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INSTITUTE OF THE CONJURING ARTS STUDIO 4.2 : GARDEN CITY | STEVEN MAN | 070965063


contents

prequel

part 1

theory & concept

part 2

brief & research

part 3

proposal

part 4

tectonic design

part 5

regulations

part 6

design process

part 7

self assessment

part 8


1.1

acknowledgements

1.2

introduction

prequel

part 1

theory & concept

part 2

brief & research

part 3

proposal

part 4

tectonic design

part 5

regulations

part 6

design process

part 7

self assessment

part 8


I would like to thank the following for their generous contribution and support to the completion of this project:

acknowledgements

1.1

Martin Gledhill Matthew Wickens Chris Fenton Darren Morcom Jack Marshall Peter Norris

- - - - - -

4th year coordinator Studio tutor Environmental engineer Structural engineer Landscape architect Regulatory compliance


g a r d e n c i t y - alienation, nature & reconciliation The Garden City reconnects man to nature with the city as the mediator between the two. The modern city has a tendency to lose touch with nature, and as such, we feel the need for exclusion from the city to experience the natural. However, how we are truly alienated from nature is not by the physical and literal connection of city and landscape, but instead it is the alienation from the untouched state of mind. Nature, from Latin natus “born”, describes the innate qualities that living beings possess from birth. Over time, we lose touch with this state and life becomes unworthy. As once described by Socrates with his aphorism, “The unexamined life is not a life worth living for a human being”, we must question everything for happiness, yet with modern life, there is a degree of acceptance without question amongst people. Magic distorts reality allowing the questioning of reality, and permitting the reconciliation with the innate qualities that we once possessed.

Our task is not to return to Nature, in the manner of Rousseau, but to find the natural man again. - Carl Gustav Jung, “The Earth has a Soul”

1.2

This project thus proposes an institute for the conjuring arts, promoting the art of magic and its acquainted artforms.

introduction


2.1

bath history

2.2

concept

2.4

translating the concept

prequel

part 1

theory & concept

part 2

brief & research

part 3

proposal

part 4

tectonic design

part 5

regulations

part 6

design process

part 7

self assessment

part 8


magic - late 14c., “art of influencing events and producing marvels,” from O.Fr. magique, from L. magice “sorcery, magic,” from Gk. magike (presumably with tekhne “art”), fem of magikos “magical,” from magos “one of the members of the learned and priestly class,” from O. Pers. magush, possibly from PIE *magh- “to be able, to have power”

bath & magic

1

Bath is renowned as a spa town, with the properties of Bath spring water having historical and legendary connections. 863BC was the period in which the legend of Prince Bladud existed, where upon contracting leprosy, he was exiled from the kingdom to the untravelled part of the country as a swineherd. His pigs also contract leprosy. However, upon arrival around the Bath springs, his pigs bathed in the mud water and were cured of leprosy. Bladud, seeing this, baths in the mud also and is also cured. Upon return to the kingdom, Bladud founded the city of Bath in gratitude to the healing properties of the Bath waters. Although a legend, the Bath waters are still widely considered to possess a healing property. This belief carries through to the Roman period, around 43AD, where the town of “Aquae Sulis” is developed around Bath as a sanctuary of rest and relaxation. Over time, Bath became a central hub for entertainment and tourism throughout Britain and Europe.

2

3

2.1

Even today’s modern society of greater scepticism, Bath’s reputation as a spa town with waters of magical healing properties continues with the recent development of the Thermae Bath Spa.

bath history

1 Prince Bladud and his bathing pigs 2 Roman Baths of Aquae Sulis 3 Thermae Spa - Nicholas Grimshaw


magic The word magic can materialise many different ideas into a person’s mind. Some think of magic as an extraordinary power truly possessed by unique beings. Others associate it with a demonic state akin to witchcraft and sorcery. Then there are those that see it as a fun activity for children’s parties and other events. These may all stand true, however they all share a common attribute - magic takes the ordinary, turns it into something extraordinary and create a moment of suspension of disbelief.

1

2

alienation On further elaboration to the introduction, we see a reality around us as one that is governed by preconceptions. We do not really see reality - instead, we perceive it. As such, we often simply accept these preconceptions as reality and are alienated from possibilities that can arise from stepping away from these limitations and simply opening our minds to new possibilities.

2.2

On the contrary, a child is born into the world with no preconceptions of the world. Everything to the child is wondrous, since the child has no understanding of what the norm of the world is.

nature and reconciliation

concept

What magic tries to achieve is to allow a person to experience a clear, primal state of mind that is reminiscent to a child’s state of mind. This is the moment of astonishment. The state of reconciliation, in this case, is the point where a person, with Jung’s principles, finds his natural state again - his inner child.

3

... what these astonished adults are really trying to say, even though they’re not consciously aware of it, is that for a brief moment, they experienced a clear, primal state of mind that they associate with a child’s state of mind. Astonishment is not an emotion that’s created. It’s an existing state that’s revealed.

- Paul Harris, “The Art of Astonishment”

1 “The Sorceress” - Jan Van Der Velde, 1626 2 Close up magic performance - Helder Guimarães 3 Child in awe


deception & conviction To find one’s inner child through magic, we must understand the underlying principles of magic and how and why people are deceived. Ultimately, the modern audience knows that magic is nonexistent and are conditioned sceptics. They understand that logical procedures are used to achieve illogical results, and this is understood as deception. However, deception is not merely enough bring people to the desired state of mind. This must be elaborated with conviction. Conviction is created through the atmosphere in which the deception occurs. Only with conviction can the audience be immersed into a state of mind whereby there is suspension of disbelief.

1

Magic is therefore resultant of both deception and conviction working together. The journey of magic which the spectator experiences can be seen as analogous to a roller coaster - it is a series of paths, with rises and falls. These rises, or transitions, can be altered but the falls, immersions or plunges, are often steep and powerful. This ends with a final finale - the greatest plunge. This is the mental path.

professionalism

2.3

plunge

transition

plunge

transition

plunge

transition

What has been discussed would not be made possible if not for the secretive nature of magic. The beauty of magic’s ability to astonish lies in the unknown. Once that unknown is broken, all sense of deception is lost and the spectator returns to their limited perception of reality. It is thus important for the magician to be professional and abide to a formal code of conduct. As such, the magician should be educated and graduate as a dedicated practitioner of magic.

1 Conceptual diagram - “The Mental Path”

concept


translating the concept

2.4

1 2


2

translating the concept As derived from the conceptual development, two underlying principles are to be carried through. Relating to the idea of the mental path, what the Institute of the Conjuring Arts will attempt to do is to create a contained environment that is mostly introverted and focuses on opening the minds of people to a world of possibilities, represented by the concept model adjacent with a floating sphere within a box, surrounded by nearby buildings.

translating the concept

1 Magic in motion - photograph of myself performing playing card manipulations 2 Art of Astonishment - spectators experiencing the moment of astonishment 3 Conceptual model - A world of possibilities

2.5

The second principle to be carried through is the idea of professionalism and the graduation of the magician. The graduation marks an important stage in the career of the magician and in that respect, should be celebrated. The building will therefore create a ceremonial route that emphasizes the importance of graduation and ascension to a higher status.


3.1

brief & intentions

3.3

programme & accommodation

3.5

site

3.7

site analysis

3.9

site history

3.11

precedents study

prequel

part 1

theory & concept

part 2

brief, & research

part 3

proposal

part 4

tectonic design

part 5

regulations

part 6

design process

part 7

self assessment

part 8


institute of the conjurings arts This brief proposes a new entertainment venue within the city of Bath, promoting, exhibiting and educating avid enthusiasts of the conjuring arts and its associates affiliates. As a city that is renowned for its tourism and its reputation for its spas and entertainment, Bath makes for an ideal location for the Institute of the Conjuring Arts. The scheme would promote the somewhat forgotten art of magic back to the public’s eyes and reinstate magic’s ability to astonish and bring wonder to a person. With the current idle nature of the youthful population in the United Kingdom, the educational aspect of the scheme would bring more enjoyable extra-curricular activities and greater self-satisfaction to the youth. The education and training of magic is not limited to only the youth, but many adults would participate in this training, to become a graduated member of the society of magicians.

3.1

As an entertainment venue, an urban location towards the city centre is an ideal preference for access to the building. Within the urban context, it must also be within close proximity to transport access, to promote the accessibility to the venue. The location will also serve as a metaphorical connection to the conceptual and historical ideas of the magical healing properties of Bath spring water. This project will be funded privately as well as from one of the largest societies of magic, The Magic Circle. As an entertainment venue that proposes to increase the tourism industry of Bath, the Bath & North East Somerset Council will contribute to the financing of the building costs.

brief & intentions

On a personal level, this project will combine my passion for performing magic and architecture to create a building that will take the principles of magic to create a metaphysical connection between magic and architecture.


pastiche or progress This was the title of my history and theory essay. Over the course of architectural history, different architectural styles have reflected the culture and technology of the different periods in time. However, within the twenty-first century Western society, it seems that there is a saturation in creativity and the architectural styles we create now do not reflect our cultural or technological status. Instead, there has been an abundance in pastiche architecture, which is easily evident in the city of Bath. Change in styles inflict stronger negative connotations rather than positive in the minds of the community. Indeed, much of the success of the city of Bath is indebted to the consistency of the limestone coloured facades and Georgian character of the buildings. However, it is evident that the mimicking of the styles has taking it’s toll, most particularly with the recent development of Southgate shopping quarter, with its overt use of prefabricated Bath stone panels. The result is a building that has no character except one that shows a lack of creative consideration.

3.2

Without change, the city will not progress. As such, it is necessary to allow architectural styles to adapt to and respect the existing site conditions, yet still attempt bold moves that deflect from pastiche. By doing so, we allow for a new story of architectural movements to be told and allow the urban fabric to evolve.

brief & intentions

Exploded overview


astonish The building will provide multiple functions for entertainment purposes of which the circulation between the rooms create the spaces of conviction.

educate

programme & accommodation

3.3

A ceremonial route will enrich the experience of the graduating student. Between these routes will be the required educational spaces.

unite The circulation will mark one of the most important characteristics of the building. Parts of these spaces will be shared between the public and the private.


programme & accommodation MAIN PERFORMANCE THEATRE with backstage The theatre will form the heart of the entertainment route where large scale conjuring acts are performed. FOYER The theatre will be served by a foyer space holding a bar and associated toilets. CLOSE UP ROOMS x 2 These are important performance rooms that seat approximately twenty people and provide a comfortable environment for intimate magic performances. LOUNGE with VIP rooms As well as an area for drinks and food for the public, the lounge will provide smaller table magic performances. MUSEUM/EXHIBITION The history of magic extends back thousands of years, with evidence of magic performances in Egyptian periods. Exhibiting this information will bring the art of magic to a wider audience. SHOP The shop will provide magic props for beginners and the experienced. LIBRARY with archive The library is a key space that preserves the documentation of magic of old and new. SEMINAR ROOM x 2 The spaces for learning are generous spaces that double up as performance rooms should more space be required. CENSORS ROOM Here is where the student graduates to the professional magician. This will be towards the end of the ceremonial route.

COURTYARD The mediator between the old and the new, the courtyard also creates a space of relief from the transitional circulation spaces. CIRCULATION As one of the most important elements of the building, this will form are large proportion of the building, with many different transitional phases.

programme & accommodation

RECEPTION and bar As well as directing people to different spaces, the reception area will act as an immersion space into the main bulk of the building.

3.4

DINING ROOM This room is a ceremonial room where upon graduation, the magician will have a formal dining experience with the teachers and friends and family.


1

site choice & surroundings The site is located at the current derelict Gainsborough Building, and the Bath Pet Store on the road opposite. A number of reasons governed the choice of the site. Relating to the conceptual idea of the magical properties of Bath water, the proximity of the spas would help exaggerate the underlying principles of the design. Located in an urban context, the car parks and local public transport are mapped to demonstrate the ease of access around the site. Local attractions are mapped out to locate the ideal site for an entertainment venue, identifying the busiest streets and the proximity to these areas.

2

3.5

The GAINSBOROUGH BUILDING and the BATH PET STORE became the chosen site, matching the ideal requirements above. One of the most important reasons for the Gainsborough building as a site choice is its historic and derelict nature. The existing building would provide as a perfect site for challenge the ideas of pastiche architecture and provide a path for progression. Building into the existing site of the Gainsborough Building, what the brief will propose is to use the existing building as a hotel (as currently under planning), and the Insititute of the Conjuring Arts will infill the site. The hotel would occasionally provide accommodation for the performers.

site

1 Existing site photo - Bath pet store and Gainsborough Building 2 Existing site photo - Gainsborough Building


komedia comedy club main shopping area

bath abbey

roman baths odeon cinema thermae bath spa

SITE GAINSBOROUGH BUILDING & BATH PET STORE hobgoblin pub

lamb & lion pub manvers street carpark

southgate shopping quarter

bus station

bath spa railway station

3.6

corn street carpark

site

Site plan demonstrating local attractions and location of public transport and carparks


1

conditions The sunpath diagram and shadow section on the right both demonstrate the lighting around the site and how other buildings affect the site, in particular with the site of the Gainsborough Building. The wall heights of the immediately surrounding buildings do not exceed the height of the Gainsborough Building. Consequently, in accordance to the shadow section, even at winter solstice when the sun is at its lowest point, the shadows cast from the buildings opposite reach only to the first floor of the Gainsborough Building.

site analysis

3.7

Although the Insititute of the Conjuring Arts is most an introverted building, focusing on its internal spaces, it is interesting to note the possible views from the building and how it may relate to these views. Predominantly speaking, the main views from the building would be to Bath Abbey, Southgate, and the adjacent park. The main views to the building are again from the park, Southgate and also from the City of Bath college.

2

12:00 summer solstice

12:00 winter solstice

The area around the building is mostly pedestrianised and with occasional delivery vans and several parking spaces. The pedestrian route is popular, with the park mostly busy and the shopping district nearby. Directly next to the site is the Lamb and the Lion pub which is often busy at night, as is the nearby Hobgoblin pub. Although noise levels from these pubs may be high, they are mostly high at night and at ground level, with minimal noise at upper levels.

1 Sunpath diagram 2 Shadow section


glass wall height - 12m roof height - 20m

wall height - 20m wall height - 14m

wall height - 9m

wall height - 5m wall height - 14m

3.8

wall height - 9-10m

main pedestrian routes dominant views from site main views to site

site analysis


1

2

pre-1900‘s The Gainsborough building was initially built as the small southern block for the residence of Dr. Charles Bave, in 1730, which was later to become the Alfred Hotel. Between 1747 to 1786, the Casualty Hospital and Bath City Infirmary and Dispernsary was established on Lower Borough Walls, in response to the alarmingly rise of serious injuries of labourers working on construction sites around the area.

site history

3.9

In 1824, architect John Pinch, merged the two establishments together, with an entrance to the new building on Beau Street. A small chapel is designed by G.P. Manners. Between 1863-64, the original building is extended with the addition of the Albert Wing by architect J.E. Gill. This building became the old Royal United Hospital.


3

4

post-1900‘s In 1932, the Royal United Hospital became too constricted and was thus moved to the green fields of Combe Park on the outskirts of Bath, where it continues to expand. The Bath Technical College occupies the building as an additional unit, for example the chapel converted as a dance studio. The building is occupied until 2005.

Royal United Hospital, Albert Wing. Photo circa. 1900 - Bath in Time Pre-demolition photo of courtyard space Dance theatre for Bath Technical College in existing chapel space Proposed visualisation of Spa Hotel

site history

1 2 3 4

3.10

In 2006, proposals for a new 97 bedroom Spa Hotel by the Bath Hotel and Spa Company. The southern block of the building on Lower Borough Walls was demolished as part of this, with the basement excavated also. Progress on the site has now been halted, leaving the site derelict.


1

2

kolumba art museum

precedent study

3.11

Peter Zumthor’s Kolumba Art Museum clearly exemplifies the use of fragments of an existing building to create a new building. The remarkably simple design permits a great juxtaposition between the old and the new, with the focus created upon the ruins of the old and the new perforated brickwork creating a dappled lighting effect that enhances the aesthetics of the old.

1 Kolumba Art Museum facade 2 Kolumba Art Museum bridge through ruins


1

2

neues museum David Chipperfield’s recent rebuilding of the Neues Museum received the well deserved RIBA European Award. The appreciation for the historical nature of the museum is undeniably evident. The juxtaposition of the old and the new allows one to allows one to clearly identify between the two. The new does not impose on nor imitate the old, but instead respects it with complimenting designs that use new technology and contemporary styles to blend the building together.

3.12 precedents study


precedent study

3.13

1 2


royal college of physicians

3

4

The success in the design of Denys Lasdun’s Royal College of Physicians lies in its well planned circulation. The reception distinctly sets itself as the entry to the celebratory route ahead, from the use of a level change. The Marble Hall holds the main stairwell that permits the ascension of the graduating physician The stairwell forms a hollow “core� of the building, with generous foyers surrounding the core. The hierarchical status increases as one ascends the stairwell, and the foyers provide a sense of freedom, whilst still retaining control of circulation.

3.14

In the building, the Censors Room lies on the ground floor, where the physician graduates and progresses up the stairwell into the library as a ceremonial ritual. This ties in with the ideas of ceremony with the progression of the magician.

Reception Marble Hall Main stairwell Stairs to upper floor

precedents study

1 2 3 4


4.1

overview

4.3

models

4.5

form

4.11

form derivation

4.13

floor plans

4.23

route

4.25

sections & elevations

4.29

visualisations

prequel

part 1

theory & concept

part 2

brief, & research

part 3

proposal

part 4

tectonic design

part 5

regulations

part 6

design process

part 7

self assessment

part 8


4.1 overview

aerial isometric overview of proposal


4.2 overview

aerial view of proposal


4.3 models

1:1000 site model


4.4 models

1:1000 site model


form

4.5


park day The view gained from the park is the prominent Corten clad theatre that sits on a perforated plinth. Surrounding this theatre is the Kalwall clad walkway, forming a relationship between the inside and outside. Silhouettes of moving people can be seen through the walkway from outside. The park itself will serve as an area of entertainment, providing areas for performance acts that draws peoples attention towards magic and to the building.

4.6

In the distance on the other side lies the main building, which is formed by another plinth holding a mysterious black box above. Along the right of the image, we see a hint of the black wall marking the entrance to the building.

form


sitting in context

form

4.7

Working with the ideas of progression from pastiche, the building form sits in context without dominating the area. The building gives itself presence from the buildings with its distinctive use of materials, most particularly with the perforated wall, which embodies the message of the piano nobile expressed amongst many other buildings in Bath, yet the extensive use of the rustication differentiates it from the typicality of Bath architecture. By utilising these ideas, what is achieved is a building that belongs to the site, yet creates a new piece of progression in the urban fabric of Bath.


4.8

form


4.9 form derivation

light penetration into existing adjacent building required

plinth created opposite site

on

linear building block formed to form courtyard allowing light to penetrate into existing building


4.10

plinth holds theatre block, which faces park area

building steps in to respect existing building, with upper floor stepping in to create sense of hierarchy

bridge extends across and wraps around theatre, “hooking� the box

form derivation


vision sketch of entrance

floor plans

4.11

initial plunge From the perceived reality, the user enters the building at basement level and are immersed into world of possibilities that is being created. The dappled lighting, created from the perforations on the floor of the library above, acclimatises the user into the subsequent spaces beyond. Within the basement floor, an underpass is formed to allow direct access for staff to the recording studios opposite. The main basement floor comprises of a water bound circulation space, with two close up magic rooms for smaller and more regular performances. A museum also lies in this floor, making the basement floor an area more designated as a public route.

reception/entrance visual


B01 B02 B03 B04 B05 B06 B07 B08 B09

reception toilets underpass office plant room close-up room close-up room museum/exhibition fire lobby

A

C

B09 B08

B07

B B

B06

4.12

B03

B05

B01

C B04 B02

A

floor plans

BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN


learning Two of the key spaces on this level are the seminar room and the library, forming two of the educational spaces within the building. The library is the heart of the learning route, holding and preserving a wealth on the history and learning of magic. Residing in an existing chapel, the bookshelves are custom built to fit within the windows to retain the holy nature to the space. The light penetrates into the room and to the perforations on the floor to create the dappling lighting of the reception below. The ground level forms the entrance to the building, and also contains an additional entrance for direct access into the lounge, which serves as a cafĂŠ/bar with performance of magic, and contains VIP rooms that may be rented for private functions.

4.13

This level also contains the courtyard space, acting as a space of relief from the darkness of the basement level. On the street opposite is a recording studio that controls the video recordings of the performances of the theatre above. It is also here that the exit of the building lies, where a moat marks the exit and when a performance is over, a steel grill rises to permit users to exit.

floor plans

library visual


G01 G02 G03 G04 G05 G06 G07 G08 G09 G10 G11 G12 G13 G14 G15

seminar room toilets fire lobby store shop library archive kitchen store lounge courtyard fire lobby store recording/editing studio exit lobby

A

C

G02

G03 G01

G04 G05 G13

B G11 G14

G15

B

4.14

G08 G07 G09

G06

C G10

A

floor plans

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


mediator The first floor comprises of another seminar room and a bar which serves the users of the seminar rooms. The bar links to the roof terrace, which faces the courtyard with stair access to the courtyard itself. It can be seen that the roof terrace and courtyard space act as a mediator between the old, existing building and the new black concrete mass.

4.15

On the street opposite is the lower level of the theatre space, where the stage and backstage lies.

floor plans

roof terrace visual


F01 F02 F03 F04 F05 F06 F07 F08 F09 F10 F11 F12 F13

roof terrace seminar room fire lobby store bar lounge vip room vip room fire lobby backstage stage main theatre exit lobby

A

C F02 F03

F01

F04 F05 F10 F11

B

F09 F13

F12

B 4.16

F07

F08

F06

C

A

floor plans

FIRST FLOOR PLAN


transition On the second floor is where the publics crosses to the theatre side of the street. Prior to that, they are greeted with a generous foyer space that provides food, drinks and toilets for the performance ahead. As they progress towards the theatre, they pass through the bridge which they saw from outside. The bridge comprises of a Kalwall cladding, that allows faded views from the outside, whilst from the inside, the user cannot see out and is greeted by a diffuse lit wall panel.

4.17

The user will enter the theatre at the higher level of the raking, and immediately are immersed into the environment created by the theatre.

floor plans

kalwall bridge visual


S01 S02 S03 S04 S05 S06 S07 S08

fire lobby toilets store bar foyer bridge fire lobby main theatre

A C S01

S02

S03

B

S05 S04

S07

B

S06

4.18

S08

C

A

floor plans

SECOND FLOOR PLAN


graduation The third floor marks an important space for the graduating student. The student ascends up the ceremonial route formed by the main stairwell and enter the Censor’s room. In there, they will graduate and enter directly into a formal dining room, where the graduate’s family and friends would be in there waiting. The space contrasts the dark and acts as a release from the constricting spaces below, with large square windows facing the courtyard. The differentiation from this space to below also marks the hierarchical status of this level.

4.19

On the theatre side, there is an upper tier for additional seating.

floor plans

celebratory dining room visual


T01 T02 T03 T04 T05

fire lobby kitchen dining room censor’s room upper tier

T01 T02 T03

T04

T05

4.20 floor plans

THIRD FLOOR PLAN


1

3

2

4

layers of revelation

route

4.21

The transition between the floors is marked by the revelation of the Silver Birch trees of the courtyard. At basement level, we find the tree trunks hinting the presence of a tree above. As we progress to the ground floor, a stacked glass wall inhibits the vision of the tree beyond and creates a sense of wonder. Finally, at the first floor, a large window panel reveals the courtyard space and the trees below. These apertures also provide for breaks in the constricted environment created by the black concrete and dark spaces.

1 first floor revelation visual 2 stacked glass wall providing a blurred vision of courtyard


the top floor steps in from the main structure and consists of the censor’s room where the learner graduates to become the professional magician and a celebratory dining room lies adjacent to it the user crosses the bridge to the theatre where they enter on the upper level

as the performance ends, the user descends down the raking to the lower floor and exit down a lobby

the pool also acts as a moat, preventing the entry to the building via this opening

the first floor consists of another seminar room and a bar and roof terrace which serves as areas for breaks for the learner

the ground floor consists of the entrance to the main building as well as a separate entrance to the lounge this floor serves both the public and members needs with a magic shop for the public and educational rooms for the members entrance to lounge

4.22

the water pool holds a steel grill below which rises to form a walking platform when required

as the user ascends to the second floor, they reach the foyer level which serves the theatre on the street opposite

MAIN ENTRANCE

shared route performance route public spaces educational route

route

members spaces

basement floor holds two close-up rooms and the museum providing an immediate relationship between the public users and building


sections & elevations

4.23


4

5

6

1

2

3

12

7

9

8

10

13

11

14

4.24

9 v.i.p. room 10 kitchen 11 plant room 12 lounge first floor 13 lounge ground floor 14 toilets

sections & elevations

SECTION A-A

1 seminar room 2 toilets 3 museum 4 fire lobby 5 finishing kitchen 6 toilets 7 bar 8 shop


1 6

7 8

5

2

9

3

sections & elevations

4.25

10

11

4

SECTION B-B

1 theatre 2 exit lobby 3 recording studio 4 underpass 5 fire lobby 6 bridge 7 foyer with bar 8 bar

9 shop 10 performer entrance 11 close-up room


4

8

5

3 1 6

9

4.26

2

1 backstage 2 storeroom 3 stage 4 upper tier 5 theatre 6 plenum 7 recording studio 8 walkway 9 plant room

sections & elevations

SECTION C-C

7


guided entrance

visualisations

4.27

A black concrete wall marks the entry to the building, contrasting to the existing Bath stone block work and the new Bath stone coloured concrete. An opening is formed as a square cutout of the wall which opens on rails, sliding back, marking the entrance. The user will notice the Corten clad office, reminiscing the Corten of the prominent theatre box. The formed path allows for a staircase and a lift to permit a similar experience for the able bodied and the disabled.

left - view from City of Bath College area above - aerial view of entrance


4.28

visualisations


counterbalance

1

2

4.29

The basement forms one of the critically integral spaces that describe the concept. The water relates to the ideas of rejuvenation, bringing the visitor back to a child’s state of mind. The courtyard above is supported by structural columns that also have an outer skin, with a reflective inner surface allowing daylight to scatter into the basement. The column lights the water beneath, enhancing the effect substantially. This underlighting of the space is balanced with trunks of trees that ascend out into the courtyard. An opening for the tree permits light to transcend down into the basement. What is created is a space with light sources from above and below. These trees also play a part in the ideas of rejuvenation and growth.

visualisations

1 vision sketch demonstrating counterbalancing 2 physical model of structural column/lightwell


4.30

visualisations


museum/exhibition

visualisations

4.31

The dark space of the museum, exaggerated by the black concrete ceiling and floor, creates a sense of intimacy and mystery. Only the displays are lit, retaining control of the lighting conditions within.

1 vision sketch demonstrating ascension route


1

ascension

4.32

Comparable to the Royal College of Physicians, the stairwell forms the heart of the building. The stairwell is lit from above with a large glass panelled roof, forming an atrium at this space. The perforated wall shines southern light into the space, creating a dappled lighting effect. The glass balustrade exaggerates the dappling further.

visualisations


1

2

visualisations

4.33

inner garden The courtyard space intends to epitomise the ideas of introversion, with the main building and the adjacent hotel containing this inner courtyard. The forest like experience departs the mind from the external environment and focuses the person’s attention towards the inner side of the building.

1 vision sketch of courtyard “forest� 2 landscape sketch


4.34

visualisations


theatre - audience

visualisations

4.35

The form of the theatre provides a great sense of intimacy between the spectator and the performer. Magic works on a very personal level and to bring the inner child back to the person, the spectator must feel connected to the performer. Although a medium scaled theatre, the theatre still permits this level of connection.


4.36

visualisations


exit The performer’s perspective of the theatre contrasts greatly to the audience’s due to the theatre’s form. What is created is an intimate relationship for the spectators and an expansive view for the performer.

visualisations

4.37

Upon the finale of the performance, the spectators are guided towards the exit. The exit is formed by a pool of water, acting as a moat making the exit inaccessible from outside. As the spectators leave, a steel grill rises from the pool acting as a walking platform, and the doors open. The spectators are given a second finale as they exit from the theatre to the park, returning them back to the reality they know with a heightened awareness of possibilities.

closed

open


4.38

visualisations


5.1

structure strategy

5.5

construction details

5.10

materials

5.11

environment strategy

prequel

part 1

theory & concept

part 2

brief, & research

part 3

proposal

part 4

tectonic design

part 5

regulations

part 6

design process

part 7

self assessment

part 8


stacked boxes The structure within the main building comprises mainly of a stacking system. The courtyard area is formed as a separate structural system itself, with the columns/lightwells supporting the floor courtyard floor. Although the building steps in and out as it progresses up, there is a main primary structure that supports that majority of the walls and floors. As the building steps in and out, the primary structure continues, with new beams supporting the new structure and are not of excessive lengths. The top floor will simply rest on the structural roof slab of the second floor.

third floor carries little mass and steps into building and simply rests on roof slab

5.1

cantilever formed and supported by primary and secondary structure building steps in forming a new secondary structure line to support floors above courtyard structure held by columns/lightwells

structural strategy

primary structure formed by main structural walls in line with one another


theatre - structure The theatre’s structure is composed of a steel skeletal structure. Cranked beams allow for the raking of the theatre, and the base beams sit on both sides of the structure, on the walls and columns provided. The theatre is braced in both directions, permitting wind loads to be carried through to the walls and columns below.

5.2 structural strategy


bridge structure The bridge structure comprises of a steel box frame with braced members. Doing so allows for a smaller members, creating a slender appearance.

structural strategy

5.3

The columns act primarily in compression with the bracing cables in tension, although they will both work in conjunction with one another to form a rigid structure. The bracing will allow wind loads to transfer to the walls of which the structure sits upon. The bridge structure will simply sit on the perforated wall below. The span between the walls is approximately 10m, which, being a relatively small distance allows for the slender structure.


5.4

structural strategy


section c-c theatre construction section

18mm plywood panels allow for concealment of stage lighting and channelling of air to ducts back to plenum roof finish to line with parapet level, formed by roof joists elevating 18mm plywood surface with black bitumen roof sheeting

construction details

5.5

roof comprising of steel frame with 100mm mineral wool insulation between beams with 100mm rigid insulation above beams and 18mm plywood beneath beams painted black

100mm thick in-situ cast concrete (bath stone coloured) from aluminium formwork (to provide for smooth finish) outer skin with 100mm SIB acting as formwork with 100mm thick in-situ cast concrete (bath stone coloured) inner skin

200mm black concrete slabs with 50mm thick GA4050 insulation board with 50mm screed finish


corten cladding system

3mm Cor-ten hook on facade outer skin standard rainscreen carrier system 100mm SIB with vapour barrier on outer face 100mm steel skeleton frame

2x 15mm Soundbloc

e l e v a t i o n - theatre unwrapped

construction details

bay

internal

5.6

douglas fir clad finish


section a-a part construction section

100mm thick in-situ cast black concrete from aluminium formwork (to provide for smooth finish) outer skin with 100mm SIB acting as formwork with 100mm thick in-situ cast black concrete inner skin

construction details

5.7

10mm thick fire resistant glass glued together to form stacked glass wall

300mm square conrete columns supporting 200mm thick concrete beams with 100mm insulation below and 12mm insulation above the beams 100 thick 1:2:4 concrete slab on 75 thick Celotex GA4075 insulation board on polythene DPM on sand blinded well consolidated 150 thick hardcore bed


p e r fo r a t e d w a l l c o n s t r u c t i o n p r o c e s s Acrylic rods are glued onto aluminium formwork, and are arranged around the regular steel reinforcement. Between the reinforcement is a 100mm SIB, acting as formwork for the cavity wall.

Concrete with bath stone aggregate infills the formwork to form wall construction. The aluminium formwork is removed providing a smooth finish and exposing the acrylic rods.

5.8

bay

e l e v a t i o n - unwrapped perforated wall construction details


roof finish comprising of black bitumen roof sheeting on 18mm plywood resting on roof joists DPM above 100mm rigid insulation above steel beams with additional 100mm mineral wool insulation between beams

zinc capping on graded timber piece with DPM with Celotex TB4012 insulation beneath to form parapet and waterproofing steel gutter

construction details

5.9

“Verti-Kal� Kalwall panels comprising of external face sheet with internal aluminium grid and internal shatterproof face sheet infilled with fibreglass insulation

floor construction comprising of 70mm screed above 100mm mineral wool insulation between beams with additional 100mm rigid insulation below DPM with 18mm plywood below

50mm gap steel casing holding Kalwall panels insulated with Celotex TB4012 encased in zinc sheeting, sealed with silicon steel casing bolted to timber beam to hold Kalwall panel

kalwall bridge detail


Black concrete resides on the inner block of the building, creating a sense of secrecy, camouflaging the building’s mystery contained within.

Stacked glass is used both as a structural element, with a similar compressive strength as concrete, and as a conceptual element. The stacked glass provides a hindered perception of the space beyond, linking with the ideas of magic and secrecy.

Kalwall panels provide a hindered vision of the space within from the external side and do not permit views out, due to the diffusion of light. The panels provide a sense of intrigue for viewers outside as they see the silhouettes of people within, yet still maintains an introspective environment.

Corten panels clad the external surface of the theatre, contrasting with the external surroundings’ architectural language and as such, drawing a sense of intrigue.

5.10

In-situ cast bath stone coloured concrete, formed by the use of bath stone as an aggregate, is used to relate to the architectural language of the surrounding site conditions. What this achieves is a continual blend of the building into the existing urban fabric. The in-situ casting will provide a smooth finish, that contrasts with the perforations of the walls.

materials


rainwater & heat

environmental strategy

5.11

One of the key environmental opportunities of this building is its proximity to the Thermae Bath Spa and its hot Bath spring water source. The Hetling Borehole is one of the several boreholes around Bath that collect the Bath spring water to a higher tunnel level, where the water is filtered for use in the spa. The Hetling Borehole is located just on the northern side of the building, outside the Cross Baths. The proposition is that rainwater will be collected through a rainwater harvesting system, in the plant room, where the rainwater is filtered for use in toilets. This water is then pumped through a pipe system that descends towards the Hetling borehole tunnel, and the pipes coil above the tunnel, allowing excess heat to transfer through. The water from the spring water is in excess of 40-60oC. This provides an opportunity for the spring water to passively bring the filtered water to a descent hot water temperature. The water then returns to a boiler system, where the water will be heated further to the required temperatures, and used for hot water in toilets and also the underfloor heating within.


boiler rainwater filtered

rainwater pumped to tunnel with pipes running above tunnel serring hot spring water for thermae baths

5.12 environmental strategy

rainwater harvesting & ground source heat pump


theatre environment

walkway theatre

The ventilation of theatre space is mainly provided by passive means with the use of a plenum space. The plant room, servicing the theatre, is separated by the plenum which allows for a sound buffer, providing a sound conditioned environment in the theatre.

environmental strategy

5.13

Several of the perforations in the external wall will consist of grills providing ventilation into the plant room. The air will pass into the plenum, which will ascend through the raking of the theatre. The lighting strips at the top of the theatre are designed to collect the stagnant air and pump it back into the plant room.

plenum

plant room

recording / editing studio


s t a ck e f f e c t The primary ventilation strategy within the northern block is the use of the atrium for the purpose of the stack effect. The ventilation of the basement floor is permitted through the use of the glass casings surrounding the trees. The casings can be mechanically opened and closed to allow air to filter down into the basement and rise through the atrium. As the air passes through the basement, the water pool aids in the cooling of the area also. Opaque openings and grills are used to ventilate all other floors. All the air is drawn from the inner, courtyard area, allowing cleaner and purer air. Having the openings on the inner side also minimises street noise substantially.

5.14 environmental strategy


6.1

regulatory compliance

6.5

construction, design & management

6.8

budget

prequel

part 1

theory & concept

part 2

brief, & research

part 3

proposal

part 4

tectonic design

part 5

regulations

part 6

design process

part 7

self assessment

part 8


part B - fire safety B1 - means of warning & escape

B2 - Internal fire spread (linings)

Electronically operated fire/smoke alarm systems installed in all rooms, in compliance with BS 5839-1, part L1, with traditional audible and visual fire alarm systems. Less than 18m travelling distance from all rooms to a stairwell. Fire protected staircore provides disabled refuge space and is free from combustible materials. Fire protected staircore provided 4.5m away from open connection. All escape routes/exits are greater than the minimum of 1000mm wide. ­­Where two internal escape routes are provided (minimum one), the other stairwells may provide as escape routes. All doors to be installed as fire resistant doors.

­Primarily concrete internal finishes for walls and ceilings provides natural fire resistance. Kalwall on the bridge provides excellent fire retarant properties, achieving an internal reaction of B-s2,d0. Timber lining the interior of the theatre is to be coated with HR-Prof Fire Retardant solution in compliance with “Class O” BS 476: Part 6 & BS 476: Part 7.

-

-

15m 9m 12m

regulatory compliance

6.1

11m

enclosed escape core stairwells escape routes

18m


B3 - Internal fire spread (structure)

B4 - External fire spread

B5 - Access for the fire service

Building is predominantly constructed of concrete which provides a naturally excellent fire resistance. Where the building touches the adjacent building, the existing stonework will provide a naturally fire resistance. Sprinklers to be installed in all rooms, particularly where the building touches the adjacent building to reduce the risk of spread. Fire resistant glass to be used for stacked glass wall. All steel members on bridge and theatre are painted with intumescent paint to provide 90 minutes of fire resistance.

No combustible materials are used for the construction of the external walls or external cladding system that would be of harm to adjacent buildings. All wall surfaces that are in contact with adjacent buildings are constructed of concrete and have minimal risk of fire spread. Sprinkler system will reduce intensity of fire and reduce risk of spread. Rooflights for atirum and exit to comprise of minimum 4mm thick unwired glass, proving acceptable for use.

Access to the plant rooms, where fires are most likely, is provided in close proximity to the entrance of the northern block and to the service area of the theatre block. Firefighting shaft is provided on main street with direct access from ground level. Dry riser units installed in lobbied area of firefighting shaft. Atirum designed for stack effect also provides for venting of heat and smoke particularly from the basement level.

-

-

-

8m

6.2

15m

regulatory compliance


part M - circulation & access access to and within building Although the building itself is not designed with car parking, due to the abundance in public transport and car parking around town, one designated parking bar for the disabled will be proposed along Lower Borough Walls. This will replace one of the existing parking bays for permit holders only, and will be marked as a disabled bay for use for the building.

1

6.3

The main entrance is requires the user to descend to basement level. A lift shaft is introduced that permits the disabled to obtain a similar experience as walking down the steps. Through the building, the main circulation core is structured around a lift shaft that serves all floors, and again retaining a similar experience as people on the steps, as the lift uses glass doors facing the experience gained from the described layers of revelation. On the other side, two lift shafts are found - one serving the staff to the recording studio and one for the exiting of the spectator. All publicly accessible doors have an effective clear width of a minimum of 1000mm, including all circulation routes with the same width.

regulatory compliance

All steps are in compliance with Part M regulations, meeting the criteria for width, tread rise and going.

1 location of proposed disabled parking spot 2 lift shafts diagram


third floor

second floor

first floor lift shaft serving all floors of primary building

ground floor

lift shaft serving exit of theatre

6.4

lift shaft serving entrance

2

regulatory compliance

basement floor

lift shaft serving staff access to recording studio


construction process diagrams

1

construction, design & management 6.5

-site fenced off to provide servicing area for deliveries, with service vehicles and skips provided -main access to site from western entrance

DEMOLITION risk: -uncontrolled collapse management: -survey adjacent building to ensure stability -take care to not undermine adjacent foundations -demolish building in parts to control stability risk: -hazardous material found management: -survey site prior to commencement of works -ensure all workers wear correct equipment

2

-bath pet store manually demolished to reduce damage to adjacent building, with bath stone rubble collected and recycled for later use -foundation laid on northern block, and new retaining wall formed against pavement. -ground bearing floor slab laid. -road excavated for input of underpass

CONSTRUCTION risk: -falls from height management: -ensure all scaffolding work is CITB certified -safety harnesses are to be used is high risk falls areas

5

theatre skeleton erected on structural walls and columns below first and second floors of northern block erected with all floor slabs and structural walls

6

-theatre walls composed with external Corten cladding installed -roof around theatre constructed -structural roof of second floor installed with third floor erected on it

CONSTRUCTION risk: -collapsing of pavement upon building retaining wall management: brace pavement wall during construction process and work in parts to reduce risk of a full collapse


CONSTRUCTION risk: -instability of formwork for wall construction management: brace all formwork prior to commencement of infilling of wall

3

4

-foundations for area of theatre laid, with retaining wall built for underpass. -primary structure for northern block erected

7

-bridge structure constructed on ground level whilst rest of walkway constructed on building -glass roof of atrium craned and fixed on

CONSTRUCTION risk: -bridge structure falling management: -bridge is to be installed by crane with all persons to clear the area below, and bridge positioned with workers from both sides of the building

8

-bridge structure lifted into position with crane -roof of bridge constructed with kalwall panels fixed onto bridge

6.6 construction, design & management

MAINTENANCE risk: -fall from cleaning glass roof management: -install anchorage points on roof for rope attachment -professional IRATA certified staff are to clean the glazing

-the structure of the plinth for the theatre is erected. -ground floor slab of northern block installed with structural walls -temporary humidity and dust conditioned working cabin built in courtyard area (for reduced dust particles) for the erection of the stacked glass


management of construction and design process

construction, design & management 6.7

The site will be fully controlled with hoarding panels arranged to prevent public access to site, yet retaining access to the surrounding buildings. The panels will create the working area for deliveries of materials and facilities for workers. The facilities would include toilets, contractor’s office, sick bay and food preparation areas. Access to the site will be from the western entrance with an alternative entrance to site on the east, should the west entrance be occupied. A construction design management consultant will be appointed at the beginning of the construction process to ensure team responsibilities and health and safety within the working environment. Written risk assessments and site rules are to be compiled and provided on site prior to the construction phase. All workers will be given site inductions with all information and additional training required. Competence of all workers must be checked. The client must be aware of their duties. Due to site limitations, additional care must be taken to ensure minimal damage to the nearby buildings and reduce injuries. The site must be organised adequately to provide easy accessibility within the tight constraints of the site.

redirected traffic route, with temporary traffic lights

primary entrance to site

hoarding panels

alternative entrance to site redirected pedestrian access

site accessibility diagram


budget new build £3200 x 3129sqm reuse and refurbish £2000 x 342sqm complexity +15% landscape costs +silver birch trees 6 x £200

= £10,012,800 = £68,400 = £10,696,800 + £1,604 520 + £1,200

BUILD COST

= £12,302,520

contractor preliminaries & profit

+12%

+ £1,476,302.40

= £13,778,822.40

design & construction contingencies +10%

+ £1,377,822.24

= £15,156,704.64

consultant fees statutory fees

+ £3,031,340.92 + £378,917.61

+20% +0.025%

TOTAL PROJECT COST ESTIMATE (excl. VAT)

= £18,566,963.76 6.8

lifespan Although the total cost estimate is high, the building’s lifespan will compensate for its expenses. The concrete and Corten require little maintenance, and are designed to weather for aesthetic purposes. Having the majority of the structure as predominantly concrete provides great longevity for the building, and the building will ultimately be designed to last greater than 100 years.

budget


7.1

design process

prequel

part 1

theory & concept

part 2

brief, & research

part 3

proposal

part 4

tectonic design

part 5

regulations

part 6

design process

part 7

self assessment

part 8


7.1

single site

design process

In the initial stages of the project, the chosen site consisted of only the Gainsborough building site. The same ideas of the transitions and the plunge were retained but in the confines of a limited site. The theatre box would protrude from the site, creating a hinting of the main theatre, whilst the buildng generally steps in to a pyramidical form. The stepping allowed the top floor as the Censor’s room, similar to the final outcome, showing the route of ascension. The building also stepped in on the side facing the hotel, permitting light to penetrate to the hotel.


7.2

extending the site

park frontage

The use of only the single site became evidently unrealistic, and as such, after the first interim crit, the site was extended to the Bath pet store across the road. This allowed a new route to be formed, with the spectator crossing the theatre to be returned towards the entrance. After the performance, the spectator would view a glimpse of the park before returning to the other side via a secondary bridge.

The returning route became convoluted and as such, a more convincing route was developed whereby the user exits towards the park after the performance, creating the final plunge. The idea of a balcony for magicians to perform for the park area was proposed, however this was soon rejected to retain the ideas of introversion.

design process


design process

7.3


7.4 night

design process

final form - park


prequel

part 1

theory & concept

part 2

brief, & research

part 3

proposal

part 4

tectonic design

part 5

regulations

part 6

design process

part 7

self assessment

part 8


8.1

strengths of the work presented

weaknesses evident

improvement

This project has been a true test to my beliefs and dedication to architecture, and also my passion for magic. This project has given me the unique opportunity to research deeper into the meaning of magic, its relationship with people and the psychology and philosophical understandings of magic. My interest in philosophy has driven the conceptual basis of the project. I have thoroughly enjoyed this project, and although there were dispiriting moments, the problems would be resolved and the enthusiasm for the project increased. I hope that this report will have demonstrated my passion for magic and the enjoyment of designing a building I feel truly connected to.

Although I have tried to allow myself to hand draw ideas more for this project, my drawing skills have not yet improved to a self satisfactory level. I understand that the project feels over-visualised, and as such, the project can become too overwhelming and difficult to absorb.

Were I to further improve the project, I would focus on the develop on the relationship between the theatre and the park, and also on the improvement of the form of the main building to allow additional light to enter the courtyard space. I feel that some of the initial ideas of the physical relationship between the theatre and the park have been lost through progress, and is possible to reinstate this relationship.

One of the targets I set to aim was to design against pastiche and to allow the city to progress. I feel that the building has effectively done so, fitting in with the urban context whilst still differentiating from its surroundings. I also believe that I was able to represent the building coherently in the form of drawings and visuals, as well as descriptively.

self assessment

I feel strongly that I have managed my time well, and this is due to my appropriate decision making, speed of work and healthy resting periods.

As for the building itself, I feel that the foyer areas of the first and second floor of the main building are not yet fully resolved, and could be further elaborated.

The courtyard, although designed receive daylight, is still a relatively dark space for an external environment. The building retains a certain bulkiness that has room for improvement to allow better light penetration into the courtyard.


1

conclusion & future aims During the making of this project, I feel successful in the response to the brief and in the progression of my education. This project has allowed me to test my abilities and further, pushing me beyond the normal confines of my pragmatic approach to design and allowed for a philosophical approach to design. I aim to progress from architecture in the coming years by using my education in the working environment. I wish to work abroad, learning about different cultures and different working ethics before returning to continue and finish my architectural education and aspirations.

8.2

2

self assessment

1 final crit presentation 2 recorded performance of magic trick demonstrating the art of astonishment


Institute of the Conjuring Arts