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MEET A FEW OF OUR

While The University of Alabama is known for its legendary success in athletics, we have many other legends who are making their mark nationally and internationally in other areas. These are just a few of our legendary alumni.

AUTHORS

Harper Lee To Kill a Mockingbird

Winston Groom Forrest Gump

Kathryn Stockett The Help

Gay Talese Honor Thy Father

Mark Childress Crazy in Alabama

Ann Waldron Eudora Welty: A Writer’s Life

Nan Boden Head of Global Tech Partners Google

Chris Emerson President Airbus Helicopters

Sam DiPiazza Chairman Mayo Clinic

Vicki Hollub President/CEO Occidental Petroleum

John Hendricks Founder Discovery Channel

Thom Rainer Retired President and CEO LifeWay Christian Resources

Jimmy Wales Co-founder Wikipedia

Janet Gurwitch Co-founder Laura Mercier Cosmetics

Sonequa Martin-Green The Walking Dead, Star Trek: The Discovery

Michael Luwoye Hamilton (Broadway)

Rece Davis ESPN anchor and host

Michael Emerson Lost, Person of Interest

BUSINESS LEADERS

Marillyn Hewson Chairman/President/CEO Lockheed Martin

Bruce Culpepper Retired President Shell Oil

ENTREPRENEURS

Millard Fuller Founder Habitat for Humanity

Joe Gibbs Co-founder Golf Channel

STAGE AND SCREEN

Sela Ward Emmy Award-winning actress

Jim Nabors The Andy Griffith Show

#

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ABOUT THIS YEAR’S COLLEGE GUIDE

The MacLaurin Buildings at Boston MIT, Boston, Mass.

Flip through the pages and find information about featured schools large and small, urban, rural and suburban, across the United States, plus important tips for making the most of your college experience.

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CONTENTS STUDENT LOANS 101

18 Above and Beyond

Get schooled on how to best choose and manage your education costs. PAGE 14

24 Slay Your Essay

4 Deadline Guide 7 Post-Secondary School Paths

22 Identifying Stressors

STUDY ABROAD

10 Digital Degrees

Studying abroad can offer lessons beyond the classroom. PAGE 26

16 Time Management

28 Scores Matter

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INTERNSHIPS

JUNIOR JOURNEY

4-YEAR GRADUATION

OUR GUARANTEES Florida Southern College goes beyond the conventional college experience, guaranteeing each student an internship, a travel-study experience, and graduation in four years. These signature opportunities, combined with our devoted faculty and stunning historic campus, create a college experience unlike any other.

flsouthern.edu/guarantees


Deadline Guide

Follow this schedule to keep your college search on track

C

hoosing a college can be overwhelming, and once you’ve started your search there are a few key deadlines to keep in mind. Here are priorities for your checklist and calendar:

ADVANCE PLANNING JUNIOR YEAR

may seem obvious, but be sure that each school offers the degree program(s) you are interested in pursuing. • Schedule trips to visit each campus. While the summer may be more convenient for you to do this, the optimal time is during the college school year so that you can get a better feel for the campus culture.

FALL

• If you have not already done so, compile a list of colleges that interest you. It 4

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WINTER/SPRING • If you plan to take the SAT, take the

PSAT first in October. If you’re taking the ACT route, look into the PreACT to help you prepare. SAT and ACT tests are offered multiple times throughout the year. Take either test once as a junior; then, retake it in the fall of your senior year, if necessary, to improve your score. • Narrow your initial list of colleges to the ones you are most interested in attending. • Research scholarship opportunities.

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TIP

• Meet with your guidance counselor, who will help you stay on track and ensure you create a calendar that helps you keep track of deadlines. • By September, you should have a final list of colleges to which to apply. The number may vary, depending on how much you want to spend on application fees (the average fee in 2019 was $43 per school). Your list should include two safety schools, two or three good-fit schools and one or two reach schools. • Request letters of recommendation and work on your essays for colleges and scholarships. • If you are retaking the SAT or ACT, do so no later than December. Have your scores sent directly to the colleges you want to attend. Applications for scholarships are also due around this time. • File the Free Application for Federal

Student Aid (FAFSA) as early as Oct. 1. The earlier date allows you more time to prepare your finances and gives colleges more time to prepare financial aid packages.

WINTER/SPRING • Most regular-admission applications are due in December or January. • College acceptance letters and financial aid offers generally arrive in April. Review and compare financial aid offers with your parents or guardians to determine which school is offering the best deal. If you’ve done your research, there shouldn’t be too many surprises in the financial aid packages. • Most schools have enrollment deadlines of May 1. Let the college you’ve chosen know you’re coming and make any necessary deposits. College Factual (collegefactual.com) is a website that helps guide students through the collegeselection process.

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It’s important to stay on top of deadlines because you will need to juggle studying for tests (high school and standardized) with completing applications for colleges and scholarships.

SENIOR YEAR

FALL

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Post-Secondary Paths Not all roads lead to a four-year college

D

eciding the right course of action for your soon-to-be graduate can be tough. Weighing the cost of higher education, the job market and cost of living, families are thoughtfully considering their options. Here are four to consider:

COMMUNITY COLLEGE

—Emily Eileen Carter

TRADE SCHOOL

Four-year institutions aren’t for everyone. With college costs rising and a nationwide skills shortage in the manual arts, many find trade school an attractive option. Experts expect some 3 million job openings in the skilled trades by 2028. Trade school averages $33,000 in total, according to DegreeQuery.com,

while four years of tuition and fees at a typical state college average $39,880. Starting salaries, meanwhile, don’t vary by much. A general electrician earns about $57,350 a year, and a welder earns more than $40,000 for entry-level positions. That’s not far from the $49,700 starting salary of the average college grad. Still, trade school has its down sides. “Those considering trade school may also have to battle the negative stereotypes that are still out there about blue-collar work,” says Mark C. Perna, author of Answering Why: Unleashing Passion, Purpose, and Performance in Younger Generations. Also, some may not be temperamentally suited to manual work. “It’s important to understand your personal preferences before committing to a program of any kind.”

For some employers, trade school graduates are a must-have.

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When deciding if a student is ready for a four-year college, it’s important to look at his or her motivation and academic preparedness. “If a student has struggled academically and does not express interest or aspirations to attend a four-year university, then they may want to consider a community college-university transfer option,” says Tom Brasier, vice president of student services for Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College in North Carolina. “This option allows the student to build their academic skills, improve their grade-point average and seek career guidance so they can best determine the right major choice and then start the university search process.”

He notes that students may find their career path while studying at a community college. There is also a financial benefit. “The amount of savings a student can have during a two-year cycle at a community college versus starting at a university can add up to over $20,000,” Brasier says. “Community colleges also afford students the benefit of residing with family to save money, flexible course options and career exploration services for students who are undecided on a career path and/or who are looking for a new career path and/or retraining.”

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post-high school options, placing more responsibility on students who are expected to challenge themselves to reach their own personal and academic goals with less assistance from professors or instructors. Also, tuition costs and fees vary from state to state. Out-of-state students’ tuition cost can increase exponentially. These costs can be lowered through financial aid, loans and scholarships. A state college or university may be the quintessential choice for a student who is responsible and flourishes academically within small student groups and also independently.

As CEO of manufacturing company WCCO Belting in Wahpeton, N.D., Tim Shorma depends on trade school graduates to keep production moving. “The hardest thing is to find people who like to do things with their hands, people who can roll up their sleeves and do hard mechanical skills: twist a wrench, drill something,” he says. “The majority of our jobs don’t need a four-year degree.” — Adam Stone

STATE SCHOOL OR UNIVERSITY

Unless pursuing an associate degree at a community college, many students choose to attend universities for four-year degrees. The standard university includes a variety of colleges and schools such as business, liberal arts and sciences, engineering, education, music and science, among other things. 8

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These institutions also offer graduate degrees in fields such as medicine, law, business and more. Students who attend state colleges and universities are given less oneon-one instruction from a professor, as lessons are often lecture-based. Collaboration with other students is widely encouraged, according to scholarships.com, a financial aid and scholarship research resource. And most are financially supported by state government. State schools and universities generally have a larger population of undergraduates compared with private institutions and other

Liberals arts schools are four-year universities that offer an undergraduate education across subjects related to the humanities such as history, the sciences, philosophy, music and art. The wide variety of curriculums offered at these institutions allows for students to develop a stronger appreciation for learning. Students who attend liberal arts colleges are given more one-onone instruction due to smaller class sizes and overall intellectual enhancement. These schools focus on discussion-based education as opposed to lecturing. A liberal arts college allows students to acquire broad knowledge, instead of focusing solely on a particular field. This method of instruction allows students to explore different career paths with more flexibility. These schools can be more expensive than other post-high school options. Liberal arts colleges tend to cost more than $40,000 in tuition and fees each year. But don’t let the prices deter you. Available need-based financial aid and scholarships from these institutions can significantly lower the actual cost of attendance. Liberal arts colleges may be an ideal option for a student who thrives in environments that foster a more flexible method of learning. Kaycee Hubbard is a sophomore majoring in digital and print journalism at the University of North Texas.

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LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE


A beautiful campus. Inspiring professors. Amazing friends. My Radford experience. - Fiona Scruggs ’19

Responsive. Resilient. Real. www.radford.edu


Digital Degrees Is an online education right for you?

T

aking college classes online gives you the flexibility to do coursework when it’s convenient for you. That can be very appealing, especially for those with full-time jobs or who might have family responsibilities to balance with their studies. But working toward a degree or certificate — or just taking a few

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classes — in this untraditional setting isn’t for everyone. Here’s what experts say you should consider if you’re thinking about this option:

WHAT’S YOUR LEARNING STYLE?

Online students need to be selfmotivated and organized to keep on top of their studies.

“Even though we have a great deal of support for our students and really try to foster as much success as possible, when it all comes down to it, an online student has to be a little bit more of an independent learner,” says Chris Foley, associate vice president and director of online education at Indiana University. It’s unlikely that you will bump into peers on campus or have the

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BY AMY SINATRA AYRES


opportunity to stop by the professor’s office after class, so that makes it especially important to be willing to ask for help, says Margaret Oakar, associate director for admissions services and financial aid for Penn State World Campus. Still, Evangeline J. Tsibris Cummings, assistant provost and director of UF Online, University of Florida, notes that while it’s helpful for students to be adaptable, “gone are the days of one-size-fits-all programs … a variety of learners may be able to find an online program that suits their unique needs.”

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DO YOU HAVE THE TIME?

Often, online students are balancing a lot of demands, so they need to think carefully about how to carve out time to dedicate to their studies. “Online learning makes sense for them because they can’t physically come to a campus or it would just take up too much of their time,” Oakar says. “A big consideration is … where am I going to fit this extra time in my schedule each week?

Because it is quite a commitment.” She says Penn State’s online students report spending 10 to 12 hours per week on one three-credit course. While most programs don’t require a specific time that you need to be online, you will likely have structured deadlines and requirements for interacting with classmates or your instructor.

IS IT A QUALITY PROGRAM?

You’re making a big investment, so do your research to make sure the institution you’re considering is respected. Potential students should ask, “What is the quality of the degree?” says Foley. “How much does my employer or my potential employer respect this institution? What kind of references will I get out of this? How

The right size. The right setting. The right value. UMW’s the right place to make things happen.

MADE FOR

THIS Fredericksburg, VA

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much networking will I have available to me?” Check out the faculty, too. “Do your homework to find out where the experts in your field work, conduct research, actively teach students and shape the curriculum,” Cummings says. “It’s important not to just look for specific courses but find out who teaches.” Oakar recommends researching the school’s accreditation and investigating how its credits would transfer to another institution. She also suggests asking for a sample syllabus, a demonstration of the learning management system you’d be working in and talking with students about their experience.

HOW CAN YOU PAY FOR IT?

Students “need to understand the cost of the program,” taking into account any transfer credit and fees, Foley says. “I would also want to make sure that the institution is making a commitment to get me through the degree in my timeline.” Online learners are often older, and therefore being able to put their degree to use quickly is especially important, he notes. Like a traditional program, online students can apply for financial aid and should make sure they understand the difference between a loan and a grant. “Attending college is one of the biggest investments you’re going to make, and you want to feel comfortable that a school you’re considering takes that seriously,” Oakar says.

Another financial aspect you might need to factor in is the cost of computer equipment. You’ll need high-speed internet access and should check with the colleges to find out what platforms their systems work on, Oakar says, but a laptop or desktop would be best. Students should be comfortable with using technology, especially email and word processing programs, and should ask the school about the tech support they offer. “We offer a 24/7 tech support and some places do that and other places don’t,” says Oakar. “If you’re having students that are working at 2:30 in the morning, that might be when they need some technical support.” 12

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DO YOU HAVE THE RIGHT EQUIPMENT?


SALISBURY A Maryland University of National Distinction

The quality of a private campus with the affordability of a public university. Academic Excellence

Offering 60 distinct programs within four endowed schools, SU is one of those rare universities that celebrates individual talents and encourages big ideas.

National Recognition

SU consistently ranks among the nation’s best in U.S. News & World Report and The Princeton Review. On the field, the Sea Gulls have won 20 NCAA Division III team national championships.

Accomplished Alumni

Nearly 50,000 graduates are taking the lead in the boardroom, the lab, the legislature and even on Broadway. SU helps put students’ education to work, supporting job searches and graduate school applications.

To find out how Salisbury University is the right — and affordable — fit for you, visit www.salisbury.edu

Beautiful Campus

Home to 8,700 students from 32 states and 66 countries, the University, a national arboretum, is situated between the Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay.

www.salisbury.edu

SU is an Equal Opportunity/AA/Title IX university and provides reasonable accommodation given sufficient notice to the University office or staff sponsoring the event or program.


Student Loans 101

Get schooled on how to best choose and manage your education costs BY ANNA HELHOSKI

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1

Opt for federal loans before private ones

There are two main loan types: federal and private. Get federal loans first by completing the FAFSA. They’re preferable because you don’t need credit history to qualify, and federal loans have income-driven repayment plans and forgiveness that private loans don’t. You may be offered two types of federal loans: subsidized and unsubsidized. Subsidized loans — for students with financial need — don’t build interest while you’re in school. Unsubsidized loans do. Take a private loan only after maxing out federal aid.

2

Borrow only what you need — and can reasonably repay

Undergraduate students can borrow up to $12,500 annually and $57,500 total in federal student loans. Private loan borrowers are limited to the cost of attendance — tuition, fees, room and board, books, transportation and personal expenses — minus financial aid you don’t have to pay back. Plan to borrow an amount that will keep your payments at around 10 percent of your projected after-tax monthly income. If you expect to earn an annual salary of $50,000, your student loan payments shouldn’t be more than $279 a month, which means you can borrow about $26,000 at current rates.

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he summer before your freshman year in college means choosing classes, checking out your future roommate’s Instagram and figuring out how you’re going to pay for your education. Chances are you will need a loan: 2 out of 3 students have debt when they leave school, according to 2017 graduate data from the Institute for College Access and Success. Many consider loans a last resort after applying for grants, scholarships and work-study. You can get these by submitting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Here are six things you need to know about getting your first student loan:


3

You’ll pay fees and interest on the loan

You’re going to owe more than the amount you borrowed because of loan fees and interest. Federal loans require that you pay a loan fee, or a percentage of the total loan amount. The current loan fee for direct student loans for undergraduates is 1.062 percent. You’ll also pay interest that accrues daily on your loan and will be added to the total amount you owe when repayment begins. Federal undergraduate loans currently have a 5.05 percent fixed rate, but it changes each year. Private lenders will use your credit history or your co-signer’s to determine your rate.

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After you agree to the loan, your school will handle the rest

Your loan will be paid out to the school after you sign a master promissory note agreeing to repay. “All the money is going to be sent through and processed through the financial aid office — whether it’s a federal loan or a private loan — and applied to the student’s account,” says Joseph Cooper, director of the Student Financial Services

What You Need to Know About Adelphi University Big enough to give you choices, small enough to feel like home

at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina. You can use it for transportation, groceries, studyabroad costs, personal supplies or off-campus housing.

6

Center at Michigan Technical University in Houghton, Mich. Then, students are refunded leftover money to use for other expenses.

5

You can use loan money only for certain things

Loan money can be used for educationrelated expenses only. “It’s specifically for educational purposes: books, clothing, anything that is specifically tied to the pursuit of education,” says Robert Muhammad, director of the office of scholarships and financial aid

96%

of our students have jobs or are in grad school within six months of graduation.

Find out who your servicer is and when payments begin

If you take federal loans, your debt will be turned over to a student loan servicer contracted by the federal government to manage loan payments. If you have private loans, your lender may be your servicer, or it may similarly transfer you to another company. Find your servicer while you’re still in school and ask any questions before your first bill arrives, says John Falleroni, senior associate director of financial aid at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. They’re also whom you’ll talk to if you have trouble making payments in the future. When you leave school, you have a six-month grace period before the first bill arrives. Anna Helhoski is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a USA TODAY content partner providing personal finance and general news and commentary from around the web.

58 countries represented

60-plus programs of study for undergrads

98.9%

of full-time incoming first-year students received some kind of financial aid last year.

states represented

21

Average class size Our main campus in Garden City is less than a one-hour train ride from Manhattan.

41 World-class faculty

Let’s see what the experts say. We are ranked a Best College nationwide and among the Best Value Schools in the 2019 U.S. News & World Report rankings. Recognized by Money magazine for excellence in Educational Quality, Affordability, and Alumni Earnings. Named a Best College in the Northeast by Princeton Review.

Connect with your enrollment counselor: Adelphi.edu/Counselors Untitled-2 1

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Time Management Smart strategies for college-bound students BY KYNDALL HUBBARD

USE A CALENDAR OR PLANNER

This is the first step in keeping track of your commitments. Your schedule can 16

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be as detailed or as general as you would like, but at the very least it should include important recurring events, such as classes, jobs and extracurriculars. Some smartphones even have useful calendar features that determine travel time to locations and send reminders to leave, helping you be punctual and responsible.

GOOD STUDY HABITS ARE KEY

Setting a study schedule sounds unnecessary, but you will be glad you did when finals week rolls around. Studying doesn’t have to be tedious and can be as painless as reviewing your notes every night for 30 minutes. You will retain more information by studying consistently over a period

of time instead of cramming. Study effectively by limiting your distractions and putting your phone away. Remember to take breaks. By the time it’s exam week, you will feel confident and prepared.

DON’T OVEREXTEND YOURSELF

As soon as you arrive on campus, you will be bombarded with opportunities to participate in student activities, clubs and work-study groups. Choose your activities carefully. Consider a couple of organizations and only join more once you’ve settled into college life. You may have the energy to juggle several commitments at the beginning of the semester, but you will eventually find that

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ou are about to begin a new chapter in your life where you will have the freedom to make most of your own decisions. The flexibility and independence might be liberating for a while, but you will soon find that to effectively manage your time, you need structure and organization. How you manage your time will determine your success in college. Here are a few tips I gained in my first year to help the transition run smoothly:


TIP Tackle Your Time • Create a to-do list and stick to it • Get enough sleep • Eat well • Exercise • Avoid distractions • Only do one thing at a time • Tackle small tasks first • Enjoy your newfound freedom

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SOURCE: PURDUE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

you are more interested in one or two rather than five or six. Pace yourself. Be selective with your involvements so that you can dedicate your best effort to your responsibilities and not compromise your physical, emotional and mental health.

GET SUFFICIENT SLEEP

Instead of scrolling on social media

before bed, get extra sleep. One sleepless night may start a continuous cycle of long midday naps and late nights, putting you in a constant state of catch-up. A good night’s sleep will give you the energy to effectively manage your time during the day, so you can complete your work without taking “power” naps that will keep you up at night.

EXERCISE

If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed, go for a walk. Take a break from your studies to hit the refresh button and unload some of the stress. Exercise is also a great mind-booster. Kyndall Hubbard is a sophomore at the University of Missouri, majoring in journalism.

A VIBRANT CAMPUS. A THRIVING CITY. Discover the person you can become at Lipscomb University, a place that will challenge your ideas, welcome your curiosity and nurture your faith. It makes a difference where you end up.

COME SEE FOR YOURSELF.

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Above and Beyond Is graduate school for you?

P

ursuing a master’s or doctorate degree can consume your life, and likely your savings. Before applying, think carefully about your return on investment. Of those who complete an undergraduate degree, only 1 in 3 will go on to obtain a graduate degree. Undergrads are bombarded with reasons they should consider a graduate program: You will be more employable; your 18

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future salary will be higher; you will find personal fulfillment through the rigor of advanced academia; you will make important contributions to society through your research and expertise. But not everyone is cut out for graduate school. And graduate school is not the only path to achieving the aforementioned benefits. Career counselors, professors and university administrators who’ve had

the opportunity to observe hundreds of students move through graduate school and into the workforce suggest that those considering an advanced degree thoroughly and thoughtfully examine their potential choices. Kip Wheeler, a professor of literature at Carson-Newman University in Tennessee, says it starts with examining your motivations for pursuing graduate school. “Why do you really want to go

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At MHU, our value comes from engaging experiences on campus, a challenging curriculum in the classroom, and a location in western North Carolina that inspires greatness.

www.mhu.edu

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Education that moves mountains

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CAREER FIELDS

HIGHER EDUCATION Examples of workforce options that typically require graduate-level degrees:

to graduate school? Is it because you enjoy the idea of being considered smart? Because you’ve been in school so long, you aren’t sure about any other options? Those might not be the best motivations for seeking a degree.” He also stresses that casual interest in an area of academia may not be sufficient reason to make the leap. “I often tell my students that graduate school isn’t for people who enjoy a topic — it’s for people who are obsessed with a topic. Graduate students who thrive are the ones who can focus on a single problem for months or years because they feel a compulsion to explore it or solve it systematically.”

CONSIDER COSTS

sales agents

Community and social service — sociologists, rehabilitation counselors Legal — attorneys Health care — physicians, psychologists, nurse practitioners and clinical laboratory technologists

Postsecondary education — college professors, and school and career counselors

Science, technology, engineering and math — biochemists, mathematicians, statisticians, environmental scientists and geoscientists SOURCE: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

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REALISTIC GOALS

One simple way to weigh your graduate school options is to think in terms of the return on investment you’d like to achieve and then do the research to find out whether your goals are realistic. With a little digging you can likely determine your salary prospects with various degree types in your chosen profession (graduate school programs range from one year for some master’s programs to more than five years for many doctorate degrees) and

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Business — economists, securities, commodities and financial services

In other words, graduate school is not for dabbling. An undergraduate degree is designed for students to explore a range of interests, but if you’re unsure after earning your degree what you want to focus on, consider continuing your exploration in the workforce — where at least you’ll get paid for it. Wheeler offers another bit of advice: “Only accept a position in graduate school if that school will provide financial support, such as tuition waivers as a research assistant or a teaching fellow.” That may sound like an extreme position, but it’s prescient when you consider the hundreds of thousands of dollars in tuition that some schools charge. If you can’t attract such an offer after a bachelor’s degree based on the merits of your academic record alone, you might have better luck after spending a few years developing your course of life through work experience. “Amassing huge debt is a poor reward for pouring your heart into graduate school,” says Wheeler.


do the math to see whether the pay bump justifies the cost of attendance. Be sure to consider all tuition, fees and living expenses, plus the fact that you may need to move to another city, or even another country to obtain your desired degree. Then, consider the intangible aspects — time constraints, job demands and for those with families, commitments. “Grad school is, for most of us, a grind — you’re constantly being corrected, reminded of how much you still have to learn and how difficult it is to land a job. A rare few thrive in that kind of environment,” says Rachel Toor, the author of Write Your Way In: Crafting an Unforgettable College Admissions Essay and a professor of creative writing at Eastern Washington University in Cheney, Wash.

“Only accept a position in graduate school if that school will provide financial support, such as tuition waivers as a research assistant or a teaching fellow.”

Consider these intangible aspects • Time constraints • Job demands • Personal commitments • Satisfy intellectual curiosity

FINDING A GOOD MATCH

On the other hand, advanced degrees can be extremely valuable in the job market if your academic research has direct application to fast-growing business opportunities, typically in technical fields such as computer science and biotechnology. Marcia Robinson, a human resources consultant who runs a website that

– KIP WHEELER, PROFESSOR OF LITERATURE AT CARSON-NEWMAN UNIVERSITY

• Spark your passion

provides career advice for students at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), says the bottom line in the graduate school equation is finding the right match. She suggests that rather than simply applying to the

highest-ranked schools in your subject area, define a specific topic of interest, identify the most highly respected and widely published scholars on that body of research, and then look at the schools where they teach. Refine your search by interviewing faculty from those schools, and current and former students, who can paint a more candid picture of the culture of the department. It’s not uncommon, she points out, that star scholars associated with a particular university actually do very little teaching. Your goal should be to get as accurate a picture as possible about what you’re getting into, and what you can realistically expect to get out of it, says Robinson. “It comes down to the individual and their unique goals."

Three ways we go above and beyond for our students 1. A college that puts you first — always.

You’re mindful of your schedule, you’re smart with your finances, and you want a college that is truly invested in your success. We’re here to help you accomplish your goals in a way that works for you.

2. Prepare for success in a great career.

At Goodwin, you’ll get more than just the necessary skills and hands-on experience to be successful — you’ll make professional connections so you will flourish in the workforce.

3. Resources and supports — when and where you need them.

You’ll get the one-on-one attention you deserve, along with access to tutoring, counseling, career services, our Academic Success Center, Math and Technology Lab, drop-in child care service, and more.

Contact us today!

www.goodwin.edu/learnmore 800.889.3282

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Programs That Lead To Rewarding and In-Demand Careers

On-Campus, Online, and Hybrid Programs Are Available

Classes Start Six Times Each Year

Goodwin College is a nonprofit institution of higher education and is accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE), formerly known as the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). Consumer information about the College and its programs, including gainful employment data, is available at: www.goodwin.edu/institutional-effectiveness/consumer-info-heoa

7/16/19 9:57 AM


Mental well-being is crucial to academic success BY KAREN ASP

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s exciting as this period of life is, transitioning from high school to college can be stressful. Even if a student is living at home to attend college, the new experiences can be overwhelming.

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Between 2009 and 2015, mental health conditions increased among U.S. college students, with anxiety, depression and panic attacks rising the most, according to a study from the Journal of American College Health.

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Identifying Stressors

Anxiety, in fact, affects 15 percent of students nationally. “Many people have their first episode of a psychiatric issue between 15 and 22 years old,” says Justin A. Barterian, a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral health and psychologist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. Multiple factors are driving the increase in stress among college students. While some are obvious, others may not be so evident at first. Entering college often means leaving behind family and friends, which can make some people feel untethered. “The typical support systems you had in place are no longer there,” says Colleen Cira, founder and executive director of the Cira Center for Behavioral Health in Chicago. Even if you’re not close to your family or view college as an escape, it comes with a new set of circumstances, people and places to navigate, which can be daunting. This may also be one of the first times you’ve struggled socially or academically. “As a result, your perception of yourself might be shaken,” Barterian says. For many students, the academic pressure to perform can also be overwhelming. “Given the cost of college, students often arrive with high expectations of how they’ll perform, especially those who are the first in their family to attend college,” says Elizabeth Gong-Guy, executive director of UCLA Campus and Student Resilience and associate clinical professor of psychology. She’s also noticed an uptick of students who are food insecure and homeless — factors that can worsen stress. Another surprising source of stress: a growing lack of resilience among young individuals, a trend that may have roots in a change in parenting styles. “Although I’m a parent and I’m not blaming parents, the parenting trend has swung toward eliminating barriers and making sure kids don’t fail or struggle,” she adds. “While it’s well intentioned, it means young people haven’t been given as many opportunities to overcome struggles, and that can make it tougher for them to adjust to college.”


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Fortunately, you don’t have to wait until you get on campus to head off that stress. The process can start before you arrive by getting as much information about your new environment as possible, Gong-Guy says. For instance, you should acquaint yourself with your roommate, attend the school’s orientation program or peruse the college’s website to familiarize yourself with everything it offers. And if you are prone to anxiety or depression, check what resources will be available once you get on campus. Students should establish a daily routine as soon as possible. “Otherwise, when you’re aimless and find yourself with a several-hour block in the middle of the day with nothing to do, it’s easy to get inside your head, which almost always leads to nowhere good if it lasts too long,” Cira says. That may be because the average individual has seven negative thoughts to every one positive thought, Barterian adds. So, create a daily schedule where most of your hours are accounted for, even if that means filling extra hours with leisure time.

And you should make sure you balance your activities so that you’re not just focusing on academics but social and extracurricular pursuits, too. This way, if you do start struggling with one area, you’ll have others to fall back on, Barterian says.

“Sleep supports academic achievement, emotional regulation and healthy immune functioning.” — ELIZABETH GONG-GUY, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF UCLA CAMPUS AND STUDENT RESILIENCE

Self-care is also critical for quelling stress, so you should take time to exercise, eat healthy, meditate or find ways to be mindful and get the sleep

you need. “Sleep supports academic achievement, emotional regulation and healthy immune functioning,” GongGuy says. It is important to get at least seven to nine hours of sleep a night. If, however, stress begins to overwhelm you, seek help. “Although manageable stress can motivate and propel you forward, too much can paralyze you,” Cira says. As a result, you might struggle to get assignments done or attend class, or withdraw from social engagements and lose interest in activities. In such cases, talk with family, friends, your resident assistant or academic adviser or visit the student services center to connect with a mental health professional. Some colleges even offer free mental health screenings. In the end, the best antidote for stress may simply be embracing the moment. “College is an interesting time in human development as you’re emerging into adulthood,” Barterian says. “Yet because that can be scary, it’s important to focus on what’s going on now versus what’s going to happen down the road.” COLLEGE GUIDE 2020

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Slay Your Essay Use this opportunity to reflect your voice and mindset BY HANNAN ADELY

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a compelling essay can reflect a student’s voice and mindset or provide a glimpse into his or her life that a transcript alone might not convey. “This is really where they can shine,” says Kelly Peterfriend, supervisor of counseling with the Northern Highland Regional High School district in New Jersey. “This is a chance for the student to speak to who they are and what they believe and what they’re passionate about.” With most early action and early decision college applications due Nov. 1 or Nov. 15, it’s

crunch time for students who should be drafting their essays. Here are suggestions from a few experts on how to write a great college essay, from brainstorming ideas to proofreading the final product:

BIG MOMENTS, SMALL MOMENTS

Some colleges ask for personal statements, and others provide a choice of topics, or prompts, for students to write about. Applicants can write about ways they had an ef-

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ompeting for coveted spots in a freshman class with thousands of peers, including many with similar grade-point averages, test scores and activities listed on their applications can be daunting and stressful for any college hopeful. What’s one way to stand out? Experts say well-crafted application essays can get the attention of admissions officers and propel an applicant to the top of the heap. Whether writing about a life-changing event or an acitivity as simple as fishing,


taught skiing to a disabled and nonverbal child. He wrote about how the two communicated, and how he felt when he got to see the child ski down his first slope. He expressed that he didn’t realize how much joy he could receive by helping someone else. The story reflected compassion and self-growth.

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UNFORGETTABLE ESSAYS

fect on their community or overcame obstacles in life, experts say. “It can be small moments told in an interesting or novel way — something that tells about their character,” says Deborah Shames, a college counselor in New Jersey. “Sometimes the smallest moments make the best essays.” For students writing about why they want to attend a certain college or pursue a certain major, Shames cautions to be specific and advises applicants to cite examples about what they want to do at that college and how they plan to take advantage of the school’s offerings.

REVISE UNTIL YOU GET IT RIGHT

When it comes to the writing process, Peterfriend encourages students to “just write and get it out” with the intent to refine it later. Students should write and revise multiple drafts and show the essay to a trusted adult, such as a teacher, counselor or parent, to proofread and offer feedback. Those reading the essay should make sure the student’s point is coming across and that the topic resonates. But they should not attempt to change the student’s voice. For Peterfriend, an essay that stood out to her came from a student who

Shames recalls one unforgettable essay in which a student who was asked to write a page from his future autobiography, offered a story about fishing with his future child — as he had done with his own father and grandfather. “It was beautifully written,” Shames says. “It stuck with me. Here’s a kid who has compassion and respect for his father and wants to create a legacy for this child. That probably (translates) to how the student acts in business and life.” Experts caution that while a great essay can be a “tipping point” to get a student noticed in a field of qualified applicants, an essay alone won’t be enough to get into college. Grades matter, too. “You can have the most amazing essay in the world,” Shames says. “(It won’t matter) if the college isn’t confident that you can come there and be successful given your academic history.” Hannan Adely is a reporter at the North Jersey (Bergen County, N.J.) Record

FEATURED COLLEGES

Garden City, New York

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

Lakeland, Florida

K E Y S TAT I S T I C S

K E Y S TAT I S T I C S

K E Y S TAT I S T I C S

Ranked a 2019 Best College by U.S. News & World Report for our personal approach.

UA was founded in 1831 and is the oldest public institution of higher education in Alabama.

98.9 percent of full-time incoming first-year students received some kind of financial aid.

We are ranked #2 in enrollment of National Merit Scholars among public universities in the country.

Offers 70+ programs of study including business administration, education, nursing, computer sciences and marine biology.

More than 60 undergraduate programs of study.

We are ranked #1 in the SEC in internship placements.

Three Fulbright Award recipients in 2019.

96 percent of our undergraduate students have jobs, are in grad school or are volunteering within six months of graduation.

UA’s Astrobotics team has won NASA’s Robotics Mining Competition for five consecutive years.

FSC has been recognized as one of the nation’s best four-year colleges.

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FSC was founded in 1883.

flsouthern.edu


Victor Namer says his experience in Thailand helped ignite his passion — addressing issues of poverty in health care and education. Photo provided by Victor Namer.

In spring 2018, Julia Ernst spent her first days in Prague taking in the culture and magical atmosphere in Old Town Square. Photo by Julianne Armbruster.

Immersive Experiences Studying abroad can offer lessons beyond the classroom BY ADAM STONE

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hen college students take a semester or a year to study abroad, they discover new cultures, build language skills and get a taste of the world beyond their backyards. A recent study by the Institute of International Education found more 26

COLLEGE GUIDE 2020

than 332,000 Americans studied overseas in 2016-17, with roughly 1 in 10 U.S. students studying abroad during their undergraduate careers. Victor Namer and Julia Ernst are among those who discovered that an overseas experience can lend

additional depth and breadth to the college experience.

‘A PROFOUND MOMENT’

As an undergrad at Western Connecticut State University, Namer wasn’t sure how he would put his double major


“In Thailand, I got to see a style of life that was very different, and what I saw there helped to jar me into my passion. I walked half an hour to and from my university every day, and on that walk, I saw homelessness and poverty on a pretty open and regular basis,” he says. “Growing up in Connecticut, I never saw these (kinds of things) so openly, and this experience really inspired me.”

FINDING COMMON THREADS

Namer visits an elephant sanctuary for abused pachyderms that had been rescued. Photo provided by Victor Namer.

Ernst says her experience in Prague helped her realize that "the world is a lot more accessible than people think." Photo by Caroline Muré.

in psychology and political science to work after graduation. “I didn’t know what I wanted to do with my career; didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life. I felt that if I could see something completely different from what I had ever seen, I could break free from this standstill,” he says. He found that completely different experience in Thailand, where he studied the local language, explored Buddhist precepts and saw poverty firsthand. “I was walking across a bridge and there was this blind man just sitting there. I gave him what would be a couple dollars in U.S. currency, which in Thai currency is a lot, and he grabbed my arm to thank me,” Namer says. “He started tearing up. It was a really profound moment to see how much good I was able to do, just by doing a little bit.” Namer came home wanting to do more. He graduated this past spring and went to work with CityCenter Danbury, where he is helping to address issues of poverty in health care and education.

A high school trip to Italy sparked Ernst’s desire to see the world. While double majoring in business administration and philosophy at Susquehanna University in Pennsylvania, she took a semester in Prague, using the central European nation as a jumping-off point for weekend trips to Ireland, England, Norway, Belgium and Germany, among others. “It was all very different from Susquehanna,” she says. “I knew I wanted to do a lot of travel while I was abroad. I chose a city that had a relatively affordable standard of living so I could have the extra money for travel. I liked that I could use Prague (Czech Republic) as my home base to see the rest of Europe,” she says. Ernst started her semester abroad with a two-week intensive course in the Czech language, a move that helped her make the most of her time in Prague. “They lived under the Soviets for a long time, and everyone there is still very reserved. They don’t smile at strangers,” she says. “But if you even say ‘hello’ in Czech, they open up immediately. If you make even a small effort to acknowledge their culture, they loosen up with you.” She then returned the favor, volunteering to teach English in a local afterschool program for elementary students. That experience helped her to see that despite surface differences, people everywhere have a lot in common. When Ernst returned to the U.S., she knew she wanted to help other young people broaden their horizons. After graduating this past spring, she took a job with the Pennsylvania College Advising Corps, helping students to navigate the college admissions process. “The world is a lot more accessible than people might think,” she says. “It isn’t hard to learn about a place and become a part of it.” COLLEGE GUIDE 2020

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Scores Matter Put your best test forward to improve acceptance odds

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our standardized test score may give you the boost you need for acceptance to college, but that depends on the school, experts say. Overall, colleges consider a student’s grade-point average (GPA) to be the most important factor on an application,

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followed by test scores and the rigor of high school programs, according to the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC). Highly competitive schools with low acceptance rates often won’t consider an applicant whose grades and scores

fall outside an expected range, says Mimi Doe, co-founder of Top Tier Admissions, a college counseling service with offices in Massachusetts and Vermont. “Very top colleges are not going to give you the benefit of the doubt. They’re data driven,” says Doe.

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BY MARY HELEN BERG


Fortunately, there are hundreds of schools to choose from (the average acceptance rate at four-year institutions is 65 percent) even when an applicant’s GPA is lower than average. High test scores can persuade many admissions officers to take a second look, says David Hawkins, executive director for educational content and policy for the NACAC.

THE GOOD NEWS

Colleges recognize that a GPA can be subjective because students take classes with different levels of rigor, says Robert Durkle, dean of admission and financial aid at the University of Dayton. Low grades and high test scores “generally signal to an admission officer that they might need to consider an applicant in a different context because it is difficult to dismiss a high test score,” Hawkins says. The bottom line is, “if you have a high score on the SAT or the ACT, it indicates to a college that you have the goods to succeed,” says Joyce

TEST PREP

Weintraub, a college admissions consultant who advises students in Los Angeles.

APPLY WISELY

Look at smaller schools that conduct a holistic review of applications because they are more likely to consider how other elements of your application influenced your grades, experts say. “They have fewer applicants and they have the time to dig a little deeper and can look at why the grades are kind of low,” Doe says. In addition, colleges that want to boost their standing may be eager to enroll an applicant whose test score helps raise the mean of their overall student profile, Doe says. Admissions officers are sometimes suspicious of a disparity between scores and grades. If a student has a 2.75 GPA and a high SAT score, he might look like a slacker or “one might suspect that (the test score) was not won honestly,” cautions Weintraub.

Options for Every Budget • The Princeton Review offers a money-back guarantee on their prep course, promising to raise SAT scores from 1160 to 1400 or higher. • The College Board and Khan Academy offer eight free full-length SAT practice tests. • The Princeton Review, College Board, McGraw-Hill, Barron’s and others publish test prep books for about $30. • Revolution Prep, Kaplan, The Princeton Review and ArborBridge offer classes online, in small groups and with private tutors. Prices range widely.

Who are we? Mississippi Valley State University is a public, coeducational university serving more than 2,000 students from diverse backgrounds. Established in 1950, MVSU is the youngest institution and HBCU in the Mississippi Public Universities System. The University is fully accredited and offers 36 undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The beautiful campus is located in the heart of the Mississippi Delta. It’s a great place to discover yourself.

HONORS FOR ALL

When you choose St. Mary’s College honors-level education, you’re asking for something special: elevated academics, a pathway to a prosperous career, prestige without the pretentiousness, and professors who genuinely care about your success.

Learn more. www.smcm.edu To learn more about The Valley, contact the Office of Admissions at 662.254.3347, 800.GO2.MVSU (in-state), or visit www.mvsu.edu

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#1

Best Undergraduate Teaching

#2 #7 Overall

See our excellence in action during a visit to our suburban Cleveland campus:

jcu.edu

Best Value

FEATURED COLLEGES

Dover, Delaware

Greenwood, South Carolina

Nashville, Tennessee

K E Y S TAT I S T I C S

K E Y S TAT I S T I C S

K E Y S TAT I S T I C S

Delaware State University was founded in 1891 as a landgrant institution. We are one of the nation’s premier Historically Black Colleges and Universities, with a diverse campus community. We offer 60+ undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degree programs across four colleges. Our Aviation program has its own plane fleet and 100% placement of professional pilot graduates.

desu.edu

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Public, coeducational, four-year university founded in 1872.

Lipscomb University is a premier, private, Christian university located in Nashville, TN

Approximately 3,100 students, with an average class size of 21. More than 60 areas of study offered, including high-demand, market-driven signature programs. Vibrant campus life with 60+ student clubs and organizations, 25+ intramurals and club sports, and 16 NCAA Div. II athletic programs.

75+ majors and 145+ areas of study | Top 5 majors: Engineering, Business, Nursing, Education and Pre-Med | Distinctive Programs: Sustainability; Game Development; Animation; Commercial Music; and Law, Justice & Society Best Values in Private Universities - Kiplinger | #1 Undergraduate Business Program in Tennessee | #1 IT Degree in Tennessee | Top 1% National Teacher Preparation Program

lipscomb.edu

lander.edu

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It All MATTERS.

• Diverse campus community ranked among the nation’s premier Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) • Degree programs that connect with high-demand career fields • Aviation program with its own fleet of aircraft and 100% placement of pilot graduates • State-of-the-art laboratory facilities and major research centers on campus • 91% of our recent graduates were employed or attended graduate school within 6 months of their degrees

DESU.EDU

302.857.6351


FEATURED COLLEGES

Itta Bena, Mississippi

Radford, VA

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“One Fee @ The V”—MVSU has no out-of-state tuition fees. MVSU offers 35 unique programs, including 100% online options. With a faculty ratio of 13-to-1, MVSU provides the classes you need and the personal attention you deserve.

An American classical campus located in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains, with many outdoor activities and engaging opportunities A mid-sized public institution with a low student to professor ratio Living-learning communities for a wide range of interests

MVSU has one of only seven accredited graduate environmental health programs in the nation.

36% of students are first-generation and 31% of students are from diverse backgrounds

radford.edu

www.mvsu.edu

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East Hartford, Connecticut

Fredericksburg, Virginia

K E Y S TAT I S T I C S

K E Y S TAT I S T I C S

Within an hour’s drive of both Washington, D.C., and Richmond, Virginia

Undergraduate enrollment: 3,477 (Fall 2018) Student-to-faculty ratio: 10:1 (Fall 2018) Program focus areas: nursing, healthcare, business and management, manufacturing, safety and security, and social and educational sciences Goodwin College is a private, nonprofit institution of higher education and is accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE).

Offers unique internships, research excursions, and recreational opportunities 88% of faculty have earned a doctorate or other terminal degree in their field

No classes are taught by graduate teaching assistants ever

umw.edu

www.goodwin.edu

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Salisbury, Maryland

S t . M a r y ’s C i t y, M D

K E Y S TAT I S T I C S

K E Y S TAT I S T I C S

Salisbury University is known for excellence in public higher education. The University is home to 8,700 students from across the U.S. and around the world.

Ranked one of the best public liberal arts schools in the nation (U.S. News & World Report) and a Best College for your Money (Money Magazine). 10:1 student to faculty ratio.

Students may choose from 60 undergraduate majors, master’s degrees and doctoral programs.

Tailor an experience that aligns your interests with 78 majors, minors, and interdisciplinary programs.

The beautiful 200-acre campus is located on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, near beaches and major cities.

94% of students employed or continue education after graduation.

www.salisbury.edu

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smcm.edu

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DEEP FAITH. ROBUST ACADEMICS. INCREDIBLE SETTING. Looking for a challenging academic experience that builds your faith? Northwest University could be your best fit. Here, students actively pursue God as they train for their careers. And NU is set in an exceptional, thriving location—near Seattle, Washington—just minutes from world-class brands and unmatched outdoor recreation. Find out more at northwestu.edu.

CONTACT US DIRECTLY: 800-669-3781 admissions@northwestu.edu

Since 1934. Kirkland, Washington.


Crew Squad Besties Boos Fam Bros Baes Peeps

Whatever you call your friends, you’ll find them here.

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