural Gas Rate ($/kcf)

$5.02

$8.64

$6.31

State & Local Sales Tax Rate

None

8.5%

9.2%

State Business Tax Climate Index

#7

#49

#20

Sources: Tax Foundation 2019, US Energy Information Association (Natural Gas) Feb. 2019, US Energy Information Association (Electricity) Mar. 2019

“We fell in love with everything the area has to offer and EDCO gave us the guidance needed to prove our case that Central Oregon is a great place to do business.” - Jeff Cummingham – GM/VP of Global Sales, Aquaglide

Case Study: Last year Aquaglide, one of the world’s premier inflatable water sport product companies, was in the process of being acquired by outdoor industry powerhouse Kent Watersports through Connelly Skis, one of Kent’s iconic brands. EDCO worked with Aquaglide providing location options, cost comparisons and more, to show Kent Watersports the many benefits of relocating Aquaglide to Bend. After months of back and forth discussions, Kent Watersports was convinced that the move was a financially responsible decision and great for their employees. One year later Aquaglide now operates its headquarters from Central Oregon, with a team of 10 which were hired locally. For Aquaglide, the lifestyle and ability to attract the top level talent that Central Oregon provides was the defining factor in relocating to Bend. Page 6 - Economic Development for Central Oregon


RELOCATE & EXPAND

Get connected to our growing industry clusters that include: Breweries, Bio, Recreation, Technology, Building Products, Automotive, Aerospace, and Advanced Manufacturing.

Our tools to help your company include: linking with the local supply chain, finding talent, incentives, business finance, and more.

WHY CENTRAL OREGON? When compared against its neighbors to the north and south, Oregon’s overall business costs rank significantly lower. Average electricity rates, natural gas rates, state & local sales tax rates, and business tax climates in particular are significantly lower than the national average. For a relocating business, Central Oregon has a reputation for welcoming new companies without sacrificing workforce,

We help you navigate the regional and local real estate market, infrastructure and permitting processes.

talent, quality healthcare, transportation, or infrastructure. EDCO’s resources and connections can help your business make the right decisions when choosing a new home.

edcoinfo.com - Page 7


* EDIT TITLE START

We mentor and advise scalable young companies from concept to exit on issues such as access to capital, critical expertise and business strategy.

“Organizations like EDCO are critical for business creation and development in any community. That said, the wicked smart and driven people that Roger Lee has assembled at EDCO are the best. The team listens to its customers (and community) and pushes hard for big results. Their monthly PubTalk meetups or the Bend Venture Conference (BVC) are two examples of some of the best programs I’ve seen in Oregon. Without EDCO and its incredible team the entrepreneur community in Central Oregon would be greatly disadvantaged. For me, EDCO has provided the platform and resources to move from a big city, start my business and grow into a global leader in our market. Thank you EDCO for all you do!” - Justin Johnson, Founder and CEO – LeadMethod

Case Study: In 2013 LeadMethod Founder & CEO Justin Johnson moved from Seattle to Bend. Unsure how to immerse himself in the business community, he reached out to EDCO for resources that allowed him to connect with many local leaders, influencers and mentors. One local resource he connected with was the Bend Venture Conference, and in 2017 LeadMethod walked away from the annual angel investing event with over $485,000 in funding. The winners of the largest Angel Conference in the West kicked their growth into high gear. The money raised from BVC allowed LeadMethod to increase their staff by 50% and move into a new 5,000 square foot office space, giving them both the manpower and room to scale the business while also adding the ability to test new and innovative ideas. LeadMethod, creator of the first channel revenue optimization software, allows manufacturers and distributors to get more information on the leads provided throughout the entire sales cycle. With 25% of their customers surpassing $1 billion in revenue, they continue to gain industry trust worldwide while expanding their footprint in Bend. Page 8 - Economic Development for Central Oregon


ENTREPRENEURIAL SUPPORT

A driving force for our economic performance is a collaborative and inclusive entrepreneurial community. This is supported via the number of new business registrations, which has outpaced far larger cities. In 2018, Bend entrepreneurs registered one new business for every 26 residents, the most registrations per capita of any medium or large city in the state. The region is large enough to provide resources and access to capital that help new entrepreneurs get started, while still being small enough that those resources are interconnected to support businesses as they grow. Unique to Central Oregon, given its size, are the numerous community resources and assets that are available. Assets managed by EDCO include monthly Central Oregon PubTalks, the Stable of Experts (mentors) and the largest Angel Conference in the West, the Bend Venture Conference.

METROPOLITAN AREAS WHERE FIRST FINANCINGS ARE RISING Area

National Rank

% Change (Annualized) 2013-2017

National Rank

% Change (Annualized) 2009-2014

Des Moines-West Des Moines, IA

1

7.7%

No Rank

0.0%

Lexington-Fayette, KY

1

7.7%

23

7.5%

Boulder, CO

3

5.4%

No Rank

0.0%

Bend-Redmond, OR

4

5.3%

3

31.6%

Columbus, OH

5

4.7%

18

12.3%

Source: Startupsusa.org, April 2018. (April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017) While the general trend shows that the total amount of startup funding is down across the country, this is not the case in Central Oregon, according to the Center for American Entrepreneurship. Deschutes County placed #4 among all U.S. metros for growth in first financings of startups from 2013-14 to 2016-17 and #3 in the preceding period. edcoinfo.com - Page 9


GROW

We partner with local traded-sector companies to help them grow and expand, offering them the very same incentives and assistance as relocation projects.

“EDCO was an instrumental part in bringing Laird Superfood to Sisters. From connecting us with key employee hires, finding available land to build our new facility, helping us secure forgivable loans with the city and county, leading us through tax incentives, EDCO went above and beyond the call of duty in support of our business. This was the determining factor in building our business in Central Oregon.” -Paul Hodge, CEO, Laird Superfood

Case Study: In November 2015 Laird Superfood started its operations with just three employees in Sisters, Oregon. Their flagship product, Laird Superfood creamer was making waves across the natural products market thanks in-part to the company’s namesake and co-founder, Laird Hamilton. The company creates clean, all natural superfood products that are sustainably grown and responsibly sourced, including coffee creamers and hydration products. Today, the company has over 80 employees and a brand new 20,000+ sq. ft. state-of-the-art campus. A recent investment from global co-working giant WeWork (now The We Company) gave the company the capital needed to continue their expansion with innovative growth plans. What started as an idea would not have been possible in Sisters without help from EDCO. Laird Superfood CEO Paul Hodge had recently moved to the Sisters community and wasn’t convinced manufacturing a globally distributed product would be possible in a city with just 2,700 residents. EDCO quickly aligned city and county leadership, state government and local support to give Laird Superfood the resources needed to launch. From incentives to land selection, workforce and development assistance, EDCO worked closely with the company, providing the necessary help for them to achieve a successful start with roots firmly planted in Sisters.

Page 10 - Economic Development for Central Oregon


WORKFORCE

#2 FASTEST JOB GROWTH IN THE U.S. - BLS, 2017

MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT GROWTH (2010-2016) U.S.

7.2%

Oregon

19%

Deschutes County

57%

Redmond

81%

Source: State of Oregon Employment Department, 2019

Private sector employment growth in the region was 26% higher than Oregon’s average over the last 10 years, and is projected to grow by 18% - Business Oregon’s Regional Competitive Industry Analysis, 2016 through 2024.

Workforce Development Internships provide students with real work experience 200 Successful Interships Placed Since Launch Four years in the making, Youth CareerConnect is a collaborative regional effort connecting high school and college students with employers for internships that benefit both. Four organizations lead local programs with dedicated staff including Chambers of Commerce in Bend, Madras and Prineville, as well as EDCO in Redmond and Sisters. With significant financial and organizational support from non-profits Better Together and East Cascades Works, 120 businesses signed up to host interns with 257 students competing for the positions during the 2018-19 school year. Stories of how both young adults and local employers are being transformed in the process are truly inspirational. To get involved, visit: youthcareerconnect.org.

edcoinfo.com - Page 11


DELIVERING WHAT IS EXPECTED

DESCHUTES COUNTY

#1

COUNTY RECEIVING MOST INVESTMENT IN OREGON

“Bend enjoys a truly collaborative environment. Everyone is not only supportive of each other, but excited to see one another grow. We share the same trails, rivers and slopes and ultimately share a similar vision to help Bend succeed.” Scott Allan GM, Hydro Flask

-SMARTASSET, 2019

The combination of a collaborative culture, a supportive attitude among government and economic development agencies, plus a location that attracts talent and investment all help Central Oregon compete nationally.

INCOMING INVESTMENT BY COUNTY IN OREGON New Building Federal GDP Growth Permits Funding (millions) (per 1,000 homes) (per capita)

Incoming Investment Index

Rank

County

Business Growth

1

Deschutes

11.1%

$1,181

26.5

$333

63.28

2

Multnomah

6.1%

$4,816

15.0

$898

48.53

3

Washington

5.9%

$2,728

14.8

$404

46.22

4

Clackamas

5.1%

$2,081

15.0

$646

45.23

9

Crook

3.7%

$90

10.5

$389

36.95

16

Jefferson

3.1%

$66

5.7

$198

30.57

Oregon Totals

1.7%

$613

6.9

$342

Source: SmartAsset, 2019

Page 12 - Economic Development for Central Oregon


TRANSPORTATION Average Commute Times

AIR

32.8 min

30.9 min

30 min

27.5 min

26.1 min

25.3 min

20 min

15.3 min

10 min

Redmond Municipal Airport (RDM; www.flyrdm.com) provides commercial air service with 26 daily round-trip flights to Denver, Los Angeles, Mesa, Phoenix, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, Chicago, Las Vegas, and Seattle via six carriers (Alaska, Allegiant, American, Delta, Sun Country Airlines, and United).

0 min

co

cis

ran nF

Sa

les

ge

n sA

Lo

le

att

Se

d

lan

rt Po

er

nv

De

nd

Be

The Central Oregon average commute time is

21 minutes each way, saving the average worker over one work week per year! Source: Census.gov 2019

Travel Time & Distance by Car BEND, OR

RAIL

PORTLAND, OR

153 miles 3 hours, 13 minutes

OLYMPIA, WA

269 miles 4 hours, 55 minutes

Burlington Northern-Santa Fe (BNSF), Union Pacific (UPRR) and the City of Prineville Railway (COPR) provide

SEATTLE, WA

328 miles 5 hours, 45 minutes

173 miles 3 hours, 22 minutes

BOISE, ID

317 miles 5 hours, 19 minutes

SAN FRANCISCO, CA

direct connections for shipping to any market in the United States, Canada and Mexico.

MEDFORD, OR

491 miles 7 hours, 54 minutes

LOS ANGELES, CA

821 miles 12 hours, 39 minutes

Travel Time By Air REDMOND, OR

FREIGHT

PORTLAND, OR

RDM

40 min

SEATTLE, WA SALT LAKE CITY, UT

1 hour

1 hour, 30 minutes

LAS VEGAS, NV

U.S. Highways 97 and 20 are two of the state’s major trucking routes, with access to major metro areas with connections to Interstate 5 (N-S) and Interstate 84 (E-W).

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 1 hour, 40 minutes

1 hour, 43 minutes

DENVER, CO

LOS ANGELES, CA 2 hour, 10 minutes

2 hours, 15 minutes

CHICAGO, IL

PHOENIX & MESA, AZ 2 hour, 25 minutes

3 hours, 40 minutes

edcoinfo.com - Page 13


SERVICES & INFRASTRUCTURE

UTILITIES Because most of our region has been built new in the past two decades, our telecommunications infrastructure is one of the Northwest’s most technologically advanced, meeting business and telecommuting requirements for capacity, redundancy and reliability.

EDUCATION Central Oregon is well-recognized for its high level of education, with some of the best K-12 public schools in the nation. In 2018, the Bend-La Pine school district’s average SAT scores surpassed the national average by over 100 points. Additionally, our higher education opportunities abound. From Oregon State University-Cascades ongoing expansion, to Central Oregon Community College’s four campuses in the region, there are opportunities for all to obtain a quality education.

HEALTHCARE Top quality healthcare is one of Central Oregon’s crown jewels. St. Charles Health System is the largest healthcare provider in the region, and is also the largest employer with over 4,400 employees across the tri-county area. A network of more than 100 clinics and specialty practices further support the community.

Page 14 - Economic Development for Central Oregon


Rank 2019 2018

TOP EMPLOYERS CENTRAL OREGON RANKED IN THE NATION FOR GDP GROWTH AT

#1

8.1%

- Bureau of Economic Analysis, 2016

2018 Central Oregon Industry Composition Trade, Transportation, & Utilities

18%

Education & Health Services

16%

Leisure & Hospitality

15% 13%

Total All Government Professional & Business Services

11%

Manufacturing

8% 7%

Construction Financial Activities

4%

Other Services

4%

Information

2%

Natural Resources & Mining

2%

2019 Central Oregon Largest 50 Private Employers

Source: State of Oregon Employment Department, 2019

According to the Oregon Employment Department, 78% of Oregon establishments have nine or fewer employees and the average private establishment employs 11 people. Still, a number of large employers operate successfully here, tapping into Central Oregon’s ever-expanding workforce, the overall low cost of doing business and business-friendly local governments. This year, the top 50 private companies collectively employ more than 22,000 Central Oregonians, or roughly 22.5% of the region’s current total employment.

1 1 2 3 3 4 4 2 5 6 6 5 7 7 8 NL 9 10 10 8 11 9 12 11 13 12 14 15 15 16 T-16 18 T-16 37 18 19 19 13 20 14 T-21 20 T-21 NL 23 17 T-24 22 T-24 23 26 25 27 27 28 T-28 29 26 30 32 31 33 32 36 T-33 32 T-33 T-38 35 31 36 43 37 41 38 T-38 39 30 40 40 41 T-49 42 42 43 45 44 46 45 48 46 47 47 51 48 T-49 49 44 50 NL

Employees 2019

2018

St. Charles Health System regional 4,447 4,183 1,138 986 Bright Wood Corporation Les Schwab regional 1,080 926 Sunriver Resort 1,000 1,100 975 840 Mt. Bachelor 853 878 Safeway regional 667 628 Fred Meyer regional -609 Rosendin Electric 587 538 Summit Medical Group 536 615 McDonald’s regional IBEX 480 540 PCC Schlosser 465 450 400 440 Consumer Cellular 385 361 Lonza, formerly Bend Research 375 360 Black Butte Ranch 350 339 Costco 350 201 Facebook 341 303 Mosaic Medical Opportunity Foundation 335 381 JELD-WEN Windows and Doors 315 375 300 300 Eagle Crest, Aimbridge Hospitality 300 150 Pronghorn Resort 296 340 Deschutes Brewery 280 280 BendBroadband/TDS Telecom 280 275 Brasada Ranch G5 278 258 274 252 The Center (Ortho/Neuro) 270 250 Contact Industries 251 254 Bi-Mart regional Epic Air 250 230 243 223 PacificSource 235 210 Keith Manufacturing Co. 220 220 Riverhouse on the Deschutes Tetherow 220 200 216 236 10 Barrel Brewing Co. 210 182 Medline ReNewal 203 191 First Interstate Bank Athletic Club of Bend 200 200 199 237 Navis Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village 196 196 190 150 Target 186 190 Neighbor Impact regional Indian Head Casino 180 180 174 174 J Bar J Youth Services 170 157 High Lakes Health Care regional Sunriver Owners Association 165 162 Rebound Physical Therapy regional 157 144 Sunriver Brewing Company regional 155 150 Ray’s Food Place regional 150 181 142 121 Western Heavy Haul & SMAF

NL = Not Listed T = Tied

edcoinfo.com - Page 15


FOUNDATIONS OF CENTRAL OREGON’S ECONOMY

BREW (Craft Brewing, Distilling and Fermentation) •

Central Oregon is home to breweries, both big and small, with Deschutes Brewery topping the list, brewing over 339,000 barrels in 2017

33 breweries, 4 cideries and 10 distilleries in the region

Bend has more breweries per capita than Portland, Oregon!

With nearly 77,000 visitors a week and 4.5 million visitors a year, it’s safe to say this is a region that really knows (and loves) its craft beer - Brewers Association, 2017, Oregon Brewers Guild, 2017, Forbes, 2016

#1 BEST CRAFT

#2 LARGEST HOP

-MATADOR NETWORK, 2016

-OREGON BREWERS GUILD, 2017

BEER TOWNS IN AMERICA

GROWING STATE

#3

BREWERIES PER CAPITA IN THE U.S. -C&R RESEARCH, 2019

BIO (Pharmacuetical, Research and Manufacturing, Medical Devices, and Bioscience Software) Producing everything from titanium implants to cutting edge research in new drug treatments, our bioscience industry has been experiencing double-digit year-over-year employment growth for the past several years. Quietly, Central Oregon’s bioscience industry has grown to more than 30 companies employing 3,000 people. The region’s lifestyle has proven capable of attracting world-class technical and science talent that purposely moves here and stays.

Page 16 - Economic Development for Central Oregon


FOUNDATIONS OF CENTRAL OREGON’S ECONOMY

REC (Outdoor Gear & Apparel) •

The region is home to a diverse array of outdoor product companies, with some of the best-known names in the industry calling Central Oregon home

100+ outdoor industry product companies

Home to the Oregon Outdoor Alliance (OOA) and Oregon’s Office of Outdoor recreation, both of which are dedicated to connecting & cultivating Oregon’s outdoor industry

The country’s first dedicated startup accelerator for the outdoor industry, Bend Outdoor Worx, is located in Bend

The country’s only four-year degree for outdoor product development at OSU-Cascades

Home to Bend Outdoor Worx BreakOut, the only early-stage funding event in the U.S. focused solely on outdoor product companies

BEST

MULTI-SPORT TOWN IN THE U.S. - OUTSIDE MAGAZINE, 2017

TECH (Software, Electronics, IT & Data Centers, and Renewable/Alternative Energy) •

Including software companies, electronics manufacturers, alternative/energy services, and data centers, the region has over 130 tech companies employing nearly 2,000 people

Five dozen software companies call the region home (with most headquartered here)

“Bend hosts a growing tech sector, which should see the gains from the development of local talent through Oregon State University-Cascades.” - The Milken Institute 2017 Best Small Cities

“Bend ranked #16 among U.S. metro areas for high-tech startup density.” - The Kauffman Foundation

#2

NUMBER OF HIGHTECH INDUSTRIES -MILKEN INSTITUTE, 2017

edcoinfo.com - Page 17


FOUNDATIONS OF CENTRAL OREGON’S ECONOMY

Aviation/Aerospace (Aircraft and related components) The production of light aircraft in Central Oregon spans back more than 30 years and over that time, 25 aircraft have moved through the process of design on paper to flight – several in scaled production. Along with these aircraft, many suppliers of specialized equipment have followed. Our region’s “special sauce” in the industry? Composite (carbon fiber) fabrication and innovation that make our OEM’s and supply chain companies unique on a national and even global scale. But it’s not all just manufacturing. We have some of the most successful flight training programs in the country with both fixed-wing and helicopter flight schools serving the global industry.

Building Products (Windows, Doors, Moldings & Specialty Products) For much of the region’s economic history, wood products manufacturing was the dominant industry employing Central Oregonians and forming the foundation for other business activity. While we’ve diversified dramatically over the past three decades, the manufacturing of products used in residential and commercial construction still plays a very important role for the region’s economy. Competing on a global scale, businesses in this industry have innovated and automated their way to becoming leaders in their respective sub-industries. The region, like Oregon in general, is salted with many specialty wood products companies including cabinet manufacturing, custom furniture and even our own cluster of musical instrument businesses.

Page 18 - Economic Development for Central Oregon


FOUNDATIONS OF CENTRAL OREGON’S ECONOMY

Automotive Make no mistake, we’re not the next Detroit of auto manufacturing. We are, however, home to a number of innovative companies in the automotive sector. Les Schwab Tire Centers, with its headquarters in Bend and several million square feet of distribution in Prineville, is just one example. Founded in Central Oregon in 1950, Les Schwab has grown to one of the largest independent tire retailers in the U.S. Meanwhile, German-based Daimler is growing its presence in the U.S. with a state-of-the art truck proving grounds in Madras. A host of small but successful specialty automotive companies call the region home, making everything from race car fuel tanks and push rods to performance components for trucks, motorcycles and propulsion systems.

Advanced Manufacturing Somewhat of a catch-all for a number of established and emerging companies in a widely diverse set of sectors, the region has dozens of manufacturers that are leaders among their peers. Specialties include metal fabrication, precision machining, Swiss machining, industrial coatings, 3-D metal printing, materials conveying systems and technology, and clean room design and manufacturing.

edcoinfo.com - Page 19


LIFESTYLE Central Oregon is blessed with a rare mix of city amenities and restful isolation. It offers the slower speed of a small town with a medical community and infrastructure not normally seen in a region of its size. Additionally, Central Oregon residents maintain a work/life balance that is difficult to achieve elsewhere.

#1 SMALL CITIES

BEST

PLACES TO LIVE ON

$55,000

FOR BUSINESS AND CAREERS

#1

BEST PERFORMING SMALL CITY THREE YEARS IN A ROW! -MILKEN INSTITUTE, 2016, 2017 & 2018

-FORBES, 2016

#8 BEST

-SMARTASSET, 2017

#14 WORLD’S BEST

BEST

MULTI-SPORT TOWN

PLACES TO LIVE IN THE U.S.

SKI TOWNS

-NEW YORK POST, 2016

-NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, 2017

-OUTDOOR MAGAZINE, 2017

30 Golf Courses

Miles and miles of trails

Thriving Arts & Culture Scene

Page 20 - Economic Development for Central Oregon

33 Breweries & counting

300 Days of Sunshine


ABOUT EDCO EDCO Platinum Members

Founded in 1981, EDCO is a non-profit corporation supported by private and public members and stakeholders. Our mission is to create a balanced and diversified economy with a strong base of middle-class jobs in Central Oregon. To do this, we focus on helping companies do the following:

MOVE. We guide employers outside the region through the relocation process as a resource for regional data, incentives, talent, site selection, and more.

START. We mentor and advise scalable young companies from concept to exit on issues such as access to capital, critical expertise and business strategy.

GROW. We partner with local traded-sector companies to help them grow and expand. EDCO’S RESULTS

Fiscal Year

Companies

Jobs (New & Retained)

New Capital Investment

2018 - 2019 2017 - 2018 2016 - 2017 2015 - 2016 2014 - 2015 2013 - 2014 Totals

23 28 44 36 35 30 196

240 240 776 266 594 590 2,706

$58.4 million $192.6 million $600.5 million $24.2 million $102.6 million $210.9 million $1.189 billion

EDCO’S Funding Sources

Additional information available at EDCOINFO.COM

40%

Public Contracts

33%

Private Members

Other

• Upcoming networking events, luncheons, conferences, and more • EDCO Info Hub: current comprehensive data for Central Oregon • Stable of Experts: a network of seasoned professionals with a passion for start-ups and small businesses

24%

Earned Revenue

AmeriTitle BendTel Cascade Natural Gas Central Electric Cooperative, Inc. Central Oregon Community College City of Bend City of La Pine City of Madras / Jefferson County City of Prineville / Crook County City of Redmond City of Sisters Combined Communications Deschutes County First Interstate Bank Mid Oregon Credit Union OSU-Cascades Pacific Power River Bend Capital Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt SGA CPA’s & Consultants St. Charles Health Systems U.S. Bank

• Success stories from regional businesses

3%

• Business news on EDCO’s blog

EDCO Contact Information Regional Office (Bend)

Redmond

Prineville/Crook County

Sisters

Sunriver/La Pine

CEO: Roger Lee

Sr. Director: Jon Stark

Director: Kelsey Lucas

Director: Caprielle Lewis

16345 Sixth Street

705 SW Bonnett Way,

411 SW 9th Street,

510 SE Lynn Blvd.

520 E Cascade Street

La Pine, OR 97739

Ste. #1000

Ste. #203

Prineville, OR 97754

Sisters, OR 97759

541.536.1432

Bend, OR 97702

Redmond, OR 97756

541.233.2015

541.977.5683

541.388.3236

541.923.5223

edcoinfo.com - Page 21


705 SW BONNETT WAY SUITE 1000 BEND, OR 97702 541.388.3236

EDCOINFO.COM #EDCOINFO @EDCOINFO


520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683

2017 SISTERS PROFILE

Photo courtesy of Five Pine Lodge

The town of Sisters takes its name from the iconic Three Sisters Mountains that dominate its western skyline, shown in the photo above. Each of the three volcanic peaksͶNorth Sister, Middle Sister, and South Sister (Faith, Hope, and Charity are their respective Native American names)Ͷexceed 10,000 feet. ^ŝƐƚĞƌƐ͛ ŚŝƐƚŽƌLJ closely follows that of the Pacific Northwest. Three miles northeast of Sisters͛ current location, Camp Polk was established in 1865 as a military post to respond to the potential threat of Paiute Indians in the area. Homesteaders quickly replaced the military after discovering there was no conflict and soon established ranches, a store, and a post office. In 1888 the post office and about twenty families relocated southwest to what is now the City of Sisters. The next one hundred years were dominated by sheep grazing, cattle ranching, and logging. In May 1923 ten downtown businesses and several residences were lost due to a garage fire. The following year Sisters was aflame again due to the Gist Hotel fire. ͞,ĂůĨ ŽĨ WŝŽŶĞĞƌ dŽǁŶ ŝƐ >ĞǀĞůĞĚ ďLJ &ůĂŵĞƐ͕͟ was written in The Bend Bulletin. By the 1970s not only was logging in serious decline but so was the City of Sisters. The leading Sisters resort, Black Butte Ranch, persuaded the city to revitalize the town by focusing on tourism. Utilizing aŶ ϭϴϴϬ͛Ɛ Western building theme inspired by ƚŚĞ ƚŽǁŶ͛Ɛ heritage, Sisters was transformed and became an attraction for tourists worldwide. Today Sisters ĂŶĚ ŝƚƐ ůĂƌŐĞƌ ƐƵƌƌŽƵŶĚŝŶŐ ĂƌĞĂ ;ŬŶŽǁŶ ĂƐ ͞^ŝƐƚĞƌƐ ŽƵŶƚƌLJ͟Ϳ is recognized for an outstanding school system, abundant outdoor recreational opportunities, a rich arts and cultural scene, and a rural, community-focused top-quality lifestyle. Though the downtown is characterized by small and authentic lifestyle retail stores and restaurants, Sisters has all of the commercial attributes to attract business owners and entrepreneurs who value and appreciate ƚŚĞ ĐŝƚLJ͛Ɛ small-town charm.

For more information, contact:

Caprielle A. Lewis Business Development Manager, Sisters

Economic Development for Central Oregon 520 E. Cascade Ave. Sisters, OR 97759 Phone: 541-977-5683 caprielle@edcoinfo.com www.edcoinfo.com

Quick Reference 2 Land Inventory 2 Top Employers 5 Wage Information 7 Industry Mix 8 Business Costs 10 Employment Trends 12 Housing Costs 14 Financial Valuations, Tax Rates 15 Population

16 Education 19 Utilities 20 Telecommunication 20 Health Services 21 Transportation 23 Fire & Emergency Services 23 Parks, Resorts & Recreation 25 Topography & Climate 27 Business Resources

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BUSINESS LAND CHOICES IN SISTERS Sisters has both light industrial and developed business park lots available. Some existing industrial and commercial buildings are available for purchase. http://www.loopnet.com/xNet/MainSite/Listing/Search/SearchResults.aspx?linkcode=13880#/ForSale/c!ARUIBQAAAQQBAlVTBQECT1IHAQdTaXN0ZXJzCgEFOTc3NTkVAADgloo7AwDAHTF-AF$EAD_AQJg$BAKQ$AA In addition, Sisters has several attractive and affordable commercial spaces for lease ranging from 500 sf to 8,000 sf. http://www.loopnet.com/xNet/MainSite/Listing/Search/SearchResults.aspx?linkcode=13890#/All-Types/ForLease/c!ARYCBAAGAg$AAEEAQJVUwUBAk9SBwEHU2lzdGVycwoBBTk3NzU5

SISTERS͛ dKW Wh >/ Θ WZ/s TE EMPLOYERS According to the Oregon Employment Department, 78% of Oregon establishments have nine or fewer employees and the average private establishment employs 11 people. To an even greater extent than the state, Central Oregon's business environment is typified by innovative, small companies, producing niche-market products and services..͟

Top Private and Public Employers in Sisters Employment Organization

2017

Black Butte Ranch

352

Sisters School District

126

Ray's Food Place - Sisters

52

US Forest Service

65

Three Creeks Brewing

55

USFS

NA

ENERGYneering Solutions Inc

53

In Sisters, the larger public employers are Black Butte Ranch, the Sisters School District, ZĂLJ͛Ɛ &ŽŽĚ WůĂĐĞ͕ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ US Forest Service.

Sisters Coffee Company

50

Five Pine Lodge & Conf. Ctr.

40

Metabolic Maintenance

35

Among the private sector, Sisters has a strong concentration of businesses related to tourism, hospitality, recreation, and the arts. However, Sisters has a growing and diverse tradedsector economy (companies that sell products or provide services outside of the area) including employers in important industries such as; Natural Resources, Agriculture, Food Processing, Green Energy, Telecom, Critical Power, Wood Products, Outdoor Recreation, Aviation/Flight Science, BioScience, Media, High Tech, Industrial Arts, Advanced Manufacturing, and Entrepreneurship.

Sisters Athletic Club

41

Bi-Mart - Sisters

33

Xpress Printing

13

Subway - Sisters

18

City of Sisters

16

Les Schwab Center - Sisters

14

Bird Gard

12

Lakeview Millworks

11

Clearly, smaller companies are more crucial to rural comŵƵŶŝƚŝĞƐ ĂŶĚ ŝƚ͛Ɛ ĨĂŝƌ ƚŽ ƐĂLJ ƚŚĂƚ SisterƐ͛ business environment is dominated by smaller-sized employers, with a few exceptions.

Mohr Solutions Power 9 Below are a few ĞdžĂŵƉůĞƐ ŽĨ ^ŝƐƚĞƌƐ͛ businesses, as well as Ponderosa Forge 7 economically significant local events categorized by industry Source: EDCO, 2017 clusters: x Tourism/Recreation: Black Butte Ranch Resort, Five Pine Lodge & Conference Center, dŚĞ &ůLJ &ŝƐŚĞƌ͛Ɛ WůĂĐĞ, Aspen Lakes Golf Course, HooDoo Ski Area, Sisters Movie House x Specialty Retail: The ^ƚŝƚĐŚŝŶ͛ WŽƐƚ, Sisters Olive and Nuts, Beacham͛Ɛ Clock Company, Canyon Creek Pottery, Antler Arts, Sisters Log Furniture x Chain Retail: DĐ ŽŶĂůĚ͛Ɛ͕ ŝ-Mart, Les Schwab Tire Center, Subway, Dutch Brothers x Arts & Events: Sisters Folk Festival, Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show, Sisters Rodeo, Sisters Art Works, Clearwater Gallery, Sisters Gallery, and Frame works, Hood Avenue Art x Light Manufacturing: Ponderosa Forge & Ironworks ( ĞŶƚƌĂů KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ůĂƌŐĞƐƚ ďůĂĐŬƐŵŝƚŚ ŽƉĞƌĂƚŝŽŶ ĂŶĚ ŵĂŶufacturer of handcrafted fireside and architectural iron products), Preston Thompson Guitars, Black Crater Clothing, Z-Glass Act (custom designer and manufacturer of light fixtures) x Media/Publications: Zion Pictures, Deep River Books x Bioscience/Health: Metabolic Maintenance (a natural nutrition supplement manufacturer) Page 2 Last updated 11/13/2017

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x x

x

Natural Resources/Wood Products: Swiss Mountain Log Homes, Three Creeks Woodworking, GFP Enterprises Inc. (emergency response company focused on wildland fire suppression and catastrophe management solutions), Rocky Mountain Timber Products Food Processing: Three Creeks Brewing Company, Sisters Coffee Company, ŶŐĞůŝŶĞ͛Ɛ ĂŬĞƌLJ ;Ă ƐƉĞĐŝĂůƚLJ ďĂŬĞƌLJ for vegan and gluten-free food)͕ >ĂŝƌĚ͛Ɛ ^ƵƉĞƌĨŽŽĚ High Tech/Engineering: ENERGYneering Solutions Inc. (a global green energy, engineering consulting and construction firm), Bird Gard (an electronic bird control company), Mohr Solutions Power (a TeleCom and critical power supply company, Abbajay Automated Control Systems Aviation/Flight Sciences: Innoviator (aircraft engineering and consulting firm)

Many of Sisters͛ downtown retail, professional services, and commercial businesses are members of the Sisters Chamber of Commerce.

BUILDING ACTIVITY IN SISTERS ͞dŚĞ ŝƚLJ ŽĨ ^ŝƐƚĞƌƐ ŝƐ ĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐŝŶŐ ĂŶŽƚŚĞƌ LJĞĂƌ ŽĨ ƌĞůĂƚŝǀĞůLJ ƐƚƌŽŶŐ ƌĞƐŝĚĞŶƚŝĂů ĐŽŶƐƚƌƵĐƚŝŽŶ ĂĐƚŝǀŝƚLJ ƚŚƌŽƵŐŚ ƚŚĞ ĨŝƌƐƚ ƚŚree quarters of 2017. As of September 30, 2017, the City has authorized the construction of 73 single family units, 20 townhouse units, and 3 triplex units for a total of 102 residential units. New commercial construction projects completed are Dairy Queen, Five Pine cabins and laundry building, Creekside Campground restroom, Sisters Mini Storage and multiple projects for the Sisters School District. Laird Superfood project is underway and other new commercial and mixed-use projects have received land use approval and are anticipated to be underway shortly including two new mixed-use light industrial/live work projects in the North Sisters Business Park. Additionally, the City has a number of projects currently under review including a hotel and formula food establishment and a new transportation center at Sisters High School. City staff continues to receive numerous inquiries supporting feasibility studies on additional residential and commercial projects. The last four Affordable Housing units out of seven are under construction at Skygate by Housing Works and a site plan application was recently approved for Housing Works to enable construction of 48 multifamily Affordable units. Construction of these 48 multifamily units is anticipated in Spring 2017. Hayden Homes has broken ground on Phase 5 of the Village at Cold Springs which will enable the constriction of 17 single family units and 24 multifamily market rate units. Infrastructure review for the Grand Peaks subdivision (formally Kuivato) and Clear Pine Phase III is currently underway, laying the groundwork for an additional 50 single family units. The building permit for The Lodge - Assisted Living Facility has been issued and construction is anticipated to commence in the near future. Although residential construction has been very active in 2017, familiar challenges with labor supply, land and construction costs continue to keep new construction from meeting the high demand. As long as the national economic outlook remains stable, we anticipate continued high levels of construction activity in 2018 in response to very high levels of deŵĂŶĚ͘͟ City of Sisters, Community Development Department

COSTS OF DOING BUSINESS In the Central Oregon Tri-County area, Sisters has established a reputation for affordable utilities, lowest systems development (SDCs) fees as a percent of the project, and responsiveness from local government to business needs. Business license fees: Standard is $105 per year plus $4 per employee. (Source: City of Sisters, 2016)

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AVERAGE WAGES FOR SELECT OCCUPATIONS Below are average hourly wages in Oregon, Washington, and California. Central Oregon wages are typically below those of Oregon, often 10 to 20%. Wages in Washington are typically higher than Oregon while California wages routinely run at least 20% higher than those in Oregon:

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COVERED EMPLOYMENT & PAYROLL Below is covered employment data by sector, employee count, payroll, and average annual wage in the tri-county region. Average annual pay is the total of all covered wages paid during the year divided by the monthly average number of covered jobs during the year. Covered employment refers to jobs that are eligible for unemployment insurance, so it is a good barometer of wage and sector trends. Note that while most employees are covered, notable exceptions include the self-employed, those who work solely on commission, and some agricultural workers. Relative to last year (2015 data), all measurementsͶthe number individuals employed, the associated payroll, and average annual payͶincreased across the board, demonstrating a broad return to a healthier economy. In terms of sheer numbers employed, the big gains in industry sectors in Deschutes County were construction, manufacturing, professional and businesses services, and education & health services. Similarly, payroll in Deschutes County expanded by 9% and average annual pay registered an improvement of 3%. The average annual wage for Central Oregon is $41,748, while the average annual wage for all of Oregon is $49,452.

INDUSTRY MIX Central Oregon has an ever-more diverse mix of industries that create the employment foundation for the regional economy. For example, in 2007, construction accounted for more than 11% of total payroll, while today it is much closer to national averages. A large slice of the overall pie, government, has seen its share of payroll disperse to other sectors such as education and health services (the fastest growing sector). Information, which includes software, IT services, and data centers, has grown by 30% over the past decade. Tourism (leisure and hospitality) has also seen gains in the past 10 years.

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COSTS OF DOING BUSINESS IN OREGON Oregon has achieved national status for being a cost competitive location for business. The table below compares the cost of doing business in Oregon, Washington, and California. Major contributing factors to the Oregon advantage are no sales tax, no inventory tax, an affordable property tax system, and affordable labor costs. Across the country on average, taxpayers pay the most in taxes to their own state and local governments.

Sources: Tax Foundation, Oregon Employment Department, Washington State Employment Security Department, and California Employment Development Department, US Energy Information Association, Employer Health Benefits Survey, Premium rate ranking index, 1 Oregon Insurance Division, Washington does not have a corporate income tax but does have a gross receipts tax (Business & Occupancy Tax). While not strictly comparable to corporate income tax rates, it is imposed on revenues, not profits, resulting in noteworthy effective tax rates, particularly for small businesses and startups.

Perhaps one of the greatest assets in Oregon is the structure of how corporations are taxed, known as the Single Sales Factor. The tax rate on corporate income of firms doing business in the state is the greater of a minimum tax based on relative Oregon sales ($150-$100,000, approximately 0.1% of sales by entity) or an income-based levy of 6.6% on taxable income up to $1 million and 7.6% above that. Relative Oregon sales are responsible 100% in determining U.S. corporate income taxable in Oregon. This single interstate factor stands in contrast to states that also use factors for property and payroll to apportion taxable income. It is advantageous to a business headquartered or producing tangible goods in Oregon, but selling products throughout the country, or the world, where it also operates, because its business Oregon tax liability is proportional only to its Oregon customer base, and that liability does not grow directly as a result of greater investment or employment in Oregon. How the single sales factor works: In its Oregon tax return, the business takes the ratio of Oregon sales to total U.S. sales and applies that ratio to its consolidated federal income. The result is Oregon taxable income. Oregon sales are based on where the greater cost of performance occurs for intangible sales. In the case of tangible goods, Oregon sales include the throwback of sales to customers where the entity would not otherwise be taxable. (Source: Business Oregon) Page 6 Last updated 11/13/2017

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dŚŝƐ ƚĂdž ƉŽůŝĐLJ ŝƐ Ă ŵĂũŽƌ ƌĞĂƐŽŶ ǁŚLJ KƌĞŐŽŶ ŝƐ ŚŽŵĞ ƚŽ /ŶƚĞů͛Ɛ ůĂƌŐĞƐƚ ŐůŽďĂů ĞŵƉůŽLJŵĞŶƚ ĂŶĚ ĐĂƉŝƚĂů ŝŶǀĞƐƚŵĞŶƚ͘ ^ŝŶŐůĞ sales factor plays an important role for Nike, Columbia Sportswear, Keen, and other outdoor gear and apparel manufacƚƵƌĞƌƐ͛ ĐŽŶƚŝŶƵĞĚ ŐƌŽǁƚŚ ŽĨ ŚĞĂĚƋƵĂƌƚĞƌƐ͕ R&D, and warehouse operations. The tables below compare costs for a manufacturing company with 20 employees to one with 200 employees. This example does not factor or include cost savings offered by incentive programs. Oregon offers more incentive programs to traded-sector businesses (companies that sell products or services outside of the area) than Washington and California combined. Attempting to understand all cost factors in different states and how those impact your specific business can be a daunting task. Some cost factors such as the efficiency and approach to regulatory oversight (i.e. implementation of federal EPA rules) can be dramatically different from state to state, but virtually impossible to place a dollar value on for comparison purposes. 20-Employee Firm, Urban Location

1

Oregon

California

Idaho

Washington

$142,014

$206,706

$147,258

$134,616

$1,045,000

$1,053,280

$947,980

$1,184,900

$191,433

$237,811

$183,220

$249,586

$6,869

$10,400

$5,944

$19,193

Property tax

$141,360

$74,080

$102,960

$59,360

3

$0

$16,734

$11,956

$52,819

Tax on capital purchases (first year only)

$0

$239,800

$18,000

$204,240

Total operating costs, initial capital taxes

$1,526,675

$1,822,077

$1,405,362

$1,851,894

+ $295,402

($121,313)

+ $325,219

Oregon

California

Idaho

Washington

Energy costs

$1,327,890

$1,903,410

$1,371,030

$1,281,510

Employee gross payroll

$10,450,000

$10,532,800

$9,479,800

$11,849,000

$878,526

$766,890

$726,294

$1,060,471

$29,430

$67,196

$59,440

$191,925

Property tax

$718,400

$629,600

$978,400

$762,400

3

$0

$167,340

$119,557

$528,190

Tax on capital purchases (first year only)

$0

$2,398,000

$180,000

$2,042,400

Total operating costs, initial capital taxes

$13,404,245

$16,297,896

$12,794,964

$17,187,706

+ $2,893,651

($609,282)

+ $3,783,461

Energy costs Employee gross payroll Payroll taxes/insurance

2

Corporate income or gross receipts taxes Other taxes

1

Difference from Oregon 200-Employee Firm, Rural Location

1

Payroll taxes/insurance Corporate income or gross receipts taxes Other taxes

1

Difference from Oregon

1 Location affects estimators only for property taxes. 2 Payroll taxes include federal Social Security & Medicare, but not local levies. 3 "Other taxes" includes any relevant business tax that would apply to the business scenario used in the example, including state franchise taxes or sales & use taxes on current purchases. Table source: Business Oregon website.

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Workers Compensation Insurance According to the Workers' Compensation Division of Oregon OSHA, KƌĞŐŽŶ ǁŽƌŬĞƌƐ͛ compensation costs, already among the lowest in the nation, will drop in 2017 for the fourth-straight year.

tŽƌŬĞƌƐ͛ ĐŽŵƉĞŶƐĂƚŝŽŶ ĐŽƐƚƐ ŝŶ KƌĞŐŽŶ ĂƌĞ ƚŚĞ ϳth lowest in the county, highly favorable compared to ŽƚŚĞƌ ƐƚĂƚĞƐ͘ dŚĞ ͞ƉƵƌĞ ƉƌĞŵŝƵŵ͟ ŝƐ ƚŚĞ portion of the premium employers pay insurers to cover anticipated claims costs for job-related injuries and deaths. State officials attribute the decrease to a focus on improving worker safety, getting injured workers treated and back on the job quickly, as well as the initial impact of medical cost control strategies. The ͞ƉƵƌĞ ƉƌĞŵŝƵŵ͟ ƌĂƚĞ ŚĂƐ ĞŝƚŚĞƌ ƌĞŵĂŝŶĞĚ ƚŚĞ ƐĂŵĞ Žƌ ĚĞĐƌĞĂƐĞĚ ĨŽƌ Ϯϯ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ƉĂƐƚ Ϯϱ LJĞĂƌƐ͘ ƚ Ψϭ͘Ϯϴ͕ ŝƚ͛Ɛ currently the lowest it has been in 20 years, making this cost among the lowest in the country for employers. For manufacturers in places like California, the cost savings of ǁŽƌŬĞƌƐ͛ ĐŽŵƉĞŶƐĂƚŝŽŶ ŝŶƐƵƌĂŶĐĞ ŝŶ KƌĞŐŽŶ ĐĂŶ ďĞ ƐƵďƐƚĂŶƚŝĂů͘ ǀĞŶ Ă ĐŽŵƉĂŶLJ ǁŝƚŚ ϱϬ ĞŵƉůŽLJĞĞƐ ĐĂŶ ƌĞĂůŝnjĞ Ɛŝdž-figure annual savings on this one cost factor alone

EMPLOYMENT TRENDS KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ 'ƌŽƐƐ ŽŵĞƐƚŝĐ WƌŽĚƵĐƚ ;' WͿ ŐƌĞǁ ďLJ 3.3% in 2016 according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. This was more than double the pace of national growth (1.5%) and the second-fastest among all states. A year earlier, in 2015, OrĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ŐƌŽǁƚŚ ƚŝĞĚ ǁŝƚŚ dĞdžĂƐ ĨŽƌ ƚŚĞ ĨĂƐtest in the nation at 4.5%, while during that same year, Central Oregon's GDP Grew by 6.9%. Additionally, Bend-ZĞĚŵŽŶĚ D^ ͛Ɛ ƚŽƚĂů ĂŶŶƵĂů ǁĂŐĞƐ ŐƌĞǁ 9.1% from 2015-2016, while the US average grew by only 3%.

UNEMPLOYMENT TRENDS Regarded as a lagging indicator by most economists, this chart provides a five-year perspective on unemployment in the Tri-County area. Since early 2011, unemployment rates have been reduced significantly. Central Oregon is currently experiencing some of the lowest unemployment rates ever recorded in the region. As of May 2017, Deschutes County's unemployment rate dropped to its lowest ever at 3.6%, with Crook County at 5.7%, and Jefferson County's rate at 5.2%, its lowest since June 2008 and a statistically significant ĚĞĐůŝŶĞ͘ ĞĐĂƵƐĞ ŽĨ ĞŶƚƌĂů KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ƐƵƐƚĂŝŶĞĚ strong in-migration job creation typically lags population growth, a reason why historically, OreŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ƵŶĞŵƉůŽLJŵĞŶƚ ƌĂƚĞ ƚƌĂĐŬƐ ŚŝŐŚĞƌ ƚŚĂŶ ƚŚĞ national rate. However, that is no longer the case. Page 8 Last updated 11/13/2017

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HOUSING / REAL ESTATE TRENDS Average Monthly Rent The Central Oregon rental market continues to face heightened demand in the midst of constrained supply. According to the Central Oregon Rental Owners Association (COROA), the overall vacancy rate is 1.50% (as of May 2016), down from 12.4% in 2009. The high demand has exerted pressure on prices and a growing interest in multi-family residential construction, particularly in Bend and Redmond. In the last year, two and three-bedroom rental houses increased more on a percentage basis than apartments and duplexes. 2016 average rent prices for a three-bedroom home were up slightly from 2015 in nearly all Central Oregon communities. Our expectation is that 2017 annual rental figures will be up sharply in Bend, Redmond, Sisters, and Prineville amidst strong in-migration and near record low vacancies.

2015 Median Residential Home Sale Comparison 700,000 600,000

Crook County Bend

500,000

Redmond

400,000

La Pine Sisters

300,000

Sunriver

200,000 Jefferson County U.S.

100,000 0

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Home Prices As with much of the rest of the country, residential property prices peaked to all-time highs in 2006-2007 and declined in value by as much 40% in the following years. Prices are now rebounding substantially - both median and average home prices increased in 2017 across the region and are currently at or above all-time highs. (It is noteworthy to mention that prices in Sunriver and Sisters include a much higher percentage of high-end homes and homes on acreage than comparable prices in Bend or Redmond.)

Commercial and Industrial Real Estate Market Trends ĞŶƚƌĂů KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ĐŽŵŵĞƌĐŝĂů ƌĞĂů ĞƐƚĂƚĞ ŵĂƌŬĞƚ ŝƐ ŵĂƌŬĞĚ ďLJ ƐƵďƐƚĂŶƚŝĂů ƉŽƐŝƚŝǀĞ ĂďƐŽƌƉƚŝŽŶ ƚƌĞŶĚƐ͘ In their quarterly POINTS report, Compass Commercial Real Estate observes that 2014 marked the beginning of the end of the recession for the office market. Retail and office sectors are experiencing historically low vacancy rates in all commercial real estate secƚŽƌƐ ŝŶ ĞŶĚ ĂŶĚ ZĞĚŵŽŶĚ͘ /Ŷ ϮϬϭϳ͕ Ϯ͕ϯϴϬ ĂĐƌĞƐ ǁĞƌĞ ĂĚĚĞĚ ƚŽ ĞŶĚ͛Ɛ h' ǁŝƚŚ ƌŽŽŵ ƚŽ ŐƌŽǁ ĐŽŵŵĞƌĐŝĂů͕ ŝŶĚƵƐƚƌŝĂů ĂŶĚ retail land by 815 acres. AbsorpƚŝŽŶ ŽĨ ĞŶĚ͛Ɛ Ϯ͘ϱ ŵŝůůŝŽŶ ƐƋ͘ Ĩƚ͘ ŽĨ ŽĨĨŝĐĞ ƐƉĂĐĞ ŚĂƐ ƉŝĐŬĞĚ ƵƉ͕ ǁŝƚŚ ƚŚĞ ĐƵƌƌĞŶƚ ǀĂĐĂŶĐLJ rate falling again from 4.6% to 3.7%, with nearly 434,000 sq. ft. of space leased since the fourth quarter of 2010. Activity in the industrial market (approximately 5.72 million sq. ft. in Bend and Redmond) has been strong. As of the end ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ĨŝƌƐƚ ƋƵĂƌƚĞƌ ŝŶ ϮϬϭϳ͕ ĞŶĚ͛Ɛ ĐŝƚLJǁŝĚĞ ŝŶĚƵƐƚƌŝĂů ǀĂĐĂŶĐLJ ƌĂƚĞ ĚƌŽƉƉĞĚ LJĞƚ ĂŐĂŝŶ ƚŽ ϰ͘ϲй͘ dŚĞ ZĞĚŵŽŶĚ ŝŶĚƵƐƚƌŝĂů market has also performed well in the recovery, with a current vacancy rate of 2.9% at the end of Q1. Ten of the last eleven quarters have shown increasing occupancy in the Redmond industrial market. Building activity is steadily increasing throughout Central Oregon. As a result, the number of building permits issued for new commercial construction, remodels, additions, and repurposing is increasing rapidly, construction prices are on the increase and rents, particularly for newer properties, are climbing.

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683

Land Prices, Lease Rates & Construction Costs Land costs in the region are rebounding after seeing as much as 50% value reductions resulting from the Great Recession. Costs do vary by community, with Crook and Jefferson Counties generally having lower land and lease costs. In Deschutes County, La Pine costs are lowest and comparable with Crook and Jefferson Counties. Several years of strong demand for retail, office, and light industrial space are pushing vacancies down and rents higher in 2017.

Tax Rates Tax rates in Sisters range from 15.8% in the city limits to as low as 11.4% just outside of town. These rates are lower than Bend and Redmond. The specific tax codes that apply to property in the Sisters area vary according to an array of factors including the type of property, amount of acreage, and proximity to Sisters city limits. For more information about tax ƌĂƚĞƐ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ^ŝƐƚĞƌƐ ĂƌĞĂ͕ ƉůĞĂƐĞ ĐŽŶƚĂĐƚ ƚŚĞ ĞƐĐŚƵƚĞƐ ŽƵŶƚLJ ƐƐĞƐƐŽƌ͛Ɛ KĨĨŝĐĞ Ăƚ ;ϱϰϭͿ ϯϴϴ-6508.

Financial Institutions & Deposits Three bank branches are located in Sisters. Additionally, 14 financial institutions with over 40 branch locations are present in Bend and have a wide range of financial services available.

Banks in Sisters First Interstate U.S. Bank Washington Federal Savings

Central Oregon is home to 16 financial institutions which collectively have 64 branches in the region. In addition to these banks and credit unions, there are a number of alternative financial resources that can be found on K͛Ɛ ǁĞďƐŝƚĞ ƵŶĚĞƌ incentives. Alternative financing includes a number of organizations with local offices that work closely with banks and credit unions including Business Oregon, Craft3, and Oregon Certified Business Development Organization. The total FDIC-insured deposit base as of June 30, 2016 (the most current data available) was $3.06 billion. Reflecting higher than average deposit wealth, Central Oregon also supports a significant number of financial planning and investment firms. Many of these firms also provide wealth management for clients nationwide. Financial Institutions Deposits in Central Oregon (in millions) County Crook County Deschutes County Jefferson County Tri-County Total

2008

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

% Growth 2015-2016

$270 $1,623 $133 $2,678

$206 $2,351 $139 $2,696

$205 $2,450 $146 $2,801

$237 $2,682 $143 $3,063

$234 $3,000 $143 $3,377

$264 $3,235 $148 $3,647

11.4% 7.83% 3.5% 8%

Source: FDIC Summary of Deposits as of 6/30 for each year.

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683

POPULATION

Population Forecast KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ƉŽƉƵůĂƚŝŽŶ ŐƌŽǁƚŚ ŽĨ 1.56% from 2015 to 2016 was again dominated by net migration (movers-in outpaced movers-out). Similarly, but even more dramatic, in-migration trends prevail in the Tri-County area. In 2016, Deschutes County was the 6th fastest growing county in the U.S. Bend more than doubled in size between 1990 and 2000 and grew by 47% between 2000 and 2010. While growth flattened between 2010 and 2012, signs over the past 24 months point to a pickup of in-migration and business activity across the region.

Tri-County Population by Age 18%

22%

60%

Ages 0-17 Ages 1864

Since 2010, Crook County has grown at a very slow pace after dramatic growth between 1990 and 2010. Since 2000, Jefferson County has grown at a steady rate that exceeds that of Oregon and the nation. The United States Census recentlLJ ƌĞůĞĂƐĞĚ ƉŽƉƵůĂƚŝŽŶ ĨŝŐƵƌĞƐ ƚŚĂƚ ǀĂƌLJ ĨƌŽŵ W^h͛Ɛ ŵŽƌĞ ĐŽŶƐĞƌǀĂƚŝǀĞ ƉŽƉƵůĂtion estimates. /Ŷ DĂƌĐŚ ϮϬϭϱ͕ WŽƌƚůĂŶĚ ^ƚĂƚĞ hŶŝǀĞƌƐŝƚLJ ;W^hͿ͛Ɛ KƌĞŐŽŶ WŽƉƵůĂƚŝŽŶ Forecast Program released a population forecast for the Tri-County region of an estimated 416,764 people by 2065 ʹ the first of its kind in many years. Deschutes County, the fastest growing county in the state, will be home to about 357,345 people in 2065, with 194,793 of them in greater Bend, ŝŶĐƌĞĂƐŝŶŐ ƚŚĞ ĐŝƚLJ ďLJ ĂŶ ĞƐƚŝŵĂƚĞĚ ϭϯϯй ŽǀĞƌ ƚŽĚĂLJ͛Ɛ ƉŽƉƵlation. The population in Jefferson County in 2065 will reach ĂŶ ĞƐƚŝŵĂƚĞĚ ϯϯ͕ϳϳϵ͕ ϰϴй ŽǀĞƌ ƚŽĚĂLJ͛Ɛ ƉŽƉƵůĂƚŝŽŶ͘ LJ ϮϬϲϱ͕ ĂŶ ĞdžƉĞĐƚĞĚ Ϯϱ͕ϲϰϬ ǁŝůů ĐĂůů ƌŽŽŬ ŽƵŶƚLJ ŚŽŵĞ͕ Ă ϭϵй ŝncrease over 2016. Overall, population forecasters expect the region to continue to be a very dynamic part of the state and country.

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683

EDUCATION Public Schools Sisters School District #6 is one of the most successful and highly acclaimed school districts of its size in the state of Oregon, not only for academics, activities, and sports, but also for community support and parent involvement, and business partnership support. Because of the exceptional community support, the Sisters School District is able to offer its students highly unique programs such as; Interdisciplinary Environmental Expedition (IEE), The Americana Project, a Young Wings Flight Instruction Course, a luthier program, Advanced Placement and honors classes, C.T.E. / S.T.E.A.M. courses, Pursue Your Passion and Future Business Leaders of America (pre-business programs), remedial offerings in core subjects, all-day kindergarten, Arts, and foreign languages. The Sisters School District includes Sisters and the surrounding area. Sisters Elementary, Sisters Middle School, and Sisters High School serve a student community of over 1,700 students. Due to low student-faculty ratios (smaller class sizes) Sisters schools are regionally renowned for high quality and individual attention to students. Of the ŝƐƚƌŝĐƚ͛Ɛ 62 teachers, all meet Highly Qualified standards, over 63% hold a DĂƐƚĞƌ͛Ɛ ĚĞŐƌĞĞ Žƌ ŚŝŐŚĞƌ ĂŶĚ͕ ŽŶ ĂǀĞƌĂŐĞ͕ ŚĂǀĞ ϭϰ LJĞĂƌƐ ƚĞĂĐŚŝŶŐ ĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞ͘

School

Total Enrollment

Sisters Elementary k-4 Sisters Middle 5-8 Sisters High 9-12 Total: Sisters School Dist.

333 324 1079 1082

Source: Sisters School District, 2017

To view the current State School Report Cards, click on the links below. District: http://www.sisters.k12.or.us/files/_FIKo2_/854932fa3db0974a3745a49013852ec4/2013-14SSD_Report_Card.pdf SES: http://www.sisters.k12.or.us/files/_FIKli_/3bc21b8c8155e0403745a49013852ec4/2013-14-SES_Report_Card.pdf SMS: http://www.sisters.k12.or.us/files/_FIKhx_/59ef9e888f6b69683745a49013852ec4/2013-14-SMS_Report_Card.pdf SHS: http://www.sisters.k12.or.us/files/_FIKht_/fc178c12e636dc673745a49013852ec4/2013-14-SHS_Report_Card.pdf For more information, visit www.sisters.k12.or.us. Private Schools in Sisters

Private Schools Sisters Christian Academy and Mountain Montessori offer quality programs and education to Sisters (and outlying areas) families. Sisters Christian Academy serves the needs of students through eighth grade.

Demand for Higher Education

Location/ Phone #

School Sisters Christian Academy (Pre K-8) www.sisterschristianacademy.com Mountain Montessori www.mountainmontessorisisters.co m

15211 McKinney Butte Rd. (541) 549-4133 104 E Adams St. (541) 549-0000

Number of students 58 32

Source: EDCO 2017

The populace of Central Oregon has a strong interest in pursuing higher education and improving their vocational skills. The last several years, demand for higher ĞĚƵĐĂƚŝŽŶ ŚĂƐ ďĞĞŶ ĚƌŝǀĞŶ ďLJ ƐĞǀĞƌĂů ĨŽƌĐĞƐ͗ ĞŶƚƌĂů KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ŐƌŽǁŝŶŐ ƉŽƉƵůĂƚŝŽŶ base, a recovery from the national economic recession, and job training and re-training. Additionally, OSU-Cascades Campus is gaining in reputation, attracting more students, and expanding its program offerings. EDCO works in partnership with Central Oregon Community College (COCC) and OSU-Cascades to ensure that program ŽĨĨĞƌŝŶŐƐ ĂůŝŐŶ ǁŝƚŚ ďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ŶĞĞĚƐ͘ ŽƚŚ ŝŶƐƚŝƚƵƚŝŽŶƐ ŚĂǀĞ ƚŽƉ ůĞĂĚĞƌƐ ƚŚĂƚ ƐĞƌǀĞ ĂƐ ŝƌĞĐƚŽƌƐ ŽŶ K͛Ɛ Board.

Central Oregon Community College (COCC) Central Oregon Community College operates campuses in Bend, Redmond, Madras, and Prineville. Founded in 1949, COCC (www.cocc.eduͿ ŝƐ KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ĨŝƌƐƚ ĂŶĚ ĐŽŶƐĞƋƵĞŶƚůLJ ŽůĚĞst community college. The College offers two-year associate degrees, transfer/lower division programs, career and technical education degrees and certificates, developmental courses, continuing education and community learning classes, industry-specific training programs and business management assistance. The COCC District covers a 10,000-square-mile area that encompasses all of Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson counties, the southern part of Wasco, and the northern portions of Klamath

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683 and Lake Counties. A seven-member board of directors governs the College, with members of that board elected from geographic zones in the District. The 201-acre Bend campus includes 26 buildings with a total of 575,000 square feet under roof. The newest buildings are the Jungers Culinary Center, funded primarily by private donations and opened in 2011, and the Health Careers Center and Science Center, funded by a voter-approved bond measure, both opened in fall 2012. The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) operated by K ƉƌŽǀŝĚĞƐ ĂĐƚŝǀĞ ƐƵƉƉŽƌƚ ĨŽƌ ĞŶƚƌĂů KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ƐŵĂůů businesses. SBDC provides programs such as counseling and market research assistance for entrepreneurs at the earliest stages of development. K ͛Ɛ ŽŶƚŝŶƵŝŶŐ ĚƵĐĂƚŝŽŶ Ěepartment delivers industry-specific courses and workshops ƚĂŝůŽƌĞĚ ƚŽ ďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ĂŶĚ ŝŶĚƵƐƚƌLJ͛Ɛ ĐŚĂŶŐŝŶŐ ŶĞĞĚƐ͘ dŚĞ Žllege also offers a wide range of continuing education for personal and professional development. K ͛Ɛ ƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ĂŶĚ ŵƉůŽLJĞĞ ĞǀĞůŽƉŵĞŶƚ ĚĞƉĂƌƚŵĞŶƚ ĚĞůŝǀĞƌƐ ŝŶĚƵƐƚry-specific courses and workshops tailored to ďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ĂŶĚ ŝŶĚƵƐƚƌLJ͛Ɛ ĐŚĂŶŐŝŶŐ ŶĞĞĚƐ͘ dŚĞ ŽůůĞŐĞ ĂůƐŽ ŽĨĨĞƌƐ Ă ǁŝĚĞ ƌĂŶŐĞ ŽĨ ĐŽŶƚŝŶƵŝŶŐ ĞĚƵĐĂƚŝŽŶ ĨŽƌ ƉĞƌƐŽŶĂů ĂŶĚ professional development. The COCC Redmond Campus sits on 25-acres near the Redmond Airport and includes four buildings to serve students with a variety of career programs, educational opportunities, and transfer eligible classes. This past year, approximately 2,400 students enrolled in one or more credit classes in Redmond. In addition to the wide range of services and college courses ŽĨĨĞƌĞĚ ƚŽ ƐƚƵĚĞŶƚƐ͕ K ͛Ɛ ZĞĚŵŽŶĚ ĂŵƉƵƐ ŝƐ ŚŽŵĞ ƚŽ ƚŚĞ ƌĞŐŝŽŶ͛Ɛ DĂŶƵĨĂĐƚƵƌŝŶŐ ĂŶĚ ƉƉůŝĞĚ dĞĐŚŶŽůŽŐLJ ĞŶƚĞƌ͕ Ă 26,000-square-foot technical training facility with certificate and degree programs readying students for jobs in the manuĨĂĐƚƵƌŝŶŐ ĨŝĞůĚ͘ ZĞĚŵŽŶĚ ŝƐ ĂůƐŽ ŚŽŵĞ ƚŽ K ͛Ɛ sĞƚĞƌŝŶĂƌLJ Technician program. The COCC regional Technology Education Center offers classes for ĞŶƚƌĂů KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ĂŶĚ ǁŽƌŬĨŽƌĐĞ population at the Redmond Campus. This 34,000-square-foot facility, planned and developed with industry participation, is home to a two-year degree option in Automotive Technology in Electronics and Diagnostics (TED). For more information: www.cocc.edu/redmond or 541-504-2900.

COCC Technology Education Center in Redmond

Enrollment at COCC has increased dramatically over the years, doubling in the last few years as increasing numbers of area residents turned to the College for education and training after the economic downturn. A record number of students have been earning certificates and degrees, then transferring to four-year colleges and universities or moving into jobs locally using skills learned in the career and technical education programs.

Oregon State University ʹ Cascades With a campus so new the paint is still drying, their first 1,200 students, 3,000 alumni, and community supporters are realizing a 30-year, grassroots effort to bring a four-year university to Central Oregon. OSU-Cascades opened its 10-acre campus in Bend at the start of the fall term in 2016. Located in the heart of Central Oregon, a vast natural laboratory, OSU-Cascades offers 16 undergraduate and four graduate degrees, including signature programs in energy systems engineering, tourism and outdoor leadership, and hospitality management.

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683 The Energy Systems Engineering Management program is unique in the state, preparing graduates for a broad range of careers in the energy industry. The Computer Science degree was developed with considerable industry input ĨƌŽŵ ŵĂŶLJ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ƌĞŐŝŽŶ͛Ɛ ƐŽĨƚǁĂƌĞ ĨŝƌŵƐ͘ K^h-Cascades is now offering an executive leadership MBA program through O^h͛Ɛ ŽůůĞŐĞ ŽĨ ƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ͘ dŚĞ MBA takes about two years and is delivered in a hybrid format, blending faceto-face with online sessions and is designed for busy professionals. The university also aims to launch additional MBA programs. OSU- ĂƐĐĂĚĞƐ͛ ĞŶƌŽllment is slated to grow to 3,000 to 5,000 students by 2025 to meet state educational attainment goals, The campus will serve students from Central Oregon, as well as Oregon, the U.S., and international destinations.

Additional Colleges and Universities Additional accredited academic institutions have a presence in Central Oregon, typically combining evening and occasional weekend classes in conjunction with distance learning. University of Oregon is offering its Executive MBA program at its Bend location (503-276-3622) Eastern Oregon University Division of Distance Education (541-385-1137) George Fox University (1-800-631-0921) Linfield College - Central Oregon Center (541-388-2986) Oregon Institute of Technology͕ ĂĐŚĞůŽƌ͛Ɛ ĚĞŐƌĞĞ ŝŶ KƉĞƌĂƚŝŽŶƐ DĂŶĂŐĞŵĞŶƚ͕ ǀŝĂ K

UTILITIES SERVING SISTERS Electric Companies Central Electric Cooperative (CEC) a member-owned cooperative, is the provider of electric power in Sisters. CEC has over 31,000 customers in the largely rural areas of Deschutes, Crook, Jefferson, Grant, Linn, Wasco and Lake Counties. For more information visit: http://www.cec.coop &Žƌ Ăůů ƐĞĐƚŽƌƐ͕ KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐĂů ƌĂƚĞƐ ĂƌĞ ǁĞůů ďĞůŽǁ ƚŚĞ national average. For industrial customers, Central Oregon providers offer rates up to nearly 16% below the U.S. average and nearly 50% below those in neighboring California. CEC was able to hold rates steady in 2012 despite increasing wholesale rates from Bonneville Power Administration to its public utility customers. As a result, CEC residential rates remain below those charged by the ƐƚĂƚĞ͛Ɛ ůĂƌŐĞƐƚ ĐŽƌƉŽƌĂƚĞ utilities.

Water System & Rates ^ŝƐƚĞƌƐ͛ ĨƌĞƐŚ ǁĂƚĞƌ ŝƐ ƐŽƵƌĐĞĚ ĨƌŽŵ ƚŚƌĞĞ ĚĞĞƉ wells that tap into a readily accessible underground aquifer. With an average daily use of 650,000 gallons and 978 residential hookups, the water demands of Sisters are easily ŵĞƚ ďLJ ^ŝƐƚĞƌƐ͛ ĂŵƉůĞ ƌĞƐŽƵƌĐĞƐ͘ tĂƚĞƌ ƵƐĂŐĞ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ summer increases dramatically to approximately 1.5 million gallons daily because of the 8,000 seasonal residents and tourists in the area. Utilizing an above-ground reservoir with a capacity of 1.6 million gallons, Sisters has the infrastructure in place to meet even the highest summer demand. In addition, the city holds water rights for future expansion. Currently, Sisters has water rights and capacity to pump 4.15 million gallons per day. The City of Sisters provides low-income rates for households that qualify. Monthly rates include a fixed charge based on meter size. For more information please contact Sisters utility billing at (541) 549-6022. Page 15 Last updated 11/13/2017

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683

Sewer Rates ^ŝƐƚĞƌƐ͛ municipal wastewater system conveys and treats an average of 200,000 gallons per day of domestic, commercial, and industrial wastewater. The ĐŝƚLJ͛Ɛ modern treatment plant is designed for a capacity of 475,000 gallons per day.

Monthly Sewer Rates (per EDU) Classification Wastewater Low-Income Assistance Program

Fee $39/EDU

$26.78/EDU Sewer rates in Sisters vary on the type of entity served. Single-family residential customers are charged one Equivalent Dwelling Unit per month. CommerSource: City of Sisters cial entities are charged based on their average winter consumption. As such, rates vary between companies. Please contact City of Sisters Finance Department at (541) 323-5209 for more information.

TELECOMMUNICATION The town of Sisters lives up to the excellent area standards of leading-edge telecommunication services. Like Bend, Redmond, and the rest of Central Oregon, Sisters boasts highend specialized data and telecommunications providers with extensive fiber-based infrastructure throughout the city and region.

Sisters Communications Providers Quantum Comm.

Commercial

http://quantum-networks.net/

BendTel

Commercial

http://www.bendtel.com/

BendBroadband

Residential & Commercial

https://bendbroadband.com/

Century Link

Residential & Commercial

www.qwest.com/

Local companies provide services with access options including landline (copper), fiber optics, and wireless (WiFi, WiMax, HSPA+ and secure microwave). DSL, ISDN, Frame Relay, ATM and Metro Ethernet services along with the traditional high capacity TDM services (T1, T3, and OCx) are available from a number of these providers.

HEALTH SERVICES dŽƉ ƋƵĂůŝƚLJ ŚĞĂůƚŚ ĐĂƌĞ ŝƐ ŽŶĞ ŽĨ ĞŶƚƌĂů KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ best characteristics. Sisters, along with the rest of Central Oregon, has ready access to a high concentration of world-class physicians and specialists attracted to Central Oregon for its great quality-of-ůŝĨĞ͘ dŚĞ ƌĞŐŝŽŶ͛Ɛ ƌĞƐĞĂƌĐŚ ĂŶĚ ĐĂƌĞ ŝŶ ĐĂƌĚŝŽůogy and orthopedics ĂƌĞ ĂŵŽŶŐ ƚŚĞ ŶĂƚŝŽŶ͛Ɛ ďĞƐƚ. St. Charles Health System owns and operates medical centers in Redmond, Madras, and Bend (Oregon's only Level II Trauma Center east of the Cascades) and leases and operates Pioneer Memorial Hospital in Prineville. St. Charles Family Care clinic in Sisters offers patient care, out-patient surgery, and an array of services for family and individual needs. Critical care and a variety of specialized services are also readily available at healthcare facilities in Bend and Redmond. A short 25-minute drive from Sisters, St. Charles Medical Center in Bend is a fully accredited, 261-bed hospital with 2,822 medical staff and employees, offering Sisters residents advanced care. Services include 24-hour emergency care, intensive/cardiac care, physical, respiratory and nutritional therapy, radiology, surgery and an on-campus rehabilitation center. In addition, St. Charles Medical Center offers cancer care, cardiology, neurology, orthopedics, stroke care, and weight loss surgery. High-tech leading-edge serviĐĞƐ ĂƌĞ ĂůƐŽ ƉƌĞƐĞŶƚ ŝŶ ^ƚ͘ ŚĂƌůĞƐ͛ ƚĞůĞŵĞĚŝĐŝŶĞ ĂŶĚ ĚĂ sŝŶĐŝ ^ƵƌŐĞƌLJ ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ͘ Over the years, St. Charles Health System has been recognized as the primary provider of quality healthcare for patients in Central and Eastern Oregon. In 2012, Thomson Reuters recognized St. Charles as one of the best health systems in the nation for quality and efficiency for the fourth year running. Healthcare Locations in Sisters: Bend Memorial Clinic-Sisters Clinic 231 E. Cascade Ave., Sisters, OR 97759 | 541-549-0303

St. Charles Medical Center-Sisters Clinic Sisters Clinic: 615 N. Arrowleaf Trail, Sisters, OR 97759 | 541-549-1318

High Lakes Health Care-Osteopathic 354 W. Adams Ave., Sisters, OR 97759 | 541-549-9609

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683 Healthcare Locations outside Sisters: 2500 N.E. Neff Rd., Bend OR 97701 | 541-382-4321 1253 N.W. Canal Blvd., Redmond OR 97756 | 541-548-8131 Sisters also has health experts in the fields of; Physical Therapy, Chiropractic care, Acupuncture, Massage, Dentistry, Orthodontia, Optometry, and Veterinary Medicine.

TRANSPORTATION Motor Freight Sisters is located on a major federal freight route 20 miles west of Bend, 109 miles east of Salem, and 100 miles northeast of Eugene. Hwy 126 intersects Sisters and connects the city with points west (Salem and terminating in Lincoln City on the Oregon Coast) and points east (Boise). Hwy 242 branches off Hwy 20 to Eugene; both highways connect Sisters to the I-5 corridor, the major north-south route connecting Washington and California. Sisters also has quick access to Hwy 97 which provides an alternate north-south route, ultimately connecting with I-5 in northern California and east-west I-84 in northern Oregon. Local freight rates are quite favorable as consumption in the region is disproportionate to production/distribution. Freight lines are looking to fill outbound trucks.

General Aviation - Sisters Airport ƚ ϯϭϲϴ͕͛ Sisters Eagle Air Airport is located one mile north of downtown Sisters and is categorized by the Oregon Department of Aviation as Category IV (local general aviation airport). While privately owned by Sisters Eagle Air, Inc. and managed by Benny Benson of ENERGYneering Solutions, Inc., the airport is open to public use. It is also used for EMS, and wildfire aircraft support. The runway dimensions are 3550 x 60 ft. / 1082 x 18 m. Though originally built in 1936, the Sisters Airport was re-paved, updated, and improved in 2013 and is fast becoming a center for local businesses. Several successful traded-sector companies, including ENERGYneering, have their headquarters at the airport. In the spring of 2014, the airport property was annexed into the City of Sisters. Through this publicprivate partnership, the airport and its key companies, have plans to expand commercially/industrially, and with an array of benefits and perks for pilots.

Commercial Air & Freight Services Redmond Municipal Airport (RDM; www.flyrdm.com) provides commercial air service with 23 flights daily to Denver, Los Angeles, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, and Seattle via four carriers (Alaska, American, Delta, and United). Considerable investment has been made at RDM in recent years including a $40 million terminal expansion, expanded passenger parking (to over 1,000 places) and tarmac and runway reconstruction.

The Airport is home to the USDA Forest Service Redmond Air Center, Cascade Aviation Management, Life Flight, Butler Aviation, Les Schwab, Bonneville Power, RDD Enterprises, Lancair, and Henderson Aviation. RDM also provides air cargo services and hosts general aviation traffic, including extensive corporate and business travel. Fed Ex, United Parcel Service, and the USPS provide air freight and package express services. Page 17 Last updated 11/13/2017

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683

FIRE & EMERGENCY SERVICES The Sisters-Camp Sherman Rural Fire Protection District, created in 1937, is a combination career and volunteer fire district with fire coverage of over 240 square miles and ambulance service area of approximately 2,000 square miles. The main station is located within the city limits of Sisters and there are three substations in surrounding areas. The fire district serves approximately 5,400 permanent residents with a seasonal population up to 20,000 people during the summer months. The Fire District currently employs 8 Firefighter Paramedics as well as working closely with a wide array of volunteer firefighters and emergency medical technicians. Sisters is covered by AirLink and Life Flight of Oregon air-ambulance services based in Bend and Redmond.

PARKS The picturesque town of Sisters is set in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains and close in proximity to bountiful recreational opportunities. The City of Sisters maintains twelve (9 developed and 3 undeveloped) lovely spacious parks (including a fun new water play park) in the city limits and all within walking distance of downtown. The City also maintains a campground facility at Creekside Park with several tent and RV hook-up sites less than a ½ mile to downtown. In addition, the Sisters Park and Recreation District (SPRD) provide a wide variety of classes, tournaments, and recreational opportunities to people of all ages. The Sisters Community Trail system is built and maintained by volunteers, operating as an independent community partner program of the SPRD, and works closely with the US Forest Service and other organizations to implement its plan for over 200 miles of trails. The organization combines the interests of walkers, hikers, cyclists, and equestrians in Sisters Country.

RESORTS & LODGING Nestled beneath shady ponderosa pines on 15 acres on the edge of Sisters, FivePine Lodge and Conference Center is the culmination of the local Willitts͛ ĨĂŵŝůLJ ĚƌĞĂŵ ƚŽ ĐƌĞĂƚĞ Ă ƵŶŝƋƵĞ ŝŶŶ ǁŚĞƌĞ ŐƵĞƐƚƐ ĐĂŶ ƌĞĐŽŶŶĞĐƚ ǁŝƚŚ ƚŚĞŵƐĞůǀĞƐ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ ones they love. The FivePine campus offers world-class lodging at the main lodge as well as numerous luxuriously appointed Craftsman style cabins. In addition, Rio (a Mexican food restaurant), Three Creeks Brewery, Shibui Spa, Sisters Athletic Club, Sisters Movie House, and several health-related professional service businesses occupy commercial spaces on or near the property. Just seven miles west of Sisters, the 1800-acre Black Butte Ranch Resort defines the classic destination resort. On the Ranch, visitors can play golf (36 holes of championship mountain golf), walk the eight miles of well-maintained trails, and take advantage of the spa and award-winning restaurants, as well as a wide variety of family recreational activities. Off the Ranch, the 1.6 million acre Deschutes National Forest beckons, offering hiking, mountain biking, fly-fishing, whitewater rafting and winter skiing and snowshoeing. Eight miles north of Sisters and situated on the banks of the rushing Metolius River is Camp Sherman. Two upscale resorts--the Metolius River Resort and privately-owned river cabins at Lake Creek LodgeͶappeal to those trying to get away from it all and enjoy the tranquility of this forested enclave. Both provide immediate access premier fly-fishing on the challenging Metolius River and, among other pursuits, hiking, and biking along miles of nearby trails. Several other Sisters lodging options are available and listed with the Sisters Chamber of Commerce.

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683

RECREATION On the outskirts of the Deschutes National Forest, Jefferson National Wilderness, and Crooked River National Grassland, Sisters is an outdoors mecca for sportsmen and tourists from all over the world. Mountain bike trails traverse through a wide range of terrain around Sisters and provide options for riders of all abilities. The 25-mile Peterson Ridge Trail south of Sisters consists of a web of interconnected trails of easy to middle difficulty; the mostly downhill 35-mile Sisters to Smith Rock Scenic Bikeway offers rolling terrain along the Deschutes River and dramatic views. In addition, there are two scenic bikeways, McKenzie Pass and Camp Sherman, in the area. The Suttle Tie Trail begins 10 miles west of town past Black Butte and finishes with a loop around Suttle Lake; the 11-mile loop of 99 Trail ŶŽƌƚŚǁĞƐƚ ŽĨ ^ŝƐƚĞƌƐ ƚĞƐƚƐ ƚŚĞ ŵŽƐƚ ƚĞĐŚŶŝĐĂů ƌŝĚĞƌƐ ǁŝƚŚ ŝƚƐ ͞ďůĂĐŬ ĚŝĂŵŽŶĚ͟ ƚŽƉŽŐƌĂƉŚLJ͖ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ ĨƵƌƚŚĞƐƚ͕ ƚŚĞ ĞƉŝĐ Ϯϱmile McKenzie River Trail, is 40 minutes away over the Santiam Pass and is so challenging it is usually ridden as a shuttle. Cyclists flock to Sisters Country for the many road routes in and around the area as well as the miles of single-track dedicated to mountain biking. Sisters has a Bicycle Friendly designation and has three ͞scenic bike routes͟ in the area. If Central Oregon is a ŐŽůĨĞƌ͛Ɛ ŵĞĐĐĂ, Sisters Country boasts three of the best 18-hole courses around. Rated 4.5 stars by Golf Digest Magazine, Aspen Lakes is a "must play" golf course when visiting Central Oregon. Aspen Lakes is a challenging but fair course that features beautiful views of the Cascades Mountains from expansive fairways. The Big Meadow Golf Course, designed by Robert Muir Graves and stretching over 7,000 yards, has received numerous awards including the 2013 honor by GolfWeek Magazine ĂƐ ŽŶĞ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ͞ ĞƐƚ ŽƵƌƐĞƐ zŽƵ ĂŶ WůĂLJ͟ ŝŶ KƌĞŐŽŶ͘ The not-to-be-missed 14th hole gives way to a dramatic view of Three Fingered Jack, a jagged volcanic peak rising above the Central Oregon landscape. Also at Black Butte Ranch, Glaze Meadow is an unforgettable course, carved out of pine forest with seven snowcapped mountains towering above. It reopened in 2012 after an extensive $3.75 million renovation by architect John Fought. Sisters is just a short drive to Hoodoo Ski Resort, the most centrally located winter sports area in Oregon. At the summit ŽĨ ĞŶƚƌĂů KƌĞŐŽŶ͛Ɛ ^ĂŶƚŝĂŵ WĂƐƐ͕ Hoodoo offers a wide range of terrain, affordable prices, and a family-friendly atmosphere. The world-class ski resort of Mount Bachelor is also only a short distance from Sisters and provides an immediately accessible big-mountain experience with manageable crowds. Hikers from all over the Pacific Northwest come to Sisters to backpack, hunt, ski, fish, and experience many other outstanding recreational opportunities. Set in the Three Sisters Wilderness Area, the 82 mile loop on the McKenzie Pass-Santiam Pass Scenic Byway has the highest concentration of snowcapped volcanoes in the continental U.S. The Byway winds through beautiful forests, offers numerous hiking trails and outlooks of three spectacular waterfalls (Proxy, Sahalie, and Koosah Falls), along with some of the best foliage viewing in the state.

SPECIAL EVENTS Among a non-stop calendar throughout the year, four ŽĨ ^ŝƐƚĞƌƐ͛ signature events have achieved national status:

Celebrating its 75th year in 2015, the Sisters Rodeo attracts world champion cowboys and cowgirls to compete in all the events of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association and is held the second weekend in June.

The largest outdoor quilt show in the world, the Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show is on the second weekend of July. Started in 1975, the show attracts approximately 12,500 visitors and has an economic impact of $1.7 million.

Held the first weekend of September, the Sisters Folk Festival delights lovers of music genres ranging from blues to folk to Celtic to bluegrass from all over the world. Part of the charm of this three-day festival is the ability to stroll from venue to venue to hear world-class musicians and songwriters.

Started in 1997, the Sisters Starry Nights concert in May serves as an important fundraiser for the school system. Prior events have featured performances graciously donated by top artists including Vince Gill, Amy Grant, Lyle Lovett, Kenny Loggins, Michael McDonald and Keb Mo. Click on the link below for a full list of the generous artists that have performed at the Sisters High School Auditorium to benefit Sisters Schools. http://www.sisters.k12.or.us/pages/Sisters_SD/Sisters_Starry_Nights/Who_Starry_Nights_-_Our_Artist

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683

TOPOGRAPHY & CLIMATE With an average of 300 days of sunshine a year, Sisters enjoys the climate typical of the high desert. Sisters, along with the rest of Central Oregon, is one of the driest and sunniest places in the Pacific EŽƌƚŚǁĞƐƚ͘ dŚĞ ƚŽǁŶ͛Ɛ ƉƌŽdžŝŵŝƚLJ ƚŽ ƚŚĞ ĂƐĐĂĚĞ DŽƵŶƚĂŝŶƐ ŐŝǀĞƐ ^ŝsters a readily accessible reservoir of fresh water generated by snowmelt. By meeting the Tree City, USA standards, the City of Sisters received recognition by the Arbor Day Foundation for its urban forestry management practices. Sisters is the gateway to the dramatic Cascade Mountain range just over 10 miles away but is sheltered from much of the rain and snow in the mountains. Sisters has four distinct seasons and average annual precipitation is just less than ϭϰ͟. Snow is on the ground during winter months, with January usually receiving the most snowfall. At 3200 feet, Sisters lies approximately 400 feet below Bend to the south and nearly 1000 feet ŚŝŐŚĞƌ ƚŚĂŶ DĂĚƌĂƐ ƚŽ ƚŚĞ ŶŽƌƚŚ͘ ^ŝƐƚĞƌƐ͛ ƉƌŝŵĞ ůŽĐĂƚŝŽŶ ŝŶ ǁĞƐƚĞƌŶ ĞƐĐŚƵƚĞƐ ĐŽƵŶƚLJ and proximity to vast areas of national forest provides for spectacular views of the volcanoes of the East Cascades, including the Three Sisters and Mt. Jefferson.

City

Elevation

La Pine Sunriver Bend Sisters Redmond Prineville Madras Warm Springs

ϰϯϬϬ͛ ϰϭϬϬ͛ ϯϲϮϯ͛ ϯϮϬϬ͛ ϯϬϳϳ͛ Ϯϴϲϴ͛ ϮϮϰϮ͛ ϭϱϳϱ͛

Summer temperatures average a high of 85° Fahrenheit and a low of 42°. Winter temperatures range from an average high of 47° to an average low of 20°. Bend, Oregon Weather Profile Average High (°F) Average Low (°F) Mean (°F) Average Precipitation (inches)

Jan 41° 24° 33° 1.5

Feb 44° 24° 34° 1.1

Mar 51° 28° 39° 0.8

Apr 57° 30° 44° 0.8

May 65° 36° 51° 0.9

Jun 72° 42° 57° 0.7

Jul 82° 47° 65° 0.6

Aug 81° 46° 64° 0.5

Sep 74° 40° 57° 0.4

Oct 62° 33° 47° 0.6

Nov 47° 28° 38° 1.4

Dec 39° 23° 31° 2.2

Source: U.S. Climate Data

TRAVEL DISTANCES FROM SISTERS

Distance from Sisters, Oregon

Sisters is situated at the intersection of the Santiam (US 20) and the McKenzie (OR 242) highways. It is located 20 miles west of Bend, 109 miles east of Salem, and 100 miles northeast of Eugene. From Sisters, residents can reach virtually any Central Oregon community within an hour. Major cities on the western side of the Cascades are two to three hours away. Other major West Coast citiesͶSeattle, Boise and San FranciscoͶare all accessed by a full ĚĂLJ͛Ɛ ĚƌŝǀĞ͘

COMMUTE TIME

City | State Miles Redmond, OR 20 OR Bend, OR 22 Prineville, OROR 39 Salem, OR OR 109 Eugene, OR OR 106 Portland, OR OR 154 Seattle, WA OR 327 WA Boise, ID 337 ID San Francisco, CA 512 CA Source: TravelMath.com

Drive Time 0 hours 26 min 0 hours 29 min 0 hours 53 min 2 hours 14 min 2 hours 0 min 3 hours 2 min 5 hours 57 min 6 hours 23 min 8 hours 56 min

Drive times in Central Oregon are very manageable. Because the Tri-County area workforce is truly regional, it͛Ɛ not unusual for individuals to drive from Sisters to Bend or Redmond for work.

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683

BUSINESS RESOURCES Resources in Sisters: Organizations

Services

Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce ͻ EĞƚǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ ĂŶĚ ĂĚǀĞƌƚŝƐŝŶŐ ĨŽƌ ĂƌĞĂ ƉƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂůƐ 541-549-0251 | www.sisterscountry.com ͻ ZĞƐŽƵƌĐĞ ĨŽƌ Sisters business information ͻ DĂƌŬĞƚŝŶŐ ĂŶĚ ƉƌŽŵŽƚŝŽŶ ŽĨ Sisters Area businesses ͻ WƌŽĚƵĐƚŝŽŶ ŽĨ ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ ĞǀĞŶƚƐ City of Sisters 541-549-6022 | www.ci.sisters.or.us/index.html Sisters Branch of Deschutes Library 541-617-7087 | 110 North Cedar St. | www.deschuteslibrary.org

ͻ Permitting, planning, zoning, and building questions ͻ Community Development, Public Works, and city parks information

EDCO Sisters Economic Development Caprielle Foote-Lewis, Manager 541-977-5683 | www.edcoinfo.com

ͻ ƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ƌĞĐƌƵŝƚŵĞŶƚ ĂŶĚ ĚĞǀĞůŽƉŵĞŶƚ for the Sisters area ͻ ^ƚƌĂƚĞŐŝĐ ƉƌŽũĞĐƚƐ

ͻ Business librarians offer entrepreneurs, small business market research ͻ Provides meeting space at no charge

Other Resources: Organizations Abilitree 541-388-8103 | www.abilitree.org

Services ͻ ĚǀŽĐĂĐLJ ĨŽƌ people with disabilities looking for employment ͻ sŽĐĂƚŝŽŶĂů ƐŬŝůů ƚƌĂŝŶŝŶŐ and job placement for people with disabilities

AdFed of Central Oregon 541-385-1992 | www.adfedco.org

ͻ ĚƵĐĂƚŝŽŶĂů ĂŶĚ ŶĞƚǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ ŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƚŝĞƐ ŽŶ ĂĚǀĞƌƚŝƐŝŶŐ ƌĞůĂƚĞĚ ƚŽƉŝĐƐ ͻ DĂƌŬĞƚŝŶŐ ĂŶĚ ĂĚǀĞƌƚŝƐŝŶŐ ƌĞƐŽƵƌĐĞ

Business Oregon 541-388-3236 | www.oregon4biz.com

ͻ ƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ƌĞĐƌƵŝƚŵĞŶƚ͕ ƌĞƚĞŶƚŝŽŶ͕ ĂŶĚ ĞdžƉĂŶƐŝŽŶ Ăƚ the state level ͻ ƐƐŝƐƚƐ ĞĂƌůLJ ƐƚĂŐĞ ďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐĞƐ ǁŝƚŚ ĐĂƉŝƚĂů ĂĐĐĞƐƐ ͻ ŽŶŶĞĐƚŝŽŶ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ ǁŝƚŚ ŽǀĞƌƐĞĂƐ ŵĂƌŬĞƚƐ via the Global Strategy Team

City Club of Central Oregon 541-633-7163 | www.cityclubco.com

ͻ ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ ĨŽƌƵŵ ĞǀĞŶƚƐ ĨŽĐƵƐŝŶŐ ŽŶ ďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ĂŶĚ civic engagement

HRACO (Human Resource Association of ͻ DŽŶƚŚůLJ ƚƌĂŝŶŝŶŐ ŽŶ ,Z-related topics including continuing education Central Oregon) ͻ EĞƚǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ ŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƚŝĞƐ ĨŽƌ ĂƌĞĂ ,Z ƉƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂůƐ 541-382-6946 | www.HRCentralOregon.org Inventors Northwest 541-317-1154 www.coinventorsgroup.ning.com

ͻ ĚƵĐĂƚŝŽŶĂů ƉƌĞƐĞŶƚĂƚŝŽŶƐ ͻ KŶĞ-on-one consulting opportunities ͻ EĞƚǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ ŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƚŝĞƐ

NEW (Network of Entrepreneurial Women) ͻ ƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ƐŚĂƌŝŶŐ ĂŶĚ ƐƵƉƉŽƌƚ ŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƚŝĞƐ 541-350-9135 | ww.networkwomen.org ͻ WƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂů and personal growth opportunities for women Opportunity Knocks 541-318-4650 | www.opp-knocks.org

ͻ ^ƚƌĂƚĞŐLJ Θ ĚŝƐĐƵƐƐŝŽŶ ĨŽƌƵŵ ĨŽƌ ďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ŽǁŶĞƌƐ͕ ĞdžĞĐƐ, and key employees ͻ ŽŶĨŝĚĞŶƚŝĂů ƉĞĞƌ-to-peer problem solving

Oregon Employer Council Central OR ͻ >ŝĂŝƐŽŶ ďĞƚǁĞĞŶ ĞŵƉůŽLJĞƌƐ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ KƌĞŐŽŶ ŵƉůŽLJŵĞŶƚ ĞƉĂƌƚŵĞŶƚ 541-749-4011 | www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/OEC ͻ ŵƉůŽLJĞƌ ĞĚƵĐĂƚŝŽŶ ĂďŽƵƚ ǁŽƌŬƉůĂĐĞ ŝƐƐƵĞƐ ŝŶ ĞŶƚƌĂů KƌĞŐŽŶ Tech Alliance 541-409-6560 | www.techallianceco.org

ͻ KƌŐĂŶŝnjĂƚŝŽŶ ŽĨ DĞĞƚ-Up groups, events, & education for tech professionals ͻ >ŝŶŬ ďĞƚǁĞĞŶ ƚĞĐŚ ĞŶƚƌĞƉƌĞŶĞƵƌƐ ĂŶĚ ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ ƐƚĂƌƚƵƉ ƌĞƐŽƵƌĐĞƐ ͻ >Žǁ-cost office space that fosters collaboration between tenants

COCC (Central Oregon Community College) 541-383-7700 | www.cocc.edu

ͻ ^ŽƵƌĐĞ ĨŽƌ ƚǁŽ-year associate degree programs as well as technical training ͻ Provides a range of continuing education and personal development programs Page 21

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683 MATC (Manufacturing and Applied Technology Center) 541-504-2933 | www.cocc.edu

ͻ ĐĐƌĞĚŝƚĞĚ ƐŽƵƌĐĞ ĨŽƌ ŐƌĂĚƵĂƚĞƐ ĐĞƌƚŝĨŝĞĚ ŝŶ D d ĨŝĞůĚƐ ;ǁĞůĚŝŶŐ͕ ŵĂĐŚŝning, quality assurance, etc.) ͻ ƵƐƚŽŵŝnjĞĚ ƚƌĂŝŶŝŶŐ ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ ŐĞĂƌĞĚ ƚŽ the needs of a specific business

COIC (Central Oregon Intergovernmental ͻ ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ ĚĞǀĞůŽƉŵĞŶƚ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ Council) ͻ tŽƌŬĨŽƌĐĞ ƐŬŝůůƐ ƚƌĂŝŶŝŶŐ 541-548-8163 | www.coic.org ͻ ƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ůŽĂŶƐ ĂŶĚ ŐƌĂŶƚƐ Deschutes County 541-388-6584 | www.deschutes.org

ͻ WƵďůŝĐ ƐĂĨĞƚLJ ĂŶĚ ŚƵŵĂŶ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ ͻ ƐƐĞƐƐŵĞŶƚ ĂŶĚ ƚĂdžĂƚŝŽŶ ͻ Manages economic development fund in partnership with EDCO

EDCO (Economic Development for Central Oregon) 541-388-3236 | www.edcoinfo.com

ͻ Recruits traded-sector companies to relocate to Central Oregon ͻ Provides comprehensive assistance to expanding companies ͻ ŽŶŶĞĐƚ early-stage companies with investors, resources, guidance ͻ Manage PubTalk events and the Bend Venture Conference ͻ ŽŶƐƵůƚƐ ǁŝƚŚ ƐƚĂƌƚƵƉƐ ĂŶĚ early-stage companies ͻ ZĞŐŝŽŶĂů Ɛource for demographics and statistics on business dynamics ͻ &ŽƐƚĞƌƐ ĚĞǀĞůŽƉŵĞŶƚ ŽĨ entrepreneurial ecosystem in Central Oregon

Venture Catalyst Program 541-388-3236 | www.edcoinfo.com

Grow 3 Degrees ͻ >ĞĂŶ ƚƌĂŝŶŝŶŐ ĂŶĚ ƌĞƐŽƵƌĐĞƐ ĨŽƌ ĐŽŶƚŝŶƵŽƵƐ ŝŵƉƌŽǀĞŵĞŶƚ, primarily for 541-388-3236 | www.grow3degrees.org manufacturing and office processes ͻ >ĞĂƌŶŝŶŐ ƚŽƵƌƐ ŽĨ ĂƌĞĂ ďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐĞƐ, industry roundtables OSU-Cascades Campus (Oregon State ͻ ϭϲ ƵŶĚĞƌŐƌĂĚƵĂƚĞ ĚĞŐƌĞĞ ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ University) ͻ ϲ ŐƌĂĚƵĂƚĞ ĚĞŐƌĞĞ programs 541-322-3100 | www.osucascades.edu SBDC (Small Business Development Cen- ͻ No cost, confidential business advice for entrepreneurs, small businesses ter) ͻ ůĂƐƐĞƐ ĂŶĚ ƌĞƐŽurces (special expertise in international trade, government 541-383-7290 | www.cocc.edu/sbdc contracting, etc.) SCORE (Service Corps of Retired Executives) 541-388-3236 | www.centraloregon.score.org

ͻ No cost business education and mentorship, pairing retired executives with business owners and founders ͻ Many valuable templates and tools on national website

Vocational Rehab ͻ ŵƉůŽLJŵĞŶƚ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ ĂŶĚ ĂĚǀŽĐĂĐLJ ĨŽƌ ƉĞŽƉůĞ ǁŝƚŚ ĚŝƐĂďŝůŝƚŝĞƐ 541-388-6336 | www.oregon.gov/dhs/vr ͻ &ƌĞĞ ĐŽŶƐƵůƚĂƚŝŽŶ ǁŝƚŚ ďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐĞƐ ĂďŽƵƚ ĞŵƉůŽLJŵĞŶƚ ŶĞĞĚƐ Worksource Bend (Oregon Employment ͻ ZĞĐƌƵŝƚŵĞŶƚ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ ĨŽƌ ĞŵƉůŽLJĞƌƐ Department) 541-388-6050 | ͻ :Žď ƐĞĞŬĞƌ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ ĂŶĚ ƌĞƐŽƵƌĐĞƐ www.worksourceoregon.org ͻ tŽƌŬĨŽƌĐĞ ĚĂƚĂ͕ ƐƚĂƚĞ ĂŶĚ ƌĞŐŝŽŶĂů employment data

Resources in the state of Oregon Organizations

Services

Business Oregon 541-388-3236 | www.oregon4biz.com

ͻ ƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ƌĞĐƌƵŝƚŵĞŶƚ͕ ƌĞƚĞŶƚŝŽŶ͕ ĂŶĚ ĞdžƉĂŶƐŝŽŶ Ăƚ the state level ͻ ƐƐŝƐƚƐ ĞĂƌůLJ ƐƚĂŐĞ ďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐĞƐ ǁŝƚŚ ĐĂƉŝƚĂů ĂĐĐĞƐƐ ͻ ŽŶŶĞĐƚŝŽŶ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ ǁŝƚŚ ŽǀĞƌƐĞĂƐ ŵĂƌŬĞƚƐ via the Global Strategy Team

OMEP (Oregon Manufacturing Extension ͻ Training for manufacturers in leadership development, workforce engagement Partnership) 541-350-7429 | www.omep.org ͻ Emphasizes implementation of lean manufacturing principles

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520 E. Cascade Ave. | Sisters OR 97759 www.edcoinfo.com | 541-977-5683

INCENTIVES FOR SISTERS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ʹ SHORTLIST Enterprise Zone

Tax abatements on new capital investments and fee discounts based on specific business development criteria

http://www.oregon4biz.com/TheOregonAdvantage/Incentives/EnterpriseZones/

City of Sisters Forgivable Loan

Loan converted to grant program to encourage new capital investments and higher wage job creation

September 2014 (In development stage)

Deschutes County Forgivable Loan

Loan converted to grant program to encourage new capital investments and higher wage job creation

On The Job Training Grant

Cash reimbursement for on-the-job training for specific employerneeded skills

The Fund has been established to offset the costs of business relocation to and within Deschutes County, including moving of equipment, purchase or construction of facilities, and site improvements such as the extension of public services and utilities. http://coic2.org/employmenttraining/on-the-job-training/

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: Caprielle A. Lewis, Managing Director EDCO- Sisters Economic Development 520 E. Cascade Avenue | Sisters, OR 97759 Phone: 541-977-5683 caprielle@edcoinfo.com | www.edcoinfo.com

Economic Development for Central Oregon (EDCO) 705 SW Bonnett Way, Suite 1000 Bend, OR 97702 Phone: 541-388-3236 | 800-342-4135 www.edcoinfo.com

Page 23 Last updated 11/13/2017

© Copyright 2015 EDCO


Articles inside

2017 SISTERS PROFILE

30min
pages 302-323

ABOUT EDCO

1min
pages 300-301

FOUNDATIONS OF CENTRAL OREGON’S ECONOMY

2min
pages 296-299

Workforce Development

3min
pages 290-295

GROW

1min
pages 289-290

ENTREPRENEURIAL SUPPORT

1min
page 288

NEW RESIDENTS, NEW IDEAS & NEW ENERGY

2min
pages 284-287

CENTRAL OREGON OVERVIEW

1min
pages 282-283

OREGON AT-A-GLANCE SCHOOL PROFILE CONTINUED

1min
pages 278, 280-281

OREGON AT-A-GLANCE SCHOOL PROFILE

1min
pages 277-278

OREGON AT-A-GLANCE SCHOOL PROFILE CONTINUED 2018-19

1min
page 276

OREGON AT-A-GLANCE SCHOOL PROFILE

1min
pages 275-276

Sisters Elementary School

1min
page 274

Sisters Elementary School

1min
pages 273-274

The City of Sisters History

3min
pages 254-256, 258-271

A Vast Amount of Caring: Collective

1min
pages 252-253

A Sense of Place: Connecting to Whychus

2min
pages 250-251

Returning to the Creek:

2min
pages 248-249

The Ebb and Flow of It:

5min
pages 243-247

The Way to the Mountain:

2min
pages 241-242

Ways of Seeing:

5min
pages 236-240

The Hidden Economy of Sisters

2min
page 233

Sisters Arts and Culture

1min
page 232

Historic Buildings in Sisters

1min
page 227

Going Wild in Sisters

1min
page 225

Sisters Parks

1min
page 224

Sisters Attractions

3min
page 222

Sisters Timeline

1min
page 221

Did you know? Sisters Oregon

2min
page 219

Now that you live in Sisters...

1min
page 218

ZONING REGULATIONS

55min
pages 162-197

UTILITIES LIST

4min
pages 15-17, 19-26, 28
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