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THE FIRST CATWALK ILLUSTRATION MAGAZINE

ISSUE o N 2013AW 01 THE SEASON OF CHANGE

§ The Insider atmospheric catwalk shots by David Urbanke § Show Spectacular FASHION IS JUST ONE BIG CIRcus § The Edit A roundup of the A/W 2013 trends § Peacock Streets HAS STREET STYLE GONE OUT OF FASHION? § Sketch Stream fast fashion illustration § The Experimentalist MERGING FASHION WITH ART § Revolving Doors THE EVER CHANGING FASHION HIERARCHY

sartorial Sketching has never looked so gOOD


ISSUE o N 2013AW 01 styleyes


COVER SHOT BY DAVID URBANKE collectors edition illustrated by denise nestor

Styleyes

A U T U M N / W I N T E R

2013


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C O N T E N T S 01

T H E I N S I D E R PAGE 10 Were you there? No! These were the showstoppers

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P E A C O C K S T R E E T S PAGE 28 Has street style gone out of fashion?

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F A S H I O N D I G E S T PAGE 33 News from all the major fashion locations

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T H E E D I T PAGE 46 Trend Report AW/13

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S K E T C H S T R E A M PAGE 61 Just how fast can you illustrate?

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S H O W S P E C T A C U L A R PAGE 69 Fashion is just one big circus

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R E V O L V I N G D O O R S PAGE 72 The ever-changing fashion hierarchy

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T H E I N F L U E N C E R S PAGE 77 A prospective creative career realised

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A M I L L I O N F A C E S PAGE 84 what's it like to wear it first?

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T H E A C C E S S O R I E S I N D E X PAGE 88 Like your very own virtual wardrobe

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PAGE 24 T H E S E A S O N E D S A R T O R I A L I S T Profile: Janelle Burger

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PAGE 30 T H E E D I T O R S W A R D R O B E Dressing for a style conscious demographic

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PAGE 34 S T A N D O U T C O L L E C T I O N S The best designer showcase of the season

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PAGE 52 C A T W A L K D E T A I L Catwalk portraiture

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PAGE 65 T H E E X P E R I M E N T A L I S T merging fashion with art

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PAGE 70 C A T W A L K C R E A T I O N It all starts with a sketch

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PAGE 75 F A S H I O N W E E K I N T E R N A T I O N A L The new style capitals

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PAGE 82 B L O G G E R A T T I Fibre-optic style sayers

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PAGE 87 F A S H I O N W E E K C O N F I D E N T I A L Twitter reactions to the AW/13 shows

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PAGE 91 A / W 1 3 L O O K B O O K

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EXCUSE ME ยง Are you lost by chance?


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N 2013AW 01

We are so glad your invite arrived in time to catch the A / W 13 catwalk collections. It’s been a very busy season. The influx of new trends always ensures we bring you the freshest content around. With new trends comes new faces, and we’ve seen a huge change up in the fashion hierarchy. Most notibly the tenure of Alexander Wang at the house of Balenciaga, who will no doubt be introducing his cool kid persona to the PPR institute. Soon the tumblr kids will be tagging his creations with Wa-len-ciaga, if they haven't already. And speaking of PPR, this season Christopher Kane felt the financial backing of a 51% investment from the French fashion conglomorates. With all this change in mind it makes you forget that the craziness this season will be a not so distant memory until the next. How about the reaction to the newly revamped YSL Saint Laurent? Courtney Love doppelgänger's meet 90s grunge angst meet a confused Paris clientele. But all of that is to follow. All the major locations have been covered, from Paris to Milan, New York and London, with new discoveries sprinkled inbetween. So why not emerge yourself in our extra special news pull-out, pin it to your wall and gaze in delight. We look to the most exceptional collections of the season and draw, quite literally, the details from the catwalk. David Urbanke's atmospheric shots are a must see, whilst Yenny Seo of Studded Hearts discusses life beyond the blog in our Bloggeratti section. And we've featured some of the best fashion illustrators, creatives and industry folk around. Be inspired by Anne-Sofie Madsen's take on wearable art in The Experimentalist, vie for a new career prospect in The Influencers, or simply gaze in awe at the beauty of Janelle Burger's fashion week sketchbook, straight from the catwalk FROW. Thankyou for taking the time to read this fashion extravaganza.

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C O N T R I B U T O R S EDITOR

Christopher Prince

COPY Grace Hawk Amelia Bowie Charlotte Taylor, Max Smith, Erin Grayson

FEATURES DIRECTOR COPY EDITOR COPY ASSISTANTS

ART DEPARTMENT Christopher Prince Luke Marcus Newgent Hanna East

ART DIRECTOR PICTURE EDITOR ART ASSISTANT

CONTRIBUTORS Jan Werner Robert Fox Sam Rollinson COMMISSIONS Caroline Andrieu David Urbanke Denise Nestor Janelle Burger Tara Dougans

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atmosphere

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The

INSIDER


THE SHOWS THAT ASTOUNDED,EXEMPLIFIED AND PUSHED THE INNER BOUNDARIES OF FASHION INTO A COMPLETELY NEW AND DIVERSE DIMENSION. WITNESS AND RELIVE AW13 PHOTOGRAPHY - DAVID URBANKE


NEW YORK


MARC JACOBS

UNTIL THE SUN GOES DOWN

a sartorial orbit of bedroom hymns from dusk till dawn


LONDON

SIMONE ROCHA

PRETTY IN PINK

ergonomic femininity incontrovertibly built for style


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MILAN


PRADA

RAW ELEGANCE

Miuccia's woman scorned transcends the ages in an ecclectic throwback to Prada's greatest hits


PARIS


LOUIS VUITTON

mise en scène

the L.V heroine pulsates with emotion in this melancholic nod to grunge


PARIS


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Belle Époque

Andy Warhol provides surrealist nuances amidst the clouds of a Raf Simons dreamscape


CHANEL

ALL AROUND THE WORLD

Daft Punk resounds, Karl takes the world by storm


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ustralian born, Paris based Janelle Burger possesses a sprightly aesthetic to her fashion illustrations. She conjures scribbles and doodles that sometimes begin haphazard on the page, but are infinitely refined into realised fashion portraits. Styleyes looks to Janelle this season to illustrate the A/W 2013 collections. Equipped with a black sugar sketchbook and pastels in every shade, study the sartorial sketches of an artist who conjures up beauty on paper.

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“It seems odd that people of such talent are usually hidden from the public eye, and as soon as they’re discovered everyone wonders why they haven’t heard of them before."

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complete paper demolition every time the door is wedged shut. She cited an interest in fashion following her studies in fine art at Parsons Paris, a course that lead to landing freelance stints at Paris Fashion Week. What began as a two year course turned into a seven year stay, and a contract with The Illustration Room, an Australian artbased agency who regularly commission her overseas to scout street style subjects.

WHAT BEGAN AS A TWO YEAR COURSE TURNED INTO A SEVEN YEAR STAY

Burger grew up in the coastal city of Perth, and it was her father who taught her how to draw the female form at the tender age of four. Most of her early work focused on personal belongings, trinkets that had been passed down from generations in which she documented in her many moleskins. Part of her extensive scrapbook collection sits dubiously on the top shelf of her wardrobe, inching ever-closer to a

janelleburgers.blogspot.fr

VISIT § Janelle's blog:

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This season Styleyes asked Burger to draw straight from the A/W 2013 collections. Some were crafted quite literally from the catwalk – a scrawl at Céline will prove that – others re-evaluated in Burger’s Parisian studio. To further heighten her experimental prowess, Burger decided to bring along a charcoal sugar paper sketchbook and a selection of pastels, resulting in wonderfully atmospheric scribbles inverted digitally for the magazine.

street style peacocks hit their fashion 2.0 poses, all rendered with a nonchalant sensibility. This seasons choice of hue; textile and silhouette are executed in the finest detail. She has a particular fascination with shoes and hairstyles, and who can blame the girl? She’s a 20-something doodle maverick that has chosen to visualise the most glamorous subject you can imagine; fashion.

JANELLE BURGER IS THE TOUR DE FORCE OF THE ILLUSTRATION WORLD

THE SEASONED SARTORIALIST

The rebirth of fashion illustration is being felt; the medium itself invites a very diverse creative crowd. Anyone can pick up a pencil and sketch a catwalk look, but it’s in the details that count. Burger cites Perth compatriot Jiiakuann as her go-to design influence. An artist who’s aesthetic rings true to Burger’s own multimedia creations.

The effortless chic of Paris has trickled through Burger’s nib, transitioning her aesthetic from drawing charming personal objects to stylish ink scrawls. She isn’t afraid to mix up her techniques either, whether it be using collage pasta shapes to create a pair of Dolce & Gabbana earrings, or splashing watercolour blots across a Proenza Schouler inspired textile print. Her style is articulated by its sheer diversity, reflective of the fashion world that surrounds and influences her.

models strut across the page as if walking a watercolour catwalk

At first, Janelle Burger’s drawings catch you unaware with their scrapbook-like compositions – and then they begin to entrance you. With her implement of choice, the humble ink pen, she deftly transforms the line into intricate depictions of the most fascinating nature. Models strut across the page as if walking a watercolour catwalk;

profile


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janelle BURGER

wHAT HAPPENS WHEN A CATWALK publication TEAMS WITH A FASHION ILLUSTRATOR? PURE EXPERIMENTALISM City: PARIS Season: AUTUMN/WINTER 2013 Janelle Burger Draws from the COLLECTIONS Why did you decide to start illustrating fashion subjects? This year I went to a lot of fashion shows during fashion week and it inspired me a lot so that’s why I’ve drawn a lot of fashion pieces. I was influenced by Paris itself, and after I graduated I decided to start marketing myself in the fashion industry. It can be very lucrative work during the fashion season, I can get around five commissions a week which is a lot for a struggling illustrator living in a tiny city apartment!

What materials did you use for the Autumn/Winter 2013 collections? Well I decided to try something different and utilise both my drawing and graphic design skills. I brought along an A5 black sugar paper sketchbook (different to my usual A4 size) and a few pastels. I experimented with collage and then decided to invert the drawings and digitally enhance them.

process for me.

Other than the collections, what influences your work? I work as a freelance street style photographer so fashion outside of the catwalks is very important to my aesthetic. You can capture different movements and moods of course. I like photographing things to draw and visa-versa. It just seems like a natural design

How do you promote your work? Some of my friends started up Tumblr accounts for their own projects and I just started one and put up my drawings. Then all of a sudden people started following me and the rest is history! It seems odd that people of such talent are usually hidden

What was your favourite collection of the season? Oh that's a hard one! Well I attended Céline this season. The laundry bag prints and sleeve-waisted dresses were so dynamic. I love what Phoebe Philo is doing over there. She's a foreigner like me; only she was born in Paris and moved to London.

from the public eye, and as soon as they’re discovered everyone wonders why they haven’t heard of them before. Before that it was just friends and family seeing my art. I Google searched myself. You should never do that but I wanted to see if anyone wrote about me. I saw people from Japan writing about my art and from that moment I thought YES, if I can reach anyone in Japan that makes me a happy girl. What's next for Janelle Burger? I like to float to be honest. Never be tied down with work, why else do you think I became a freelancer! I would like to do more print commissions and definitely collaborate with other artists. That would be cool.


DID YOU KNOW ยง Janelle's favourite

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band is Ladyhawke

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: cร‰LINE laundry bag plaids eRdem gothic florals marc jacobs underwear as outerwear PROENZA SCHOULER graphic collage maison martin margiela checkerboard 3.1 Phillip Lim urban streetwear Miu miu Mary Janes PRADA dishevelled silhouettes Pastels & collage on charcoal sugar paper


STRIKE A POSE ยง Send in your

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street style snaps to Styleyes

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INDUSTRY ISSUES


STREET

MODEL OFF-DUTY

PEACOCK STREETS T

he style stakes have never been higher on the not-so-mean streets of fashion capitals around the world. Those who dare, win. What was once considered a spontaneous art form has since evolved into fashion pandemonium, where more photographers line the entrance of shows than the shows themselves.

Fashion can be considered survival of the fittest, or in this case, survival of the most stylish. Gaudy and glaring, twinkling with paillettes and stacked atop gargantuan heels, the fashion conglomerates attract street hawkers like moths to a flame. The culprits are of course the style heavyweights, cult fashion bloggers, beanpole editors and FROW celebrities. Street style however, gives anyone who’s anyone the ability to dress up for a day of fashion reckoning. And then we have the acclaimed street style photographers, Scott Schuman of The Sartorialist, and Tommy Ton of Jak & Jil, both regular contributors of fashion bibles and online blogs - creatives who have built street style, quite literally from the streets, to primetime column news. Filmmaker Andinh Ha recently documented the issues regarding what street style really means today in his short, “Take My Picture”. The film is FROW: MEANING § Front row, duh!

foregrounded in the debate set off by Suzy Menkes’ T Magazine confessional, The Circus of Fashion, which pinpointed the effect of street style bloggers promoting a newly developed flashier way of dressing. Ha cites the celebrity of bloggers of today to that of the supermodel boom during the nineties. And through extensive interviews with key fashion industry commentators, the documentary sets out to explore D.I.Y glamour. “The concept felt very organic to me,” Ha comments. “Every season it’s the same faces wearing the newest, most lavish catwalk looks, it’s very ironic. Anna Dello Russo was a fascinating subject to consider. She’s tall, slender, very gamine. Her looks range from the absurd to the practically insane, and yet she has hoards of fashion followers hanging onto her every whim. These people of course can barely afford a rhinestone on her Balenciaga gown, but that doesn’t deter them from lusting. Fashion is all about desire after all.” Yet this desire becomes all too self involved. Where old school journalists deflect bribes from fashion designers, big-name fashion bloggers seem to revel in the sponsored glory. Style has morphed from something personal and individual to a walking advertisement, where judging fashion becomes all about the ‘me’ and less about the ‘them’.

“You can definitely tell when someone has tried too hard, they reek of desperation. And of course photographers will flock anywhere there’s a waif clothes hanger. It’s what sells. This documentary isn’t meant to degrade street style, that wasn’t my intention whatsoever,” Ha continues. “Look, there are some incredibly stylish people in this world, and if you are attuned to true style, like many of the veteran street style photographers, then sorting the wheat from the chaff is pretty straightforward.” *

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HAS STREET STYLE GONE OUT OF FASHION? PEACOCKS AND DISINGENUOUS SARTORIAL STYLE AT FASHION WEEK The bloggers have made a name for themselves. Bryanboy being a perfect example of brand marketing following Marc Jacob’s namesake ‘It’ bag in 2008. All this boils down to smart market research, where big brands notice consumer influence from online style mavericks. It’s a clever move of cour se; multimedia is after all our driving force. Whether the fashion veterans like it or not, street style will forever provide a constant source of inspiration for those that have tight purse strings, yet big sartorial dreams.


The Queen of street style, Anna Dello Russo has been the sartorial style maverick for Tommy Ton of Jak + Jil since 2005. With her wicked eye for print, electric colour and penchant for ‘It’ pieces, Russo’s wardrobe choices reflect that of an experienced fashion Grande Dame. Once labelled as a ‘fashion maniac’ by photographer Helmut Newton, Russo’s invidiual style simply cannot be ignored. Whether she’s donning a pair of Prada geta’s or gilded in a baroque Dolce & Gabbana caban, Russo forever shines through her sartorial choices The bloggersphere are addicted to her her, tumblr forever updates, and twitter ignites. She’s a tried and tested tour de force in the style stakes.

ANNA DELLO RUSSO

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EDITOR AT LARGE: VOGUE JAPAN LEARN FROM AND BE INSPIRED BY THE SARTORIAL STREET STYLE MASTER

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GIOVANNA BATTAGLIA

EDITOR: L’UOMO VOGUE FASHION MEANS BUSINESS AND THE INDIVIDUAL Giovanna Battaglia has been a long-standing street style veteran. With an individual mix of bold colour and dynamic silhouette, street style photographers are forever on the hunt to catch a glimpse of her departing the most prestigious of fashion week events.

a n n a v o i G

As a contributor to W, Battaglia will actively avoid photographers if she’s with her boss, Stefano Tonchi, citing street style as time wasting. Yet when she’s on the go the sartorial magic happens. Photographers tend to capture her in action, walking to and from shows. Battaglia is best know for her high-risk style choices, opting for a mix of print and shade to stand out from the crowd.


STYLE

THE EDITORS WARDROBE DRESSING FOR A STYLE CONSCIOUS DEMOGRAPHIC

TAYLOR TOMASI HILL

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR: MODA OPERANDI A RETURN TO MODESTY AND SHYING AWAY FROM THE CAMERA

Taylor

With a recent position as artistic director at Moda Operandi, this season Taylor Tomasi Hill has deliberately avoided the photographers to take her new career move more seriously. However, this is the case of biting the hand that feeds you. Would Tomasi Hill be as relevant in the fashion industry if not for her sartorial choices? When she does rear those russet locks be sure to see her hue of choice jade, and a combination of oversize silhouettes pairing traditional textile with print.

KATE LANPHEAR

STYLE DIRECTOR: T:THE NEW YORK TIMES STYLE MAGAZINE EX-ELLE STYLE DIRECTOR SWAPS FASHION GLOSSIES FOR A SERIOUS INDUSTRY SHAKE UP Under the new guise of EIC Deborah Needleman, T magazine’s editorial team has shifted spectacularly as of late. The edgy Kate Lanphear being recently appointed as style director ignites T’s need for cutting edge fashion. Lanphear has always been a credible street style subject. Her peroxide side-swept cut and uniform of black evokes both a simplicity and ease with a rock & roll aesthetic.

Kate


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COLLECTIONS

ALEXANDER WANG RODARTE MARC JACOBs PROENZA SCHOULER 3.1 PHILLIP LIM JASON WU VIcTORIA bECkHAM DKNY CHRISTOPHER KANE ERDEM ASHIsH J.W. ANDERSON BURBERRY PRORSUM ISsa GUCCI DOLCE & GABBANA PRADA FENDI

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JIL SANDER SPORTMAX VERSACE BALENCIAGA CÉLINE RICK OWENS GIVENCHY ALEXANDER MCQUEEN styleyes

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A/W 2013

STAND

collections O U T

A FASHION COMPENDIUM OF THE MOST UNFORGETTABLE SHOWS OF THE SEASON


shrouded SHOULDERS

rib knit caps cocoon coat

burn-out double faced wool aw13 hue - tan brushed knitwear

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a new tweed hybrid

metallic silk spun twill

high sheen leather

01 aLEXANDER

fur stole boxers mittens

seasonal fur

WANG

URBAN ROCKY

ENVELOPE TROUSERS

the concertina clutch

MOHAIR CAPPED BOOTIES


DARE TO BARE

Joan Jett CROP

fur layered sequins

mOHAIR FUR oversize paillettes

s b o c Ja

laser-cut mesh

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MARC JACOBS

ALL THAT GLITTERS printed foil

microplaid

60s SWING JACKETS

fur chubbies

pajama shapes

snakeskin t-bar sandals


silk soutache corded INLAYS

Engineered corded lace bondage silhouettes

leather kiltie strap closure

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roses and feathers

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bandage layering

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rubber ankle boots

CHRISTOPHER KANE

brain matter

fibre optic 3D fringing

camouflage silk brocade

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feather edging

fox fur


ruffled necklines futuristic cat eyewear

Erdem

punched floral detail

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ostrich feathers

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digital printed florals

Striped mohair knits

a-line net skirts

LAYERED scale BLACK SEQUINS

acid embroidered trousers

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ERDEM

FLORAL GRUNGE suede ankle straps


photoreal herringbone

padlocked clutch bags

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lace foliage

Byzantine crosses

hand beading

Sicily's Cathedral of Monreale

Venetian mosaics

gilded crowns

D&olce a n a b b a G

D O L C E &G A B B A N A guipure lace

structured bodices

a-line kIck skirts

BAROQUE EMPRESS

velvet pumps


asymmetric Sheath dresses

dishabille necklines

Vichy checked wools

damp AND UNHINGED

hourglass silhouettes

Prada alligator

below the knee

gold ankle straps

casual weekender bags

patent sandals with cleated soles

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PRADA

mama-mia broad stripe wool twills


astrakhan fur

zingy polka dots

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canvas waist cinchers

zippered nylon parkas

bi-coloured stripes

ostrich carpet bag

low scoop knit dress

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ribbed ankle length skirts

07 metallic FRONT BUTTONED ANKLE BOOTS

MIU MIU

LIQOURICE ALLSORTS futuristic mary janes


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CÉLINE

CHECK MATE

laundry bag tweed

feather appliqué

felt wool

FELT ZIP CLUTCH BAGS

cocoon and flared

Céline fluted sleeves

shin-high ankle boots

WINDOW PANE CHECKS


crepe de chine

trapeze-line jackets

graphic herringbone

asymmetric skirts

Aran ruffled-knit peplum

Dior

WARHOL BOX BAGS

satin courts

archival EMBROIDERY

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DIOR

SURREALIST DREAM silk cloque


photoreal prints spray painted curls

aggressive patchwork

zippered peplums

lace paisley detail embroidered MAXI skirts

bambi caricature

RUFFLED GYPSY SILHOUETTES

Givenchy

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GIVENCHY

romantic grunge


floral sprig print

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black birds

appliquéd tulle

robe-like coats

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LOUIS VUITTON

50s boudoir

degradé sequined hemlines

MINK CLUTCHES

slip dresses

retro platform sandals


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REPORT

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The

EDIT trend report a/w 2013


PUNK. GRUNGE. ANARCHIC. THE 40S. THE FLIRTATIOUS 50S. LUXE SPORT UPDATE. METALLICS. GLAM. PATENT LEATHER. VELVET. SHELL TOPS. BIKER HYBRIDS. SURREALISM. SHOWMANSHIP AT ITS FINEST.


And it was fabrics that dictated the New York style stakes. One of the most directional fabric trends to emerge was the use of heat-fused bonded textiles, which worked in tandem with the aerodynamic silhouettes and exaggerated shoulder lines. This made for a key update towards sport luxe, with designers opting for weightless yet protective outerwear. Quilting was also favourable with emphasis on all-over patterns, creating dimensional surface textures on biker jackets and sport separates.

Hues of choice work in favour of vivid ultra-blues, providing strong commercial relevance. The colour was used as both a highlight to the bold monochrome palette that dominated the show circuit, and also as a key winter bright for outerwear.

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SLASHED HEM PENCIL ULTRA BLUE PONYSKIN

Designers have also been tapping into easy transitional winter pieces and emphasising a move to a much softer silhouette. The sweatshirt this season incorporates a healthy mix of sporty embellishment and spherical shoulder shapes. New looks combine offbeat zip placements, pony skin and bonded leather. Also on the horizon is the upsurge of widecut boxy tees, marketed as a much dressier everyday basic. Sleeves come wider and fall to the elbow with hemlines pointed.

QUILTING

Elsewhere key item of the season, the blouson, came in rounded silhouettes, updated with fabric blocking and elongated into new knee length shapes. For a new play on proportion keep an eye on the A-line skater skirt-rounded blouson combination which will provide much easier transitions for the junior consumer.

Blousons

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BOXY TEE-TOPS

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THE NEW SKIRT SHAPES

LUXE SWEATERS

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In New York, with his global recognition duly raised, Alexander Wang’s preemptive namesake brand had all eyes forced upon it, even more so than usual. Wang had recently been announced as Creative Director at Balenciaga; a move that further promoted the fashion capital’s rich catalogue of young designers possessing ambitions to rival their abilities. Swapping the raw space of Pier 94 for the dusky Cunard Building on lower Broadway, the show opened to the punchy opening bars of “Eye of the Tiger.” What Wang presented echoed the archetypal Balenciaga aesthetic of cocooning silhouettes and diaphanous tailoring, cut from new textile hybrids.

STRUCTURED A-LINE

New York introduced a reflective seasonal palette of gemstone hues; leaning towards a less structured silhouette featuring ergonomic sportswear separates and cocoon coats. LONDON looked to fabric for its glamour, with wetlook patents and luxe brocade smattering the runways. MILAN gave us ultra-feminine, florals and ankle skimming maxi coats broke the Italian code for sex appeal, whilst PARIS dropped prints altogether and favoured graphic monochrome tweeds and dare to bare fishnet, the mood was grime and the shows were somber.

F

BONDED

NEW YORK FASHION WEEK key item Blouson key hue Ultra-blue key TEXTILE Ponyskin key silhouette Wide-cut tees

all 2013 brought a tirade of strong directional trends into play, with the hard-edged punk grunge being counterbalanced by the coquettish ladylike retro-inspired silhouettes and ambiguous masculine tailoring. Nonetheless it was a celebration of the female identity. What influenced the runways was a universal notion of anarchy, with designers discarding the rulebook for a more projected style aesthetic.

STANDOUT COLLECTIONS ALEXANDER WANG, PRABAL GURUNG, proenza schouler, DKNY


london FASHION WEEK key item Patent skirts key hue Pink key TEXTILE Velvet key silhouette Fit-and-flare

Homegrown talent has never been hard to come by in the British fashion capital. london this year surrendered to the drama in a season dominated by extra-luxe fabrics and mindboggling monochromatic prints. But colour deviated from New York with welcome injections of warm feminine pinks that brought an offbeat edge to an otherwise downbeat show season.

The key silhouette for the season was the waisted fit-and-flare. Gathered or tucked skirts, skater A-lines, deep V-necklines and sleeveless details made for a youthful alternative to column dresses. A silhouette adopted from New York was the layered trouser combination. Slim pants were layered under short A-line or kilted skirts, a trend that addresses this seasons rebel punk influences. London also introduced a 90s throwback in the shape of a shell top, cut boxy and widersleeved, the shell top came in varying brushed wool, leather, check and tweed alternatives.

Embroidery this season combined more handcrafted techniques, used to create 3D surface textures and randomly placed alongside or instead of print. Designers went a step further by embellishing needlework with jewels and paillettes. This also lead to a movement with brocade, a key fabric direction in New York was also confirmed in London. Designers updated sportswear items with opulent metallic weaves. Elsewhere a more geometric look came into play, even camouflage-inspired imagery worked its way into the collection in tonal colourations. Key hues of the season sat on opposite sides of the shade spectrum. Rich berry was a tone of choice, which worked onto simple dress shapes, leather and satin. Wetlook patent came luxe too in oversaturated opulent colours. An artful use of pretty pinks lifted London’s fall sensibility, with collections seen in various hues of pale rose, retro bubblegum and bright fuchsia.

STANDOUT COLLECTIONS CHRISTOPHER KANE SIMONE ROCHA PETER PILOTTO ERDEM

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EMBROIDERY

VELVET

PATENT LEATHER

One such victim of London’s moody surroundings was Erdem Moralioglu, who made a surprising and not entirely welcome passage to the dark side with a collection that was black as black. Jonathan Saunders was another designer delving into the dark shadows, this season he introduced second-skin fetish fabrics that hugged the body in all the right, yet wrong places. Yet it’s a measure of London’s thrilling volatility that disappointment is actually a compliment. That the risks didn’t pay off ultimately means less that the fact they were taken in the first place. Unpredictability is actually London’s best asset.

London possessed the most tactile aesthetic of any other fashion week, with fabric innovation high on designer’s lists. Glossy wet-look finishes, particularly for outerwear, were a practical goto in simple shrouded silhouettes and revamped heritage trench coats. Patent skirts were also a key item for the season, worked in pencil silhouettes or the new long-line skater lengths and paired with oversize shirts, the look emphasised an hourglass shape. Velvet also made a revival, with designers flirting with the tactile appeal of rich silk cottons. The fabric came reworked with devoré, burn-out effects and heavy-gauge lace.

BERRY TONES

DIGITAL PATTERNS

PINK

THE NEW MONOCHROME


TWEED

MAXI COAT

PLAID ATTACK

Designers also dabbled in a little decade play, with influences drawn from the 1940s. Skirt lengths were demure, dropped to the knee with high necklines and tailored waisted silhouettes replacing Milan’s sexy body-con signatures. The 80s punkette made an appearance with looks featuring thigh-high mini kilts and omnipresent biker jackets seen with a pop of wetlook patent and punk graffiti graphics.

THE FORTIES

PUNKETTE

CASTELLATED HEMS

STANDOUT COLLECTIONS PRADA, GUCCI, VERSACE, SPORTMAX, MOSCHINO

MILAN FASHION WEEK key item Maxi coat key hue Luxe white key TEXTILE Plaid key silhouette Castellated hems

MILAN discarded its usual overt sexual prowess for something a little more feminine. Noir glamour met neorealistic chic, and the forties reigned supreme. Miuccia Prada championed such aesthetics with a collection citing fashion as a platform for the moving image. Prada rekindled her old favourites, juxtaposing ladylike glamour with raw-edged grittiness. From the wall projections shadowing models as they stalked the runway to the purposely disheveled styling, the Prada runway echoed the grunge aesthetics of New York and London with a very sophisticated undertone.

Gucci’s Frida Giannini also provided a different undertone to Milan, opting for blasts of colour and silhouettes that evoked the hedonism of Gucci’s early seventies aesthetic, in an effort to promote a spirit of cheerful escapism. Giannini welcomed rigors of neorealism with a passage of evening femme-fatales dressed to the nines in slinky silk gowns. Milan confirmed several of the key trends seen elsewhere this season, most notably the emerging mood for punk, which came through in traditional tartans and leopard prints. New trends emerged too, luxe pales and cosmetic pinks provided a welcome change from the muted show palettes, whilst scrolling baroque patterning and ankle-skimming maxi coats evoked a less-is-more attitude for the new season.

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The classic check and tweed were manipulated beyond recognition, with traditional tartans offset with quirky leopard print. Tweed tapped neatly into the newly emerged mood for a more demure look, with exaggerated weaved and diagonal twills, compact techno effects and classic Donegal. A key tailored silhouette for fall was the skirt suit paired with an easy unstructured coat shape. A new take on outerwear emerged from Milan, with ankle-grazing maxi coats worked with strict military detailing, cut in novelty plaids and checks or romanticised with embellished detailing. Skirt suits will also be a key focus for fall. Designers moved towards a more womanly, less overt silhouette, as longer full skirts were balanced with nipped waisted jackets, indicative of the 40s influences. Pleats are set to be a key silhouette direction. Lighten up the look with kneelength hemlines slashed into castellated effects as an alternative interpretation of the trend. Soft touch knitwear is also set to be a key item. Designers cut easy tunic shapes updated in fluffy angora and lofty brushed mohair as a colour vehicle or seen in colourful jacquards and intarsias, as well as in skin patterns and softy diffused stripes. The hue of the season in Milan was a neutral battle with collections smattered with luxe winter whites and sunkissed faux-nude tones. Cool ivory and cream hues were enriched in outerwear flannels and brushed wools, whilst cosmetic pinks were developed for outerwear in soft velvet and crepe.


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FIRE ENGINE RED

ELONGATED SKIRTS

CHECKS

STANDOUT COLLECTIONS LOUIS VUITTON SAINT LAURENT MIU MIU CÉLINE DIOR

TRAPEZE COAT

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Elongated skirts brought a surprise silhouette to the Paris runways, giving the skirt suit a more urbane look as lengths sat just above the ankle. Contrasting against the fuller circle and skater skirts in Milan and London, Paris saw soft, straight silhouettes teamed with boxy or relaxed blazer shapes to maintain an easy-to-wear vibe.

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DROP SHOULDER COATS

Marc Jacobs borrowed from the boudoir in a sensuous showing of sheer slipdresses and men’s plaid overcoats with hems dipped in graduating sequins. His cinematic collection brought grunge to a new light, inspiration, which some twenty years ago catapulted him from mustsee wunderkind status into legendary unemployment. Grunge is no longer the latest obsession of the disaffected youth, and unlike at Saint Laurent, Marc Jacobs discovered an intimacy for the Louis Vuitton conglomerates.

A practical winter solution conjured designers to create knitted sheath dresses, a key item for the season. Coming waist-cinched with asymmetric hems and patchwork detailing, the humble weaved textile added a tactile quality to the collections. Romantic bias ruffles also fed into a more sophisticated silhouette, pertaining to the 1940s tailored looks, consider this an update for other details such as skirt hems and dress necklines.

kntTED dress

Céline’s Phoebe Philo, meanwhile, traded in furry shower slippers for abovethe-knee leather leggings-tight boots. Cowl-neck tops and slit skirts came in contrasting laundry-bag checks. The taste level remained high with silhouettes featuring loose jumpers and coats paired with fluted knee-length skirts.

The oversize trapeze coat became an instant classic in Paris, offering a roomier alternative to outerwear. Shoulders came rounded and lengths hit between the knee and ankle. Prints were important with laundry-bag checks and florals keeping the look bold. Mohair and astrakhan furs elevated the silhouette with luxe detailing.

bias ruffle

In contrast, Raf Simons’ tenure at Dior was stabalised thanks to a trusty bread and butter collection which included all the archival house silhouettes of seasons past. Simons brought Andy Warhol’s early illustrations to life, painting his collection with surrealist scribbles. Those illustrated bags will be hard to miss on the street; in them Simons may have come up with his first collectors item for Dior.

Metallic brocade was a dominant force in Paris. The hue of choice breathed new life into classic tailoring. The skinny pantsuit came pieced from ornate lamé and adorned with all over sequins. Shearling provided an instant update to the classic aviator jacket. Luxe winter whites looked newest on the runways, with chocolate browns offering a traditional look with contrast cream or black linings.

METALLIC GOLD

The ever-controversial Hedi Slimane cast Saint Laurent in a whole new rebellious light in PARIS. Slimane brought California grunge to the collection which channeled Kurt and Courtney in their early nineties glory. Fashion’s new enfant terrible, indeed. Slimane completely destroyed and rebuilt the house codes of the Saint Laurent legacy, yet ironically Yves himself favoured controversy over acceptance.

Elsewhere in Paris the trends of weeks passed were confirmed and transitioned. The 40s silhouette of Milan took on a new androgynous mood, with masculine tailoring and slouched mannish trousers. Punk came prettier, rose floral motifs and dark plaids replaced the harsh spikes and studs, with babydoll dresses and biker separates favoured.

rounded shoulders

PARIS FASHION WEEK key item Knitted dress key hue Metallic gold key TEXTILE Checks key silhouette Trapeze outerwear


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COLLECTIONS

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catwalk

DETAIL its all in the detail don't you know? illustrations by caroline andrieu


COLLECTIONS

01 Marc Jacobs threw some optimism into the mix for his collection, with a giant yellow orb representing the sun as part of his runway set, shining on the faces of the front show and allowing his sequin embellished and metallic garments to shine.

MARC JACOBS

BRIGHT, SHINING CHIC

A move towards tactile fashion with pyjama silhouettes, fur chubbies and satin slip dresses


COLLECTIONS

02 The Mulleavy sisters looked to their youth for autumn/winter, channelling their days growing up in a Californian beach town in the 80s for this nostalgic collection.

RODARTE 80S PSYCHEDELIC CALIFORNIA Tie-dye prints and acid wash to go


COLLECTIONS

Christopher Kane's star is in the ascendence. Couture-like detailing and fabric, rich colour and plush fur, combined punkish camouflage weaves and prints with the almost historical romance of velvet and lace.

03 CHRISTOPHER KANE SENSORY DELIGHT Highlander punk meets brain aneurysm


COLLECTIONS

04 A tightly focused collection from Proenza Schouler with a nod to the season’s emerging trend for an exaggerated rounded shoulderline, balanced by elongated wrap skirts, all offered in a monochromatic palette of black and white, with a soft peach tone worked as an unexpected feminine accent.

PROENZA SCHOULER

GROWN UP ELEGANCE

Heat-fused embroidery and elongated skirt shapes


COLLECTIONS

05 One word summed up Miuccia Prada’s showing - sexy. It was everywhere from her long pencil skirts and dishabille necklines to the metallic belts circling narrow waists, down to the models’ wet-look hair.

PRADA

FILM NOIR HEROINE

Retro 50s vibe and full circle skirts


COLLECTIONS

06 Marc Jacobs' retro-themed collection of boudoir-fuelled romance, coupling pretty sprigged florals and trousseau-worthy lingerie looks with strict tailleurs and mannish tailored coats, hinted at the newly feminine and yet grown-up mood that we can expect to see next winter.

LOUIS VUITTON

50s BOUDOIR

A frisson of romance laced with elegance


COLLECTIONS

07 Textural, tactile finishes and luxuriously experimental fabrics were on Alexander Wang’s agenda for autumn/winter, with furs and lofty, densely brushed finishes nestling against the protective qualities of leather and ponyskin.

ALEXANDER WANG

TOUCH ME, FEEL ME

Shrouded shoulders, a fighters mentality


sketch

STREAM


ART

BY THE WAY § It actually takes Tara just one minute to

paper, and most importantly, an eye for detail.

T

here's a new trend in the art world. Age-old, it is not, but for the past few seasons fashion illustration has been feeling a resurgence amidst the bright instant flashbulbs of the cameras and the on demand live catwalk streams. The time is now to pick up a pencil and sketch.

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Top Right: A sketch from Tara Dougans Top Left: Helen Bullock illustrates the Menswear AW/13 collections Above: Tara Dougans studies the recent Dior collection Below: Helen Bullock works on watercolour sketches

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Fashion illustrators, Tara Dougans and Helen Bullock are no strangers to the humble pen and paper. Dougans is already an established artist, currently residing in Amsterdam and commissioned freelance as an art director and illustrator. Graduating from Central Saint Martins with a BA in fashion, Shropshire born Bullock has a penchant for all things bold and bright. She trained as both a textile and fashion designer. Other than their shared passion for art, Dougans and Bullock also have a knack for live catwalk illustration. Take note – if you’re really going to be successful at this your hand and your wrist must work tenfold. Think of it as typing without looking, fashion illustration should be intuitive. Outside of the digital realm, live catwalk illustration is something rarely practiced, and in the fast paced industry we live in, an eye for detail and precision succumbs for instant fashion. Live streams have both helped and hindered the drawing process. The biggest drawback is the 2-Dimensional limitations. Yet the advantage of witnessing a catwalk show live from your computer screen seems too good to pass. And that’s exactly what SHOWstudio did following the spring 2013 haute couture collections last January. The team live-streamed Dougans and Bullock painstakingly perfecting their detailed line work as the current crop of collections whizzed past them via live stream.

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MATERIALS NEEDED : ruler, pencils, eraser, markers, paper, yes lots of

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JUST HOW FAST CAN YOU ILLUSTRATE? TARA DOUGANS AND HELEN BULLOCK DRAW LIVE FROM THE COLLECTIONS

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sketch a catwalk look


ART

Tara Dougans hopes to explore animation for her a new career departure into films

What interests you about live catwalk illustration? I just love the fast-paced nature of it. It’s funny because the live streams and catwalk photography is so instant, and then there’s me, frantically scribbling away trying to perfect the silhouette before the model exits. I think to be a true live catwalk illustrator you have to have stamina. I remember first hearing that Grace Coddington of Vogue draws every look of a collection from the front row. I mean that’s such an incredibly hard thing to do, but Grace of course is an old pro. Is there a particular drawing technique or medium you would like to explore? Well as you know, I love animation. But there are so many other skills I haven’t obtained yet, and so many more that I’d like to experiment with. I think I’d like to go into film or motion; I’ve been toying with some concepts of how illustrations can be incorporated in tandem with real-time footage. The role of fashion illustration still plays a very small part, but I’m quite excited to develop this and hopefully prove that it is a sensible and viable way of showcasing instant fashion.

sTYLEYES CAUGHT UP WITH tara dougans and HELEN BULLOCK to discuss the creative process. How would you describe your style of illustration? My early work was very reflective. I remember I just wanted to perfect a simple hand-drawn line. It wasn’t easy. Since I gained more confidence with my aesthetic I started to explore different creative outlets. I now work in animation; I love to bring my illustrations to life. It just gives a whole new dimension to what fashion illustration is about. When I’m offered commissions I try and choose projects that allow more room for error, but also a lot more room for play. I think fashion illustration should evoke something playful all the time. I only recently started to draw from the collections, but I’ve practiced intensely since Nick Knight (of SHOWstudio) approached me regarding a project he had for the site.

THE ROLE OF FASHION ILLUSTRATION STILL PLAYS A VERY SMALL PART

Can you elaborate on the process of how to quick-speed illustrate from the shows? First off I start with a simple silhouette and then flesh it out with coloured pencils (or anything I have hanging around). I think it’s important in those precious seconds to document everything you see. Draw a rough outline; something that probably looks hideous to begin with, but with some patience it can turn out to be truly magnificent fashion sketch. Which other artist’s work do you admire? Well of course I’m going to say my fellow SHOWstudio creative, Helen Bullock! I do a lot of travelling and so have had to cut down on any magazines I purchase that would give me some sort of inspiration. A friend of my is an avid enthusiast of 70s magazines. I can spend hours rifling through the pages, just fascinated by the old school art direction.


ART

How would you describe your style of illustration? I work in quite an abstract manner. I’m not really one for intricate detail, not like Tara anyway. My style is more robust; I just tend to splatter paints and watercolours everywhere. Sometimes working like that can be reductive because of the mess! But it’s just how I visually react to what I see.

Can you elaborate on the process of how to quick-speed illustrate from the shows? At first I’m fairly methodical with my planning. I draw out a grid on at least an A3 sized page; bigger is always better, and make sure I’m surrounded with all the materials I need. Usually when the paint comes out, that’s when I tend to destroy the workroom. If I see a bright pattern or textile walking the runway I instantly choose watercolours. When they’re dry you can create such crazy textures, which really lends itself to the tactile nature of fashion, up close and personal. In terms of the finer detail, I tend to leave that during the end. Models all look the same so what’s the point in illustrating their faces if it’s the clothes you’re only interested in?

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Which other artist’s work do you admire? I am more of a loner when it comes to appreciating the art world. I rarely ever pay attention to other creative people and instead tend to find inspiration from unknown online sources and photographs. I actually don’t think it’s a bad thing to discard your own profession; it keeps things fresh if you’re discovering influences from other media.

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hELEN buLLOCK

Visit www.helenbullock.com www.taradougans.com

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Was illustrating menswear different to womenswear? The proportions are different that’s for sure. You can be much more forgiving when your sketch a man, you know big broad shoulders ready to be coloured in. I’ve never been good at drawing women’s fashion, it’s very intricate. I suppose if there was a graphic textile involved or something then perhaps my aesthetic would lend itself, but my style is definitely catered for the bigger silhouettes!

I GET TO INSTANTLY REACT AND THROW PAINTS AROUND THE PAGE, IT'S WHAT I DO BEST

Helen BULLOCK DRAWS MENSWEAR

What interests you about live catwalk illustration? I’ve always been interested in fashion, and since Nick asked me to create some live menswear illustrations over the show season I felt obliged to get to know the technique a little better. I think particularly with my style and the spontaneity of the catwalk, live illustration is a match made in heaven. I get to instantly react and throw paints around the page; it’s what I do best.


DESIGNER

the experimentalist MERGING FASHION WITH ART, ANNE-SOFIE MADSEN IS JUST ONE OF THE NEW CROP OF DESIGN TALENT TO EMERGE FROM THE SCANDI ISLES

Despite the world of colour she creates for other women, when it comes to her own wardrobe, Madsen prefers to dress head-to-toe in black. “As a child my mum used to dress me in super colourful, matchy-matchy clothes, so when I hit 13 or 14, I rebelled,” she explains. “Some female designers really live their brand and present themselves as muse. But for me, because I work with colour in such a specific way, I need to strip it away from everything around me.”

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Madsen’s designs aren’t just prêt-à-porter pieces to covet, they’re true works of art. And she promotes her collections with individual aesthetic style, working closely with London based photographer Jens Langkjaer to encapsulate her zeitgeist. Her first public foray was on the catwalk at Copenhagen Fashion Week in 2010, presenting a couture-inspired show entitled ‘Mononoke’ of tattoo print second-skin dresses and diaphanous boxy jackets, her whimsical illustrations unbridled on the form tracing silhouettes and creating tribal emblems. “I’ve always been obsessed with Hayao Miyazaki,” Madsen explains. “He’s this incredible manga artist and film maker. Miyazaki is kind of like the Japanese Walt Disney, only darker with more of a twisted sense of humour. In Japanese, the term ëmononokeí is generalised as the spirit or monster, which is where a lot of Miyazaki's references come from and I adopt this sensibility for my design aesthetic.” In her latest SS13 showing Madsen found her commercial feet with slubby separates and sporty silhouettes. Here she vibed on streetwear with illustrations soaked in dripping paint, dip-dyed and ombred with cloud-like delicacy on silk bases. A neoprene fisherman’s jacket sported furious white seams and leather too felt urban-cool with one sheath dress cut from zippered black hide with additional funnel cape.

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Luckily, Madsen’s somber wardrobe doesn’t reflect her personality. Warm, bubbly and down-to-earth, she laughs loudly and often, and is remarkably levelheaded. She takes great care of her team, keen to avoid long working hours and people being overstretched. So much so that she recently employed two new members of staff, bringing her team up to 12, a number almost unheard of for a young designer.

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What makes her rapid trajectory so thrilling is the path she’s taken to get here: Madsen is not your conventional designer, but a former fine art student who has transferred her passion for illustration and material transfers into one of the most visually stunning labels born from Europe. Her reference points lie in the world of art and design, and include sensory fabrics, graphically wild knitwear and fringe, with looks featuring upturned collars and streamline contours. It is Madsen’s ability to fuse print, colour and texture so beautifully, and with such intensity, that makes her work unique.

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esign supernova, Anne-Sofie Madsen has illustrated her way out of the Scandi woodwork as a one to watch frontrunner. Already on her third collection, Madsen’s skillful hand and eye for detail has championed, with exemplary success, the merge of art in fashion. It’s a remarkable achievement for the 26-year-old, Danish-born designer, who in three short seasons has established herself as one of Scandinavia’s brightest young starts.


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“There is this duality which I never thought I could achieve. I try and create a literal contrast between the ethereal, more feminine pieces and the masculine solid garments,” explains Madsen. “So the techniques I utilise the vast majority of the time tends to revolve around menswear craftsmanship contrasted with classic European ballet costumes, it sounds random I know. The late Muromachi period of Japan unveiled a lot about the world of the contradictory and the complimentary. It is as a meeting between a mechanical ballerina and a graceful samurai.”

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Perhaps key to Madsen’s brilliance is the fact that she didn’t follow the typical fashion path. Despite specialising in fine art, it wasn’t long before she shifted her attention to womenswear, fascinated by the possibilities of print. On graduating her affiliation under the helm of fashion royalty, John Galliano for Dior and experience training as a Junior Designer for Alexander McQueen, gave her the tools to create her own self-styled brand. “What I learnt from working with other designers, mainly at John Galliano was to watch different movies, visit different exhibitions, go to the library and just look around. I gain a lot of inspiration from old magazines, from clothes that aren’t particularly fashionable anymore, but those that have a special feeling about them,” sights Madsen of her catwalk inspirations. “To begin with we have hundreds of images spread out across the studio, and then we make a selection. It’s quite stressful at first because you don’t know the exact direction you want to take. But later on we start to make little samples utilizing the techniques. Whilst doing that we start sketching so the process itself is quite simultaneous running parallel to one another. Then finally we realise the looks on mannequins and experiment with silhouette and form.”

Madsen’s first catwalk show debuted under the scrutinising eyes of the fashion elite during Copenhagen Fashion Week. But she has since gone on to showcase her pieces around Europe and has landed a place in London’s prestigious BFC showspaces for 2013. “We’ve now shown a few times during Copenhagen Fashion Week and that’s been a great experience. I started out doing mainly commercial pieces and so now I think the more commercial and production side of things is starting to get its base now. My goal is really to mix those two things together and I think I succeed more and more and I enjoy it.” “I’m really excited to debut in London. I think, or I hope more like, that they get my aesthetic as I think London in particular is a very creative city. Fingers crossed.” Being a former textiles student also has its advantages.

Madsen’s experimental yet sympathetic relationship with print and illustration has enabled her to enhance a woman’s figure in near-magical ways. “I like to use fabrics that are meant for another purpose. For instance in my last collection instead of using fur I used a fringe made out of a technical material that is actually meant to be used for furniture,” she says, “I like to make everything in the collection myself. I dye silk by hand, wash it with salt water and leave it to dry in the sun to give a sunbleached quality to the material. It’s this friction with soft and hard that most attracts me to the fabric. I also work with leather a lot, pressing it into shapes, weaving it in and out which is an incredibly time consuming process.” In some ways, the depth of thought and research that goes into each dress is more akin to art. “There are some parallels,” admits Madsen, “but I don’t see myself as just a designer. I am definitely interested in things other than just fashion. There’s a utilitarian need in what I do. But if people buy my clothes because they find beauty in them and want to own them as a piece of art, that’s great, too.”

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Clockwise from Left: Behind the stage at Copenhagen Fashion Week 2012. SS/12 Ad campaign. Cherrilee SS/13 collection. Copenhagen Fashion Week 2013.

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“Many of my designs explore sensory fabrics, manipulating crushed velvet, graphic knitwear and fringe. For my illustrations I laser print from the computer and then hand embellish.” In the future, Anne-Sofie Madsen wants to build a world around print that will incorporate design technology with handcrafted sketches. “Obviously the core of my business within my brand is to have two lines: made to order, which is hand embroidered and ready to wear, with the prices being more affordable for the modern consumer,” she explains, “but that doesn’t mean that in the future if I have the time and the right partnerships, I can’t explore other activities.” As the theme for Anne Sofie Madsen’s collections change, the vision stays the same: a wish to show the wellknown through the un-known and to use traditional handcraft methods and couture techniques within readyto-wear. The possibilities are endless.

I DON'T SEE MYSELF AS JUST A DESIGNER. I AM DEFINITELY INTERESTED IN THINGS OTHER THAN JUST FASHION anne-sofie madsen

DID YOU KNOW § Anne-Sofie never creates

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a catwalk look without illustrating it first


POPULARITY RANK § The most

A fashion show has such a tangible quality, it evokes a particular mood or nuance of a designers aesthetic. An ostentatious production garners attention for all the right reasons, it’s the beckoning of the fashion press that catapults designers into wanting to create bigger, better shows.

Arguably Paris, it seems, provides the most spectacular show sets of the season. However Riccardo Tisci of Givenchy decided to adopt a more restrained approach. He transported his consumers to a carousel show space, accented with a performance by Antony Hegarty to set the somber mood. Inspired by personal trauma, Tisci’s Yet, whatever those particular elements, the morose collection presented a wayward distinction invariably comes down to the gypsy girl among modern surroundings. fashion itself. How did the clothes make you react? Did it leave you feeling awe-inspired, Things weren’t always on the dark side disappointed or simply dumbfounded? however. At Dior, Raf Simons’ took the Catwalk shows are there to transport the fashion conglomerates up in the clouds. It was onlooker from industry professional to giddy the setting for his dream-like state of mind consumer. Speaking of the consumer, the in a collection that focused on the notion influx of live streaming and instant catwalk of nostalgia and desire. Simons explored access has lead media savvy brands like such concepts within the confinement of an Burberry Prorsum and Prada to experience incongruous catwalk space, surrounded by growth of sales ten-fold, particularly in the gigantic mirrored spheres atop a Magritte Far East. The runway has transformed from style mural of clouds. He’s no stranger to an intimate experience to something global. such surreal influences, referenced most What brands like these are trying to achieve recently in his spring couture collection, is something bigger than this seasons trends, which featured Dior nymphs appearing from concern becomes ever more paramount for the undergrowth of flower-strewn meadows. the increase of sales and customer satisfaction. Simons referenced ‘memory dresses’ Over the past few years, a few designers, specifically Karl Lagerfeld, Marc Jacobs and, more recently, Miuccia Prada, have embraced showmanship in the literal sense of the word, utilising elaborate catwalk productions to transmit the brands current seasonal message. For fall, Lagerfeld’s giant globe heralded Chanel’s international reach while serving as backdrop for a bold, youthful lineup, just a month after Chanel invaded, metaphorically, the ragged cliffs of Scotland. Prada and Jacobs decided to keep things a little more low-key, opting for gloomy spaces with dramatic lighting. Prada explored the Forties-inspired dishabille; each model appearance provided a character study against a Rem Koolhaas warehouse set. Whilst Marc Jacobs took a cue from Lagerfeld’s globe by emitting his very own sun-ray from a giant spherical torch, sending his models out twice, once in the dusk and again in the dawn. Over at Louis Vuitton, Jacobs elevated his controversial grunge aesthetic by surrounding the Parisian crowd with an eerie hotel cor ridor lined with doors, which when opened revealed intimate video moments of hotel guests.

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THE RUNWAY HAS TRANSFORMED FROM AN INTIMATE EXPERIENCE TO SOMETHING GLOBAL pin-pointing his archival explorations with classic black crêpe bar jackets. His draw on graphicism resulted in cloud-like tiered peplums in bold herringbone tweed. Where Simons felt the weight of a house history to deliver, his stunner of a show at his last posting at Jil Sander felt more of a breakthrough moment. Jil herself returned with an ultra collection showcased within the houses obligatory white-walled surroundings. And at Céline too, Phoebe Philo provided her usual minimal tailoring with a bold, yet confidently quiet sensibility. As in other areas of life, fashion firsts tends to be memorable. Such was the case with Alexander Wang’s Balenciaga debut, in which the manipulation of the most stunning of fabrics walked synonymous within an intimate cracked marble runway setting. His namesake label was staged on a grander scale in the Cunard building.

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popular show of the season was Chanel with over 3 million tweets


Perhaps the biggest drawback of witnessing such huge show spectaculars is the added sense that fashion has become less about the clothes and more about the media pandemonium. And the trusted fashion capitals are continually producing new fashion weeks from the far regions of the world where creatively, though applauded, is saturated. Shows are now mega marketing schemes aimed at securing big business in accessories; a driving force for the industry, as well as the additional perfumes and cosmetics. The clothes themselves are becoming irrelevant and controversy seems to rule supreme.

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Beneath the hallows of its architectural grandeur staged a fight night of tactile fabric explorations and slouchy silhouettes. Sometimes ‘unforgettable’ results from the confluence of clothes and surrounding buzz. And this was particularly appropriate for Hedi Slimane’s second ready to wear outing at Saint Laurent. What a name change and a different direction can do to a brand, as Slimane rendered his own ideals of grunge in a marmite, love-it-or-hate-it collection. Either way, people couldn’t stop talking about it.

show

SPECTACULAR The fall 2013 collections concluded on a moody Wednesday afternoon in Paris. A heavy-duty season primed with perfectly fine proverbial clothes and countless shows. A plethora of collections that have since receded into the seasonal blur, with only the biggest show stoppers being genuinely memorable.

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CATWALK CREATION F

ashion illustration plays a vital role in the production of a catwalk show. It represents the designers first initial design concept, and provides a reference point for the collection archives. A fashion illustration can communicate a particular emotion or nuance, with aims to increase the value given to a garment.

LAGERFELD LINE ยง Perhaps the

most famous of designer artists, Karl Lagerfeld sketches the collections in haphazard biro scrawls and watercolour overlays

IT ALL STARTS WITH A SKETCH The culmination of both historical and modern styles can influence the outcome of a fashion illustration, a sketch that is drawn specifically to tell a story and project the current social situation. Charles Dana Gibson, made famous by his Gibson girl sketches, aimed to portray the ideal female body during an austere Victorian era. The silhouettes conjured at the house of Dior post Second World War, for instance, were driven to elevate optimism and hope for a better future. A singular sketch can represent both social movements and individual personality.

Fashion illustration can also help clarify the historical eras of fashion. By referencing designs of past periods, the ability to identify not only what trends were popular at that particular time, but also how clothing has developed within the modern outlook of fashion. Utilising fashion as art can be a profitable marketing tool. On a deeper level, illustration can be understood as more than just a way of representing fashion; it can also be a device for communication. The duality between that of the instant catwalk photograph and the initial catwalk sketch serves as an individual social experience, whereby the designer can see their creation realised and the consumer can analyse its design credibility.


ART

§ Designers

Today designers are introducing many different techniques to fashion illustration, incorporating graphic design and animation to their sketches. Last season an array of British designers were commissioned to bring Walt Disney’s cartoon Minnie Mouse to life. Richard Nicoll, Michael van der Ham, Piers Atkinson, Lulu Guinness, Tatty Devine and Terry de Havilland were all chosen to design accessories and garments inspired by Minnie’s famous polka dot dress. Such an event lead to a collaboration with the boys at Meadham Kirchhoff for their S/S 13 collection.

And over in New York, department store Barney’s created a holiday short immortalising famous fashion faces in an ode to Disney’s caricatures. Included in the project were Lady Gaga, Alber Elbaz, Carine Roitfeld, Sarah Jessica Parker and Mario Sorrenti. Many designers who utilise illustration in turn influence an entire creative industry, inspiring countless other artists to explore different elements in their own illustrative work. It is the balance of art and fashion in their collections which is more indicative of the current trends and which ultimately garners them great critical acclaim.

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Art and fashion share many similar qualities. It’s something you want to study, and most of the time there is often an element of surprise, it can be chic or ugly, yet ultimately it is a matter of personal taste. The boundary between the literal tactile fabrics of a garment and the initial sketch is always somewhat blurred.

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The fashion industry thrives on the now and the next, which inspires illustrators and designers alike to produce new forms of art. The fashion illustration itself is not focused on the literal depiction of a catwalk look, but an initial reaction from the designer.

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incorporated a plethora of mixed media in their pre-collection sketches. From paint to ink and chalks, the sketches evoked the mood of the season


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The fashion houses have been playing revolving doors with their head designers and with the new appointments come a fresh, modern aesthetic that will change the way we dress. Is this the beginning of a new era in fashion history?

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The AW13 collections brought a whole new meaning to the word ‘change’. The lead-up to Alexander Wang’s tenure at the house of Balenciaga saw the fashion industry buzzing with speculation. Following the departure of Nicolas Ghesquière, Wang set out to showcase a more polished if imperfectly so, side to the brand. During his fifteen years as creative director, Ghesquière had established himself as one of the most visionary designers. The ergonomic sci-fi futurism of his last show at the house was more akin to pop culture than clothes, with his influence and penchant for lust pieces smattered across the globe.

This season’s fruition did not stop there. To Paris, where Raf Simons presented his first fall collection at the house of Dior. Simons’ is known to be a player in the modern art world, and on a windy day in Paris he conjured a show that was all about the clothes and the nature of their design. His show notes alluded to Christian Dior's early career as a gallerist in which he represented the great surrealist artists, Dali and Giacometti.

Wang’s first outing at Balenciaga saw archival silhouettes reworked with crisp spherical shoulders and textile hybrids, he weaved in Cristobal’s DNA paying homage to the classicism of Balenciaga’s sculptured silhouettes. Perhaps such a sign of restraint was in reaction to the attitude of his namesake show held some three weeks prior in New York. Housed within the Cunard Building, with the runway shaped like a Rocky themed boxer ring, his collection spoke of new traditional tailoring in preparation for his big move. And all of this set to the soundtrack of ‘Eye of the Tiger’, expertly disguised as a metaphor for his new ownership in Paris.

Not unlike Wang, Simons focused on the hallmarks of the house codes, placing great emphasis on the iconic Dior houndstooth and classic bar coats. Simons referred to his designs as “memory dresses”, a term that probed the Dior outlook from the wearable to the surrealist. The collection possessed a quieter approach from Simons, not necessarily reverent of his forebear, though certainly respectful of the house’s founder.

The fall collection suggested Wang had done a close read of Cristobal’s history. The couture-level attention to embellishment he showcased is the very inheritances of the label, and he was surefooted in his reinventions. But if you looked closely, the Wangisms were there, too, in the intriguing cracked textures of painted knitwear and in the nouveau camo sheared-fur jackets and vests.

But what makes Simons’ Dior revival even more interesting branches from his previous tenure at Jil Sander where he was dealt a wicked game of fashion fate, he left, she came back and he moved to the house of Dior, which equated to big shoes to fill, and my what a job he has done.


INDUSTRY

DIOR

RAF SIMONS

The story and success of Balenciaga remains to be written, but PPR surely knows that Wang isn’t just a one trick pony. Instead of just churning out perfectly nice clothes, what the fashion press wants is a shake up where true innovation is seen as paramount. There couldn’t be a better trio of revolutionaries to uphold the fashion beat in the form of Wang, Slimane and Simons.

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His take on pseudo Courtney Love and Kurt Cobain was a touch short of the audacious. Slimane wholeheartedly embraced the spirit of punky grunge, producing a collection that withheld the power to inspire the international high street and junior markets.

The shift in roles at the very peak of the fashion hierarchy represents a changing of the guard for fashion. Designers like Slimane and Simons see fashion not just as the art of creating beautiful clothes, but as a way of having a voice in culture, being part of the big conversations about the way we live now. Simons is attuned to the underground market, his own namesake label has catapulted menswear from blasé and strict to ambiguous and innovative. And it’s in the rise of the digital that is forcing luxury fashion houses to review and modernise in order to survive.

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Slimane had recently denounced fashion altogether in the spring of 2007 to concentrate on his photography, and his return to design, particularly womenswear, sparked one of the most highly anticipated fashion comebacks of the decade. Yves was proven to be a risktaker himself with his Left Bank beat-inspired collection back in the day, and by subjectively putting gritty street wear on the runway; Slimane fuelled what essentially was and is the Saint Laurent legacy.

SAINT LAURENT

Yet nothing compares to the altercation between the Parisian crowd and fashions new enfant terrible of the season, Hedi Slimane. Within the space of a year, Slimane has already uprooted from Paris to his creative headquarters in Los Angeles, and entirely rebranded and renamed Yves Saint Laurent, dropping the houses namesake for Saint Laurent. In recently memory, only Alexander McQueen has ever managed to stir up a kind of rebellion that Slimane did with his California grunge collection this fall. He has shrugged off conceptual fashion quicker than an oversize cardigan in favour of anarchic glamour.


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Designers at Sydney Fashion Week have always excelled at turning out clothes that are resort-ready. But in recent years, they’ve diversified to include the likes of Romance Was Born whose shows are always theatrical spectacles. Newer names, such as Christopher Esber and Magdalena Velevska, are also proving that there’s much more to Australian fashion that a well-cut bikini. That’s why more and more fashionistas attend the shows down under. Stylish Taylor Tomasi Hill of Moda Operandi is one of them, giving her seal of approval by also wearing many Australian designers.

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You can always count on a cornucopia of ideas coming from Tokyo and, last season, Style. com’s Tim Blanks was suitably impressed by what he saw. Jenny Fax may not be Japanese but, together with her husband, designer Mikio Sakabe, she’s reinterpreting Japanese subculture in her own unique ways. G.V.G.V. while being more trend-led, never fail to impress with their straightto-the-point, cohesive collections. Anrealaģe are Tokyo’s answer to Viktor & Rolf.


INDUSTRY

FASHION WEEK INTERNATIONAL THE NEW STYLE CAPITALS

SEOUL STREET STYLE DOMINATION Fashion-hungry Seoul is not just a great street style destination, but also growing as a fashion capital, with an array of impressive boutiques. Lie Sang Bong is Korea’s biggest fashion designer, and he references the national culture with couturelevel craftsmanship. Steve J & Yoni P are more playful and whimsical, creating contemporary clothes that have a sense of humour and attract a lot of local celebrity fans.

Seoul SCANDI STYLE SHAKE UP Fashion-conscious Sweden is the birthplace of big global player Acne, as well as wellknown labels Filippa K and Cheap Monday. But it's the latest generation of young designers who are making waves, with Altewai.Saome, Nhu Duong and Hernández Cornet all creating striking collections that signal a shift away from the stereotypically minimal-but-cool Swedish aesthetic.

Stockholm


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industry

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the INFLUENCERS INDUSTRY FOLK WITH CAREERS WORTH CRAVING LEARN THE TRICKS OF THE TRADE


Kelly Sawyer Patricof THE CREATIVE DIRECTOR

How would you describe what you do? I’m the Creative Director at Satine, which means I handle most, if not all the marketing online. I’m very involved in the production of the brand. I work with a large promotional team and we discuss brand strategies and marketing possibilities. I also get to work alongside the art department when we shoot new campaigns for the next season.

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What do you consider to be your greatest achievement? Having my two girls. They’re both so adorable! Although I’m a workaholic nothing can stop me from seeing my children. Other than my personal life I’m pretty proud of what we’ve managed to achieve at Baby2Baby. I’m a co-president of the organisation, which seeks to benefit underprivileged children with guidance and support.

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What inspires you? California inspires me, the weather, the people; the laid-back attitude really is something special. It’s such an exciting place to live. I’m also addicted to fashion, anything from Isabel Marant or House of Harlow.

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How did you get started in the industry? I originally started out as a model funnily enough. I was actually born in the North of England, but my family relocated to Vancouver. I did a little travelling around Europe in my early twenties, renting the most hopeless of apartments in Paris and Milan. I eventually returned back to Canada and met my partner. He’s a producer from LA, so I relocated yet again. Then one evening at an event in LA I started talking with Jeannie Lee of The Covetur. She asked me out for lunch and we discussed business propositions because, at that time, I had no career prospects. She agreed to take me on at Satine, an online luxury label she’d just started and I guess the rest is history. I’ve worked my way up the ladder ever since.

california inspires me, the weather, the people, the laid back attitude

What advice would you give to others following in your footsteps? Don’t give up. But don’t set too many strict goals, life never turns out the way you plan it no matter how hard you try. I would never have thought I’d be in the position I’m in today; I was a model after all! Just take opportunities with both hands and never be afraid to try something different. Which five words sum you up? Proactive, stubborn, clumsy, workaholic, emotional.


ALICE TAYLOR THE CASTING DIRECTOR

How would you describe what you do? I do fashion casting, so the majority of that is working with models and some non-models. It’s often street casting to a brief. I put the pieces in the jigsaw. It’s not just about a face, it’s about a physique, a feeling, an attitude and an understanding. It’s about finding great people. The right casting can add another dimension to clothes.

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What do you consider to be your greatest achievement? I’ve been working on Alexander McQueen’s womenswear shows since 2002, the one that really sticks out is the last one we did with Lee, Plato’s Atlantis (SS/10) because it was so ambitious and he inspired us all so much. I also loved The Girl Who Lived in a Tree (AW/08). They’ve all been amazing. Working with Sarah Burton is also incredibly inspiring. I’ve also done Luella shows in London that I just thought were so pretty and beautiful. I loved working with Luella and really miss her presence in fashion.

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What inspires you? Paintings, musicians, architecture or costume: so many things. You can see someone and think, oh my God, that person looks like they should be in a Vermeer painting. You see people that the artist would have liked. I’d find it hard to book somebody who I didn’t like or didn’t get a feeling from. Is there anything you wish you had achieved but haven’t yet? I’ve already worked with such amazing people, designers, photographers, fellow creatives. I get very greedy and want it all, but I’ve achieved so much already. Which five words sum you up? Determined, calm, compassionate, intuitive, discerning.

How did you get started in the industry? My fist job was as a temp for a photographer’s agent while her assistant when on holiday, I was bout 17, and then she got me a job with the photographer Carrie Branovan who used to photograph a lot for The Face magazine and John Galliano. Then I went to a fashion show and was standing next to Sarah Doukas of Storm Models, I knew her from working in photography, and she said, “Oh, I’ll give you a job.”

i'd find it hard to book somebody who i didn't like or didn't get a feeling from


PHOTOGRAPHY DAVID URBANKE


DAVID URBANKE THE PHOTOGRAPHER

How would you describe what you do? Well its basic really. I pick up a camera and shoot. No, in all seriousness learning photography is not an easy task. You have to study lighting, aperture and contrast, then if you’re shooting street style you have to be on the ball. Every shot is so spontaneous. When I get commissioned for campaigns or editorials I can take my time, storyboard and surround myself with a team.

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What do you consider to be your greatest achievement? I got the chance to intern with Steven Meisel; I think we were working on a shoot for US Vogue. He needed my help setting up his equipment, and after the days end he let me take a few shots with his camera. Ok, so it’s not an achievement, but who else can say they used the great Steven Meisel’s camera? Not many I bet!

Is there anything you wish you had achieved but haven’t yet? Oh lots and lots and lots of things! I’m only young. My list is endless, but I’d really love to get commissioned for a big-name publication like V, Vogue or W magazine. Which five words sum you up? Creative, excitable, perceptive, greedy, flirty.

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What inspires you? The 80s. I have a penchant for anything from that decade. Punks, rebels, the music, even the fashion. Being a photographer I’m always inspired, even by just stepping out my own front door. You have to have that mindset if you want to be in my profession. I also find fashion very inspirational, as most people do. This season I managed to attend a lot of shows, and seeing the clothes up close and personal gives you such a different perspective of fashion.

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How did you get started in the industry? I used to take photographs for fun when I was younger. I’ve always been interested in cameras. My dad bought me my first Canon lens when I was 5 and I haven’t looked back. I guess my big break came when I was at New York Fashion Week. I applied as an intern to help document street style subjects and it just so happened that I bumped into the infamous Tommy Ton of Jak + Jil. He really liked my style of photography, which was a huge compliment, and he told me to continue to document everything I saw. I plucked up enough courage to interview at a photography agency, and thankfully they liked me. It was such a weight off my shoulders, but now I get commissions instead of having to search for work like some of my fellow photography friends.

wHO ELSE CAN SAY THEY USED THE GREAT STEVEN MEISEL'S CAMERA? NOT MANY I BET!


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BLOGGERATTI

THE RISE OF THE FIBRE-OPTIC STYLE SAYER

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If there were a blogger to be labeled by any other name, Yenny Seo of Studded Hearts would uphold the profession of being an art curator. Her blog hosts some of the most stunningly visualised images on the internet. Yenny is somewhat of a taste-maker, the Australian started her blog in the summer of 2009 and has gained a serious following of art lovers and fashionistas in her wake.

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WEBSITE:

5inchandup.blogspot.co.uk

BLOGLOVIN: 40K FACEBOOK FANS: 11.5K

WEBSITE: studded-hearts.com BLOGLOVIN: 32.7K FACEBOOK FANS: 4.9K

An alumni of the London College of Fashion, Finnish born Sandra Hagelstam’s effortless street-chic style transcends a following across continents. She’s a total ‘It’ girl worldwide. Her blog, 5 Inch and Up showcases an obsessive penchant for shoes, all kinds of shoes. And opens up a world of girlish style tips and tricks. What’s 5 Inch and Up all about? It’s kind of like my own personal lookbook. At the start my initial intention was just to document what outfits I wore as a kind of a style log. But then the site developed and my following increased dramatically. I don’t really know how it happened but I guess people just like to look at beautiful clothes. I studied fashion design and marketing at school which definitely gave me the tools to be more business savvy with the way I interact with my fans.

What’s Studded Hearts all about? My blog is going to be four this year! I’ve been doing Studded Hearts since June 2009; I almost can’t believe it’s been How is Scandi style different to that long. I think people read my blog London? because I try to curate a wide range of I think in London you can just be a lot interests, like an art consultant creating crazier with your style choices. Everyone an exhibition. My blog is there for the there is so creative, attending a public to peruse, it can be scary fashion school meant I at times, because you don’t was surrounded by likeHAVING AN ONLINE know what feedback you’ll minded people all the receive, but I’ve been doing OUTLET ALLOWS JUST time. I made an effort this long enough to not get everyday to show off ABOUT ANYONE TO affected by bad comments. I my own personal style. CREATE THEIR OWN have been very lucky in that In Finland we’re much a lot of exciting things in my CYBER WORLD THAT IS more conservative, still life have come as the result chic, but definitely on FILLED WITH AS MUCH of running Studded Hearts. the opposite style scale JUNK AS YOU WISH of London. I enjoy the What is the best thing parallels though; much about blogging? of what makes Finland a style The freedom it gives you. Having an capital in its own right influences online outlet allows just about anyone to my sartorial choices. create their own cyber world that can be filled with as much junk as you wish. I What opportunities have come study at the moment, but blogging gives your was as a result of blogging? me a different perspective of the creative Diesel approached me to be part of their industry. When my followers give me design team to re-vamp their brand. feedback, regardless of some of the bad Of course, blogging didn’t instantly get press, it ensures me that I’m blogging for me such a big gig, but combined with a reason. And if people want to share my degree and previous internships I my everyday thoughts then I let them. managed to make my voice heard by the big brand executives. I’ve also been given Why are bloggers important to the the opportunity to attend fashion week industry? and meet some incredibly talented people. I think they provide a voice for the The clothes are just an added bonus! big industry heavyweights to listen to. Everything you work for and THE TWITTER BATTLE. WHO HAS MORE FOLLOWERS? 5 INCH AND UP WINS! gain through blogging is down to determination, success doesn’t come #5.1K TWITTER FOLLOWERS instantly. Bloggers project the image that no matter who you are, you can be successful in what you’re interested in. #12.3K TWITTER FOLLOWERS


THE TWITTER BATTLE ROUND 2. KARLA'S CLOSET WINS BY A LANDSLIDE!

#14.8K TWITTER FOLLOWERS

#21.3K TWITTER FOLLOWERS

Californian based Karla Deras has dominated the online style stakes of late. A merchandising student at FIDM, Karla utilises her self-taught fashion knowledge to combine heritage fashion with cutting edge designer brands, sending street style photographers dizzy with the sheer experimentalism. What’s Karla’s Closet all about? I originally wanted to start a blog about music, but I wasn’t that great at discussing my favourite bands! It slowly morphed into a style blog because fashion to me felt more natural. It’s a journal of sorts; I wear and write whatever I like. I used to think I had to be an editor and write perfect posts but after a while I started to despise blogging, instead I’ve learnt to be more spontaneous.

21-year-old Swedish beauty, Angelica Blick is often referred to as one of the most inspiring bloggers to come out of Scandinavia. Her unique blog spans many fashion influences and champions the art of street style as an important factor in the way people dress today. What’s Nyheter24 all about? I began my blog in August 2009 and kept it as a diary of day-to-day events in my life. I’ve always been interested in fashion and experimenting with different styles, and then one day my best friend, who was studying photography at the time, decided to take a snap of me and post it on his website. The image got so many hits and comments. Isn’t it amazing how clothes can make people react like that? My website today focuses on personal style, and I still use the same photographer who technically gave me my first big break in the blogging world.

What are your style influences? I love the seventies. The silhouettes of that decade really suit my figure. Farrah IF WEARING Fawcett is one on my What is your opinion SOMETHING many style inspirations; I of the bad press style love her carefree attitude REALLY AWKWARD bloggers are receiving to style. Though I can’t from the industry? MAKES YOU FEEL say I’ve ever attempted I don’t wear heels and a to wear my hair like COMFORTABLE THEN tutu to go and grab coffee her! I also love the great so people can stare at me; I THAT'S WHAT YOU Debbie Harry of Blondie. wear my style because that’s She really introduced SHOULD DO what I feel comfortable in. women’s sex appeal to If wearing something really the masses. I tend to awkward and strange makes you feel identify with strong female characters, comfortable, then that’s what you should which influence both my girlish and sexy do. The industry are always going to be approach to dressing. I also love looking subjective regarding what people outside at other fashion bloggers, like Cupcakes of their exclusive clichés are doing. and Cashmere and Fashiontoast. Those ladies inspire the content that projects How does vintage fashion onto my blog for my followers to see. influence your style? What’s great about vintage is that you How has blogging affected you? can take something completely oversize It has taught me to be a more open and and alter it to fit your body. You get to well-balanced person. I’m no longer dress up in so many different eras and shy of new opportunities anymore experience wearing something that and that’s all thanks to meeting others people before you have cherished. I love in my realm of work that feel the D.I.Y too. Thrift shops and flea markets same way about fashion that I do. have so much selection. It’s like being in Forever 21, only the clothes smell a little funkier and the prices are even cheaper!

WEBSITE: nyheter24.se/modette/ angelicablick/ BLOGLOVIN: 17.4K FACEBOOK FANS: 4.5K

WEBSITE: karlascloset.com BLOGLOVIN: 119.9K FACEBOOK FANS: 35.2K


ALEXANDER WANG

SAINT LAURENT

FENDI VICTORIA BACKHAM

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VALENTINO

A MILLION FACES WHAT'S IT LIKE TO WEAR IT FIRST? Words | Sam Rollinson

I

The fashion industry can be so fickle about age, being 18 now gives me roughly seven more years in the industry, eight at a push. You’re practically retired at 25 but I’m hoping to go to University once modeling has quietened down. I’m also pretty frugal, some of my model friends splash the cash whenever a paycheck rolls in. I mean, I’ve occasionally splurged on a pair of Balenciaga The following year I landed my first big boots here, and a Miu Miu tote there, break at Burberry. I’ve always admired what but I intend on saving up for my future. Christopher Bailey has done to the brand, and being a Yorkshireman himself he made me I don’t know if the models of today are nearly feel right at home. As a teenager it can be very as powerful as the supermodels of the 80s. daunting to stand in front of a camera and Cindy, Christy, Linda and Eva, those girls bare to the whole world well, in this case the had it all. I’m just trying to do my job, when photographer, your soul. But after three years I look in the mirror I don’t see a model, or a in the business it’s safe to say I’m an old pro. diva at that. I’m just a regular Yorkshire lass grew up in Yorkshire, a long way from the world’s fashion capitals. I didn’t really know what fashion was at that time, and when I was scouted at 14 my parents couldn’t be more skeptic. You hear stories all the time of these young girls being duped out of thousands of pounds by bogus model agents, but luckily for me, that wasn’t the case.

that likes tea and cross stitch (trust me it comes in handy when waiting for long hours on set). I’ll never forget my first London shows. To walk for great homegrown talent like J.W. Anderson and Erdem gave me such a feeling of pride. Though slightly less hard work and slightly overly dramatic, being on that runway and completing my walk felt like winning a gold medal for my country. I like to think of the runway as a very short stage performance. When a designer gives you a certain personality to portray you have to live up to their expectations, one day it can be sexy, the other moody (which isn’t such a stretch being a model you know). The novelty and hype during a fashion show will never wear off for me I don't think. It’s too much of a buzz to give up.


§ THE AGENCIES

CHRISTOPHER KANE

I’ve worn some fantastic and outrageous items in my short career so far. This season was a real stamina test. Probably my favourite show was Miu Miu. Miuccia is such a visionary. She dressed me in this wild pink polka dot dress that featured a zipper all the way down. I felt very Wicked Witch of the West that day, as did the other models at the show. I think being part of the Chanel show this year will go down in history as one of my career highlights. Karl, though quiet and reserved, is a very friendly man unlike what the press makes him out to be. In the pre-show rehearsals we had to navigate our way around a giant globe set piece and I remember tripping at the steps heading up to the platform, thankfully this didn’t repeat on the actual day!

When you walk in such a big show space like that you realise just how dominant the fashion industry really is. You literally have thousands of eyes pin-pointed on you, and its your job to sell that garment, whether it be a high street brand like my recent campaign for Zara or walking in the most glamorous of shows in Paris. All I know is, fashion picked me. Otherwise I wouldn’t be where I am today. It’s a blessing to be working with amazingly talent people, and I’ve met some of my best friends along the way. Models are privileged to be one of the first audiences the clothes have and I’m grateful to be in a career that allows me to dress up for the day. I just hope this magical journey will go on.

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Select Model Management London Women Management New York Women Paris Women Milan


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CATWALK CONFIDENTIAL

FASHION? HOW DOES IT TWEET? WE'VE DONE A ROUND UP FROM THE FRONT ROW

@LibertyLndnGirl The Proenza Schouler collection said everything that a fashion show should say now #NYFW

Alexander FURY'S LFW CONFESSIONAL

@jesshallettcast Magazines will pull in this #Rodarte collection because it’s going to look great in print #NYFW #Punk

@AlexanderFury @WEARESIBLING do one thing and they do it better than anyone else. They push their technique #LFW

@SHOWstudio Matthew Williamson gives us a glimpse into @MWWorld w/ his upbeat 'Fashion Mix', feat. Grace Jones, Grimes & more

@AlexanderFury It’s kind of seventies nipple colour, perhaps spanked flesh pink? #JonathanSaunders #LFW

@katiebarontweet Still transfixed by amazing leather @UnaBurke_Design pieces. Think samurai-Victoriana / fetish armour. Go See

@AlexanderFury I don’t want to look like an eighteen year old wearing purple frilly socks in East London #LFW

@osmanstudio What I find is some designers love exhibitions, some don’t engage with them at all #PFW

@AlexanderFury It’s very unnerving when you’re unpicking references from your own suburban past #LFW #nineties

@Brixsmithstart A part of me loves the fact that the @YSL collection put the cat among the pigeons #PFW

@AlexanderFury I’m not a massive Meadham Kirchhoff fan but their show was one of the best I saw in London #LFW

@HilaryAlexander Saint Laurent did bikers in the 60’s, maybe Slimane was not totally off the mark. #roundups @JessicaBumpus: #Prada played into its archetypal looks, looking into its archive but I loved the disheveled-ness @susiebubble I have a feeling that the BFC will instil some changes to encourage people to come to #LFW

TWEETCLOUD § Janelle Burger @janelleburgers / Artist

@AlexanderFury When you’re annoying the conservative majority, you know you're doing something right #LFW

TWEETCLOUD § Sam Rollinson @SamRollinson / Model

@emmaelwickbates In London people don’t worry about the taste barometer as much #LFW @TallulahHarlech: @victoriabeckham asks for help and direction from the powers that be, it shows humility #NYFW @katiebarontweet @victoriabeckham was an autobiographical collection, it’s an evolution of how she is progressing @harrywalker1 I think texture was used in New York to glamorise the clothes but also make it more modern #NYFW @katiebarontweet @marcjacobs collection was revealing the secrets of suburbia, none intimidating #NYFW @cjohnsonhill The way the set allows the models to walk in and out provides a great rhythm #PFW @LouisVuitton @mrsjackiedixon It takes a huge amount confidence to show 10 looks at Alexander McQueen @WorldMcQueen #PFW @LouStoppard I love Karl Lagerfeld’s self aware narcissim, he would print a bag with his face on it #CHANEL #PFW @fashionlala As much as @CHANEL is targeting the youth, she is the symbol of being a women #PFW @cjohnsonhill If it wasn’t for the hair and the make-up the show could be by a different designer #PFW #Givenchy @sustfashion Humberto Leon and Carol Lim honour what he stood for, they’ve moved it on @kenzo_paris #PFW


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THE ACCESSORIES INDEX

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LIKE YOUR VERY OWN VIRTUAL WARDROBE

FUTURISTIC EYEWEAR Sports-inspired looks filtered all the way down to eyewear for AW13, with goggle-like frames fusing sports and futuristic styles. From structured visors to extreme cat’s-eye lenses, the frames of choice were ultra-modern and super cool. 1. Fendi 2. Carven 3. Erdem 4. Nicholas K THE STATEMENT NECK CHAIN Necklaces moved on from last season, breaking away from delicate festival chains as designers opted for long, chunky or beaded versions decorated with oversized pendants which hung to the waist. Pendants ranged from stars to crosses and insects, all in embellished metals. Chains, worn layered together, drew on the punk-grunge look of the season. 1. Dolce & Gabbana. 2. Lanvin 3. Nicole Miller THE ACTIVE BELT The active belt, a key item on the men’s catwalks appeared on the fall runways as sports luxe looks continued to influence and update tailoring and formalwear. From bungee straps to metallic side-release buckles and D-ring fastenings, this modern utility belt brings a contemporary edge to outerwear. 1. Givenchy. 2. Miu Miu 3. Monclear Gamme Rouge 4. Jean-Charles de Castelbajac


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THE ACCESSORIES INDEX

MARY JANES The classic Mary Jane is updated for the new season with chunky heels, double or triple straps and peep-toe details offering a new twist on the ultra-feminine style sitting within the flirtatious Fifties trend. 1. Christopher Kane 2. Rochas 3. John Rocha 4. Dolce & Gabbana THE FLAT LOAFER The flat loafer has had huge commercial success over the past few seasons, becoming the go-to flat shoe of choice. For AW13 the flat has been updated in new fabrics and decoration, with studding, heel embellishment, chunky cleated soles, glitter finishes, ponyskin and suede injecting a luxe finish. 1. No21 2. Rag & Bone 3. Thakoon

SOFT CLUTCHES Designers moved away from the classic structured bags as soft, slouched silhouettes come into play on the fall runways. Oversized and small clutches appeared in neoprene, soft leather and wool, with drawstring detailing to pull them in or simply soft enough to fold up or scrunch, creating an easy-to-use and casual daywear bag. 1. CĂŠline 2. Burberry Prorsum 3. Marc Jacobs 4. DKNY


Stlyeyes

O N L I N E

www.styleyesuk.com ยง Catwalk Coverage Revisit aw13 with extensive coverge of all the major shows, from new york, london, milan and paris ยง Show Archive Delve back seasons past, want to READ the menswear reviews? no problem! ยง Styleyes Notices VISIT OUR TUMBLR PAGE FOR INSIGHT INTO THE NEWEST FASHION ILLUSTRATORS AROUND ยง Digital ACCESS THE NEW ISSUE OF STYLEYES ONLINE Smartphone App Coming Soon


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AW13

LOOKBOOK Christopher Kane

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AW13


Lanvin


Marni


Fendi


Saint Laurent


Salvatore Ferragamo


Alexander Wang


J.W.Anderson


Michael Kors


Louis Vuitton


Marc Jacobs


Peter Pilotto


Dior


Prabal Gurung


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AW13

F A R E W E L L

D E A R

UNTIL NEXT SEASON

R E A D E R S


Styleyes Autumn/Winter 2013  

The Season of Change

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