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Green purc particular e hasing in nco the evaluat urages ion of multiple en v ir o nment impacts of every prod al uc throughout its lifecycle t

Challenges and Opportunities Lifecycle perspective To the greatest extent possible, universities should identify opportunities to save money and streamline systems by purchasing less. There is no single definition of sustainable procurement or green purchasing, and applications vary across organisational hierarchy and sector. One definition could be that a lifecycle perspective, a service, or a product has a significantly reduced environmental impact compared to the average product or service. All stages in the lifecycle of a product offer the potential for optimisation/minimisation of the product's environmental footprint. Buying green means to prefer an environmentally beneficial alternative – this supports innovation in the supply chain of the product which ensures further progress in the development of environmentally sound solutions. Organisations practicing sustainable procurement meet their needs for goods, services, and utilities. They work not on a private cost-benefit analysis, but with a view to maximising net benefits for themselves and the wider world. Green purchasing in particular encourages the evaluation of multiple environmental impacts of every product throughout its lifecycle. 68

Procurement There are numerous practical considerations for each of the procurement phases – planning, acquisition, use, maintenance, and disposal – to ensure that environmental considerations are included in procurement decisions. And, as purchasing at universities is often controlled by the individual institutes – i.e., organised in a decentralised fashion with limited pooling – know-how about green purchasing is scattered, as there is no central accessibility. GREEN PURCHASING


IARU - Green Guide for Universities – pathways towards sustainability