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themanager

themanager The magazine of the League Managers Association

Issue 5: Spring 2010

World Cup 2010 special “You do need instinct as a manager, but you need experience to back up your instinct” fabio capello

TIME FOR ACTION

Terry Venables and Graham Taylor on the art of tournament management

HITTING TARGETS

How to win a World Cup with England... by a coach who’s done it

Eyes on the prize ‘UNDER-PROMISE, OVER-DELIVER’ The complete guide to managing expectations

Issue 5: Spring 2010

Keith Alexander Sir Alf Ramsey Bruce Arena Stuart Baxter Hope Powell OBE Luther Blissett

Fabio Capello talks tactics, Rooney and England’s chances

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— welcome —

KICKING OFF

8 From the dugout

All of the latest news, from both within the LMA and the wider world of football

12 Keith Alexander

A tribute to the popular LMA member and Macclesfield manager, who died on March 3rd

14 Ramsey revisited

The life and times of Sir Alf Ramsey, the only England manager to win the big prize

It’s in his hands

We speak to Fabio Capello on the eve of his first tournament as an international coach

THE WORLD CUP 22 The best man...

12

...for a job is often a woman. As shown by the England women’s coach, Hope Powell

24 Short-term action

Building a team when time is of the essence

28 Covering the cup

8

30 LMA overseas

Managing expectations

The BBC’s Philip Bernie on bringing the 2010 FIFA World Cup to UK homes We catch up with Finland manager Stuart Baxter

32 The outsider

An interview with a man who’s already won a World Cup with England, rugby kicking coach, Dave Alred

35 Hopeful hosts

TOUCHLINE

52 The coach’s view

Manchester City’s Mike Rigg reports back from an eye-opening trip to Brazil

An update on the current status of England’s bid to stage the 2018 FIFA World Cup

54 Fit to manage

THE BUSINESS

How Newcastle and WBA played their way back to the top flight

40 David and Goliath

How to punch above your weight... and win

An intoxicating look at alcohol, with Dr Dorian Dugmore

LMA PARTNERS

58 President’s Dinner

44 Turning it around

61 Jaguar Academy

Arsenal’s long-serving club secretary on the changing nature of his role

Pictures from the February get-together with the England manager

An in-depth interview with First Great Western CEO, Mark Hopwood

The luxury car maker unveils its all-new, all-British sports club

How to piece together a successful team, then keep them pulling as one unit

50 The blame game An extract from Dr Sue Bridgewater’s Football Management

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14

56 Analysis

42 The insider: David Miles

48 The human jigsaw

A guide to finding, meeting and managing expectations from above and below

16

62 Bobby Moore Fund

Fresh back from Project South Africa, Luther Blissett checks in

65 Virgin Atlantic

How the England team will fly in style to South Africa this summer

66 Stoppage time

Avram Grant celebrates a famous victory at Wembley

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THE MANAGERS’ VOICE

“Management in all walks of life is a difficult and fluid science”

Management is a complex discipline and football management is more complex than most. What the past few weeks have shown us is that factors outside of our control can unexpectedly impact on our plans and strategies. Who would have expected to see Liverpool, Fulham and Barcelona travel overland to play their European semifinals? Football, it seems, is not immune to external forces. Football is, however, a strong and vibrant industry. Broadcast and sponsorship incomes continue to grow and the sport’s global appeal remains undiminished. But popularity brings its own challenges; the debt and ownership issues remain a cause for concern. A strong regulatory framework is a prerequisite for stability. The LMA will continue to work with the game to improve regulations. Football clubs are not merely businesses to be bought and sold, they are fundamental parts of communities and should be treated with respect. Managing through periods of uncertainty requires strong leadership and commitment. In the past season, managers such as Chris Hughton, Eddie Howe and Avram Grant have put to one side issues over which they have no control and delivered success. And, in these instances, success on the field can lead to stability off it. With continuing technological advancements (such as Sky’s introduction of 3D) the football experience continues to improve. It is, therefore, an ongoing disappointment that at the highest level, the game won’t support the introduction of technology for certain areas of decision-making. Goal-line technology, specifically, is supported by so many in the game, including the vast majority of the LMA’s membership, it surely is time to embrace the future. Management in all walks of life is a difficult and fluid science. It is even more so in football, where scrutiny and a thirst for results create a challenging working environment. Within the LMA’s membership we have exceptional managers, with a combined experience in the game of more than 95,000 matches. Football needs to embrace the knowledge and experience within the LMA’s ranks to drive the game forward. Better leadership and communication at the top will build the framework for the future of football and the next generation of players, coaches and managers. Richard Bevan LMA CEO

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BRAZIL MAY BE FAVOURITES BUT NOT EVERYTHING MAY BE SO PREDICTABLE… Brazil are once again tipped to win the FIFA World Cup™ according to the Castrol FIFA World Cup™ Predictor – our new tool designed to objectively analyse team performance in South Africa this summer. The calculations show Brazil are the favourites to win, with a 23.6 % chance of glory. Spain are the second most likely side to win, with a 16.1 % chance, followed by England on 10.4 % and Holland on 10.1 %.

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Castrol has applied the same expertise they apply to the development of their oils to create the Castrol Predictor, using objective analysis and highly advanced technology to offer unique insights into winning performances. Based on predicting the group outcome and who will win subsequent rounds the graphic below represents who England are most likely to play if they make it through to that round.

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The Castrol Predictor measures past team and player performance and works out the attack and defence ratings of each nation. Then, by simulating the tournament more than 100,000 times and taking into account the draw groupings, Castrol has calculated each team’s chances of progression through the FIFA World Cup™ group stages and ultimately, of winning.

5%

Castrol Ambassador Marcel Desailly commented: “I am surprised that the Castrol Predictor shows Brazil as favourites because I really thought Spain were the team to beat this time. I will be hoping that my home nation Ghana does better than predicted as the Castrol Predictor only gives them a 0.2% chance of success! It’s great being able to look at the teams’ predicted success in this way and I’m sure it will be a talking point for football fans everywhere.”

CASTROL – OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE PARTNER OF THE LMA

IF ENGLAND QUALIFY 2ND IN THEIR GROUP THEY ARE MOST LIKELY TO PLAY ROUND OF 16

QUATER-FINALS

SEMI-FINALS

FINAL

GERMANY

ARGENTINA

SPAIN

BRAZIL

SOURCE: WWW.CASTROLFOOTBALL.COM

For further details on Castrol’s football analysis and the Castrol Predictor visit: www.castrolfootball.com/predictor/explained


themanager Published for the LMA by Seven Squared Ltd. Opinions expressed by contributors are their own. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. Publishing enquiries 020 7775 7775 www.sevensquared.co.uk Advertising enquiries Richard Ibbotson 020 7775 5714 richard.Ibbotson@sevensquared.co.uk Editor: Ciarán Brennan Art director: Sundeep Bhui Senior sub-editor: Darren Barrett Creative director: Michael Booth Picture editor: Martha Gittens Picture researcher: Christina Blackmore Production controller: Chris Gardner Account director: Jake Cassels Publisher: Mike Bokaie Finance director: Roger Baker Editorial director: Peter Dean Chief executive: Sean King Chairman: Mike Potter Cover portrait: Back Pages Images Picture credits: Action Images, Alamy, Barcroft Media Ltd, Eyevine, Getty Images, Istockphoto FOR THE LMA Executive editor: Jim Souter Contributing editor: Sue McKellar

SPONSORED BY

The League Managers Association, The Camkin Suite, 1 Pegasus House, Tachbrook Park, Warwick CV34 6LW Tel: 01926 831556 Email: lma@lmasecure.com www.leaguemanagers.com

Editor’s letter World Cup memories

I’m not sure if I’m alone in this or not, but I tend to mark the milestones in my life through major football tournaments. My earliest memory is collecting cards and coins in the run-up to Mexico 1970 (excitement matched only by the tournament itself ), while the final of Germany 1974 marked the awful moment that I realised that life wasn’t fair and that the good guys don’t always finish first. I could go on (don’t get me started on the events of 2002), but I would probably take up the entire magazine. Fabio Capello will, of course, have more extensive World Cup memories than I do; he played in that 1974 tournament and has seen his birth country lift the trophy twice in his lifetime (to add to the two titles they already had before he was born). But one thing that Fabio hasn’t done until now is lead a team through the tournament... something which he speaks to us about in our exclusive interview on page 16. Working through short-term projects (such as the World Cup finals) to achieve long-term goals isn’t just a football management challenge – it crops up in almost every other business, too. We look at the best ways to approach this in an in-depth feature (starting on page 24), while another perennial management challenge which Fabio will know all about, managing expectations, is tackled on page 36. Who knows how events will unfold in South Africa over the course of this summer, but we will surely end up with at least one more World Cup memory in our lockers... let’s hope it’s a good one.

Ciarán Brennan

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— KICKING OFF : News —

Kicking off news

66%

The decrease in this season’s winter transfer market, compared to 2008/09

and views from the dugout

top three finish for manchester united

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Barclays Premier League giants rated among world’s richest clubs, according to competing reports

Manchester United’s finances remain in the media spotlight, with the club being rated as either the world’s richest (according to Forbes magazine) or third behind Real Madrid (Deloitte). The Forbes report, which analysed data collected in the 2008/09 season, valued the north-west giant at £1.19bn, while Deloitte’s Football Money League 2010 (covering the same period) suggested that the club enjoyed revenues of £278.5m. The Deloitte report also indicated that the financial power base is moving ever more firmly into the realm of the ‘big five’ European leagues, with England contributing seven clubs to the top 20, Germany five, Italy four and France and Spain represented by two each. Although the trends were generally positive across both reports, particularly in terms of increasing sponsorship and media revenue, the Forbes report does note that the average worth of the clubs featured fell by 8.5 per cent.

Extra time

A round-up of LMA members contributing to their communities

Old Trafford (right) contributes an average of £3.6m per matchday to Manchester United’s coffers, according to Deloitte’s Football Money League report.

Harry Redknapp and a number of other LMA members (including Rafa Benitez, Carlo Ancelotti and Roberto Martinez) contributed selfportraits to a book which raised £32k at auction for the Nordoff Robbins charity.

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Martin Ling will have to forego the pleasures of watching this year’s FA Cup final, as he’s taking part in BBC Radio Cambridgeshire’s annual all-star charity football match (in aid of Trustline) at Cambridge City’s Milton Road ground on May 15th.


— KICKING OFF : News —

deal hammered out West Ham United are working with Newham Council to formulate a joint bid to use the 2012 Olympic Stadium after the Games. A final decision on the stadium’s post-Games use is not expected until March 2011.

leeds utd tackle cancer

moyes suggests managing upwards Third longest-serving manager in the Barclays Premier League suggests a turning of the tables to interviews

Everton manager David Moyes has come up with a novel way to improve stability within football clubs, suggesting that managers should interview chairmen, rather than the other way around. “If you have a good, stable chairman who understands things that’s better, so the manager should be able to find out what the chairman is about, what his expectations are, when does he crack, is he on the phone moaning after every defeat, how interfering is he? “Obviously, there is a pressure to stay in the Premier League. Whoever is near the bottom comes under pressure, but some managers in that position are doing well with the resources they have, so there should be an appreciation of that. Finances play a part, but then to sack a manager costs money and to get a new one costs money. “They say they’re skint until they have to get rid of a manager and then they’re happy to find the money to get things moving. When the team’s not doing

George Burley ran this year's Virgin London Marathon on behalf of the Brain Tumour UK charity, while Ian Hendon completed the course for the Prostate Cancer Charity (alongside his first-team coach at Barnet, Lee Harrison).

Leeds United have signed a three-year agreement with Yorkshire Cancer Research to raise awareness of its Cancer. Let’s Tackle It campaign, which focuses on cancers that commonly affect men. “This partnership is designed to give male fans more of an idea of the kinds of signs that could indicate the presence of cancer and to encourage them to seek help,” said Clair Chadwick of Yorkshire Cancer Research.

well it’s tough on the chairman because sometimes the supporters shout at them and that’s unfair, too. You need chairmen who don’t buckle. Managers get it every week, but some chairmen don’t know how to handle that criticism and the only way they know how to is to get rid of the manager.”

Martin Allen will travel to Cape Town, South Africa, in June to deliver a four-day coaching programme to local volunteer coaches as part of the LMAsupported Coaching for Hope charity programme (www. coachingforhope.org).

Gary Waddock turned out against his own side (well... almost), by joining Alan Pardew, Malky Mackay and Gianfranco Zola (among others) to take on a team of Wycombe Wanderers legends in the Mike Keen Charity Cup on April 15th.

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shirt numbers Despite England’s performance in the world financial tables (see opposite) the Barclays Premier League still trails the Bundesliga in revenues generated by shirt sponsorship. Clubs in Germany’s top division earned an average of €6.3m from shirt sponsorship deals (a five per cent rise on the previous season), compared with the Barclays Premier League’s €4.8m (a fall of ten per cent). The most active sponsors were from the betting and energy sectors, taking over the position previously occupied by financial institutions.


— KICKING OFF : News —

Radio rights decided The BBC, Absolute Radio and TalkSport will share the Premier League’s seven national radio commentary broadcast rights packages for 2011/12 and 2012/13.

Management and brands by the book A brace of books on the subject of football management from one of the UK’s leading sports marketing experts

Five things I’ve learned Munir Samji

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Chairman and CEO, Blitz Communications 1. set ambitious targets: You’ve got to know exactly what you’re aiming for... then push yourself to aim a little higher. 2. It’s who you know: People are the most important asset in any businessman’s locker... you really can never do enough networking. 3. It takes an agile mind: By all means make quick decisions, but be prepared to change your mind quickly, too. 4. when you stop smiling, leave: When you feel that you’re no longer enjoying something, it’s probably time to move on. 5. It’s never only plain sailing: You have to be prepared to handle the storms, too. blitzcommunications.co.uk

Respected football academic and long-time LMA collaborator, Warwick Business School’s Dr Sue Bridgewater is making her extensive knowledge of business and marketing available to a wider audience through the publication of two new books – Football Management and Football Brands. Using statistical analysis and academic insight, Football Management compares the management of football with the disciplines and practices of management in other areas of business. Commenting on the book’s launch, LMA chairman Howard Wilkinson said: “I am delighted to endorse this excellent book, not least because it cuts through

Heroic effort by Football League Cross-club collaboration raises valuable funds for the association's first-ever official charity partner

The Football League’s Football for Heroes week (March 6th-14th) saw all 72 clubs come together to raise much-needed funds for wounded servicemen and women. The nine-day event, which saw each club host at least one home game, raised tens of thousands of pounds through collections, auctions and fan donations. Help for Heroes was chosen as the Football League’s first-ever official charity partner through an online poll. “The contribution being made by our armed forces around the world is humbling,” said honorary president of the Football League, Lord Mawhinney.

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all the emotional issues which so often cloud the judgement of people trying to arrive at sensible analysis of this very demanding profession.” Described by LMA chief executive Richard Bevan as “a must read for anyone working in the game”, Football Brands explores the lucrative nature of football and sports branding using leading-edge research in an accessible way, based on unparalleled access to football clubs and professional bodies. Football Management and Football Brands are available now, published by Palgrave Macmillan (www.palgrave. com). To read a short extract from Football Management, turn to page 50. Preston’s Darren Ferguson (right) and Kevin Russell show their support


— KICKING OFF : News —

¤401.4

m

The revenues generated by Real Madrid in 2009 (according to Deloitte’s Football Money League 2010 report)

eca secures uefa fair play deal

sir bobby keeps giving

Association of European clubs agrees on phased introduction of new scheme with governing body

Roughly 6,000 shirts, scarves and flags that were placed in tribute at the grounds of Sir Bobby Robson’s former clubs have been donated by the late knight’s family to a number of charities, including KitAid, Coaches across Continents and CAFOD. One of Sir Bobby’s sons, Andrew, said: “My family and Dad’s former clubs didn’t want to see any of that memorabilia going to waste.”

The European Club Association (ECA) has negotiated a range of concessions from UEFA on the forthcoming financial fair play scheme – the most notable being a phased introduction. The scheme, where clubs will have to break even, will come into force in 2015 after a three-year transition period. ECA chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge (right) said: “We have some trouble in the economy and football industry and it was a good moment for UEFA to intervene. We agreed with the breakeven criteria and that non-overdue payables need to be faced immediately.”

playing at her majesty’s pleasure Community initiative by Doncaster Rovers brings new meaning to the phrase ‘closed-doors friendly’

Doncaster Rovers manager Sean O’Driscoll (below) oversaw an unusual training session on the day before his team’s game at Preston on March 9th – a match against young offenders at HMP Doncaster (Marshgate). The game was organised as part of a long-running programme, set up by the Prince’s Trust and funded by the

no sponsor for saints Professional Footballers’ Association and Football Foundation, that aims to reduce offenders’ chances of reoffending. Doncaster’s community manager Liam Scully said: “When people look into the positive outcomes of this – both on a statistical and personal level – they will understand the huge impact a project like this can have.” Denis Lehman, of the PFA, added: “The game was played with great enthusiasm by everyone, and Sean O’Driscoll, along with all the first-team players and community department, should be proud of their commitment and support.”

Southampton’s shirt for next season will not carry a sponsor. Instead, the club will mark its 125th anniversary by celebrating its history on the new shirt. Executive chairman Nicola Cortese said: “It is a one-off commemorative product that will never be produced again. Our finances allow us to take such a decision.”

money for old boots The boots worn by Sir Stanley Matthews in the 1953 FA Cup final have been sold at auction for £38,400 at Bonhams in Chester. The boots were initially expected to sell for £8,000.

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— OBITUARY —

“Keith blazed a trail for black managers at a time when some of us thought even getting a foot in the door was an impossible task. Frankly, for what he achieved in his career, he deserved the shot at a bigger club”

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PAUL INCE, MANAGER, MK Dons

Alexander The Great The LMA has lost one of its most popular and active members, with the passing of Macclesfield manager Keith Alexander words Ciarán Brennan

THE FOOTBALL WORLD was united in mourning on March 3rd as news broke of the sudden and unexpected death of Macclesfield manager Keith Alexander, one of the game’s true gentlemen. Many of the media reports which appeared following his death incorrectly described Alexander as the first black manager of a Football League club (that distinction actually fell to Tony Collins, who managed Rochdale between 1960 and 1967). That, however, is somehow

appropriate, as Alexander always saw himself as a football manager who happened to be black, rather than a black football manager. Despite being offered trials by Notts County as a teenager, Alexander (a powerful centreforward) spent most of his playing career in the non-League environment, not making his Football League debut until 1988 when (at the grand old age of 31) he turned out for Grimsby Town. His managerial career took a similar path as, having begun with

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a short spell at Fourth Division Lincoln City in 1993, he learned his trade over the next nine years in a number of positions with non-League clubs. Alexander once again took over the reins at Lincoln, in 2002, and remained in League management until his premature death. His second stint with the Imps was more successful, as he guided his team to the play-offs in four consecutive seasons – including two finals at Cardiff ’s Millennium Stadium – a record


— OBITUARY —

“Keith was a true football man and an absolute gentleman off the field who had time for everyone. He never forgot his roots and there were not many like him. He will be sadly missed” Barry Fry, director of football, Peterborough

that no other manager has managed to repeat. This feat was all the more remarkable given that in 2003, five months after Lincoln’s first play-off defeat, Alexander suffered a double cerebral aneurysm. Despite emergency surgery, Alexander was back at work within six months. Leaving Lincoln in 2006, Alexander was reunited with Barry Fry (who he had played under at Barnet) as manager of Peterborough United. “You won’t find a more dedicated man at any club, he always gave 150 per cent,” said Fry. Alexander’s final job was with Macclesfield Town, who he joined in February 2008. Alexander’s life had always revolved around football. As well as being a player and manager, he was also a qualified referee and had been an early graduate of the LMA’s certificate in applied management at Warwick University (as well as a UEFA Pro Licence holder). This dedication to the game led him to be an active and popular member of the LMA. Paying tribute, LMA chief executive Richard Bevan said: “Keith will be sorely missed by the LMA, its members and the football community. Keith was an active member of the LMA and our projects with the Prince’s Trust in particular. Nobody would deny that Keith knew just about all there is to know about managing football clubs on a low budget. He was a champion of civil rights and equality issues and was also active in the Black Coaches Association.” LMA chairman Howard Wilkinson added: “It is ironic that on the day of his death I was due to invite Keith to join the LMA committee; such was the respect

“Keith was a pioneer. An unstinting supporter of equality and a role model for aspiring coaches and managers, whatever their racial background” Piara Powar, Director, Kick It Out

that he was held in within football, both as a person and manager.” Although he never managed at the highest level, the esteem that Alexander was held in was underlined when the England team wore black armbands in tribute in their friendly against Egypt on the day after his death. Gary Simpson, Alexander’s friend and assistant manager at Macclesfield, voiced a universally held opinion when he said: “He was a larger than life character – an honest man, a splendid man who will be missed by not only football people, but people in all walks of life. He was an absolutely superb human being.”

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Keith ALEXANDER FACT FILE Born: Nottingham, November 14th 1956 Playing career: 1974-1996. Scored 30 goals in 142 League appearances. Won three caps for St Lucia in 1990. Managerial career: Lincoln City (1993-1994); Ilkeston Town (non-League, 1995-2000); Northwich Victoria (non-League, 2000-2001); Lincoln City (2002-2006); Peterborough United (2006-2007); Bury (director of football, 2007-2008); Macclesfield Town (2008-2010).


— KICKING OFF —

From the SPONSORED BY

No.1 Sir

Alf Ramsey

In the first of a regular series looking at the history of the game, we turn the spotlight on the only England manager to win a major tournament

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July 30th 1966 will be a date

forever enshrined in the annals of English football. It is the date when the son of an Essex smallholder led a team of heroes to the pinnacle of their profession – and capped a meteoric rise in management that had begun just over a decade earlier. A strong and polished defender in his playing days, Sir Alf Ramsey was a part of the famous Tottenham Hotspur ‘push and run’ League-winning team of 1951 and earned a total of 32 caps for England between 1948 and 1953. But for all his success on the field, Ramsey only found his true calling in August 1955 when he was appointed manager of Ipswich Town. At that time, the Suffolk club was languishing in the Third Division South (the lowest rung of the ladder, as the Third Division was separated into two regional groupings and there was no Fourth Division). Under Ramsey’s guidance, Ipswich rose spectacularly; progressing from Third Division also-rans to League champions in less than seven years (taking the title at the first attempt). Such an extraordinary achievement was bound to attract attention and, when Walter Winterbottom resigned as England manager in late 1962, the FA turned to Ramsey.

The first England manager to be responsible for both selection and coaching, Ramsey was viewed as a gifted tactician. According to the Complete Book of Football Managers (Breedon, 1993): “His tactics changed English football for all time. Gifted individuals did not necessarily fit into Ramsey’s plans. His tactics were innovative and by the time the opposition had worked them out, Ipswich had gained the League championship.” When Ramsey took up his new role in January 1963, he made his mark by announcing that England

“Nobody took anything for granted. After one midweek international, Martin Peters said, ‘Bye Alf, see you next time’. To which Alf replied, ‘You might’.” Sir Bobby Charlton, World Cup winner with Ramsey’s England in 1966

would win the next World Cup. This was noteworthy not only because Ramsey wasn’t known as an effusive or boastful character, but also because the ‘Three Lions’ had underachieved up to this point (in the three previous World Cups, England had failed to make it beyond the quarter-final stages). Just over three years later, though, he fulfilled his promise –

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and achieved something that none of his successors has come close to. Although it was the 11 men on the pitch that beat West Germany, Ramsey’s influence loomed large. His selection of Geoff Hurst ahead of Jimmy Greaves (one of the world’s most potent strikers) showed the courage of his convictions; as did his decision to abandon his favoured 4-3-3 formation in favour of a more direct 4-4-2 half-way through the tournament. This, however, was to be the peak for both England and Sir Alf (he was knighted in 1967). The international game was progressing and, despite an impressive showing at the 1970 World Cup in Mexico, England was falling behind. When England failed to qualify for the 1974 World Cup finals, the FA decided it was time for a change at the top. Ramsey became a director of Birmingham City in January 1976 and subsequently became the first knight to manage a Football League club when he took the reins at that club in September 1977. This appointment – his final job in football – lasted just seven months and Sir Alf eventually left the game for good in March 1978. Having lived the remainder of his life in quiet retirement in Suffolk with his wife Victoria, Sir Alf died on April 28th 1999.


Feature

“You’ve won it once. Now you’ll have to go out there and win it again”

Alf Ramsey’s words to his team before extra time in the 1966 final

ALF Ramsey FACT FILE Born: Dagenham, Essex, January 22nd 1920 Playing career: Full-back. Southampton (1944-1949); Tottenham Hotspur (1949-1955); England (32 caps, one goal). Honours and achievements: First Division champion (1951); Second Division champion (1950). Managerial career: Ipswich Town (1955-1963); England (1963-1974); Birmingham City (1977-1978). Honours and achievements: World Cup winner (1966); First Division champion (1962); Second Division champion (1961); Third Division (South) champion (1957). Knighted (1967); inducted into English Football Hall of Fame (2002).

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england expects

This June, Fabio Capello will embark on a new phase in his managerial career when he takes England to South Africa for his first World Cup tournament. The Manager spoke with the Italian to gain an insight into his approach to leadership and the lessons he’s learnt over the course of his 19-year career words Sue McKellar

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— WORLD CUP 2010 : FABIO CAPELLO INTERVIEW —

Q

What approach do you take to management; are you a deep thinker, a very detailed planner? When I started out in management I studied a lot. The approach that I take in management towards managing my players and the approach towards my opponents are two different things. The week before the game I prepare my players through training and I explain everything to them; at the same time I fully respect my opposition and this has always been a very important thing for me to do. You can study and prepare, but how much do you rely on instinct? Instinct does play a part, but you also have to be able to understand your players. When your players are all in good form it is easy, but you have to realise that this is not always going to be the case. You have to be able to react when they lose form and make changes during a game, and even during training sessions. It is really important to let the player recover in terms of confidence. You do need instinct as a manager, but you need experience to back up your instinct.

Fabio the winner:

“Fabio is a strong guy; a winner who’s convinced of the methods that he uses” Arsène wenger

How much have you had to adapt during your career to accommodate the game’s evolution? I worked in the north of Italy and central Italy (managing AC Milan, Roma and Juventus), and they were entirely different in terms of the weather, the fans, the atmosphere around the club and the players, and you have to be able to understand and adapt your approach. When I managed in Spain it was completely different again because for Real Madrid fans and players, Real are the best team in the world. At Real Madrid, psychologically it was really important for the players to play for the ‘white shirt’, and as their manager you have to fully appreciate the psychology of this club and its players.

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— WORLD CUP 2010 : FABIO CAPELLO INTERVIEW —

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FABIO CAPELLO FACT FILE

Midfielder Capello won 32 caps for Italy – and scored the winner against England at Wembley in 1973

So understanding the culture of your club is essential? As a manager, you have to change your approach every time and be able to change the style or the system that you play; essentially you need to understand where you work. At the moment, all the teams press a lot to win the ball back quickly. In Spain, the style is to play a lot of football and not the long ball; you have to arrive after 25 short passes to shoot or score a goal. In Italy, the system is different, with more tactics involved. I believe that if you study all the club teams in the various countries, and all the national teams, you will find a mix of different styles, and because of this I think football has improved a lot. To be a good player now you have to be strong, really good technically and understand the pressure around you.

1946: B  orn in San Canzian d'Isonzo, Gorizia, Italy 1964: Makes pro debut for Ferrara side SPAL 1973: Scores as Italy beat England at Wembley for the first time 1991: Appointed head coach of AC Milan 1992: Wins first of four Italian league titles with Milan 1994: Milan beat Barcelona 4-0 in European Cup final 1997: Wins Spanish league with Real Madrid 2001: Guides Roma to their first Scudetto for 18 years 2004: Wins Scudetto in first season with Juventus 2007: Guides Real to La Liga during his second spell 2008: Succeeds Steve McClaren as England manager Fabio the believer:

“I think England are one of the best teams in the world and we can win against anyone” fabio capello

How have you had to adapt to manage England? Obviously, it’s a very different job being a national manager rather than a club manager. The pressure is bigger as England manager because behind the national manager and the team you have the country. The country expects a lot and the fans believe a lot in the

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team. As a club manager, you can work with your players every day, you can train to improve and study what happened and why in between each game, and you can usually rectify things quickly. As England manager I can do a lot of in-depth preparation and then there’s an injury and everything I have prepared is for nothing! Wayne Rooney recently described the positive influence that you have had on his game. How pleasing is it to see such a naturally gifted young talent so keen to improve his game and where do you rank him among the current crop of international strikers? Wayne Rooney is one of the best talents that I have ever coached. He’s like Raúl in that he is a very important player and a big talent. Every time Rooney trains he wants to learn and he always wants to stay on that training pitch for as long as possible. It is really important that the other players see that Rooney, one of the best players in the world, wants to stay on the pitch and wants to continue to learn. You've enjoyed a lot of success at club level, but international management is a relatively new chapter in your career path; with just how much relish and anticipation are you approaching the opportunity to manage in your first World Cup? For me, the World Cup is a really big challenge. I think England are one of the best teams in the world and we can win against anyone. My approach to the World Cup is relaxed now. I have


— WORLD CUP 2010 : FABIO CAPELLO INTERVIEW —

to study the other countries that we will be playing against and I hope that everything that we are preparing will be ready for the tournament. Whenever you go to South Africa you are interested in the quality of the pitches, but my most important hope is that all of my best players will be injury-free and available to play in the World Cup. Fabio and england:

“Can he win the World Cup? Why not? England has great players and Fabio is a great coach”

Above: In-depth preparation in training is a key element for the England manager Right: With Chelsea manager Carlo Ancelotti at the LMA President’s Dinner in February (more on pages 58 and 59)

Marcello Lippi

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business

with real balls

The Manager is the quarterly magazine from the League Managers Association. Drawing on the rich experience of the men on the touchline – as well as from leaders in many other businesses – The Manager provides insightful and fascinating perspectives on the professional disciplines and personal qualities needed in successful management. To see a digital version of the latest issue, go to www.leaguemanagers.com and click on ‘The Manager’ To subscribe to The Manager, email lmasubscriptions@sevensquared.co.uk To advertise, please call Richard Ibbotson on 020 7775 5714


— WORLD CUP 2010 : hope powell INTERVIEW —

England’s

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If Fabio Capello needs advice

on how to guide a squad through the rigours of an international tournament, he should take a short stroll down the corridor of the FA’s offices and knock on the door of Hope Powell OBE, the England women’s national coach. To date, Powell has been involved with England squads at five major tournaments (four senior and one with the U19s) and is busy preparing her charges for the next FIFA Women’s World Cup, which will take place in Germany in 2011. “Fingers crossed that we’ll get there,” she says. “We’re up against Austria, Spain, Turkey and Malta in qualifying. Spain have caused us problems when we’ve played them before… they’ll be a difficult challenge.” So what advice does Powell have to offer her male counterpart on his imminent tournament debut? “There’s a lot that you have to get right before you actually kick a ball,” she says. “By the time you get to the venue you should have done most of your homework… you’ll know the teams that you’re playing against inside out, so the period before your first game is all about getting the squad used to

each other and used to working in a strange environment. Towards the end of the preparation period you start to embed your strategies into the team, but once that first game kicks off, it’s really a case of taking each game as it comes.” But then, no matter how well you prepare, squad members pick up injuries or facilities don’t turn out as promised – in fact, it’s unlikely that things will ever go exactly to plan. Powell believes that this is where the manager earns his or her keep. “You always try to have a ‘Plan B’,” she says, “but sometimes things happen that you can’t change and at that point it’s all about making decisions very quickly. It’s a challenge, but it’s really good fun.”

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The Manager meets Hope Powell, an England first team coach with a wealth of international tournament experience to draw on words Ciarán Brennan

One challenge that Powell will no longer have to face is taking an entirely amateur squad away for a five-week tournament as, thanks to the inception of the Women’s Professional Soccer league in the US (now in its second year), nine members of her squad are now full-time professionals. Not only that, but many UK-based players now work within football (albeit not as full-time players). “It used to be all about balancing work or college with training,” says Powell. “You have to really applaud the girls for the commitment they showed and the work that they did to get themselves not only selected, but also in a position to go away for five weeks. It does make a difference now that a lot of the girls who are still based here are in football-related jobs.” A good number of these jobs are on the staff of the high-profile men’s clubs which, of late, have increased their commitment to the women’s game. Indeed, at the time of writing, only one of the top five teams in the FA Tesco Women’s Premier League table – Leeds Carnegie – wasn’t affiliated to a big-name men’s club.


— WORLD CUP 2010 : hope powell INTERVIEW —

“Things will happen that you can’t change and at that point it’s all about making decisions very quickly”

While Powell – who became an honorary member of the LMA in February of this year – welcomes this involvement, she remains slightly wary. “It’s all about the resources,” she says, “but it hasn’t always worked. Take Charlton Ladies, for example. They were one of the bigger clubs a little while ago, but when the men got relegated (from the Barclays Premier League) the first thing to go was the women’s set-up.” Despite this, Powell believes that the English women’s game is stronger than it’s ever been. It is, however, still some way short of where she would like it to be. So, where exactly is that? “It would be great if all of our players were professional and could make it a career to be full-time athletes. That would certainly help the national team.” More than this, though, Powell believes that English players need to develop a winning habit. “Things won’t be where we want them to be until we start winning and continue to win,” she says. “We’re getting better. The U19s won the European Championship for the first time in Belarus last year, so we may just have started

Hope Powell FACT FILE Born: London, December 8th 1966 Playing career: Midfielder, Millwall Lionesses, Fulham, Croydon and England (66 caps, 35 goals). Captained Croydon to League and Cup double in 1996, FA Women’s Cup winner three times. Managerial career: England Women (1998-present) Honours and achievements: Awarded OBE (2002); first woman to achieve the UEFA Pro Licence (2003); inducted to English Football Hall of Fame (2004).

to turn the corner. The jump from U19 to the seniors is, of course, huge – which is why we introduced the U23 team – but I think we’re on the right track and closing the gap between ourselves and the big hitters such as Germany. Just like the men’s team, they always turn up at major finals expecting to win. They’re a bit like the Americans, where it’s all about winning… we’re a bit more about taking part.” So what’s Hope Powell all about? “Me? I’m absolutely about winning… nothing else matters.”

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— world cup 2010 : short-term OPERATIONS —

right here

right

words mark williams manager interviews sue mckellar

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now

Having to briefly bring together a team to achieve a great aim isn’t unique to the FIFA World Cup. The Manager talks to leaders from all areas of life about how best to manage in short-term situations

On April 20th, children at the Nandi Primary School in Soweto, South Africa, were given free footballs as part of an initiative by BP, the official 2010 FIFA World Cup fuel sponsor. BP will distribute more than 50,000 footballs to underprivileged schools over the course of the 50 days leading up to the tournament kicking off.

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— world cup 2010 : short-term OPERATIONS —

TEAM AMERICA in an ideal world, managers

would always have time for planning, deliberation and reflection. But the real world, as we know, is far from ideal. Many management situations (some planned – such as the forthcoming FIFA World Cup – some entirely unforseeable) require quick action to achieve short-term goals. One extreme example of a situation which requires shortterm action with little or no planning time is a humanitarian disaster. For example, no one could have anticipated the devastating earthquake that hit Haiti in January this year. With more than 200,000 people dead or dying, 300,000 injured and one million-plus homeless, managers in many organisations around the world suddenly had to start thinking in the short term. Emergency medical and humanitarian aid organisation Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) had three hospitals in Haiti, but none was operational in the immediate aftermath of the quake. MSF field personnel adviser Boelie Boelens helped to scramble additional international emergency medical personnel. “Acute disasters require immediate action. If local emergency services can cope, we don’t send in teams,” she says. “But such was the lack of medical provision and the scale of the disaster in Haiti, there was no question.” Assessing the scale and type of emergency enables MSF to decide which medical supplies and professionals are required. The organisation selects from national pools of pre-checked medical professionals with acute emergency training. “Although I’m based at Operation Centre Amsterdam, I’m in touch with colleagues in the UK, Germany, Canada, the USA

and Holland,” Boelens adds. “I might request three surgeons, two anaesthetists, two nurses and four supply logisticians, for example, and maybe different-size teams from different countries. Other operation centres do the same in their territories.” In the eight days that followed the Haiti earthquake, MSF sent in a total of 165 international medical experts. More soon followed. “Logistics were a nightmare,” Boelens recalls. “Port-au-Prince Airport wasn’t operational, so people and supplies were flown in via the Dominican Republic. Most Haitians speak Creole or French, which also affected team selection. When selecting a team, unless it’s a very dangerous place, you balance experienced people and ‘first-missioners’. “We brief volunteers with the latest medical, logistics and security information and give them a full ‘sit-rep’.” Boelens was in constant communication with colleagues in Haiti to see how the volunteers were performing and to find out whether more people or resources were required. Motivation remained high and blending personalities wasn’t an issue, she says. “It never is in acute disasters. People join MSF for the best possible reasons. They might seek experience and new skills, but above all they want to make a difference. “Living conditions are still tough – Haiti isn’t the place for egos. The hours are long and the work is intense, but such disasters unite people.” At the end of a mission, Boelens says debriefing is crucial. “Staff can be deeply affected, so we have counsellors on hand. We might even recommend that a volunteer takes a break. Their ➽

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As United States manager for the 2002 and 2006 FIFA World Cups, Bruce Arena built up a strong base of short-term team management expertise. He gives The Manager some of the benefits of his experience…

Q

What are the key elements for success in a short-term scenario? Besides having a group of talented and experienced players, you need elite players who can accept and play roles. This allows you to build a proper team spirit during a stressful period. How did you help your players handle the 2002 and 2006 tournaments? If we’d tried to lock our players up for 30 days they would have gone crazy. We told them, “When you leave the playing field we have enough confidence and respect for you that you can go and experience the World Cup”. I believe it’s one of the key decisions on how you deal with your squad. Does a player need a certain level of maturity to handle a tournament? A strong nucleus of your team has to possess leadership skills, but that isn’t always going to be the case. Pelé was 17 when he played in the World Cup and he wasn’t expected to be a leader. In 2002 [when the US made the quarter-finals], Landon Donovan and DaMarcus Beasley were young and didn’t understand what pressure was, but we had the leadership skills of Brad Friedel and Claudio Reyna. Your senior leadership has to be right.


— world cup 2010 : short-term OPERATIONS —

BEEN THERE, DONE THAT Graham Taylor and Terry Venables are two former England managers with experience of putting together short-term tournament teams. Here, they offer their perspectives on the challenges facing Fabio Capello and his backroom staff during this summer’s FIFA World Cup.

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“You learn so much in your first experience of tournament football; you learn about yourself and about which of your players can handle a tournament. You find out the players who can handle being away from home for three or four weeks at a time surrounded by expectations and media scrutiny. A tournament gives you an account of the mentality of your players. What England hasn’t had over the years is sufficiently good tournament players and Fabio Capello will find out during his own first tournament in South Africa who his tournament players are.” Graham Taylor OBE “I have always thought that it is a very grownup business playing for England because it’s tough, the expectancy is enormous and if it doesn’t go right you can get ‘beaten up badly’ by the press. As England manager you and your players have often got to withstand a lot of unfair criticism. So I selected ‘captain material’ players like Tony Adams, Stuart Pearce, Gareth Southgate, Paul Ince, Alan Shearer; all players who were leaders and captains more or less in their own right.” Terry Venables

➽ wellbeing is paramount and we have a duty of care.” A world away at BBC TV, Kay Satterley is the production manager for football. “I work with the editorial team on our regular football output – Football Focus, Final Score, Match of the Day and MOTD 2,” she says. “I also work on specific events, so I’m working on the 2010 FIFA World Cup, as I did in Germany in 2006. I plan the logistical aspects of the coverage, and look after travel, accommodation and accreditation.” Satterley, who has worked at the BBC for more than 22 years, carefully plans the level of coverage and devises a staffing plan from within an existing talent pool. “Objectives must be formed at the outset,” she says, “then continual monitoring ensures that we keep the production on track.

on developing skills and long-term working relationships between team members.” The pressing focus on tasks and goals, he says, means a manager must immediately try to establish effective working relationships and practices. “If there are problems – perhaps an individual is impacting negatively on others – they must be dealt with quickly and sometimes drastically.” With the luxury of time, staff development can be given more emphasis, but members of shortterm teams are expected to bring ready-made skills to the table. “The fundamentals of good management remain the same,” Pardey stresses. “A good manager still sets direction, while coordinating and facilitating high performance. They deliver value for their organisations by

“Because a short-term project team is just that, a manager’s focus on immediate goals is much greater” It also keeps me in touch with those involved.” Working with short-term teams isn’t anything out of the ordinary, she says. “Within our department, people work across the entire output. There’s continual movement between teams – large, small, season-long, short term – it’s just part of our working life and it doesn’t create any additional issues.” The Institute of Leadership and Management (ILM) helps more than 85,000 UK managers across all key sectors to develop their skills each year. Senior research and policy manager David Pardey says: “In a business setting, because a short-term project team is just that – short term – a manager’s focus on immediate goals is much greater, which places less emphasis

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constantly seeking to improve the skills of those they manage and their own. They have the integrity and emotional intelligence to engage others and engender trust.” Pardey adds: “Good managers also recognise that they’re managing groups of people who often have different motivations, so they must try to understand how to get the best out of each team member.” Whether it is post-earthquake Haiti, a hectic BBC TV production unit or assembling a squad to bring home the World Cup trophy, the key to getting the best out of people brought together for fixed, short periods remains a significant challenge. It is, however, a challenge that can be overcome using tried and tested management techniques.


— WORLD CUP 2010 : THE MEDIA —

BRINGING IT HOME With the world’s biggest festival of football now only a matter of weeks away, The Manager talks to one of the men responsible for bringing this sporting festival into Britain’s living rooms, BBC TV’s head of sport, Philip Bernie

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words Alexandra Willis

When FIFA president Sepp Blatter announced that the 2010 World Cup was to be hosted by South Africa, the decision marked another milestone in that country’s post-apartheid history. Now, almost six years later, the host nation is putting the finishing touches to its preparations. And as the world waits to watch every kick, flick and trick, one man has been largely responsible for the way the month-long tournament – the first to be held on the African continent – will be viewed here in the United Kingdom. “It’s great that the World Cup is moving into a new territory,” says Philip Bernie, head of BBC TV Sport. “There’s been a lot of talk about the development of African football over a long period of time. A lot of quality African players now play in the major worldwide leagues, not to mention the fact that the whole continent is fanatical about football.”

“The BBC’s finest minds were at the drawing board while the Italians were still dancing in the streets of Germany” Not only will South Africa’s sheer love of the sport make for an exuberant and lively atmosphere at the tournament’s 10 venues, it will also increase the reach and exposure of the event itself. “Every match in this World Cup will be an enormous individual occasion, which we are expecting to attract unprecedented audiences,” says Bernie. “Our job is to make sure we capture every match with our best people and support, to properly reflect both the country and the festival of football.” Achieving such a goal is no easy task, especially in hitherto unexplored territory, but the BBC’s finest minds were already

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at the drawing board while the Italians were still dancing in the streets of Germany in 2006. “One of the equations with all major events is what you can produce from London and what you can produce on site,” Bernie explains. “For the Winter Olympics, we had a small team based in Vancouver and produced the bulk of the coverage in London, which made the most sense in terms of the audience, but the World Cup is different. There will be so much material originating from our broadcast centre that to feed it back to London is not practical, not to mention extortionately expensive. So to get the best value


— WORLD CUP 2010 : THE MEDIA —

out of all the material, it was decided we would base the whole operation in South Africa.” Rather than the effort (and expense) of hopping from venue to venue, it was decided that the BBC should operate from one main studio. While the International Broadcast Centre will be housed in Johannesburg, close to Soccer City stadium, the BBC’s fixed abode will be just a few hundred metres from Green Point stadium in Cape Town (home to England’s match against Algeria), with a spectacular backdrop of Table Mountain and Robben Island. Although Bernie’s primary

concern is moving pictures, the BBC prides itself on providing multi-platform operations. Despite sending a smaller team than for Germany 2006, the BBC will produce more than 110 hours of coverage across its TV channels, 100 hours plus on the red button and online, and more than 250 hours on radio. “We have worked throughout with our radio and online colleagues to make sure our services are well integrated,” says Bernie. “We want to make sure that we’re as economical and prudent as possible, while still delivering the best coverage.”

Ultimately, though, every World Cup is judged on the football, and at the root of it all, Bernie is like any football fan. “What you most want to see is fantastic football; you want to stare at the skills on show. In an ideal world, there will be few surprises early on, with the most glamorous teams staying in as far as possible, before a wonderful final between Brazil or Spain against England... with England winning. Unfortunately, none of us pull the strings. You’re in the hands of footballers and teams and injuries and all kinds of psychological effects, and who knows which way it will go. All I can wish for is a great event that provides great entertainment.”

FIFA WORLD CUP 2010 – by the numbers

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1.35

billion Estimated cumulative TV audience for the entire tournament Individual commentary positions in Johannesburg’s Ellis Park stadium million Worldwide TV audience for 2006 final

billion Potential Chinese audience who will see the finals on free-to-air broadcasts for the first time

3,000

Radio and TV professionals from 41 African countries who have benefited from FIFA’s ‘broadcast academy’ workshops

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— WORLD CUP 2010 : LMA OVERSEAS —

Man of the world In the latest in our regular series covering LMA members working overseas, we cast the spotlight on Stuart Baxter, a man with hands-on experience of international management in South Africa words ciarÁn brennan

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Stuart Baxter is a man of

many flags. Born in England and raised in Scotland, he currently lives in Sweden while managing the Finnish national team. In fact, Baxter’s managerial career has, to date, seen him operate in seven different countries across three continents… and who’s to say that those numbers won’t increase at some point in the future? “I look at my workplace as being global,” he says. “I suppose that if you’ve only worked in one country, the British Isles for example, you don’t apply for a job in the Bundesliga. But if I think that any new job might be interesting for me and my family, both sporting and socially, then I’ll take it on.” Despite his global CV, Baxter will be no more than an interested observer at this year’s FIFA World Cup, as Finland didn’t make it – drawing twice with group winners Germany in qualifying, only to finish third behind Russia. While Baxter can be proud of this performance, it’s especially

impressive as the Finnish national team is currently in a period of transition. Baxter explains: “When I took the job two years ago, one of the challenges facing Finnish football was that a few outstanding players had been carrying the team for about ten years – the likes of Sami Hyypiä, Jari Litmanen, Petri Pasanen and Jussi Jääskeläinen. But as they were all getting older, my challenge was to kick-start a development programme that would throw up a new crop of players quickly.” Baxter sees his task as being similar to that facing the manager of most ‘second tier’ national sides. “With a smaller country, you’ll have a small core of good players and you do whatever it takes to get them on the pitch for every game,” he explains. “It doesn’t matter so much with a larger nation, because you’ve probably got 20 or 30 players of roughly the same level so you can play a little

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— WORLD CUP 2010 : LMA OVERSEAS —

bit of ‘please the press’ or rotate your squad to look at different combinations. That’s a luxury you don’t have when you’re with, say, an Ireland, Austria or Finland.” Before taking his job with Finland, Baxter’s most recent experience of international management was with South Africa, which he took charge of between 2004 and 2005 in an ultimately unsuccessful attempt to qualify for the 2006 World Cup in Germany. Reports suggest that Baxter’s time with ‘Bafana Bafana’ was troubled, but he paints a slightly different picture. “I loved working with the players,” he says, “and the fans were massively supportive… I got on really well with them. We started very well, we were leading the group at one point and we’d had some good results in friendlies – we’d beaten Nigeria for the first time and beaten Mexico in Los Angeles in the Gold Cup with a virtual reserve team – but then the interfering and political nonsense started and the players, who’d seen it all before, became demotivated.” So what obstacles, in Baxter’s opinion, will Fabio Capello’s

boys (some of whom Baxter will have taken charge of in his tenure as England U19 manager from 2002-2004) have to face when they step off the plane in Johannesburg in early June? “Even though they’re all hardened pros who will have seen most things, playing in South Africa will still be a bit disconcerting,” he says. “For example, the vuvuzelas – metrelong horns blown by fans at South African stadiums – create a ‘wall’ of background noise; it’s not like the singing at Anfield or the energy of Old Trafford... it’s a constant noise that’s difficult to even talk over.

“If the fans are allowed near the training they’ll be on the pitch kicking the balls around”

“The security will have to be good, too,” he continues. “Not to protect the players physically, but to allow the lads and the technical staff the freedom to do their work. The fans there don’t have the same sort of etiquette that you have in Europe; if they’re allowed anywhere near the training they’ll be on the pitch kicking the balls around with the players.” Baxter’s contract takes him through to the end of qualifying for the 2012 UEFA European Championships. Like most people in his position, he doesn’t know what might happen after that. “Getting the development programme up and running has been a massive part of this job for me,” he says. “I know that it’s not likely to get me a job at Barcelona or Real Madrid, but it’s very rewarding. Putting a structure like that in place is something you do for the love of the game. You know that when you eventually leave the country they’re not going to say, ‘He may have been beaten 4-0 by Poland, but he did a great job with the development programme’, but you do it because you know you’re doing the right thing.”

Stuart Baxter FACT FILE

Managerial career: 1985 Örebro SK 1986 IF Skarp 1987 Vitória Setubal 1988-1991 Halmstads BK 1992-1994 Sanfrecce Hiroshima 1995-1997 Vissel Kobe 1998-2000 AIK 2001 FC Lyn Oslo 2002-2004 England U19 2004-2005 South Africa 2006 Vissel Kobe 2006-2007 Helsingborgs IF 2008- Finland

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— WORLD CUP 2010 : the outsider —

Kicking for goals

With England setting off to the southern hemisphere in an attempt to beat the world, The Manager talks to a man with experience of doing exactly that, England’s former rugby kicking coach Dave Alred words ALEX MEAD Illustration sundeep Bhui

It’s late on a November

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evening in Sydney, Australia. Jonny Wilkinson catches the ball, drops it to the floor and bisects the posts with a perfectly executed kick. The ground is deathly silent for a second before Wilkinson hears a familiar sound… Dave Alred shouting, “All right, Jonny, let’s try another one.” This scenario, which was to be repeated almost a year later in more significant circumstances, unfolded in November 2002, a full 12 months before the climax of the England rugby team’s successful World Cup campaign. “A year before the World Cup we toured every venue that we were going to play in,” says Alred, England’s kicking coach at the time of that campaign. “We went to look at the conditions. It could be that you train in Perth during the day and it’s very bright and breezy, but in the evening – the time you’re going to actually play – it’s very still and at halftime there’ll be dew on grass. The change in conditions can be stark – you may train in condition X, but you’ll play in condition Y.” While some people consider him to be the best kicking coach in the world, Alred does far more than

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— WORLD CUP 2010 : the outsider —

“What if players did an extra five minutes of half-volleys after each session? How much would they improve? Massively” teach players how to apply boot to ball – he also teaches mental preparation, getting players to perform under pressure and helping them to broaden their minds to new ideas. What’s more, he applies his methods to any sport, including skiing, football, cricket and judo, and is currently working with golfer Luke Donald. “I don’t see there being a demarcation between the mental and physical,” he explains. “The key is that when you’re under pressure you slot back into what you knew before. The big thing I’ve learnt is that, with elite performance, the more pressure there is, the more there are similarities right across the board.” It’s not just the mental side of things that Alred believes every sport has in common, there’s also the physical. “In layman’s terms, it’s understanding that all your power comes from the centre,” he says. “Look at heavyweight boxers and analyse the knockout punches – they are punches when the elbow is cocked on impact and power is delivered from the centre. “Look at Cristiano Ronaldo in dead-ball situations – there’s no follow through; in the back swing

there’s a complete power shift and he’s using the biggest muscle group possible.” Having worked with footballers (he’s spent time at Watford, Southampton and Newcastle) Alred knows he can help, but believes there’s a reluctance within the game to bring in ‘outsiders’. “One or two Premier League players come to me to do some work and I think they find my positive attitude rubs off on them,” he says. “But I still think that football could do with taking a good look at players and managers in other sports. The world is a rich place, but it’s not so rich if you stay in your own back yard.” It’s not that Alred doesn’t understand the football manager’s position. His ideas require a ‘rewiring’ of a player’s mind-set and Alred knows there’s not often time. “In professional football, the number one thing is the next game,” he says. “Coaches wish they had the time, but it’s often a case of the left-back’s injured, the goalkeeper is out, the striker’s in rehab and there’s this guy from Planet Zob saying, ‘let’s get better’.” Alred does believe, though, that if an individual player wants to change himself, he doesn’t need

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the manager to tell him. “How many players choke on their weak foot?” he asks. “Yet what if they did an extra five minutes of half-volleys after each session? How much would they improve? Massively.” What’s infectious about Alred isn’t his encyclopaedic knowledge of activating the biggest muscle groups or dealing with pressure, it’s his passion for the growth of players. “The players I work with really believe there are no limits,” he says. “You almost want to take them back to when they were six years old and exploding with enthusiasm, desperate to read the sentence they’ve just cracked or the skill they’ve just learned. But we beat that out of them through dominating them rather than letting them grow. We don’t get winners, we get dependent robots who win now and again when the conditions are perfect.” And his rules don’t just apply to his charges. “We are all students and the day the coach becomes the centre of knowledge is the day you go backwards. I’m confident enough to go into any environment and I know I’m going to learn something… I don’t know the answers, but I’m getting better at asking the right questions.”


— World cup 2010 : the 2018 bid —

Back The BID Although a ball has yet to be kicked in anger at this year’s FIFA World Cup, one English team is already focused on a future tournament – one that will hopefully be played on these shores With the bid submission

deadline for the 2018 FIFA World Cup drawing ever closer (see ‘The Bid Process’ below), the campaign to bring the finals to England for the first time since 1966 has become increasingly active, with delegations having visited members of the FIFA Executive Committee in locations as diverse as Trinidad, Guatemala, Kuala Lumpur and the Ivory Coast. Former Arsenal vice-chairman David Dein has joined the bid team as England 2018 international president, while 1999 Footballer of the Year David Ginola has visited football schemes and held coaching sessions in Guatemala and the Ivory Coast in his role as England 2018 ambassador.

Former Tottenham Hotspur and Newcastle United ace Ginola said: “I am proud to be an England 2018 ambassador and it is an honour for me to be able to meet with people around the world and help persuade them that a World Cup in England would be great for football everywhere.” Speaking at a recent Sport Industry Group meeting of top business people, England 2018 chief executive Andy Anson said: “It’s going to be really hard work from now on; it’s going to be very competitive, so we have to be very focused. We have our strategy and I am confident we can do it.” In addition to its footballing heritage and infrastructure, England’s bid for what Anson believes will be “the most

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THE RIVALS England is up against six rival bids in the race to host the World Cup in 2018 (and/or 2022). These are: Australia Belgium & Netherlands Japan Russia Spain and Portugal United States

commercially successful World Cup ever” is also going to have to demonstrate strong support from the business world. This support continues to grow with the recent addition of Morrisons, BT and npower as bid partners. Further information on the bid is available online at www.england2018bid.com

THE BID PROCESS Having expressed its formal interest in hosting the 2018 or 2022 tournaments in January 2009, the FA is now nearing the end of the bidding process. The next stage is for each interested party to submit a ‘Bid Book’ to FIFA by May 14th. Approximately 16 stadiums are required, with minimum capacities of 40,000 (group matches) and 80,000 (opening match and final). The winning bid must also satisfy FIFA’s requirements for accommodation, transport, IT, medical services, broadcasting and safety and security. The hosts for both the 2018 and 2022 World Cups will be announced in December.


— THE BUSINESS : leadership —

GREAT

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EXPECTATIONS? Whatever their business, all managers occasionally find themselves being asked to achieve the impossible. The Manager looks at how best to manage the various and conflicting demands of bosses, employees and customers... words Mark Williams illustration PADDY MILLS/synergy art

It’s not what we achieve that counts, it’s how our achievements measure up to expectations. For the manager of a top European club, failure to win the UEFA Champions League could lead to the sack, while simply avoiding relegation could be judged successful elsewhere. Even outside the Barclays Premier League, expectations are high. Survive for more than 18 months at a Championship club and you’re doing better than average; lose a few games and fans and the media are soon calling for your head. The chances of survival in League One are even slimmer. Expectations are not unique to

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football management, though. All of us encounter them every day, in the home and workplace. The key to survival, says Mike Emmott, employee relations adviser at the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, is to manage expectations effectively. “Expectations are linked to the ‘psychological contract’,” says Emmott. “There’s a deal that exists in employees’ minds about what their employer owes them and vice versa. Employees believe promises have been made to them – explicitly or inferred.” Problems can occur when expectations aren’t met, he says. “It leads to disappointment. The


— THE BUSINESS : leadership —

“Success lies in employers moulding employee expectations in line with what is realistic” employee loses confidence in the organisation because they believe their managers aren’t delivering on assurances. This damages trust, motivation and engagement – the voluntary elements people bring to their work. Productivity and loyalty can quickly diminish.” Emmott says success lies in employers moulding employee

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expectations in line with what is realistic. “The psychological contract can be modified. If the business can’t afford bonuses, management must communicate that openly. That way, expectations remain realistic. You’ve got to retain the trust and confidence on which good relationships are built, and managing expectations is a key element in that process.” Unrealistic expectations from superiors also create pressures for managers. As Emmott recommends: “You must engage your superiors’ attention, claim their time and assert your perspective, otherwise you risk being unfairly marked down for underperformance. “Often, it’s all about explaining choices. Your superiors might have asked for A, B and C, but you might have to say, ‘I can give you A and B, but you’ll have to wait for C’. Managers should feel they can go to a superior for help when necessary, as well as communicate problems if they arise.” As Emmott observes, some expectations aren’t valid or ➽


— THE BUSINESS : leadership —

expectations exceeded

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➽ realistic, but they can’t simply be ignored. “They must be reshaped, otherwise you’re only storing up unpleasant surprises. Organisation leaders must also establish the right culture, in which expectations aren’t set too high or too low.” If managing workplace expectations is tough, managing customer expectations can be even tougher. Businesses usually pay the ultimate price for getting it wrong. “If customers feel let down, they’ll go elsewhere,” says Londonbased sales consultant Andrew Milbourn. “It’s harder and about five times more expensive to sell to new customers when compared to existing ones. “In the old days, you might have got away with over-promising and under-delivering. Now there’s so much competition and buyer knowledge, success lies in underpromising and over-delivery. You must delight your customers and exceed their expectations.” With more than 20 years’ sales experience, Milbourn helps companies identify how they can maximise sales opportunities. “Laziness, poor communication and fear of losing a sale can mean sales terms aren’t properly explained. Consequently, because customer expectations aren’t met, the result can be payment failure

or loss of longer-term business.” Milbourn doesn’t believe the customer is always right. “If their expectations are excessive, a deal might not be sufficiently profitable. Sometimes you’ve got to push back. As long as there’s integrity in a contract and effective communication about expectations, you can do that. If you handle your client relationships well, it shouldn’t create conflict.” Emmott recognises the dangers of busting a gut to exceed workplace expectations. “People can expect it every time and you may not be able to deliver. If a striker scores a few goals, then everyone expects them to keep on scoring, which increases pressure on them, although I suppose that’s preferable to the pressure of going a long time without scoring.” Expectations in business and football are driven by the need to succeed – often at all costs. And because all clubs and businesses operate against commercial pressures that dictate that only the very best results are good enough, then none of us should expect expectations to diminish any time soon. However, knowing how to successfully deal with expectations – however big or small, achievable or unrealistic – can make life much easier.

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One man with recent experience of exceeding expectations is Norwich City manager Paul Lambert (left) who, after only nine months at Carrow Road, has guided his charges to promotion to the Coca-Cola Championship. This feat is even more remarkable given that Norwich started the season by losing 7-1 at home to Colchester United, a team managed by... Paul Lambert. So when he took the job in August 2009, how did he manage the Norwich board’s expectations? “It’s a balancing act,” he says, “you want people to believe, but you don’t want to get them over-excited.” As anyone involved with football knows, the only people with higher expectations than the people running a club are those who support it. Was Lambert aware of what the fans expected of him? “I very rarely read the papers, but you get a good feeling of what people are thinking from the atmosphere around the stadium on matchday. I always say that the most important people at a club are the players and fans... as long as you keep them happy, you’ll do okay.” Lambert – who won a UEFA Champions League winner’s medal while playing with Borussia Dortmund (to go with all of the Scottish domestic honours, won with St Mirren and Celtic) – knows that next year will present a serious challenge to his squad. This time, it’s going to be all about his expectations. “We don’t have many players with experience of the Championship or the Premier League,” he says, “but they have the ability and their enthusiasm will drive them on. It will be tough, but I learned a lot in Germany and if I can make my players as focused and strong-minded as the people I played with there, then we’ll be up to the challenge.” The move up to the Championship may well be a trip into the unknown for the majority of the Norwich playing staff, but at least this time around they won’t have to start the season by facing a team managed by Paul Lambert.


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— THE BUSINESS : leadership —

Punching above your weight What’s usually forgotten when a clash is described as a ‘David versus Goliath encounter’, is that the little guy in the story won. So what do you need to do to make sure you get the same result when confronting a bigger and more powerful rival? words chris alden Photography Hannah Edwards

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How do you cope when faced

with an opponent that’s ‘bigger’ than you? It’s a question we all ask ourselves – yet next time you’re faced with a trip to the home of larger rivals, remember: history is full of David versus Goliath stories, and the moral is that the Goliath is not certain to win. Few, of course, can forget Jimmy Montgomery’s heroics for Sunderland in the 1973 FA Cup final, or when Wimbledon’s ‘Crazy Gang’ overcame the Liverpool ‘Culture Club’ in the same competition in 1988. In business, too, the stories are everywhere. How did Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic become a major rival to British Airways, despite launching with only one secondhand plane? How did Nike, Google and Amazon grow from humble origins to become some of the world’s biggest companies? The answers are critical to anyone who believes better management leads to success – in business or in sport. Brad Rosser, who once worked directly for Richard Branson and is now a serial entrepreneur and

author of Better, Stronger, Faster, says that one advantage to being a ‘David’ is that your opponent may not take you as seriously as they should. “When you’re small, you can be underestimated,” he says. “Your preparation has probably been better and your competition

“Few can forget when the ‘Crazy Gang’ beat the ‘Culture Club’ in the 1988 FA Cup final” are not eyeing you up.” Exploit that, and you stand a chance. When Virgin Atlantic launched, Rosser explains, it was small enough to ‘fly under the radar’ before its main competitor, British Airways, reacted. Rosser now works with start-up companies

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– the ‘Davids’ of the business world – and his advice to them is to: “Come up with a sound strategy and don’t, under any circumstances, be intimidated by someone who’s bigger or looks bigger… prepare for it, go for it and catch them by surprise.” To anyone who’s ever seen a little-fancied underdog hang on for 90 minutes before completing an unlikely smash-and-grab win, those words will ring true. But what should this sound strategy be? Malcolm Gladwell, one of the world’s most creative business thinkers, has written about just this in a New Yorker magazine article, How David Beats Goliath, in which he argues that the underdog’s chance comes from breaking unwritten rules. He himself uses the example of Lawrence of Arabia, who in 1917 led a band of irregular Arab troops on an exhausting, 600-mile loop across the desert, to attack a Turkish garrison town from its lightly defended rear – and won. “The Turks simply did not think that their opponent would be mad enough to come at them from the


— THE BUSINESS : leadership —

desert,” Gladwell writes. “This was Lawrence’s great insight.” Whatever the field of conflict, experts agree, a ‘David’ should do what he can to profit from his own strengths and put Goliath off his huge, comfortable stride. That might mean exploiting rule changes (Virgin Atlantic, for example, profited from deregulation in the aviation sector), using unusual tactics (Rory Delap’s ‘torpedo’ throw-ins spring to mind), or even taking advantage of new trends your opponent isn’t aware of yet. “Intelligence-gathering is very important,” says Simon Chadwick, professor of sport business strategy at Coventry University Business School. The internet company Amazon, he remembers, only launched in the mid-1990s, but it took on bricks-and-mortar bookshops by thinking: what is it about them that people don’t like, that means they can’t respond quickly? “Amazon really looked for those weak spots and exploited them,” he says. Being data-driven is another trend that small teams can learn from business, says Chadwick. He cites the book Moneyball by Michael Lewis, the story of how a small US baseball team punches above its weight by exploiting the power of statistics to bring success. But he also says that the shared identity at a club – the sense of “doing it for the little guy”, as he puts it – is important in building up a collective spirit of achievement. “In football, there’s a tendency to talk about patterns and systems in teams, but what’s

Room at the top Remember the UEFA European Championships in 1996? Back then, Google was only a research project run by a couple of PhD students. Now Google’s strategic focus on internet search has made it a $200bn company… a Goliath in its own right. Sports company Nike was founded as Blue Ribbon Sports in 1964 by American athlete Philip Knight and his coach. It started as a distributor for a Japanese company, and didn’t even start making its own trainers until the 1970s, but it’s a $36bn business today. When Sir Richard Branson launched Virgin Atlantic, he had just one second-hand plane. But his talent for PR helped the company to grow, and then in 1993 British Airways apologised in court after a libel row over alleged ‘dirty tricks’. Virgin came up smelling of roses… and last year celebrated its 25th birthday.

more important than that – and this is where the crossover to business comes – is the culture of the organisation,” says Chadwick. Perhaps, though, you don’t always want to be thought of as a David. If that’s the case, says Rosser, you need to build credibility, using your PR skills to give everybody with a stake in the club – crowd, players, media

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and owners – the idea that you’re moving forward. “Get testimonials from happy people or (in the case of a football team) from other players who say, ‘This is a fantastic operation, they looked after me in this way and that way – and we’re going places’,” he suggests. That’s the thing about being one of the ‘Davids’: you don’t have to stay that way for long.


— THE BUSINESS : Profile —

Insider The

David Miles Photography Hannah Edwards

We go behind the scenes at the emirates stadium with Arsenal’s David Miles to examine the ever-changing role of the club secretary

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Through the large window

behind David Miles’s desk looms the impressive edifice that is the Emirates Stadium; through the opposite window stands the slightly smaller (but equally impressive) construction that used to be known as Highbury. This setting is somehow appropriate, as Miles himself is a strong link between the Arsenals old and new. Miles started work in the Highbury club shop at the tender age of 16, back in the summer of 1971. “I left school on the Friday,” he recalls, “had a ‘gap weekend’ and then started work on the Monday… and I’ve been here ever since.” Progressing from club shop worker, through box office attendant to box office manager, Miles became assistant to the then secretary Ken Fry in the mid-1980s. Then, when Fry was appointed managing director in the early 1990s, Miles became club and company secretary, positions which he has held ever since. So, with almost four decades at Arsenal and almost two as company secretary under his belt, Miles is ideally positioned to give an insight into the role. “A lot of the job revolves around complying with the rules and regulations of the various organisations we have to deal with – the FA, the Premier League and UEFA,” he says. “Obviously, I can only talk from Arsenal’s perspective,” he continues.

“I’m sure that if you talked to my counterparts at Tottenham, Chelsea, West Ham and the rest, they would have slightly different duties, but I’m sure that a lot of the core stuff is the same.” One major element of Miles’s role is to supervise all player transfer dealings. Like his position within the club, this is something that has changed beyond

“When I first got involved, a transfer agreement wouldn’t even fill a single page of A4” recognition over the years, not only because the figures involved have risen dramatically, but also because of relatively recent developments, such as agent involvement and the introduction of the transfer window. “When I first got involved, a transfer agreement wouldn’t even fill a single page of A4,” he explains. “They’re now usually 15 to 16 solid pages. Add to that the fact that FIFA’s transfer regulations change

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all the time – and then there are all the ‘dos and don’ts’ of bringing in young players, EU work permits, the freedom of contract rules…” And then, of course, there’s deadline day. “That certainly concentrates the mind,” says Miles. “For example, on the last day of August 2006, I was walking across the car park at about 7am when I took my first phone call of the day. It was our then vice-president, David Dein, who said, ‘Are you ready for this David, it’s going to be a busy day?’ By the time the window closed at midnight we’d completed six deals: we’d exchanged Ashley Cole and William Gallas, bought José Antonio Reyes, Júlio Baptista and Denílson, and we’d sold Pascal Cygan.” And, of course, each of these deals had a number of disparate elements that needed to be brought together. “Take the Denílson deal as an example,” says Miles. “If memory serves me correctly, the player was in Japan with the Brazilian U19s, you’ve got the club in Brazil, we’re in London and, I think, the agent was travelling from Belgium to Holland. We were working across about four different time zones.” Miles also finds himself involved in the more prosaic team affairs, such as determining fixture dates, not only when the Premier League needs to move games because of cup clashes, but also before the


— THE BUSINESS : Profile —

season even begins. “Because Transport for London is going through a programme of network improvements at the moment, I know when the Piccadilly Line will be closed in 2010,” he says. “The problem is that I don’t know my fixtures that far in advance, so I have to sit down with TfL, find the trouble dates and compare them with the draft fixture list that we get in June. “At least 80 per cent of our crowd comes by public transport nowadays, so you can see how having the trains out would be a problem.” Pulling all of these various roles together, of course, requires a great deal of experience. It’s no coincidence, therefore, that many of Miles’s counterparts have been doing the job as long as he has.

Some, in fact, are even more experienced. “Peter Barnes at West Ham has been in the job longer than me,” says Miles, “and so has Ken Ramsden at Manchester United, although he is retiring in the summer. I think this is because if a new owner comes in, they might have a bit of a clear-out at CEO or team management level, but they will always need a ‘football person’ as secretary who knows how the club ticks.” So, with almost 40 years under his belt, what more does Miles hope to achieve at Arsenal? “I’d love to be involved with a Champions League win, as that’s the one thing that we haven’t got,” he says. “Also, as I’ve spent all of my working life at Arsenal, I think I would very much like to be a one-club man.”

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— the business : turning things around —

Getting

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track With First Great Western firmly at the foot of the train service league table, new managing director Mark Hopwood had the unenviable task of taking the company to the top. Here, he tells The Manager how he’s trying to do it words GUY MATTHEWS

When you’ve hit bottom, the only direction you can travel, goes the argument, is back up again. Train operator First Great Western has plenty of experience of looking up from the bottom of the heap. For a lengthy period of time, at the tail end of the Noughties, it was statistically the worst performing of the UK’s 19 privately owned rail operators – judged by punctuality, reliability and customer satisfaction. The company, which runs services out of London’s Paddington station to the Cotswolds, south Wales and the West Country, as well as commuter services in the Thames Valley, was for a long time the object of much anger and derision from long-suffering passengers, who staged regular

“It’s harder to fix things than to keep them running well in the first place” fare boycotts and mass protests over issues such as overcrowding and service cancellations. The government wasn’t shy about weighing in, too. In February 2008, the then secretary of state for transport, Geoff Hoon, singled out First Great Western for having “fallen persistently short of customers’ expectations

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and been unacceptable to both passengers and government”. But by June 2009, new management and a fresh approach looked to have transformed this toxic situation. In an 18-month efficiency blitz, the company became one of the UK’s more punctual operators, with almost 95 per cent of trains arriving on time. The cherry on the cake came in February of this year when the company was named Train Operator of the Year at the National Rail Business Awards. Judges pointed out that, in short order, it had gone from last of 19 to seventh in the performance league table. Much credit for this transformation must go to Mark Hopwood, managing director of First Great Western. Hopwood joined the company two years ago as performance manager, then moved to the position of deputy managing director, taking over the top role from Andrew Haines in December 2008. The Manager talked to Hopwood in an attempt to get a flavour of the elixir that has enabled him to facilitate such an impressive turnaround.


— the business : turning things around —

needed to figure out what needed to be done to actively improve matters, and come up with a plan for making that happen. Did an atmosphere of constant criticism and scrutiny hinder matters? Railways have always had prominence in the public’s eye, and naturally generate an enormous amount of public interest and comment. That’s just the industry we’re in. Of course, in the era of the internet and blogs, the job of communicating adverse comment has got a lot easier. But in a way, I view the interest taken in the UK’s railway services as a good thing. Sure, there’s times when you’d rather not be in the spotlight, but I take public scrutiny as a positive. Railways are so important to this country. If you took them away it would radically affect the economy for the worse. Just consider what life would be like here in our home town of Swindon without them. Rail is a crucial part of the local economy. Imagine if everybody who wanted to come to Swindon had to arrive by car.

Q

What challenges faced First Great Western when you took over? When I first joined the company as performance director, it was in pretty poor shape. It had developed an unfortunate reputation for not running a good quality of service – in many respects a rightly held opinion, it must be said. Punctuality and reliability were

poor, and the level of customer service not great, either. What were your initial priorities, as far as fixing those challenges was concerned? The first job was to stem the general deterioration, and also to communicate what we were achieving as we went. Then we

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How far would you say you are along the road to improvement? What goals lie ahead? The journey so far has seen our performance move from unacceptable to acceptable. Our performance is now way above average for the UK railway sector and our customer service delivery is now recognised as being a step ahead of our peers. The next job is to move from acceptable to exceptional. By when? It’s hard to put a timescale on it. I’ve been in this job for 18 months. Maybe in another 18 months we’ll have gone through another step change. I hope so. Our priority is to carry on the good work we’ve done to improve reliability and punctuality, ➽


— the business : turning things around —

➽ then carry on working with all the company’s stakeholders on restoring our reputation. We also need to make sure we are working as effectively as possible with government. We need to make sure we secure the right funding arrangement to allow us to make further improvements to services, upgrade stations and so on.

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How do you judge how you’re doing? What metrics do you value most as indicators of business success? We’ve set goals and achieved many of them. Our performance has improved way beyond our initial targets. We’re up to 92 per cent of our trains arriving on time, and I want to carry on improving that. I want further improvements to rolling stock. And I want to do even better than the ten per cent rise in customer satisfaction levels we’ve managed in the past 18 months. When it comes to metrics and measurements, I like to look at a whole range. We’ve talked about punctuality already, but another important area that counts for a lot is safety. And let’s not forget

Mark Hopwood’s top five business tips:

■M  ake sure that you communicate effectively, both internally and externally, at all times ■ Demonstrate clear leadership, especially when making decisions that might not prove popular, but have to be made anyway ■ Be clear about your aims and make sure that everybody around you knows what’s important and why ■ Manage all the business’s stakeholders well, starting off with knowing who they all are ■ Measure your successes carefully – if you’re not measuring you’re not managing, as the old adage goes.

softer measures, such as employee satisfaction. You can’t deliver a better service without happy staff. What conclusions can be drawn from the ups and downs of First Great Western that might stand as useful lessons for organisations in other markets? I wasn’t here when the company was going downhill, but I reckon one bit of advice any business leader should follow is, “Don’t let matters deteriorate too far before you take action, as it’s much harder work to fix things than to keep them running well in the first place”. That said, I guess, personally, I was lucky to have been brought on board to help manage the recovery, and wasn’t here for the difficult bit when it all started to go wrong. There’s also the matter of having the right team in place – not just the right management team, but the right frontline team, too. When the going gets tough, you need to know how to communicate the right message. Bad news needs to be communicated just as effectively as good news. And you need a plan in place at all times so you can measure what you’re doing. The plan has to be able to change, of course, but always deliberately and not accidentally. What lessons do you think you have learned as a senior executive that you can take forward with you in your career? If there’s one thing that I’d do differently it would be trying to move even faster than we did. In hindsight, we should have done even more, even sooner. I’ve certainly learned other lessons, concerning, for example, the importance of good communications and the role of highly visible leadership.

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driving change Having transformed the fortunes of a number of clubs, including Derby County and his present charges, Nottingham Forest, Billy Davies knows more than most about changing an organisation’s fortunes. So what’s his advice for a manager looking to turn things around? “It’s easy for a new manager to walk in and highlight a club’s shortcomings,” he says, “but I don’t do that because there’s usually been a lot of good work done before you join, irrespective of where the team is in the table.” So what is Davies’s first priority when he walks into a new club? “The first objective for me is to give everybody the opportunity to be part of a new chapter. You know that confidence will be low and that it takes not just the manager, but everyone at the club, to support the challenge.” Despite this, Davies knows that strength of character is also important. “You’ve got to be resolute and make the changes that are needed; not only in terms of the playing staff, but also to the club itself. I think that everybody throughout the club has the ability to have a major or a minor impact on its future.” Ultimately, though, Davies is aware that the buck stops with him. “I believe that it’s really important to be yourself,” he says. “The only person I am out to please is the person that is employing me and I will always do what I believe is right and I will always make the decisions for the right reasons knowing the facts that I have got.”


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— the business : team building —

Putting it

together Your organisation may have the best individuals, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they will work well together. The Manager asks an expert how disparate individuals can be moulded into a winning unit words Alex mead

Whether it’s in business or in

sport, creating a team that works together for a common goal isn’t always the easiest thing to do. The way in which a team is put together often means you don’t instantly have a dynamic within a group that sits easily. And that’s when problems can begin. Such is the similarity between business and sport that one company has taken its success in helping organisations from the latter arena into the former. Leading Teams has been involved with Australian sport for 15 years (working with both rugby codes and the national cricket team, among others) and has branched

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out into the corporate world, consulting for brands such as Nike, Vodafone, BMW and Toyota. The company has now exported its methods to the northern hemisphere and is working with Coca-Cola Championship side Doncaster Rovers, Hull FC in rugby’s Super League and the England rugby union team. “What we do is work with groups to improve their team dynamics,” says Gerard Murphy, managing director of Leading Teams Europe. “We create a behavioural framework, getting a group to work together to identify the behaviour it needs to display to be the best it can be.”


— the business : team building —

Which can be easier said than done. When called in by a company or club, the first thing Leading Teams does is sit down with the individual team members and work out what they all want to achieve. “We ask them to refine how they want to be seen, then give them a set of tools that allows them to work out the behaviours that will help them to become the team they want to be.” The group formulates a code of conduct that it must follow to achieve its aims. “They’re accountable to those rules,” says Murphy, “and it’s hard to argue against rules if they’ve set them.” Problems faced by teams are common, whatever field the team works in. “We often sit down with groups and they’ll complain about a colleague’s working hours or say that someone is undertaking behaviour outside of the club that is detrimental,” says Murphy. “But our job is to see if this behaviour is actually affecting the team’s performance. If it’s not, then it doesn’t matter.”

“Great clubs look at players who fit into their system” Once a behavioural framework has been agreed, Leading Teams appoints a leadership group responsible for keeping it intact. “Sport is so public,” says Murphy, “and success and failure is so public that sport has to review performance harder than business. If you have a bad day at work you won’t get laid off for two weeks… but that’s what happens to, say, Joe Cole if he has a bad match.” And yet, Murphy believes that some sides ignore what their own group dynamic is when it comes

to bringing in new people. “Great clubs look at players who fit into their system, others buy players who are the best and hope they’ll fit in,” he says. “The best teams understand what they stand for and recruit according to that.” Another parallel between sport and business is that success is rarely achieved by the efforts of one individual. “Lionel Messi can’t win on his own,” says Murphy. “Actually, that’s probably a bad example, but he has to get the ball from somewhere. If you look at

Barcelona, the team component and spirit is often undervalued, but they work so hard for each other when they haven’t got the ball, they’re always trying to get the next opportunity.” But one thing that unites all great teams is that they all have great leaders. “We would say that everyone has leadership capacity,” he says. “Some people don’t want the responsibility that comes with being captain. You can, however, do your own thing and lead by example – that’s leadership.”

DO IT IN STYLE... THE ART OF BUILDING A TEAM Having taken his club out of the bottom flight for the first time in 36 years, Rochdale manager Keith Hill (below) is well qualified to speak on the subject of building and maintaining a team. So, how has he created a team that’s achieved where so many had failed? “When I started at Rochdale as director of youth football in 2004, I was given carte blanche to develop the set-up just as I wanted, without any pressure,” he says. “The then manager, Steve Parkin, allowed me to recruit a backroom team that would help me achieve this.” Hill recruited a sports scientist, a fitness coach, a psychologist and a physio. “With that team and myself, I felt that we covered all areas of development,” he says. “Then, when I took over the first team in January 2007, I brought that group with me and added the final piece of the jigsaw, first-team coach Dave Flitcroft, who’s been an integral part of the team-building process.” Does Hill feel that Rochdale are now recruiting players to fit a system? “Without question. We’ve always had a system and a style in which we want to play the game. Anyone we bring in, playing or non-playing, has to be

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‘in sync’ with what we expect, not just from a playing dynamic, but from a social one, too.” On the subject of the social side of things, how does Hill keep disparate personalities working together? “It’s difficult, but when we feel that there’s someone who’s not moving in the same direction as the rest of the group, we’re quick to move them on – regardless of how good they are. We have a small squad, so it’s important that everyone sings from the same song sheet. We know the type of character we’re looking for and most of the time we get it right.” And, as things are inevitably going to move up a gear next season, how does Hill see his team developing? “We’ll definitely keep the core,” he says. “They know how we work and what we expect. We’ll have to recruit, but then every team has to do that. Our hope is that the core will bring the newcomers up to speed with the way we operate.” While it’s obviously a challenge, the prospect of moving up to League One seems to exhilarate Hill. “We’re all going into unknown territory – staff and players – but you’ve got to be a quick learner in this game. If you’re not, you’ll soon find yourself out of it.”


— THE BUSINESS : BOOK EXTRACT —

stopping the revolving door

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In this extract from ‘Football Management’, Dr Sue Bridgewater – having set out and analysed the relevant data – asks if managers are sacked to effect genuine change or are simply used as ‘scapegoats’ So in the Premier League, at least, there is an uplift for a short honeymoon period and then performance dips back to a level slightly below the level where it was before the change of manager. Twelve games after appointment, the points benefit of changing manager has vanished, suggesting that any benefit is very short-lived and the longer-term impact of changing manager is negative. Looking at the trends over time, it seems that the peaks and troughs of performance are levelling out – perhaps because other factors, such as the quality of players, are growing in importance relative to the impact made by any individual manager. Moreover, although the level at which a manager was dismissed seemed little changed between the earlier season and the 06/07 and 07/08 seasons, in 08/09 the trend line is much flatter. It seems that manager performance does not need to decline as much before a football manager in the Premier League is dismissed. The fall-back in average points once the honeymoon period is over also seems greater than in earlier seasons. This trend is worth monitoring. If it continues, then the effect of changing manager is

not just neutral, but has a negative impact on performance, except in the very short term. Overall, changing manager seems to have a negligible effect on how well the club does in the longer term. Indeed, if we look at the Premier League since 1992, it would appear that – as with other types of organisations – clubs do rather less well once the initial

“Changes in manager do little to improve results” honeymoon period has passed than they did before changing their manager. If we convert the average points into actual points, a club who dismisses its manager may arrest a decline. Hypothetically, if a manager was dismissed 18 games into a season, the club – on average – might gain around three points in the 12-game upturn, but lose two points over the remaining games. That’s a net gain of one point for a considerable outlay

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and ongoing lower performance. Analysis of club finances suggests that spending this money on better players might have a greater effect. In any case, ups and downs of team performance tend to correct themselves over time, whether or not a manager is changed. Research from baseball and American football suggests that when a coach is not sacked, performance seems to turn in a pattern similar to that seen in the honeymoon period after a club changes manager. The conclusion seems to be that managerial changes in football do little to improve performance. Why might this be? Research suggests several possible explanations. The first is that leadership has little impact on organisational performance. Lieberson and O’Connor (1972) suggest organisational performance is more influenced by other aspects of the organisational context, such as resources. So perhaps performance might be affected by the quality of players, injuries or just luck rather than anything the manager does. The second explanation is that switching to a different leader brings with it disruption which, in itself, can have a negative effect on performance (Grusky 1960, 1963, 1964). Hope (2002) suggests that there are different phases in a football manager’s lifespan – some in which he may have a run of bad luck or a blip and others


— THE BUSINESS : BOOK EXTRACT —

where performance may take a downturn while the manager is rebuilding for the longer term. This does not mean that a club should never change football manager. As in other organisations, sustained decline in performance is often addressed by changing manager – and this may arrest and turn around performance. The data would suggest, however, that clubs panic and pull the trigger during minor blips in performance rather than following a sustained decline. Moreover, the level at which they do this is getting higher and the benefits gained from the switch may be less significant than they anticipate. In any business where there is a high-profile leader figure, it has long been recognised that the leader may be ‘scapegoated’ for poor performance. Leaders are

the focus of the uncertainty which affects all organisations. Where the impact of poor performance might place pressure on the board of the club, it is perhaps not surprising that there is a temptation to sacrifice the manager. This option is attractive on many levels – the board can point to its decisive action, the fans have their scapegoat, the new incumbent may be under less pressure to deliver results

in the short term and might thrive as a result. Both the theory and data shown in this chapter suggest, however, that scapegoating of football managers is unlikely to bring an improvement in performance. Football Management by Sue Bridgewater is available now, published by Palgrave Macmillan. Further information at www.palgrave.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Dr Sue Bridgewater is associate professor in marketing and strategy, and director of the Centre for Management in Sport at Warwick Business School. Since 2001, she has directed the Professional Footballers’ Association and LMA Certificate in Applied Management for Football Managers. Her past students include Mark Hughes, Stuart Pearce, Brian Laws, Aidy Boothroyd and Alan Irvine. Dr Bridgewater also teaches and researches in cricket and rugby, has written articles in a range of leading international journals, and maintains and analyses football manager statistics for the LMA.

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— THE Touchline —

The Coach's view

Photography Hannah Edwards

Manchester City’s Mike Rigg reports on some surprising findings from his recent trip to Brazil

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as technical director

of Manchester City, part of my job is to oversee the club’s worldwide scouting and recruitment network. South America is, of course, a very big market for football, but up to this point Manchester City have had no player identification presence there. My trip to Brazil was intended as the first step in developing this, but, during the week I spent there, it became more of a fact-finding mission. I didn’t over-research the trip and went there with an open mind. And I’m glad that I did, as I was completely blown away by what I found. I expected a ‘street football’ mentality, with clubs having sub-standard facilities and offering limited opportunities to players – instead I found facilities that, at least, match the best available in the UK. I visited a total of nine clubs, but I will concentrate here on my experiences at São Paulo (which were fairly typical of what I came across throughout the trip). I was expecting good training facilities – my brief time in Brazil had already taught me that this was more or less a ‘given’ – but what I found was way beyond that. In addition to the normal training amenities, the complex housed conference and education facilities, dentistry, podiatry, nutritional support,

medical support and pastoral care. What’s more, the club was in the middle of a building programme that will soon deliver an enormous medical rehabilitation centre to rival the best of the UK’s private hospitals. São Paulo have a simple explanation as to why so much time, money and attention to detail have been invested in the club’s youth development programme. Not having access to the revenue streams that major European clubs enjoy, São Paulo (like all Brazilian clubs) survive by selling players; player development is, therefore, a necessary part of what is, in effect, an export business. To feed this business, the club (like its rivals) scours all of Brazil and even some neighbouring countries (Uruguay and Argentina, for example) to find the best available talent. Some of this talent comes from some of the most deprived regions in the world, so football is often the only way to escape. The academy team at São

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Paulo therefore see their job to develop them, not just as players, but as people. The flipside of this is that the standards they set for the kids are extremely high – no matter how good a player might be, if they don’t meet the behavioural standards, they’re out. This work and investment has definitely paid off, as there’s something in the region of 1,000 Brazilians playing professional football around the world. My overwhelming feeling at the end of my trip was that all of us involved in English football have to take a long, hard look at how we develop players. Okay, we’re severely restricted by regulation, but even within those parameters we have to think about how we invest in player development. I wasn’t sure what I was going to find when I set off for Brazil, but what I certainly didn’t expect was to find a system that put almost everything that I’ve seen in the UK in the shade. The truth is that if you were to take a player out of any one of the academies that I saw in Brazil and drop them into a UK academy, in nine out of ten cases it would be a backward step for them, while if you took a kid from this country and put them in São Paolo’s academy they would feel that they’d hit the jackpot. Left to right: Mike meets (the original) Ronaldo, undergoing treatment at the Corinthians facility; one of the dentists at the São Paulo Academy; part of the Santos medical centre, built with funds generated by the sale of Robinho to Real Madrid


— THE Touchline —

5 3 4 1 2

A WEEK IN BRAZIL

Mike Rigg spent seven days in Brazil, visiting a total of nine clubs across five cities... 1. Caxias do Sul (Juventude) 2. Porto Alegre (Internacional, Grêmio) 3. São Paulo (São Paulo, Palmieras, Corinthians) 4. Santos (Santos) 5. Belo Horizonte (Clube Atlético Mineiro, Cruzeiro)

ABOUT MIKE RIGG

Mike Rigg is technical director and head of scouting and player acquisition with Manchester City. Before his appointment at City in the summer of 2008, Rigg was academy manager of Sheffield Wednesday, technical director for the Wales FA and chief scout at Blackburn Rovers. Mike’s main responsibilities include the management and organisation of scouting and player recruitment. His aim is to build and coordinate a network of staff to best identify and monitor the finest football talent throughout the world.

“I found facilities that, at least, match the best available in the UK” the manager SPRING 2010


— THE Touchline : HEALTH AND WELLBEING —

Fit To

Manage with DR Dorian Dugmore

Dorian Dugmore examines the myths and realities behind one of health’s most intoxicating subjects

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To drink or NOT TO DRINK?

That is the question. Within the high-pressure cauldron of football management, a drink can sometimes be perceived as a way to relieve pressure, by aiding sleep and relaxing the body and brain… but does it really achieve this? Alcohol is absorbed through the stomach and small intestine and then carried through the bloodstream to all of the body’s tissues and organs. Alcohol contains no proteins, vitamins or minerals, but it does contain ‘empty calories’ (seven per gram, twice as many as sugar) so it will cause weight gain, especially if a person doesn’t exercise, or exercises less than before. Wine (12 per cent ABV) is more concentrated than beer (four per cent ABV) and spirits are even more concentrated. Blood alcohol content (BAC) changes, depending on body size, body composition (muscle versus fat) and gender (women tend to have more fat, which does not absorb alcohol as readily as muscle). A large person’s BAC will consequently be less than a smaller person’s, as alcohol is diluted more in the larger person’s tissues. Alcohol is toxic to the body, so it is essential to have at least two drink-free days per week, giving the liver time to recover. Alcohol acts as a central nervous system depressant and can affect judgement,

inhibitions and reaction time, while also causing sleepiness. It can also cause dilation of blood vessels, temporarily dropping blood pressure. People sometimes say “have a drink to warm you up”, but alcohol actually does the opposite. Some of the long-term effects of alcohol use are an increased risk of certain cancers, liver damage (cirrhosis) and heart disease. More recent research also suggests that alcohol can raise the levels of C-reactive protein, a harbinger of coronary artery inflammation. But are there benefits? The answer to this is complicated. Moderate alcohol consumption (such as a glass of red wine with dinner) is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke (Dr Ellison, Boston University, School of Medicine, USA). Moderate use can also lead to an increase in HDL good cholesterol (and a corresponding decrease in LDL bad cholesterol) and it can decrease the blood’s propensity to clot. Furthermore, alcohol contains anti-oxidants (naturally occurring compounds that aid in protecting cells against inflammation caused by oxidation) and research has shown that people who drink moderately show less signs of arterial inflammation compared with non-drinkers and heavy drinkers (Dr B Franklin, William Beaumont Hospital, Michigan, USA).

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— THE Touchline : HEALTH AND WELLBEING —

RedorWhite? It’s generally felt that light to moderate alcohol use has a cardio-protective effect, regardless of which variety is drunk. A theory was advanced at a cardiovascular conference some years ago that red wine contained more anti-oxidants (especially flavonoids), but it should probably be taken into consideration that this conference took place in Bordeaux.

ALCOHOL AND EXPERT COMMENT Sport and alcohol SLEEP “Alcohol “Even small amounts of alcohol impair athletic performance. helps you fall can It promotes dehydration asleep, but it through its diuretic effect, with larger amounts affecting disrupts quality coordination. After exercise it recovery, so if you drink sleep by blocking impairs after sport, first rehydrate and normal sleep then drink in moderation.” and dreaming Dr John Rogers MB BCh MRCGP MFSEM (UK), endurance medical patterns” officer, UK Athletics

BEHAVIOUR & ALCOHOL Number of drinks Approx Time for removal

Effects/feeling

1 drink 2.5 drinks 5 drinks 10 drinks 20 drinks 25-30 drinks

Relaxed, loosened up Impaired judgement Impaired memory/speech Slowed reflexes Impaired breathing Fatal to most

1 hour 2.5 hours 5 hours 10 hours 20 hours n/a

Essentials for Health & Wellness, 2nd edition (Edlin et al) These figures relate to a male subject of 70-75kg and a ‘drink’ is one beer, glass of wine or mixed drink.

The hangover “Too much alcohol? The liver has to work overtime, causing a temporarily low sugar level which often leads to headaches, fatigue, weakness, shaking, irritability and vomiting”

BINGE DRINKING “Is defined as ingesting five or more drinks on one occasion” THE ESSENTIALS

Tips for the safer enjoyment of alcohol… ■ If you are a non-drinker, don’t start drinking to get what you think are the potential health benefits of alcohol. ■ Drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol, with at least two drink-free days per week (preferably not consecutive). ■ Drink alcohol with meals, as fatty foods and proteins slow the absorption of alcohol. ■ Avoid fizzy alcoholic drinks, especially if driving, as the presence of carbon dioxide in champagne, sparkling wines, beer and carbonated mixed drinks increases the rapidity of absorption (especially on an empty stomach). ■ Drink a glass of water for every glass of wine – together with food, this helps dilute and slow absorption. ■ If you take medication check with your doctor for any effects of alcohol (for example, heavy use of aspirin plus alcohol can cause bleeding of the stomach wall). ■ If you consume between five and seven alcoholic drinks in one evening, don’t drive the next morning.

Dorian Dugmore is founder of the LMA’s Fit To Manage programme, run in association with Wellness International at the adidas Wellness Centre in Stockport, funded by the Barclays Premier League

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— THE Touchline : ANALYSIS —

Analysis At the end of the 2008/09

season two high-profile clubs, West Bromwich Albion and Newcastle United, found themselves relegated from the Barclays Premier League. Following a successful 2009/10 season, both have now secured an immediate return to the top flight, with Chris Hughton’s Newcastle having taken the Coca-Cola Championship title

findings and shows that their success rate is still greater than the League averages of 78.6 per cent for the Barclays Premier League and 74.9 per cent for the Coca-Cola Championship, with Newcastle United on 81.2 per cent and West Bromwich Albion on 80.9 per cent.

350 300 250 200 150

■ NU ■ WBA ■ FAPL Average ■ CCC Average

45.84

44.41

47.65

45.72

Figure 3. Percentage of passes forward Both teams’ percentage of passes that are played forward are two to three per cent lower than the Championship average. They are also both similar to the Premier League average.

■ NU ■ WBA

23.09

23.48

22.78

21.44

100

■NU ■WBA

50 0

60

NU

WBA

FAPL CCC Average Average

Figure 1. Average number of passes seen in a game for both teams and both Leagues Figure 1 shows that both teams were well above the Coca-Cola Championship average, and even went beyond this season’s Barclays Premier League average for passes made in a game (the Championship average stands at 265, the Premier League 303). Newcastle and West Brom respectively averaged 310 and 325. As expected, due to their high number of passes, both teams’ number of successful passes is greater than the Championship and Premier League average. A percentage success rate of their passes gives more representative

FAPL Average CCC Average

■ FAPL Average ■ CCC Average

50

Percentage of passes (%)

Number of passes

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and Roberto Di Matteo’s West Brom securing automatic promotion in second place. With both teams having dominated the Championship for the majority of the season, we’ve looked at the level and style of their play to see if the reason for their quick success and response to relegation is maintaining a Premier League style of play (all data is correct up to April 19th 2010).

Newcastle and West Brom... Premier League or Championship Standard?

40 30 20 10 0

Short

Medium

Long

Figure 2. A breakdown of the length of passes as a percentage of all passes Above, we can see a breakdown of the length of passes performed by each team. Both teams fall below the Coca-Cola Championship average for long passes and above the average for medium passes. It is apparent that the teams’ trends are closer to that of the Premier League than the Championship.

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Figure 4. Percentage of passes backward The opposite is seen when looking at the percentage of passes played backwards. Both teams have a slightly higher percentage than the average for both Leagues, suggesting they are comfortable in possession while being more selective with their choice of pass. In conclusion: While there are differences in the average performance outputs between clubs in the Premier League and Championship, the 09/10 season suggests that teams adopting a style more consistent with the Premier League have been more successful.


— THE Touchline : ANALYSIS —

THE CASTROL LMA MANAGERS’ PERFORMANCE TABLE Season 2009/10, Quarter Four (up to April 23rd 2010) Club

P

WP

DP

GS

CS

WM

CP

PTS

TT score

Chris Hughton

Newcastle United

10

88

12

23

4

14

0

141

141

L2

Steve Cotterill

Notts County

11

96

11

20

8

16

0

151

137

3

L1

Kenny Jackett

Millwall

9

66

11

22

4

18

0

121

134

4

C

Roberto Di Matteo

West Bromwich Albion

10

84

12

20

5

12

0

133

133

5

P

Sir Alex Ferguson CBE

Manchester United

8

54

11

22

4

14

0

105

131

6

P

Carlo Ancelotti

Chelsea

9

54

6

22

2

16

14

114

127

7

L1

Alan Pardew

Southampton

11

76

11

18

5

12

14

136

124

8

P

Rafael Benitez

Liverpool

8

50

11

20

3

13

0

97

121

9

P

Roberto Mancini

Manchester City

7

44

6

17

1

13

0

81

116

10

L2

Micky Adams

Port Vale

9

56

17

17

1

10

0

101

112

11

P

David Moyes

Everton

7

34

23

13

3

5

0

78

111

12

C

Brian McDermott

Reading

12

62

23

24

5

16

0

130

108

13

P

Harry Redknapp

Tottenham Hotspur

8

52

0

12

1

7

13

85

106

14

L2

Paul Buckle

Torquay United

8

44

11

15

4

11

0

85

106

15

C

Ian Holloway

Blackpool

9

54

5

21

2

12

0

94

104

16

L2

Mark Yates

Cheltenham Town

9

44

22

18

3

6

0

93

103

17

L1

Lee Clark

Huddersfield Town

8

54

5

13

3

7

0

82

103

18

L1

Danny Wilson

Swindon Town

10

58

15

13

5

9

0

100

100

19

L1

Andy Scott

Brentford

12

54

34

19

5

7

0

119

99

20

C

Dave Jones

Cardiff City

11

66

16

13

3

7

0

105

95

Pos

Div

1

C

2

Manager

WP Win points DP Draw points GS Goals scored CS Clean sheets WM Winning margin per goal CP Cup points

The Castrol LMA Managers’ Performance Table (powered by Prozone) allows managers from every level of the League to test themselves against one another. Every competitive game counts towards a manager’s individual score. Points are awarded for victories and draws, with results away from home scoring higher. Points for clean sheets and goals scored accumulate throughout the season, while a team’s winning margin also counts towards the total.

POINTS SYSTEM Home win 10 points Goal scored 1 point Away win 12 points Clean sheet 1 point Home draw 5 points Winning margin per goal 1 point Away draw 6 points There is also a factor included in respect of knock-out matches (‘Cup points’), based on the League status of the relevant club. Points are divided by the number of games played. This number is then multiplied by ten – to exclude decimals – producing the final Top Twenty score.

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— EVENTS : PRESIDENT’S DINNER —

an evening with fabio The LMA’s President’s Dinner provided an audience with England managers past and present

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On February 11th, the LMA (in association with

Barclays, Castrol and Jaguar) hosted its second President’s Dinner at Wembley Stadium. More than 600 guests, including Sir Alex Ferguson, Carlo Ancelotti and former England managers Graham Taylor OBE, Terry Venables and Sven-Göran Eriksson, joined the guest of honour, England manager and LMA president Fabio Capello. The event, which was hosted by the BBC’s John Inverdale, included a memorable ‘question and answer’ panel session with Capello, Taylor, Venables and Eriksson, which provided a fascinating insight into football management and the pride and pressures associated with managing England. Commenting on the evening, LMA chief executive Richard Bevan said: “This evening offered a unique insight into the role of managing England and the LMA thanks these members for contributing to a truly memorable event.” The dinner also made a significant fundraising contribution to the LMA Community Fund. The fund teams up LMA members with community and charity activities, not only raising awareness and profile, but also actively engaging them in programmes. .

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— EVENTS : PRESIDENT’S DINNER —

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— Advertising feature —

THE

FORTE VILLAGE RESORT

The LMA is proud to welcome a new supporter, the Forte Village Resort

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Just a few kilometres from

Cagliari in Sardinia and nestled on a magnificent Mediterranean beach, the Forte Resort offers luxury five-star holidays, tailored to you and your family, in one of its eight hotels or 44 five-star suites. Within its luxurious borders, the Forte Village Resort offers a host of sporting activities for all tastes and ages. Whether in the water (the spectacular Sardinian sea is perfect for water sports), in the gym, or on the football pitch, tennis court or golf course, topclass facilities and instructors are available for every discipline. If, on the other hand, you’ve come to Forte Village to escape

the stresses and strains of a sporting life, you might prefer to spend some time in the resort’s unique thalassotherapy spa. Thalassotherapy is a treatment that uses the combined action of climatic and marine elements, such as seawater, sand and seaweed. The sea becomes a completely natural source of

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treatment to restore the body’s wellbeing and inner peace. This is the secret of thalassotherapy, an ancient science born on Mediterranean shores. Today it is built upon by the most advanced scientific research from the incredibly professional team at Thaermae del Forte Village Resort, led by Dr Angelo Cerina. And while you take advantage of the spa or sports facilities, the younger members of your family can enjoy all of the benefits of Leisure Land, a fully equipped entertainment complex with trampolines, eight bowling alleys and a go-kart track. And even when the sun goes down the adventure continues, as guests can enjoy fresh cuisine from the extensive menus served in the resort’s 21 gourmet restaurants, including Gordon Ramsay at Forte Village. To visit Sardinia’s most sought-after resort, and for exclusive benefits for LMA members, go to www.fortevillageresort.com or call +39 070 921516


— LMA PARTNERS : JAGUAR ACADEMY OF SPORT —

Big cat roars for British sport LMA senior partner demonstrates its commitment to backing British sport, with the creation of a new academy designed to encourage excellence among the nation’s sportsmen and women

is a long-term commitment by Jaguar to support British sport and contribute to the creation of the next generation of British sporting talent. British sport has come a long way in recent times and we believe this should be recognised, celebrated and used to help inspire the talent of the future.” David Beckham OBE (below), one of the academy’s patrons, added: “The Jaguar Academy of Sport is all about supporting the next generation of British talent. I’m delighted to contribute to this initiative and, together with the other patrons, to make sure sport in this country continues to thrive.” The Jaguar Academy of Sport’s activities will be documented on its dedicated website which, in addition to containing more in-depth details on its activities, will also carry regularly updated content on the performances and activities of British sportsmen and women throughout the world. www.jaguaracademyofsport.co.uk

JAGUAR CARS has underlined its commitment to

sporting excellence with the launch of the Jaguar Academy of Sport, a ‘best of British’ sports club that aims to inspire the country’s sportsmen and women to reach their full potential. The members of this club will include many of Britain’s most successful sports stars (both current and former) who will offer their knowledge, opinions and guidance to inspire anyone involved with or interested in sport. At the heart of the academy’s activities is a bursary fund that will support the development of young British sporting talent. All sports will be considered and the beneficiaries will be those who demonstrate the greatest potential, real dedication to their sport and an outstanding desire to succeed. The academy will work closely with the charity SportsAid (www.sportsaid.org.uk) to ensure the very best talent is identified, while the final decision on the winners will be made by the academy’s patrons, some of the nation’s most successful sportsmen and women. Over time it is hoped the bursary fund will help to develop the next generation of British sporting champions. In addition to the fund, the academy will also feature a prestigious annual awards ceremony, celebrating the best British sporting achievements of each year, and will recognise rising stars from across British sport. Winners will receive a trophy created by Jaguar’s chief designer, Giles Taylor. Speaking at the launch of the academy, Jaguar UK’s managing director Geoff Cousins said: “This

Meet the people

The academy’s roster of ambassadors and patrons reads like a ‘who’s who’ of British sport. The line-up includes… Jamie Baulch David Beckham OBE Sir Ian Botham OBE Dave Brailsford CBE Martin Brundle Tasha Danvers Gareth Edwards CBE Jessica Ennis Mark Foster Steven Gerrard MBE Dame Kelly Holmes DBE Sir Chris Hoy MBE

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Colin Jackson CBE Denise Lewis OBE Sir Steve Redgrave CBE Dave Roberts CBE Michael Vaughan OBE Lee Westwood Shane Williams


— LMA PARTNERS : THE BOBBY MOORE FUND —

Doing it for the kids The Manager catches up with Luther Blissett, a former England striker who’s already made his mark in South Africa in 2010

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While Fabio Capello and his charges probably haven’t even begun to think about what to pack for this summer’s main event, one former England star has already put in a hard shift on South African soil. Luther Blissett, the former Watford, AC Milan and England centre-forward, had just returned from 11 days of hard labour on the Bobby Moore Fund’s Project South Africa initiative when he spoke to The Manager. “It was a brilliant trip,” he says. “There were 38 of us, all living together in tents on the side of a mountain, taking cold showers and enjoying the luxury of using chemical toilets!” Project South Africa had two objectives: to raise much-needed funds for Cancer Research UK’s fight against bowel cancer and, more directly, to renovate a dilapidated school and a football pitch in partnership with the local population in one of

South Africa’s many deprived areas. Blissett was delighted to be asked by the trip’s organisers to take part. “I’ve done a few things with the Bobby Moore Fund in the past – dinners and quiz nights and that sort of thing – but I’ve always wanted to get my hands dirty on something like this,” he says. “I got a call from the PFA in October saying there was a place there for me if I wanted it, so I jumped at it immediately. It was very rewarding in many, many ways.” In addition to working on the renovation project, Blissett, who currently coaches at the Stevenage Borough Academy and with Hemel Hempstead Town, also put some of the local children through their paces on the football pitch (below), all of which has given him an appetite to do more. “It was hard work,” he says, “but I’d love to do it again. I’m hoping to be on the Namibia trip next year, then maybe go to Brazil, too.” Stephanie Moore MBE, the World Cup winning captain’s widow and founder of the Fund, says: “I have taken part in several projects to Brazil and South Africa and found them to be the most rewarding experiences of my life. The help that is being given in these remote areas is vital for the local people to be able to remain in their village, and the money raised through the participants’ fantastic fund-raising efforts is hugely important to the work of the Bobby Moore Fund. To know that we are making a real difference to both causes is something very special.” If you’re interested in taking part in a future Bobby Moore Fund project, call 020 7009 8881 or email catherine.lorne@cancer.org.uk www.bobbymoorefund.com

the manager SPRING 2010


WORLD CLASS BRANDING

Working with the world's leading venues, events and sponsors, Icon provides the complete signage and branding solutions package. From short-term dressing for individual events to permanent venue signage, wayfinding and advertising systems, Icon's service portfolio covers the full range from initial concept through design, manufacture and installation. With offices in London, Berlin and Doha, and partners in Ontario, Shanghai, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Icon also offers a fully international survey, audit and project management service for both indoor and outdoor venues, as well as host cities and local organising committees.

THE IMAGINATION BEHIND THE IMAGE www.icondisplay.co.uk


The Spiritual Home of The Ryder Cup

The Brabazon Challenge is back…

Team up with a golfing buddy and come and enjoy tournament golf on the world famous Brabazon course. • 6 qualifying dates (April to September 2010) • 2 ball better ball stableford • Top 8 leading teams will qualify for the matchplay finals in October To find out more call our Golf Sales Team on 01675 470301 or visit www.TheBelfry.com

In partnership with

Just

£199

per team Terms and conditions apply


— LMA PARTNERS : VIRGIN ATLANTIC —

flight to remember Sir Richard Branson promises that England will be looked after in style, as the team prepares to fly to South Africa for the FIFA 2010 World Cup When England set off to take part in its first

FIFA World Cup tournament, in Brazil in 1950, the squad didn’t travel together as a single unit. In fact, prior commitments (such as a tournament in Canada) meant that some of the team’s best players didn’t even play in the competition until the second game. How times have changed. For this year’s tournament, LMA business partner Virgin Atlantic is providing the England team with its own plane, which will fly direct from London Heathrow to Johannesburg on June 2nd, ten days before the team’s opening match against the United States. The specially commissioned Airbus A340-600 will carry Fabio Capello and his 23-man squad, along with England’s key support team.

Announcing this flight, Sir Richard Branson, president of Virgin Atlantic, said: “It’s a great honour for Virgin Atlantic to be carrying the England team to Johannesburg. We are thrilled they have chosen to fly with Virgin Atlantic on our award-winning Upper Class Suite and promise they will be looked after in style by our world-class cabin crew, so that when they arrive in Johannesburg they are fit and ready to take on the world. I, along with everyone at Virgin Atlantic, am sure they will make England proud.” The Upper Class Suite has the longest fully flat bed in business class and a state-of-the-art in-flight entertainment system. The menu will be tailored specifically to the players’ requirements. The team will also speed through the airline’s private security channel in the Upper Class Wing at Heathrow’s Terminal 3. Further information on this flight is available online at www.virginatlantic.com

Follow the team

The LMA has teamed up with Africa Travel to arrange tailor-made trips to the FIFA 2010 World Cup, for those both with and without match tickets, with all accommodation personally sourced. Please contact Frances Geoghegan on 020 7843 3505 to discuss your requirements.

the manager SPRING 2010


StoppagE

Time

66

Portsmouth beat Tottenham in the FA Cup semi-final, April 11th 2010

They say that you have to experience the lows in order to appreciate the highs... and if that’s the case, then Avram Grant and Frédéric Piquionne must be enjoying this moment to an almost unprecedented degree. There were only two certainties facing Portsmouth as this scene was captured – one was that the road ahead is going to be tough for the cashstrapped club; the other was that Grant’s men would be back at Wembley on May 15th to face his former side, Chelsea. Play up Pompey!

the manager SPRING 2010


This experience could change your life Join the Bobby Moore Fund for Cancer Research UK on a once in a lifetime international project Namibia Spring 2011 Registered Charity Number 1089464

Brazil 26 September – 6 October 2010

• Renovate a school for the local community • Build a football pitch • Play football with the local children • Form friendships that will last a lifetime

• Leave a lasting legacy for a community that desperately needs your help while raising money to help fund bowel cancer research in the UK

Register now for £350 and pledge to raise £4,000 in sponsorship For more information about the project and registration please visit www.bobbymoorefund.org To take part in a Bobby Moore fund international project you must be 18 years and over


PROVING MY TEACHERS WRONG. WEALTH. WHAT’S IT TO YOU? Early life experiences are often a spur to ambition. To build on the success which your drive and talent have brought you, talk to Barclays Wealth. We can help you develop an effective long-term investment strategy, with a portfolio that balances risk and reward to a degree that suits your temperament. As a symbol of success, it’s less obvious than the classic car, but equally satisfying. To grow your wealth, call Rob Price on +44 (0) 20 7487 1041 or visit barclayswealth.com today. International and Private Banking • Financial Planning • Investment Services • Brokerage

Barclays Wealth is the wealth management division of Barclays and operates through Barclays Bank PLC and its subsidiaries. Barclays Bank PLC is registered in England and is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority. Registered No. 1026167. Registered Office: 1 Churchill Place, London E14 5HP.

The Manager  

The magazine of the League Managers Association