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MAXIM WAKULTSCHIK


MAXIM WAKULTSCHIK One Thousand and One

September 7 – October 6, 2018


The Power of Illusion Maxim Wakultschik has updated his optical portraits for the digital age. Comprised entirely of hand-painted wooden dowels, ‘Optical Portrait Wood’ effectively pixelates a series of portraits into abstraction. With each new point of view, these works respond in kind by offering an entirely new formation of kaleidoscopic geometric forms, creating the illusion of autonomous kinetic energy. Wakultschik actively fragments the human face and challenges viewers to think about how the interplay of color, space, and form create a whole image. Furthermore, through a manipulation of these formal elements and the subsequent distortion of the familiar, Wakultschik offers a new way of seeing, and perhaps, an alternative reality. In his most recent solo exhibition, One Thousand and One, Wakultschik continues his exploration of fragmentation, composition, and pattern by expanding his practice beyond portraiture in his new Persian rug-inspired series, ‘Carpets.’ In this series, the wooden-dowels which the works are composed of take on new meaning. The meticulous hand placement of each dowel to create a whole image is reminiscent of the process of carpet-making, which in itself is a meditation on the collaboration of parts to form a whole. Sitting side-by-side in One Thousand and One, the works of  ‘Optical Portrait Wood’ and ‘Carpets’ center on the principle of deconstruction – a fascination which began with Wakultschik’s first series, ‘Reflections,’ which debuted during his time at Düsseldorf Art Academy in Germany. Wakultschik’s newest works challenge preconceived notions of painting in an analogous manner to his previous illusionistic Neo-Pop portraits. While painting has been used to trick the eye for centuries using painterly methods like chiaroscuro and trompe l’oeil, Wakultschik solidifies his signature hybrid method of sculpture-painting with his new wooden dowel compositions which prompts a reconsideration of the way we think about the medium and its relationship to illusion. Wakultschik uses his illusory works to carefully control not only what viewers see, but how they see it. He uses his art as a medium through which to control and alter the viewer’s perspective. Wakultschik’s engineering of space and color in ‘Reflections’ urges viewers to register the works as three-dimensional, while in ‘Multipersonality,’ the substitution of a flat picture plane for a wooden accordion forces viewers to move around the piece to reveal the full work. Similarly, in his new series, ‘Optical Portrait Wood’ and ‘Carpets,’ the full image can only be seen from a distance, compelling viewers to position themselves accordingly. Therefore, Wakultschik manipulates not only the paintings’ formal elements to orchestrate his optical illusions, but viewers themselves.

In One Thousand and One, the two series enter into a dialogue with one another by comparing and contrasting their formal elements and materiality with their individualism and autonomy. The ‘Carpets’ series, notable for its emphasis on compositional symmetry and geometric pattern, most obviously foregrounds Wakultschik’s technique by drawing comparisons to tradition carpet-making methods. However, the works’ titles (Arash, Anahita, and Azar), inspired by ancient Persian names, infuse the carpets with individual personalities akin to those of the neighboring portraits. Similarly, the featured works from ‘Optical Portrait Wood’ effuse a sense of personhood due to their high level of detail and expressive rendering. The artist bridges the gap to ‘Carpets’ with one optical portrait in particular in which he alters his method by turning the wooden dowels flat to resemble wefts on the reverse side of a tapestry. This drifting in and out of focus between the material and ethereal is at the core of all of Wakultschik’s works. While the portraits of celebrities are recognizable from afar, each individual becomes reduced to a series of wooden dowels upon closer inspection. Through a manipulation of color, space, and material, Wakultschik’s series ‘Optical Portrait Wood’ and ‘Carpets’ expand upon his earlier practice and provide a new perspective with which to reflect upon the power of illusion.

Meredith Loper Research Assistant, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland, GB


Arash 2018 Carpets-Series lacquer, wood on kapa board 100 x 80 x 9 cm / 39 1/3 x 31 1/2 x 3 1/2 in



Anahita 2018 Carpets-Series lacquer, wood on kapa board 140 x 105 x 9 cm / 55 x 41 1/3 x 3 1/2 in


Azar 2018 Carpets-Series lacquer, wood on kapa board 100 x 80 x 9 cm / 39 1/3 x 31 1/2 x 3 1/2 in



Sheratan 2018 Optical Portraits Wood Flat lacquer, wood on kapa board, museum glass 140 x 105 x 3 cm / 55 x 41 1/3 x 1 in


Kaliande 2018 Optical Portraits Wood-Series lacquer, wood on kapa board 80 x 60 x 9 cm / 31 1/2 x 23 2/3 x 3 1/2 in



Ismenis, (river nymph) 2018 Optical Portraits Wood-Series lacquer, wood on kapa board 140 x 100 x 9 cm / 55 x 39 1/3 x 3 1/2 in


Selena 2018 Optical Portraits Wood-Series lacquer, wood on kapa board 57 x 43 x 9 cm / 22 1/2 x 17 x 3 1/2 in


Lia 2018 Optical Portraits Wood-Series lacquer, wood on kapa board 80 x 60 x 9 cm / 31 1/2 x 23 2/3 x 3 1/2 in


Valeria 2018 Optical Portraits Wood-Series lacquer, wood on kapa board 57 x 43 x 9 cm / 22 1/2 x 17 x 3 1/2 in


Right On Point — Portraits and Patterns Maxim Wakultschik’s Dazzling Relief Works Kaliande. Valeria. Selena. Beauties in the spirit of Pointillism. Iridescent, multidimensional, recognizable, with graceful features that are almost realistic. Their names, taken from mythology or picked right from the night sky, are full of transcendent connotations that evoke ideas and emotions. The wall objects from Maxim Wakultschik’s series Optical Portraits are mysterious, yet strangely familiar.

Born in Belarus, Wakultschik does not think of himself as a painter. Even though color is a central aspect of his art, his focus is always the object. “As I am an object artist, I find inspiration in everything around me, even if it is a flat object. In my mind, I develop it into something three-dimensional”. While traveling to California, he thus developed the idea of painting with wooden sticks.

Wakultschik alters and reinterprets images that he comes upon or creates himself. Devoted to portraiture that is rooted in the aesthetic traditions of Renaissance Italy, he, at the same time, takes artistic techniques originally developed by artists Georges Seurat or Paul Signac in 19th century France to the next level.

Seriality lies at the core of Wakultschik’s work. He has been working on Optical Portraits since 2015. This year, he presents his new series, Carpets, which is sparked by his interest in tapestries. Open to all kinds of inspiration, he references materiality and symbolic meaning of wall hangings and floor coverings, while at the same time relieving his Carpets from the burden of use. Work titles such as Arash, Azar and Anahita conjure memories of One Thousand and One Nights and imbue the work series with the magic of Scheherazade. Tales of Aladdin, of flying carpets, of palaces and mysteries of the orient shimmer through the pieces. In Qatar, a craving for pomegranates and the longing for the Rivers of Paradise are woven into the pattern.

His artworks are both haptic objects and sensory play of deception. Three-dimensional Pointillism — a continuous invitation to a sensual, visual skimming of the surface. With every changing angle of incidence, every alteration in position, the viewer experiences stunningly diverse perspectives. Wakultschik’s works are never static, but elementally vigorous, leading a life of their own. In a strict geometrical manner of accurately placed, latticed wooden sticks, the compositions summon the female models en face; the color of the wood answering to the polychrome demands of skin, eyes, and hair. Additive application of paint assisted the pointillists in bringing luminous paintings into being. Intransigently assembled and arranged wooden dowels, about three inches in length, serve the same purpose for Wakultschik. The use of tens of thousands of them, adds a wow factor to his art. Pointillism, the once derogatorily coined ‘confetti art’ of the Post-Impressionists, pointed to the pixel and raster graphics of the digital age; an age, in which the boundaries of object and image are fluid to the extreme; where multidimensionality and the deceiving powers of images in an era of ubiquitous availability and virtual repetition are constantly being renegotiated. Stemming from intensive digital preliminary work, Wakultschik uses strict vertical and horizontal configurations to create his special variant of analog portraits. This enables him to create his Optical Portraits, with their captivating picture puzzle character that has become his trademark style. Herein, the object artist recalls his early interest in structure, mathematics, and arrangement systems that have captivated his imagination. “In school, I was the best at Math.” While studying under professor Jannis Kounellis at the Art Academy in Düsseldorf, Wakultschik worked part-time with an antiques conservator. Here, he discovered his passion for plastic expression, in particular for reliefs. His first ventures into this new artistic realm took place 20 years ago and resulted in his Order Reliefs. Up to this day, Wooden Reliefs play a vital role in his oeuvre.

But Wakultschik adds irony to the objects of his observation, while at the same time thwarting their substantiality by way of his technique — the classic Oriental rugs are made of heavy textile and charged with symbolic meaning. Object-like quality and structure of wooden sticks paraphrase their knotting, while simultaneously ruling out the use as floor covering. Wakultschik thus alludes to the quintessential purpose of the objects that served as models — in the East, the product category of rugs includes textiles which cover walls or tables. While a knot count of over a million makes for an exquisite example, Wakultschik needs 16,000 wooden sticks for one of his mid-sized works. Only then does he achieve the desired resolution and the intensity of emotion, illusion, and vibration that he aims for — and his utmost joy of puzzling the viewers and playing with their perception. Op-Art artists such as Bridget Riley admired Seurat.  Wakultschik, in turn, stands in the tradition of Op-Art. Through his empirical studies, he arrives at its pointillistic roots. But with his moving, shimmering dots in a manner of Seurat, he takes the pointillistic technique of painting to a new level and quite literally into space. Painting with light and shadow, and with illusionistic strategies that are as subtle as they are clever, he plays the loveliest tricks on us. Wakultschik puts the viewers’ sense of sight to the test and undermines parameters of perception that hitherto were irrefutable. Diving into optic phenomenons that Goethe was already fascinated with, he pulls his viewers into a world of flickering surfaces; a place where optical deception is embraced. From the depth of the shadowy spaces to the outermost tips of his pointy structures, Wakultschik directs and redirects our sight a hundred thousand. Right on point, indeed. Dorothee Baer-Bogenschütz, Art Critic and Art Historian, Wiesbaden, Germany Translation: Nathalie Krall, Art Historian and PhD Candidate, University of Cologne, Germany



Maxim Wakultschik born 1973 in Minsk, Belarus Lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany 1992 – 2000 Art Academy Düsseldorf, Germany Studies with Jannis Kounellis and Beate Schiff Teaching Experience 2017 – Lecturer at Alanus Hochschule für Kunst und Gesellschaft (Alanus University of Arts and Social Sciences), Alfter, Germany Awards 2009 SWITCH ON, Recognition Award, Kunstpreis Licht 2009 (Art Award Light 2009), Graefelfing, Germany 2006 Special Prize for Originality, Kunstpreis Wesseling, Wesseling, Germany 2005 Award of PSD Bank, Rhein-Ruhr, Düsseldorf, Germany 2001 Art Award of Sparkasse Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany Young Art Award of Stadtwerke Herne AG, Herne, Germany Emprise Art Award 2001, NRW-Forum Kultur und Wirtschaft, Düsseldorf, Germany 2000 Caspar von Zumbusch Award, Herzebrock-Clarhorst, Germany Kö-Galerie Award, Düsseldorf, Germany 1987 Third prize at the Union Competition Diploma, Moscow, Russia Selected solo exhibitions 2018 One Thousand and One, Anya Tish Gallery, Houston, Texas, USA Trugbild oder Täuschung (Illusion or Deception), Galerie Seidel, Cologne, Germany The New Art Order, Christian Marx Galerie, Düsseldorf, Germany The Illusion of Perception, von fraunberg art gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany Neue Werke, Galerie Simon Nolte, Münster, Germany 2017 Blurred Boundaries, COVA art gallery, Eindhoven, The Netherlands Maxim’s World of Art, Art Galerie 7 / Meike Knüppe, Cologne, Germany 2016 Neue Werke von Maxim Wakultschik (New Works by Maxim Wakultschik), Galerie Simon Nolte Münster, Germany Perspective Three, TRIBU HOUSE, Geneva, Switzerland Monuments, Christian Marx Galerie, Düsseldorf, Germany 2015 Art meets Fashion – Inline unlimited, von fraunberg art gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany (solo with Agata Agatowska) Porträt. Form, Farbe, Illusion (Portrait. Form, Color, Illusion), NEW AG, Mönchengladbach, Germany Faces, Unique Gallery, Galerie Claudia Junig, Cologne, Germany Facetime 2.0, Galeria Simon Nolte, Portocolom, Majorca, Spain (solo with Sebastian Herzau) 2014 Der heimliche Blick (The secret Gaze), Alte Honigfabrik, Kunstverein Ibbenbüren, Ibbenbüren, Germany Der zweite Blick (At second Glance), Galerie Palais Walderdorff, Gesellschaft für Bildende Kunst Trier e.V., Trier, Germany Von Angesicht zu Angesicht (Face to Face), Museum im Haus Hövener, Kunstverein Östliches Sauerland, Brilon, Germany Face Time, Galeria Simon Nolte, Portocolom, Majorca, Spain Face Time, Galerie Michael Nolte, Münster, Germany Die Poesie des Alltags (The Poetics of Everyday Life), Kunstverein Aurich, Aurich, Germany Zeitfenster (Time Window), Kunstverein Gundelfingen, Gundelfingen, Germany

2013

2012

2011

2010

GESICHTS-ZÜGE – Malerei und Objekte (Facial Features / Train of Faces – Painting and Objects), Kunstverein Heidenheim a. d. Brenz, Heidenheim a. d. Brenz, Germany The Art of Shadow, Kunstverein Nümbrecht, Nümbrecht, Germany Face to Face, Alte Brennerei, Kunstverein Ebersberg, Ebersberg, Germany Kunstverein Biberach, Biberach, Germany Maxim Wakultschik, Gallery Frank Pages, Geneva, Switzerland New Objects, von fraunberg art gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany Hall of Fame, Christian Marx Galerie, Düsseldorf, Germany Trainspotting, Municipal Gallery, Versandhalle Grevenbroich, Grevenbroich, Germany FaceTime, Anya Tish Gallery, Houston, Texas, USA Schilderijen / Wandobjecten (Paintings / Wall Objects), Galerie BMB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Raymond Banas Art Gallery and House of Culture, Metz, France (catalogue) Der heimliche Blick (The Secret Gaze), Kunstsammlungen der Stadt Limburg, Limburg a. d. Lahn, Germany wirklich – nicht wirklich (real – not real), Kunstverein Barsinghausen e.V., Barsinghausen, Germany (catalogue) Ost-West Nachtzug (East-West Night Train), Städtische Galerie Petershagen, Petershagen, Germany Maxim Wakultschik – Malerei (Maxim Wakultschik – Painting), Turmgalerie Schloss Augustusburg, Augustusburg, Germany Maxim Wakultschik – Malerei / Yukiya Izumita – Skulptur (Maxim Wakultschik – Painting / Yukiya Izuminta - Sculpture), Galerie an der Pinakothek der Moderne / Barbara Ruetz, Munich, Germany East-West Night Train, von fraunberg art gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany

Group Exhibitions 2018 Todos Podem Ser Frida, Espacio Gallery, London, UK Russian Icons, Art Center La Recova, Tenerife, Spain (catalogue) Galleria Simon Nolte, Majorca, Spain Zeitgeist, Galerie Simon Nolte, Münster, Germany Das große Format (The large Format), Art Galerie 7 / Meike Knueppe, Cologne, Germany 2017 Neue Werke (New Works), Galerie Simon Nolte, Münster, Germany All in ..., von fraunberg art galerie, Düsseldorf, Germany Masterpieces, Christian Marx Galerie, Düsseldorf, Germany Defragmentation of the Reality, Galerie Seidel, Cologne, Germany salondergegenwart, Hamburg, Germany (catalogue) Das kleine Format (The small Format), Art Galerie 7 / Meike Knueppe, Cologne, Germany Biało – czerwono – biali. Współczesna sztuka białoruska / White – Red – White. Contemporary Belarusian Art, Centre of Contemporary Art, Torun, Poland (catalogue) MONOCHROME – Art Utilizing Primarily One Color, M A N I F E S T, Non-Profit Creative Research Gallery and Drawing Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA (catalogue) Discover as on a Journey, von fraunberg art gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany Uitnodiging (Invitation), COVA art gallery, Eindhoven, The Netherlands Gruppenausstellung zu den Skulptur Projekte in Münster (Group Exhibition for the Skulptur Projekte Münster), Galerie Simon Nolte, Münster, Germany Skulptur, Objekte (Sculptures & Objects), Christian Marx Galerie, Düsseldorf, Germany RARITY SUMMER CONTEMPORARY 2017, Rarity Gallery, Mykonos, Griechenland WE THE WOMAN, Atelier des Bains, Geneva, Switzerland / with Frank Pages Gallery, Geneva, Switzerland


2016

2015

2014

New Works, Galerie an der Pinakothek der Moderne / Barbara Ruetz, Munich, Germany Unzertrennlich (Inseparable), Galerie Seidel, Cologne, Germany Happy new Drawings and other Objects, Gallery Burkhard Eikelmann, Düsseldorf, Germany Now U see it‘s Xmas Season, von fraunberg art gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany Stiftung Starke, Löwenpalais Grunewald, Berlin, Germany Weihnachtsausstellung 2016 (Christmas Exhibition 2016), Stiftung Starke, Löwenpalais Grunewald, Berlin, Germany Pure Pop – The Art of Popular Culture, Christian Marx Galerie, Düsseldorf, Germany Galeria Simon Nolte, Palma, Majorca, Spain 50 Contemporary Artists, EAF / ENTER ART FOUNDATION bei ABC Berlin, Berlin Art Week, Berlin, Germany (catalogue) Art After Work, Kunstakademie.gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany Zeitgeist, Galerie Simon Nolte Münster, Germany Riss oder Spaltung? (Split or Division?), Gallery Galina Seidel, Cologne, Germany XX Part One – 20th Anniversary Exhibition, Anya Tish Gallery, Houston, Texas, USA Revision, group photo project for ZBOR. BELARUSIAN ART MOVEMENT in IZOLYATSIA, Platform for Cultural Initiatives, Kiev, Ukraine SaisonstArt (Season StART), Galeria Simon Nolte, Portocolom, Majorca, Spain SUPREME Skulptur – Malerei – Installation (SUPREME Sculpture – Painting – Installation), Art Galerie 7 / Meike Knüppe, Cologne, Germany Pixel of Identities – The Body Language, Bogota Arte Contemporaneo BAC Gallery, Bogotá, Colombia Liquid Rooms – The Labyrinth, Palazzo Ca’ Zanardi & VENICE ART HOUSE Gallery, Venice, Italy Gallery Artists, von fraunberg art gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany 100 Jahre Schwarzes Quadrat von Kazimir Malevich. 10 Künstler x 10 m2 Kunst (Centennial Anniversary of Kazimir Malevich‘s Black Square. 10 Artists x 10 square meters of Art), 20th gallery anniversary show, Galerie Seidel, Cologne, Germany Grand Opening, Christian Marx Galerie, Düsseldorf, Germany Neue Werke (New Works), Galerie Simon Nolte, Münster, Germany KunstBoulevard 2015. Malerei und Fotografie (Art Boulevard 2015. Painting and Photography), cultural council Steglitz-Zehlendorf with Boulevard Berlin, Berlin, Germany (catalogue) #BYOA #Proudcollector, Woeske Gallery, Berlin, Germany Revision, Foundation Izolyatsia Platform for Cultural Initiatives, Kiev, Ukraine ZBIÓR (ZBOR) (Set (Zbor)), group project Revision, Galeria Arsenał, Białystok, Poland Magie des Realen (Magic of the Real), Galerie Simon Nolte, Münster, Germany Naked, Nave Gallery Annex, Somerville, Massachusetts, USA (catalogue) Hinter Kulissen (Behind the Scenes), Christian Marx Galerie, Düsseldorf, Germany Future Identities – Bodies. Places. Spaces., Laura Haber Art Gallery, Buenos Aires, Argentina Future Identities – Bodies. Places. Spaces., International Photography, Painting, Installation, Video Art, and Performance Art Festival im Palazzo Radetzky, Milan, Italy Saisonart 4.0 (Season Art 4.0), Galeria Simon Nolte, Portocolom, Majorca, Spain Portfolio: Wirklichkeit und Illusionen (Portfolio: Reality and Illusion), Galerie Seidel, Cologne, Germany MODERN VENUS, Kunstraum Gerdi Gutperle, Viernheim, Germany Männerwelten (Men‘s Worlds), Kunstverein Burgwedel-Isernhagen, Isernhagen, Germany NordArt 2014, KiC Kunst in der Carlshütte, Büdelsdorf, Germany Myth & Muse, an Homage to Frida Kahlo, GO Gallery, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Unter 4 Augen – Sprache des Portraits (Under 4 Eyes – Language of the Portrait), Altes Rathaus, Kunstkreis Gräfelfing, Gräfeling, Germany

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008 2007 2006

AFTER THE FAIR & NEW POSITIONS, von fraunberg art gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany Gallery‘s Choice, von fraunberg art gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany No Time Like the Present, Anya Tish Gallery, Houston, Texas, USA small but just in size …, BESPOKE, Düsseldorf, Germany 20 Jahre Galerie Ruetz – Jubiläumsausstellung (20 Years Galerie Ruetz – Anniversary Exhibition), Galerie an der Pinakothek der Moderne / Barbara Ruetz, Munich, Germany Menschen-t-raume (Human Dreams / Human Spaces), Galerie Seidel, Cologne, Germany Galerie an der Pinakothek der Moderne / Barbara Ruetz, Munich, Germany Auf der ewigen Reise (On the eternal Journey), E.ON Galerie, E.ON AG, Düsseldorf, Germany (catalogue) NEWart.21, Galeria Simon Nolte, Portocolom, Majorca, Spain Nomaden (Nomads), CMG Christian Marx Galerie, Düsseldorf, Germany Summertime, von fraunberg Art Gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany Radius Null (Radius Zero), temporäre space, Fabrik „Horizont”, Minsk, Belarus In between Days, von fraunberg aart gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany New States of Contempory Art, Galerie Michael Nolte, Münster, Germany Review und Ausblick – 7 Jahre Galerie T40 (Review and Outlook – 7 Years Galerie T40) , Galerie T40, Düsseldorf, Germany Ambivalences, Galerie Michael Nolte, Münster, Germany Mobilität 6: Inside Movement (Mobility 6: Inside Movement), Förderverein für junge Künstler e.V. – Galerie im Griesbad, Ulm, Germany ON WHAT?, Anya Tish Gallery, Houston, Texas, USA Seewerk 2010, das SEEWERK, Moers, Germany Gallery Artists, Galerie Michael Nolte, Münster, Germany Public Inside, von fraunberg art gallery, Düsseldorf, Germany Closely Watched Trains, Anya Tish Gallery, Houston, Texas, USA Light Switch, Anya Tish Gallery, Houston, Texas, USA Krieg der Engel – Junge russische Kunst (War of the Angels – Young Russian Art), Galerie Oben, Chemnitz, Germany Krieg der Engel – Junge russische Kunst (War of the Angels – Young Russian Art), Kunstverein Talstrasse e. V., Halle a. d. Saale, Germany Gallery Artists, Anya Tish Gallery, Houston, Texas, USA Russische Variationen (Russian Variations), Stiftung Landdrostei, Pinneberg, Germany Revision, Bereznitsky – Berlin, Berlin, Germany White, Anya Tish Gallery, Houston, Texas, USA Dualities, Anya Tish Gallery, Houston, Texas, USA Collections Adelta Finanz AG (Düsseldorf, Germany), AXA (Cologne, Germany), Bach, Langheid & Dalmayr (Cologne, Germany), Booz-Allen & Hamilton (Frankfurt a. M., Germany), Denk GmbH (Berlin, Germany), Emprise Consulting GmbH (Düsseldorf, Germany), Ernst & Young Deutsche Allgemeine Treuhand AG (Frankfurt a. M., Germany), Fast Trade AG (Cologne, Germany), Hewlett Packard Germany (Böblingen, Germany), NEW AG (Mönchengladbach, Germany), ProFonds GmbH (Munich, Germany), PSD Bank RheinRuhr (Düsseldorf, Germany), PwC Deutsche Revision AG (Düsseldorf, Germany), Qiagen AG (Hilden, Germany), Sparkasse (Herne, Germany), Arsenal Municipal Gallery (Białystok, Poland), Taylor Wessing (Düsseldorf, Germany)


text: Meredith Loper, Dorothee Baer-Bogenschütz translation: Nathalie Krall photo: Maxim Wakultschik layout: Oleg Yushko

Anya Tish Gallery • 4411 Montrose Blvd., Houston, TX 77006 • 713.524.2299 • anyatishgallery.com



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