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BOARD OF DIRECTORS

HANDBOOK Fifth Revision © 2009


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

HANDBOOK Contents

Section 1

Introduction

1

Section 2

Mission and Core Values

5

Section 3

Biblical and Theological Foundations

6

Section 4

By-Laws and Responsibilities

7

Section 5

Directory

13

Section 6

Guidelines for Officers

14

Section 7

Campus Ministry Interns

20

Section 8

Student Ministry Model

25

Section 9

UNC Charlotte Five Year Calendar

27

Section 10

PCUSA Campus Ministry Assessment

29

Section 11

ELCA Annual Review

31

Section 12

Western NC United Methodist Assessment

33

Section 13

Review of Financial Records

35

Section 14

Notes

37


Board of Directors Handbook

Cooperative Christian Ministry in Higher Education

Section 1

Introduction Cooperative Christian Ministry in Higher Education (CCMHE) is the official campus ministry for four major mainline Protestant denominations in the Charlotte North Carolina metropolitan area. Today CCMHE is a 501c3 non profit organization governed by a Board of Directors serving the University of North Carolina at Charlotte as the only mainline protestant campus ministry. CCMHE is in ministry through an active student group, United Christian Fellowship, a young adult worship component called Just-Worship, a student Habitat for Humanity build guided by HomeWork, a Montana Summer Internship Program, and various other ministries that bridge students to Christ. In the early 1960’s the University’s founder Miss Bonnie Cone brought a young Methodist minister from a private college in the Midwest to the new Charlotte College to develop a religious studies and a religious life program. In 1963 the Rev. Dr. Loy Witherspoon, hosted his first ecumenical meeting of students as the new campus minister. Under his direction a covenant was established between the Presbyterians and the Methodists that has continued to this day. In 1966 the Baptists, Catholics, and Moravians arrived on campus to begin their own campus ministries. As the university city area blossomed, other churches reached out to the new student populations. During this time Dr. Witherspoon arranged for each campus ministry to have an office in the new high rise residence halls on campus. Further, Dr. Witherspoon developed an Office of Religious Affairs under the leadership of the Student Affairs division. Additionally, Dr. Witherspoon organized an interfaith council on campus called United Religious Ministry. In the 1970’s the Episcopal Church planted a new campus ministry at UNC Charlotte. Hosting weekly Eucharist, fellowship activities, and mission trips. Being heavily involved in the justice and peace movement in protest to the Vietnam War, the Canterbury Club grew to be UNC Charlotte’s largest and most active campus ministry. In response to the Canterbury Club’s effectiveness, the Methodist and Presbyterian campus ministry hired a full-time campus minister allowing Dr. Witherspoon to devote his energy to university activities and the new campus minister to student ministry. The 1970’s were particularly successful times for both Canterbury and Methodist-Presbyterian Campus Ministry. In 1971, Dr. Witherspoon and a board of directors incorporated the Methodist-Presbyterian Campus Ministry with the state of North Carolina naming it Cooperative Christian Ministry in Higher Education—a legal name still carried. Shortly thereafter, Witherspoon and the board gained the 501c3 charitable status with the Internal Revenue Service. In 1979, Dr. Witherspoon began discussions on the possibility of UNC Charlotte building a chapel on campus. However, in 1981 North Carolina Attorney

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General Rufus Edmisten declared to Chancellor E.K. Fretwell that the primary effect of the chapel was “to advance religious thought on the UNCC campus,” and the “university should not proceed to implement their proposal to construct a Center for Religion and Living and should explore means for reducing the University’s involvement with URM policies and program.” Also in the 1980’s the university gained groups like Campus Crusade for Christ, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, Campus Outreach and the Alpha Theta, the Lutheran student group. The Lutherans, like the Episcopalians, Methodists and Presbyterians offered weekly programs, holy communion and service opportunities for students. By the late 1980’s, however, the Episcopal and the Lutheran programs were suffering from the undercurrent of the highly fundamentalist para-church groups. In 1988 Alpha Theta made a request to Advent Lutheran Church on Highway 49 and to the North Carolina Lutheran Synod that a student center be constructed. Interested in this proposal, Advent Lutheran began to explore the issue further with several of its members. It was decided that the Christian Education wing of the church could be converted to a student space, provided the NC Lutheran Synod would help fund a new sanctuary space. The request was granted and named after one benefactor, Mrs. Blackwelder and backed by a major donor anonomously. With the new student center ready the Lutherans made a covenant communion with the Methodist and Presbyterian Campus Ministry to consolidate the two campus ministries and create a new ecumenical identity, United Christian Fellowship (UCF), although the ministry retained the CCMHE name legally. The Lutherans agreed to equate their funding levels through cash, the use of office equipment, the use of the new Blackwelder student center at Advent Lutheran Church and the funding of a part-time campus ministry assistant. During this transition, a professional study was conducted of the ministry providing needed visioning for the future. In 1992, the United Religious Ministries and Chancellor James Woodward hired Little & Associates Architects to build a United Religious Ministries building on the campus of UNC Charlotte. The $3 million facility would house offices for campus ministers, worship space for 350, a theater, a coffee house, classrooms, and a lounge. Yet again, the proposal was blocked due to church-state issues. However, in 1999 Chancellor James Woodward gained permission from Miss Bonnie Cone to create a meditation center on campus as a memorial to her great contributions to her dedicated services to the community. Wash Hatem Nelson Architects created a program center around the importance of intimacy and mood and the State of North Carolina along with the UNC system approved the site upon Miss Bonnie’s death. Also in 1999 the North Carolina Diocese of the Episcopal Church stopped funding the UNC Charlotte Canterbury Club and directed their funds to a new chaplaincy at Davidson College. This sudden move shocked the university community, especially those who were Episcopalian. Immediately

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CCMHE began a dialogue with the former Episcopal chaplain and Episcopalian university faculty members. The dialogues resulted in a request from the North Carolina Diocese for CCMHE to start serving the Episcopal Church as the official campus ministry. In 2000, the Board of Directors launched a special task force, The Campaign for Students, to raise funds to endow the ministries and programs of CCMHE. The task force consisted of 12 members headed by Dr. Loy Witherspoon and a group of advocates from Myers Park United Methodist Church in Charlotte. A fundraising booklet, a video narrated by Mike McKay of WDAV in Davidson, and activity towards a silent campaign directed to reach a small number of people for donations began. However, the group at Myers Park halted the progress of the campaign due to certain health issues of Dr. Witherspoon. On March 8, 2003 Miss Bonnie Cone died. The memorial booklet produced by the Chancellor’s office stated “in final recognition of her role in the history of this institution, Miss Bonnie will be permanently interred on the UNC Charlotte campus, thereby assuring that she is forever with the students she so dearly loved.” In 2007 UNC Charlotte took a bold step to remove all campus ministry office presence. Intervarsity, Mission 28, the Catholic Campus Ministry and CCMHE were to vacate by June 2007. The Baptist Campus Ministry would have the same fate by June 2008. Moreover, under the direction of the Office of Religious Affairs, the university began to remove faculty-staff privileges from campus ministers, begin to refer to all ministers as “faith affiliates” and limit building access, mail, telephone, and other privileges Dr. Witherspoon worked hard to achieve. Meanwhile denominational cutbacks forced CCMHE to rethink campus ministry funding. As a result in 2006 CCMHE with Advent Lutheran began renovation of the CCMHE Student Center to update the student space as well as provide storage and office space for the campus ministry. In October 2007 the campus ministry underwent a thorough quadrennial review process administered by the Lutheran Church’s campus ministry section based in Chicago. CCMHE received numerous commendations including being declared a “model campus ministry.” Despite both good and bad times in ministry, CCMHE has prevailed. It’s theology and history itself contribute to a rationale for ecumenical ministry despite the fact that these connections have always been made out of financial necessity. Regardless, the past forty years has taught the UNC Charlotte community that campus ministry is best done ecumenically because such ministry demonstrates a gospel truth that different “kinds” of Christians can work together, build partnerships, worship, pray and serve together the same Lord, Jesus Christ.

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Section 2

Mission and Core Values The CCMHE Mission: The purpose of CCMHE is to help students live life to the full, connecting them to God, to one another, and to great faith experiences.

CCMHE Core Values: •

To make disciples of Jesus Christ.

To establish ways for students, staff and faculty in the university area to reach up in worship and praise to God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

To reach out to the campus community proclaiming the gospel in ways that seek, welcome and gather students and others into Christ’s body.

To encourage students and others to reach in and develop a new, or strengthen, their relationship with God and offer ways of invitation for students to make Christian commitments.

To nurture students through worship, fellowship, prayer and service, all grounded in faithful, but reasoned, interpretation of the scriptures.

To send forth students in the grace of God toward a life of Christian vocation and calling.

To advocate the moral use of knowledge and social justice, advocacy and mercy ministries and thus influence the campus community to see the world as God sees the world.

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Section 3

Biblical & Theological Foundations for Ecumenical Ministry John 17:11 “...that they may be one, as we are one.” 1 Corinthians 1:10-13 “...that there be no divisions among you...Has Christ been divided?”

2 Corinthians 5:17-18 “...everything has become new! ...God...has given us the ministry of reconciliation.” Galatians 3:26-28 “for in Christ Jesus you are all children of God through faith...There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer male and female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus.”

The CCMHE Board of Directors Confession of Faith We come from many Christian churches: It is not necessary to our work together that each person involved states the Christian faith in precisely the same way or even that we take up all the theological debates of the centuries. Yet, as an ecumenical ministry on a large campus, there is much that we can say together about our Christian faith and unity. Through Word and the Sacraments we learn that we are together the body of Christ called and empowered to serve the world God created, following the model of the ministry of Jesus Christ. We believe that God’s creative, saving, and healing presence has always moved and is now moving towards a good world in which there would be harmony and justice among all aspects of creation, a world which would by its very order praise God, its maker. Our common mission and concern for students and all those engaged in the academy affirms the unity of Christ’s church and seeks to make its unity more visible to the world.

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Section 4

CCMHE By-Laws and Board Responsibilities I.

CREATING THE ARTICLES The Presbytery of Charlotte of the Presbyterian Church (USA), together with the North Carolina and Western North Carolina Annual Conferences of the United Methodist Church, together with the North Carolina Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, together with the North Carolina Diocese of the Episcopal Church (USA), agree to cooperate in the Support and administration of the Cooperative Christian Ministry in Higher Education, Inc., of Charlotte North Carolina.

II.

THE NAME This cooperation shall be known as Cooperative Christian Ministry in Higher Education, Incorporated, a nonprofit 501c3 North Carolina Cooperation, hereinafter referred to as CCMHE.

III.

THE PURPOSE The purpose of CCMHE shall be to develop and maintain a cooperative Christian campus ministry of the Presbyterian, United Methodist, Evangelical Lutheran, and Episcopal denominations, hereinafter referred to as the “sponsoring agencies,” at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte primarily and any other college or university in the Charlotte region secondarily.

IV.

RESPONSIBILTY OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS A.

To oversee, maintain, and give supervision to the campus ministry property.

B.

To receive and administer all gifts that are made to the ministry.

C.

To properly invest all funds of the ministry.

D.

To ensure articles of incorporation are maintained.

E.

To approve annual budget(s) of the ministry.

F.

To be accountable to the sponsoring agencies of the ministry.

G.

To oversee the tasks of each campus ministry Board work area.

H.

To serve as the executive agency of the ministry.

I.

To set up the process for long range planning.

J.

To provide the ministry’s financial needs.

K.

To fill staff vacancies.

L.

To be responsible for the overall relation to the sponsoring denominations.

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V.

Board of Directors Handbook

VOTING MEMBERSHIP OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS The voting membership of the Board of Directors shall consist of the Campus Minister and elected representative as follows: A. At least one third of the voting membership shall be faculty, staff, or administrators of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. B. It shall be appropriate for the nominations committee or campus minister to nominate to the electing members the names of persons who shall be considered for election as members. C. The term of office of voting members of the Board of Directors shall be three years, with the option of repeating terms at the approval of the Board of Directors. D. Ex-Officio members may be elected to the Board of Directors having the privilege of voice but no vote. Whereas the nominations committee of the Board nominates each member, should a sponsoring agency find it necessary to appoint a representative to the Board of Directors, those appointments shall receive ex-officio membership only.

VI.

THE EXCUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS The elected officers of the Board of Directors-the chair, campus minister, treasurer, and at least one at large member generated from the Board of Directors, appointed by the chair shall constitute the executive committee. The executive committee shall act for the Board of Directors according to policies and procedures established by the board from time to time.

VII.

THE CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS The Board of Directors shall be presided by a chair, nominated by the nominations committee, generated from and elected by the Board of Directors. The chair’s responsibilities are: A. To be responsible for guiding the work of the Board of Directors throughout the year, planning agendas, and presiding at meetings. B. To consult with denominations concerning requirements for the activity of the board. C. To consult regularly with the campus minister. D. To confer with the alumni and student representatives of the ministry. E. To serve as an ex-officio member of all board committees. F. To convene an annual retreat of the Board for the purpose of planning and education of all new and returning board members.

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VIII.

Board of Directors Handbook

THE PERSONNEL COORDINATOR OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS The Board of Directors shall elect a personnel coordinator nominated by the nominations committee, generated from and elected by the Board of Directors. A. To make recommendations for needed staff positions and to develop and approve written job descriptions and titles for staff with Board approval. B. To discuss regularly with the campus minister and staff the personnel conditions that affect the ministry. C. To make recommendations to the Board concerning compensation, travel, housing, continuing education, and other ministerial and staff allowances. D. To develop and maintain a written policy of hiring, evaluating, promoting, retiring, and dismissing staff procedures as approved by the Board. E. To coordinate an annual evaluation for use by the campus minister to maintain effective ministry. F. To communicate necessary recommendations to sponsoring denominations on personnel decisions made by the Board. G. To assist in identifying continuing education needs and support continuing education and spiritual renewal for the staff.

IX.

THE CAMPUS MINISTER The Board of Directors shall call an ordained minister from one of the sponsoring denominations as it’s campus minister. The campus minister’s responsibilities include: A. To preach, teach and witness to the Word of Jesus Christ and oversee the worshipping life of that campus in the context of campus ministry. B. To administer the sacraments and various other means of grace such as encouraging students to reaffirm their baptism, seek fellowship, and strive in the disciplined life. C. To give oversight to the total operation and ministry of the campus ministry as the executive officer. D. To be in connection with the campus community as to create and foster positive relationships between the campus leaders and the campus ministry. E. To counsel students in relationships, who are bereaved, who are struggling with personal, ethical, or spiritual issues, and thus serve as a chaplain to the university. F. To participate in the campus and larger community events that are inter-religious in nature and to lead UNC Charlotte students into service and advocacy. G. To search out from among the student body men and women for pastoral ministry and other church related occupations for all four denominations.

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H. To give diligent pastoral leadership in ordering the life of the ministry and the board. I.

To participate in and, if necessary, assume supervisory responsibilities in the campus ministry governing bodies and the connection of the four denominations as needed.

J.

X.

To train students in peer ministry and student leadership.

THE TREASURER The Board of Directors shall elect a treasurer nominated by the nominations committee, generated from and elected by the Board of Directors. The treasurer’s responsibilities are: A. To disburse all money contributed to the ministry budget, keeping accurate records of how money is spent. B. To receive funds, record them, and report them to the board in a regular basis. C. To deposit money in a bank as soon as possible after it is received. D. To record the names and addresses of donors. E. To build an annual budget to support the mission of the ministry and submit it to the Board for annual approval. F. To arrange an annual review of the records and report the findings of the review to the Board. G. To promulgate long range financial planning.

XI.

THE BOARD SECRETARY The Board of Directors shall elect a secretary nominated by the nominations committee, generated from and elected by the Board of Directors. The secretary’s responsibilities are: A. To keep accurate records of the minutes of Board meetings and necessary Board documents. B. To serve as a resource person to assist the board in understanding the history of the ministry. C. To assist in the arrangement of displays, banners, fliers, and announcements for the University Times, Campus News, Niner Online, uncc.edu, and UNC Charlotte television.

XII.

THE NOMINATIONS COORDINATOR The Board of Directors shall elect a nominations coordinator nominated by the nominations committee, generated from and elected by the Board of Directors. The nominations coordinator’s responsibilities are:

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A. To become familiar with as many persons in the community as possible who may be possible recruits for new members of the Board of Directors. B. To educate board members on work area tasks. C. To invite people to serve in leadership positions of the board, receive their responses, and present those persons to be nominated to Board membership. D. To provide an annual opportunity for board planning and direction. E. To coordinate the planning and implementation of a comprehensive peer ministry and lay volunteer program.

XIII.

THE DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR The Board of Directors shall elect a development coordinator nominated by the nominations committee, generated from and elected by the Board of Directors. The development coordinator’s responsibilities are: A. To coordinate the planning and implementation of a comprehensive program of campus ministry education, inspiration and action, so as to fund the ministry. B. To learn the hopes and concerns of the staff, students, and Board in the area of funding. C. To link with organizations, individuals, churches, and resources beyond the denominational sponsors. D. To chair a campaign committee if necessary. E. To participate in fundraising training experiences. F. To work with an endowment committee.

XIV.

CHAIR OF THE PERMANENT ENDOWMENT COMMITTEE The Board of Directors shall elect a chair of the permanent endowment committee nominated by the nominations committee, generated from and elected by the Board of Directors. The chair of the permanent endowment committee’s responsibilities are: A. To chair a committee of the following persons: The campus minister, the treasurer, the development coordinator, and one ex-officio member in a permanent endowment committee that handles and invests bequests, trusts, annuities, insurance, and real estate property of the board. The committee shall have the following powers and duties… B. To receive and administer all bequests made to the ministry. C. To receive and administer all trusts. D. To invest all trust funds of the ministry in conformity with the laws of Mecklenburg County and the State of North Carolina.

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E. To receive and administer gifts of real property. F. To protect principal when appropriate.

XV.

AT-LARGE MEMBERS The Board of Directors shall elect at-large members nominated by the nominations committee, generated from and elected by the Board of Directors. The at-large member’s responsibilities are: A. To attend each meeting and participate fully in the Board of Directors. B. To provide theological and biblical foundations for campus ministry and for ecumenism. C. To learn about the hopes and concerns of the Board of Directors. To ask questions, listen, and share what you have learned with denominational leaders. D. To serve on various Board committees, task forces, or working groups as needed.

XVI.

THE EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS The Board of Directors shall elect ex-officio members nominated by the nominations committee, generated from and elected by the Board of Directors, or appointed from the sponsoring agencies. Ex-Officio Members have voice, but no vote. Responsibilities include: A. To attend each meeting and participate fully in the Board of Directors. B. To provide theological and biblical foundations for campus ministry and for ecumenism. C. To learn about the hopes and concerns of the Board of Directors. To ask questions, listen, and share what you have learned with denominational leaders.

XVII.

NOTICE OF MEETINGS A notice shall be emailed to each voting member of the Board of Directors at least seven days in advance of each meeting.

XVIII.

QUORUM One third of the voting members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business.

XIX.

DISPOSAL OF ASSESTS Although organized to exist perpetually, in the event of dissolution or abandonment of the CCMHE Inc., all property and assets then remaining shall be divided among sponsoring agencies then affiliated in the same portion as such sponsoring agencies have contributed financially to the work of this corporation over the immediately preceding five years.

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Section 5

CCMHE Directory Campus Ministry Office: and CCMHE Student Center: 8840 University City Blvd. | Charlotte NC 28213 (Adjacent to Advent Lutheran Church) | 704-549-8291

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 562776 | Charlotte, NC 28256-2776

Websites: www.uncc.edu/ucf | www.campus-ministry.org www.just-worship.com www.sco.uncc.edu/homework Board Only: www.gbgm-umc.org/uncc

Campus Ministry Email: ucf@uncc.edu | leader@campus-ministry.org

Board of Directors Email Listserv: ucfboard@listserv.uncc.edu

Campus Minister: Stephen R. Cheyney (ordained United Methodist) Office: 704-779-1587 Email: steve@campus-ministry.org

Denominational Sponsors: The North Carolina Diocese of the Episcopal Church (USA), Raleigh Committee on Campus Ministry & Higher Education

The North Carolina Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Salisbury Committee on Campus Ministry

The Presbytery of Charlotte of the Presbyterian Church (USA) NC Presbyterian Higher Education Ministries (www.preshighered.org)

The Western NC Conference, The United Methodist Church, Charlotte Council on Campus Ministry

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Section 6

Guidelines for Officers & Volunteers Between 1999 and 2003, the Board of Directors of CCMHE spent a lot of time updating the bylaws and infrastructure of the board. We believe the by-laws are clear and to the point. However, we offer these guidelines as supplemental aid to the role of the board and the various positions. With constant turnover, there is a great possibility that you may be new to the board or new to a particular board role. Use these guidelines as ways to help you succeed as a board member. The purpose of the CCMHE Board of Directors is to oversee and maintain an already active campus ministry in Charlotte, most particularly at UNC Charlotte. The campus ministers, other staff, and student leaders direct a program of nurture, outreach, and witness that seeks to articulate the overall mission and purpose of the campus ministry. The goal of the board, then, is to provide the means to ensure this mission is implemented; to provide an administrative infrastructure; to align the mission with the four sponsoring denominations; to evaluate the effectiveness of the mission; and to act as the administrative agency of the campus ministry. The Board of Directors model reflects and continues a historic tradition within the Church. Jesus called twelve disciples to be together in the leadership of the early Christian movement (Luke 5:1-11, 27-32; 6:12-16). Following the resurrection and ascension of Jesus, leaders of “the Way” often convened in groups to make decisions and to support each other in the work of mission and disciple-making. Acts 15 describes the Council formed at Jerusalem. Throughout the letters of Paul, especially in Romans 12 and 1 Corinthians 12, leadership in the church is described as the shared work of spiritually graced men and women—the body of Christ. For CCMHE, the Board of Directors is greater than the sum of its parts. Gifted individuals—knit together in faith, love, and commitment and empowered and guided by the Holy Spirit—can accomplish much more than any individual. We honor and glorify God best when we become the body of Christ together.

The Board exists to create a strategic plan for the campus ministry. Therefore, its primary work is one of leadership rather than management. This is an important distinction to make. Leadership is the visionary, “big picture” work that assesses critically where the campus ministry is at the present moment, where God is calling it to be in the future, and what resources will be required to move from the current reality into the desired reality. Management is the essential “detail work” that must be accomplished on a daily basis to make the ministry effective. This is done by the pastor(s), staff and students. One tendency is to confuse management with leadership. Both are essential, both are of great value, and both require specialized talents and knowledge, but they are not the same thing. Often boards become “report centers” where various committees or staff members provide an update on

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where things stand, what resources are needed, and what the short-term goals are—management meetings. However, most of the best planning gets lost when the typical board reconvenes to deal with more immediate concerns, and leadership is lost to the management needs of a current program. One of the critical functions of the CCMHE Board chairperson is to clarify the different leadership and management functions and to make sure that they remain well balanced. Planning is first and foremost a leadership function, and the CCMHE Board of Directors should make the long-term planning process a top priority.

The Role of the Board Chair As the Board chairperson, you are a partner in ministry with your pastoral leadership and the other CCMHE Board members. The chairperson holds the “big picture” view of the work and life of the ministry. As such, the board chairperson is fundamentally the “chief trustee” of the Ministry. What does this new role actually look like? What are the requirements and expectations of the chairperson? 1. Be a spiritual leader—focus on ministry rather than administration. 2. Stay focused on the primary task—keep the board focused on the primary task and vision. 3. Actively guide the work of the board—preparing agendas, conducting meetings, communicating with members, and monitoring the progress of the members. 4. Lead the visioning and strategic planning process within the campus ministry. 5. Actively participate in developing learning/training experiences for the board. 6. Conduct an annual mid-range planning meeting with the board. 7. Maintain a close and intentional working relationship with the campus pastor(s). 8. Provide accountable leadership to the sponsoring denominations. 9. Be CCMHE’s best advocate.

The Role of the Treasurer The Bible speaks frequently about money and wealth and emphasizes the importance of generous giving (see Proverbs 22:16; 2 Corinthians 8–9), wise investment (see Luke 16:10-13); debt management (see Proverbs 21:20; 22:7), prudent fiscal oversight (see Luke 12:13-21; Acts 4:32-35); and appropriate attitude (see 1 Timothy 6:10). As the CCMHE treasurer you have at the heart of your task providing for the ministry through wise money management. Whatever income and expense is generated by CCMHE is ultimately for the work of ministry.

Responsibility for the financial health of

a non-profit is an awesome task. In providing “direction,” you are demonstrating by word and action that someone is in control, that there is a plan, and that faithful stewards are leading CCMHE’s finances. It is vital that you have a sense of direction, a plan to move CCMHE’s financial stewardship, and the ability to monitor the ongoing finances of the campus ministry. The board, the sponsoring denominations, and financial supporters look to the treasurer for reports, or signals, about the financial health of the ministry. It is vital that accurate records be

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maintained so that adequate reports can be prepared. A financial report should be prepared for each meeting of the board. This report should present both a current month and a year-to-date picture of financial activity. Develop a system that will enable you to track the flow of all giving to CCMHE from the time the gift is given until the funds are remitted for their intended purpose. The Revenue Reconciliation Act of 1993 requires that donors who make a contribution of $250 or more must have a “contemporaneous written acknowledgment from the donee organization.” In addition to taking the necessary steps as outlined in the by-laws, the following table should be of some help: January

Finalize the budget; Mail end-of-the-year statements; Prepare end-of-the-year report to the board.

March

Submit budget proposals for the upcoming year to sponsoring denominations

July-August

Complete a review of the records with an independent auditor

September

Collect necessary documents from personnel concerning upcoming salaries

October

Submit insurance and pension forms to appropriate bodies

December

Revise and detail upcoming budget

The Role of the Development Coordinator Raising money for campus ministry is not an easy task. You were obviously nominated as the development coordinator because you have experience in this area. Even so, here are just a few things we have learned over the years. CCMHE has learned to emphasize the spiritual need of the giver to give rather than the need of the campus ministry so much—to receive money to meet its budget. Simply put, a campus ministry budget does not inspire generosity! Typically CCMHE has conducted a small scale annual campaign as a method of reaping a harvest. The harvest is much more likely to be abundant if you have had an effective year-round process for communicating and celebrating the mission and ministry of CCMHE and this is where we need help the most. Here the coordinator can work directly with the campus minister and intern.

The Role of the University Relations Coordinator Yours is truly unique role to campus ministry. The ministry is a program of the Church, not the academy. However because UNC Charlotte has recognized the importance of development in a student’s life, spiritual development plays a part. The university can not deny religious organizations to exist and meet on campus. But CCMHE is more than just a student club. CCMHE is really the body of Christ—the Episcopal, the Lutheran, the Methodist and the Presbyterian Church right on campus. For the campus minister—the campus is his or her parish. Here are ways to succeed in your role:

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Advocacy—The URC serves as primary advocate for and representative of the students and CCMHE to the university. As an “extension” of the campus ministry in the community, you also will need to be aware of the reputation CCMHE has on campus and work either to enhance it or improve it. By advocating for CCMHE, you may need to stand up as a voice where no one else can. Modeling Discipleship— The visibility of your position places you in the position to model good habits of personal devotion and discipleship. As you engage in spiritual practices, you can be an example and mentor to others on campus. Building Awareness—You build awareness of CCMHE by helping the students and campus minister communicate the programs and activities of the campus ministry to colleagues. Network—Provide means and resources for the campus minister to penetrate the campus community in ways he or she would not otherwise be able to do. Examples may include invitations to special banquets, committee memberships, etc.

The Role of the Personnel Coordinator The Personnel Coordinator has some of the same functions of a personnel officer or HumanResources Director in other organizations. There are some legal and risk management issues for which the PC has responsibility. However, campus ministry leadership pushes us to focus our attention on God and away from “business as usual.” Even in the midst of meetings or crises, the PC must never forget they are part of the body of Christ, and they must always be aware of the mission of God’s church. The PC is the cheerleading coach for the staff of CCMHE. Hospitality includes a pleasant environment for the staff to work in and the tools and equipment for the job. The PC has primary responsibility to work with staff so that CCMHE’s mission and vision are fulfilled. This includes providing feedback to the board, the staff, and the necessary powers of the sponsoring denominations about the way the staff works. Assessment of ministry should raise awareness of mission and vision for both the ministry and the staff. Each year the PC needs to review salary and non-salary support for each staff member. Other aspects of support for all employees include determining: 1. working conditions, including working space, office helpers (volunteers), equipment, and hours. 2. travel expenses, including car or car allowance, ministry related supply, conference allowance, continuing education for both clergy and employed staff, mission expenses, and so forth. 3. compensation for the pastoral staff, including salary, housing, and other benefits.

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Personnel Timeline: January

If the campus pastor is Methodist, make a formal letter to the bishop requesting that the campus minister be “re-appointed� to UNC Charlotte.

March

Meet with the campus minister to determine goals for the upcoming academic year.

October

Prepare and administer an assessment of the ministry.

November

Make a formal salary recommendation to the board for approval for the upcoming budget cycle.

December

Review the assessment and make goals for areas to improve.

The Role of the Nominations Coordinator More or less, the major responsibilities of the Nominations Coordinator are to: ssist persons on the board to identify their gifts and skills for service; assist in the nurture and development of Christian spiritual leadership; dentify and recommend persons for service in the various ministry areas of the board; quip by training and support; and dentify competencies needed for a variety of ministry tasks. As the NC, you have the privilege of linking persons who have gifts to share with opportunities to meet specific needs within the board and campus ministry. This is no simple task. It requires hard work and a strong commitment on your part, but it can be a joyous and rewarding experience as you help persons discover and use their gifts in ministry. Remember that people are the most valuable resource for the board. With them, and with careful leadership and guidance, CCMHE can effectively proclaim Christ’s good news to the world. Here are some tips to get you started: 1. Engage in biblical and theological reflections on the mission of CCMHE and the primary task of the board. 2. Intentionally become acquainted with as many persons in the community as you can. Maintain and strengthen the CCMHE database / potential board member bank. List their gifts, skills, interests, knowledge, and commitment. Consider persons of various ages, various life situations, and persons who will ensure racial and ethnic inclusiveness. Develop a system for keeping this list up-to-date. 3. Study the responsibilities for each leadership position and identify the gifts and competencies needed to function effectively in this position. 4. Prayerfully match potential leaders with particular leadership positions. 5. Invite persons to serve in leadership positions. Receive their responses and present those nominated to the board. 6. Guide the development and training of spiritual leaders, also providing nurture and support.

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The Role of Everyone The college years are a time when students shape the dreams and visions that will influence the rest of their lives. Those years also are a time when students examine the faith and values that will support their life choices. Your ministry to this board helps students know that the church affirms them as they increase in knowledge and shape those visions. That is no small responsibility! Here are steps that each board member needs to take: - Pray for the campus ministry, those being effected by it and those potentially reached by it. - Covenant to attend CCMHE board meetings and be involved as a enthusiastic leader. - Give financially to the campus ministry. - Keep your church constantly aware of campus ministry, and specifically CCMHE. Encourage the

church to include CCMHE in its annual budget and to invite the campus minister and/or students to lead worship, programs, or preach. - Talk to students about CCMHE and encourage them to participate. - Let your friends, neighbors and colleagues know of your commitment to campus ministry. - Identify constituents and students to the CCMHE board. - Educate your church that supporting campus ministry is a more practical use of time, talent and money than creating its own mechanism for collegiate ministry. - Visit www.campus-ministry.org website weekly. This will help you keep up with student activities. - Lead a devotion for a CCMHE Board Meeting when asked by the chair.

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Section 7

Campus Ministry Interns Charlotte Based Interns Role & Responsibility The CCMHE internship ministry is designed to give ready to graduate undergraduates, graduate students, or recent alumni experience in campus ministry. Ideally, these should be persons who are interested in exploring the possibility of Christian ministry (and seminary) as a career following graduation. The internship is designed to give interns the opportunity to discover and use their spiritual gifts, to grow spiritually, to work in an atmosphere of personal and professional guidance and support, and to gain practical ministry experience. Interns work directly with the campus minister who acts as their supervisor. Interns spend most of their time meeting with students in a one-on-one setting. As a staff person, the intern ministers to the university community and seeks to fulfill the purpose of CCMHE as outlined in the handbook.

Personal: To be a maturing disciple of Jesus Christ: growing in love for God, God's Word, God's people of every Walk of life, and God's justice and mercy on the campus, in the community, and in the world.

Leadership: · To participate in the life of CCMHE campus ministry · To lead CCMHE in an area of ministry that relates to your spiritual gifts · To engage regularly in ministry to students through pastoral care, programming, and small groups.

Fund Development & Public Relations: · To secure personal financial and prayer support and strategic funds for the area as needed · To cultivate and maintain relationships with churches and individuals. · To represent CCMHE within the broader community

Qualifications: · Affirm CCMHE’s Statement of Faith contained in the creeds and doctrines of the Episcopal, Lutheran, Methodist and Presbyterian denominations. · Previous supervisory experience preferred · Effective oral and written communication skills · Ability to organize events and the details involved· - Ability to take charge of tasks and work independently without close supervision · A working knowledge of current Microsoft software applications (Word, Access, Excel, and

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Fund Raising The internship ministry student is to be staffed with people who have raised their own support to learn campus ministry. In return we give them a team, a community, and training.

1.

Build a Database of friends, relatives, and acquaintances. Keep contact by letter, phone, e-mail and personal visits. Relationship building requires a genuine interest in why a benefactor feels that his or her contribution is meaningful. State precisely your need up front.

2. Send a “Good News” e-mail to your benefactors. Donors want to keep in touch and help celebrate success. 3. Write letters of thanks enclosing a business card, flyer, and especially make sure it is hand-written to foster increased meaning. 4. Blog by creating your personal web log of pictures and activities to keep your donors informed. 5. Visit churches and in every speech, report, or meeting — even ones not necessarily directed at benefactors — mention student success stories and the legacies created by donors.

Church Solicitation (Phone) When soliciting for church support it is likely that the intern will have to wade through several levels of red tape. In attempt to alleviate some of the hassle, try this: Call the church office and politely ask the receptionist if he or she has a few seconds to answer a question. Then explain: I am ___________, an intern for your ______ (insert denomination) campus ministry at UNC Charlotte. I would like to visit the church and make a proposal to the missions committee but I am not sure what steps I would need to take. Do you have a chairperson, a staff person, or some direction I can take? Your goal is to get inside of the church for a visit, but often it doesn’t take that much work. At the next level, with the lay or staff person you have been directed to, explain: Hello, I am _________, an intern for your ________ (insert denomination) campus ministry at UNC Charlotte. I would like to gain support from _________’s (church) ________ committee (or group). We have a great campus ministry program and need the support of area churches in order to continue our growth. You can continue, let me highlight the ways that UCF serves students and our community. We have worship services, mission trips, Habitat builds, disaster response aid and other activities. In fact in 2007 we were declared a "model Campus Ministry" by a national review. Our excellence in student ministry is built on the generous spirit of churches just like yours. Would you support UCF at this time?

If Yes: Confirm the gift amount and provide the information to donate online or where to send a check. And make sure to thank them for their generous support. If No: Thank them for their time and consideration. Note: If they do not have the time, ask when would be a good time for a call back (or visit). Note: If they say “no” remember this is a church and you can attempt the process through a different individual.

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Church Solicitation (Letter) When soliciting for church support it is also likely that you will get a name and address. In fact, often is the case that contributions will not be made directly over the telephone. Therefore, much of the telephone work is finding to whom the letters should be addressed. Make sure your letter is marked for a specific individual rather than a committee name. Also, non-staff will usually take more time with church mail than staff, so attempt to get your letter to the committee chairperson. In the letter include a business card, UCF flyer, and stamped return envelope. Sample Letter: Hello, my name is Kelly Jackson and I am a recent graduate of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. While in college I was active in United Christian Fellowship, a campus ministry that in many ways changed my life and lead me to a life of discipleship. Founded in 1963, United Christian Fellowship (UCF) is the Episcopal, Lutheran, Methodist and Presbyterian campus ministry serving the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. The University has over 23,000 students and UCF reaches 5,000 through its weekly e-news and nearly 800 students have attended at least one program during the school year. UCF ministers to students through worship, Bible studies, small groups, retreats, conferences, confirmation, local service and outreach, mission trips and more. These ministries help students live life to the full, connecting them to God, to one another and to awesome faith experiences. In October 2007 UCF was designated by a national ministry evaluation as a “model campus ministry.� Our excellence in student ministry is built on the generous spirit of supporters like you. I am asking you to consider a financial gift to support my 2008-2009 internship with UCF. As an intern I need to raise support to provide ministry and programming assistance to the ministry. I will be leading many of the programs, groups, and retreats and in order to do so, I need to raise $12,000 for this academic year. Every gift to UCF symbolizes a commitment to the importance of student ministry at UNC Charlotte. I invite you to join me in redefining campus ministry for the next generation.

Time Commitment The CCMHE intern will be designated as a part-time employee of the ministry that devotes an average of twenty hours a week to the campus ministry. At the same time, ministry is not an hourly position. Interns will be compensated with a stipend, not by the hour. Some weeks may require only fifteen hours of direct service, while others may be much more demanding. Retreats, conferences, and mission trips are also not to be considered in the form of hours, but rather as ministry opportunities to help students know and grown in Christ.

Four Areas of Ministry Each intern will be responsible for leading his or her own core group, to be determined in collaboration with the campus minister. The intern is responsible for integrating his or her core group with JustWorship. Further, each intern will share responsibility load with at least one student ministry area. Moreover, each intern will have levels of administrative, pastoral, and programmatic responsibility based on the needs of the campus ministry at the specific time of the internship.

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Montana Internship Program The Blackfeet Reservation Former CCMHE board member pastor Abe Cox was so moved by the need of America’s poorest Native American’s (the Blackfeet) that he dedicated much of his life to make a difference on the desolate reservation in northwest Montana. In 2004 Abe died. In his memory, 22 UNC Charlotte students from CCMHE decided to make an annual pilgrimage to the reservation to offer service and outreach ministry. In 2005 these 22 students arrived on the reservation but there one was slight problem … no one was there to coordinate the mission projects. So with a small local congregation, and the support of the Blackfeet, we developed the CCMHE Montana Internship Program where a UNC Charlotte student or two coordinate the entire summer mission and ministry program for the southern portion of the reservation. Today teams from all types of churches and campus ministries travel great distances to offer service and outreach at the direction of our campus ministry here at UNC Charlotte.

The Internship Position In brief, as an intern you will lead Sunday services of worship, lead Bible studies, work with community members to asses physical needs and coordinate mission work projects for mission teams be they construction projects or other types of ministry.

Length of Service Depending on the specific needs of the intern (graduation, exams, etc.) generally the intern will arrive in Mid May and depart in Mid August.

Housing The mission site is the Apistodooke United Methodist Parish. In all intents and purposes the intern will be the summer chaplain for the parish. The building has three bathrooms and showers, and sleeps up to 35 mission volunteers with a fully equipped kitchen, chapel, sanctuary, laundry, tool and supply building, and food pantry. There are two private rooms where interns can reside.

Transportation Because the worksite is very large and driving is a must, the intern will need to provide their own transportation to the reservation.

Support System The Blackfeet Parish headquartered in Browning, Montana has a full time pastor who will help orient you to Heart Butte and offer ongoing support to your ministry through the summer. Additionally, members of the parish will attend services, open their homes, cook meals, suggest activities, and offer care/advice. Moreover, throughout the summer the intern will coordinate a number of mission teams from all over the U.S. who utilize the facility you manage (the parish) and look to you for project

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leadership. These teams offer extraordinary care to the interns. They understand as well that it is there responsibility to include you in meals and so you will never go hungry. You will be in constant contact with folks at UNC Charlotte by internet, phone and an occasional site visit as well.

Free Time While the internship can be demanding and challenging, you will find yourself relaxed and in a sense of awe to the wonderful Montana land. When not engaged in a ministry activity, you are free to explore Glacier National Park, Waterton Lakes Park (Canada) and other great places nearby. Every mission team will also want to tour which means you will visit these wonderful sites almost weekly.

Credit In addition to the experience, you will receive 500 hours of community service that you can apply as needed. You can also check with a selected professor as we will cooperate with requirements and procedures to award academic credit as it is available.

Packing List Do not bring unnecessary valuables and things you don’t need! You will need a good Bible; toiletries (sunscreen!); detergent; towels; casual clothes for most days and maybe 1-2 nicer outfits; alarm clock; exercise clothes; plenty of old work clothes for painting and projects; cleaning etc.; both a light jacket and heavy coat; sheets; pillow; all necessary medications; passport or passport id; Insurance card; CD’s for worship or ipod; phone cards; sweatshirts; camera.

Raising Funds Each intern has the opportunity to grow their faith by trusting God to provide the financial resources needed. God will provide! You'll be able to invite others-family, friends, fellow church members, etc.-to invest in expanding God's kingdom as you go this summer. We'll guide you with instructions. It is always encouraging to see God bring in the financial support that we need for our interns.

More About Finances Housing and food is provided! The funds that are raised will go toward your stipend which pays mostly for your travel expenses and extra cash. For ideas on fund-raising, refer to the Charlotte Based Interns portion of this section.

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Section 9

Student Ministry Introduction to Model Five areas of ministry are designed to meet the four basic marks of the early church: Koinonia, the fellowship and healing ministry; Didache, the spiritual formation ministry; Kerygma, the worship and proclamation ministry; and Diakonia the missional outreach ministry.

Kerygma: Worship Student Worship meets the Kerygma mark of the early church. Students continually develop what might be classified as an emergent, indiginious and creative worship service offered on weekly in the evening for Charlotte’s college students. The worship has it’s own music ministry, utilizes a teaching ministry model and is the ‘base camp’ for all CCMHE programs. Each week’s teachings are provided for each Core Group to study, reflect and act upon.

Koinonia: Wednesday Dinner Weekly Dinners are CCMHE’s primary weekly activity that take place at the CCMHE Student Center. The dinners are provided by volunteers from area churches and the programs differ each week lead by a team of student leaders.

Didache: Immersed Students are encouraged to immerse themselves into Core Groups. UCF Core Groups are the lifeblood of the ministry in that small groups of 3-15 students meet at least twice a semester to become one with Christ, one with each other, and one in ministry to all the world. Core Groups meet for study, service, building community among its members, and prayer. Essentially, each Core Group has the four components of Koinonia, Didache, Kerygma, and Diakonia as part of its makeup. Core Groups can have any mix of the four common components depending on their focus. For instance, a group might dedicate 70% of their time to service, and 10% to the other three components and so on. Also Core Groups can meet with an open-ended time frame and meet forever, or a definite time frame of a set number of weeks. A Core Group can meet every week, three times a month, or at least twice a semester. A student can attend multiple Core Groups as they wish and invite friends. Core Groups can meet in someone's dorm, apartment, at the Student Center, on campus, at a restaurant, etc. Core Group leaders must adhere to our Convictions, Persuasions and Opinions Guide:

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Convictions, Persuasions, and Opinions Guide: Our Convictions are the essential core beliefs of the Christian faith that are foundational for our campus ministry, found in the doctrinal statements of the Episcopal, Lutheran, Methodist & Presbyterian churches. These are the beliefs that we proclaim with joy and excitement for they are "Good News.” Our Persuasions are beliefs about which we have persuasions, though recognizing many Christians have drawn different conclusions. We believe God's love for the world is an active and engaged love, a love seeking justice and liberty. We cannot just be observers. So we care enough about people's lives to risk interpreting God's love, to take a stand, to call each of us into a response, no matter how controversial or complex. We hope to help people think and act out of a faith perspective, not just respond to all the other "mind-makers-up" that exist in our society. Our Opinions are ideas, thoughts, and viewpoints that are non-essential for Christian living and not worth arguing over. Upon these points we affirm for people to "think and let think." For example, some options might be: One translation of the Bible is better for studying than another; or one political party is more aligned with Christian values than another, etc. When Core Group leaders impose any convictions, persuasions, or opinions upon others they are practicing legalism; concluding their perceived conviction is for everyone. When Core Group leaders are convicted and persuaded by the love of Jesus Christ, they are called to treat all persons with dignity, despite anyone’s opinions. Diakonia: Seven37 (seven37 is derived from Jesus’ words in John 7:37) We feel called to recognize the world for what it is, including it’s pain and suffering. For CCMHE, it’s not just and we know the misery of the poor, abused, neglected, and hungry troubles God. We also believe that God has taught each of us to love those around us, by and through the life of Jesus Christ. The more we love God, the more we reflect His loving image back to those around us. The more we do this, the more we are in God’s presence. UCF operates Habitat for Humanity work group, sends teams on mission and outreach during each break, coordinates the Montana Internship Program, and coordinates a student Disaster Response service with a fully equipped trailer. CCMHE’s travels have gained partnerships in Montana at the Blackfeet Reservation, in Mexico and in Haiti, and has worked in a number of states and countries.

Special Events The final area of CCMHE’s Student Ministry is that of Special Events which incorporates all of the components from the early church. In short, our special event ministry coordinates any aspect of student ministry not already covered above.

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Section 9

UNC Charlotte Five Year Calendar

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Section 10

Presbyterian (USA) CM Assessment 1. __ The ministry staff is tired but has appropriate provision for being restored. 2. __ There are users of the ministry who can and will tell true stories affirming the ministry. 3. __ The numbers of program participants are the expected number and maybe a bit better. 4. __ The ministry can verify the numbers of program participants. 5. __ The ministry has good relationships with local churches in the community. 6. __ The ministry has good relationships with agencies in the community with similar values. 7. __ The ministry has good relationships with components of the academic institution served. 8. __ The ministry has good relationships with its funding ecclesiastical bodies. 9. __ The ministry’s students connect with local churches. 10. __ The ministry has a growing endowment program. 11. __ The ministry has clear examples that it is planning for the future. 12. __ There is a broad financial support base for the ministry. 13. __ There is a rational donor identification and cultivation process at work. 14. __ A very high percentage of the board members financially contribute to the ministry. 15. __ There is a rational plan for publicizing the ministry to the academic community. 16. __ There is a plan in operation to develop, educate and strengthen the Board members. 17. __ There is an up-to-date data base on the alums of the ministry. 18. __ There is a direct local mission (service/learning) involvement program component in the ministry. 19. __ There is a national/global mission program ministry component. 20. __ There is a fellowship and social activities program component in the ministry. 21. __ There is a biblical literacy/study program component in the ministry. 22. __ There is a worship/meditation/spiritual development program component in the ministry. 23. __ There is a funds development program component in the ministry. 24. __ There is at least one “marquee� program of the ministry that is well known in the community and mission partners/supporters/donors. 25. __ There is a good mix of learning styles or pedagogies used in the ministry programming. 26. __ There is a focused ministry with students. 27. __ There is a focused ministry with faculty. 28. __ There is a focused ministry with administrative and support staff of the college/university. 29. __ The ministry works cooperatively with other religious organizations serving the campus (congregations and other campus ministries). 30. __ There are certain issues that public knows where the ministry will stand. 31. __ There are numerous program entry points for potential participants in the ministry.

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32. __ If the current ministry staff were to leave this summer the ministry would continue in the fall. 33. __ The ministry has sufficient administrative support staff (paid or volunteer). 34. __ The students have responsible roles in the ministry. 35. __ The ministry facilities are fully accessible to handicapped/disabled persons. 36. __ There is a strong and open accountability and review process on file. 37. __ There is a strong and open accountability and review process on file AND it is used. 38. __ Job descriptions are clear and held to. 39. __ Staff get honest and constructive reviews. 40. __ There are fiscal accountability safeguards in place and followed. 41. __ There is appropriate insurance coverage on staff, facilities and users. 42. __ The ministry has a tax exempt status. (No = 0, In Process = 1, Yes = 4) 43. __ Minister’s office door has an uncovered window in it or is left open during one-on-one sessions. 44. __ Make up and rate your own Assessment Item. (Your chance for a “4”.) 45. __ There is a planned Funds Development process with several aspects for securing donor support. 46. __ The ministry has web site. 47. __ The web site was last updated: last week=4, two weeks ago=3, three weeks ago=2, four weeks ago=1, over a month ago=0. 48. __ The ministry has and uses an email list server. 49. __ The Board has an up-to-date manual for its members. 50. __ The Board has an annual retreat to review program and policies. 51. The “minister” does ___% of the program and work.

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Section 11

ELCA Annual Report Worship 1) In the area of worship, what is one effort or initiative from this past year that the ministry is most proud of, learned the most from, or is most eager to share? 2) Is there provision made for students to receive the sacrament of Holy Communion? 3) What is the total number of worship services (on average) provided per month? 4) Please choose from the following list the various liturgies and styles used during worship: 5) When is regular worship held? 6) a) Estimate the number of students worshipping per week: b) Estimate the total number of students who have attended worship at least once during the semester/quarter: 7) What is one program goal for next year with respect to worship?

Evangelism and Outreach 1) In the area of evangelism and outreach, what is one effort or initiative from this past year that the ministry is most proud of, learned the most from, or is most eager to share? 2) How is the campus ministry program made known to the campus community? 3) How many new students did the ministry make a personal initial contact with this past year? 4) How are new students integrated into the ministry? 5) a) How many baptisms were conducted this past year related to campus ministry? b) How many of these were adult baptisms (over 18)? 6) If the ministry is a non-congregational setting, have you recorded these baptisms with a local congregation? 7) Does the ministry use peer ministers for evangelism and outreach to students on campus? 8) What is one program goal for next year with respect to evangelism and outreach?

Christian Education and Faith Development 1) In the area of Christian education and faith development, what is one effort or initiative from this past year that the ministry is most proud of, learned the most from, or is most eager to share? 2) What programs or activities are offered for education and faith development of students? b) What programs or activities are offered for faculty/staff education and faith development? 3) Estimate the number of students participating in education and faith development activities... 4) Estimate the number of faculty and staff participating in education and faith development activities... 5) What is one program goal for next year with respect to Christian education and faith development?

Hospitality and Community Building 1) In the area of hospitality and community building, what is one effort or initiative from this past year that the ministry is most proud of, learned the most from, or is most eager to share? 2) What types of programs or activities are offered for community building? 3) Describe the ways in which the ministry is an open and affirming community and extends hospitality to the larger campus community, including GLBT students, international students, non-Lutherans, non-Christians, etc.? 4) What is one program goal for next year with respect to hospitality and community building?

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Community Service 1) In the area of community service, what is one effort or initiative from this past year that the ministry is most proud of, learned the most from, or is most eager to share? 2) a) What projects or activities have students participated in during the past year to provide community service? b) How many distinct service opportunities are made available per year? c) Approximately how many individual students participated in at least one community service this past year? 3) a) Did students participate in a travel service project? (i.e., Winter or Spring Break service trip) b) If yes, how many students participated? 4) What is one program goal for next year with respect to community service?

Justice and Advocacy 1) In the area of justice and advocacy, what is one effort or initiative from this past year that the ministry is most proud of, learned the most from, or is most eager to share? 2) For which of the following topics has the ministry had any activities or programs with respect to justice and advocacy? 3) In which of the following activities has the ministry participated with respect to justice and advocacy? 4) What is one program goal for next year with respect to justice and advocacy?

Pastoral Care 1) In what ways does the ministry provide for pastoral care to students, faculty and staff and to the university community at large? 2) How many of the following pastoral acts related to campus ministry did you perform this past year? a) Marriages: b) Funerals/Memorial Services: c) Miracles: 3) How many hours per week (on average) do staff spend in pastoral care conversations? 4) To how many couples have you given pre-marital counseling?

Leadership Development 1) In the area of leadership development, what is one effort or initiative from this past year that the ministry is most proud of, learned the most from, or is most eager to share? 2) What opportunities exist for student leadership within the campus ministry program? 3) To the best of your knowledge, how many students from your campus ministry are... a) currently enrolled in seminary? b) currently in a candidacy process? c) currently volunteering in a volunteer program such as LVC, Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, etc.? d) currently in a congregational or synodical leadership position? 5 4) What is one program goal for next year with respect to leadership development?

Stewardship and Fundraising 1) In the area of stewardship and fundraising, what is one effort or initiative from this past year that the ministry is most proud of, learned the most from, or is most eager to share?

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2) Does the ministry have a strategic plan for fundraising? 3) Through which of the following ways does the ministry raise funds? 4) What are the ways in which the ministry encourages student giving? 5) What is the percentage of staff time (on average) that is devoted to stewardship and fundraising? 6) What is one program goal for next year with respect to stewardship and fundraising?

Vision and Planning 1) a) Does the ministry engage in an annual goal setting process? b) If yes, who is involved in this process? 2) Does the ministry have a mission/vision statement? 3) How does the ministry assess its goal setting and effectiveness?

Ecumenical and Interfaith Cooperation 1) In the area of ecumenical and interfaith cooperation, what is one effort or initiative from this past year that the ministry is most proud of, learned the most from, or is most eager to share? 2) Are any staff serving as members of an ecumenical or interfaith campus or community organization? 3) What is one program goal for next year with respect to ecumenical and interfaith cooperation?

Building Relationships 1) What is done to communicate the ministry to synods and to congregations? 2) In what ways is the ministry a resource to the educational institutions served, the broader church, or the community? 3) In what ways does the ministry support LSM? 4) What is one program goal for next year with respect to building relationships?

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Section 12

United Methodist Annual Report Western North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church Council on Campus Ministries Campus Ministry Grant Application and Evaluation Purpose: The WNCC Council on Campus Ministry has the responsibility of holding each campus ministry site accountable to certain standards of ministry. While each ministry program (like a church) has different ways of living out its faithfulness, a centralized, broadly framed list of criteria will provide ministry sites with a benchmark towards which to work, and will provide the WNCC Council on Campus Ministry a standard by which to evaluate each site’s effectiveness in ministry. The following criteria will also provide a basis for the WNCC Council on Campus Ministry as we determine how to properly distribute conference funds for campus ministry. Only those campus ministry sites that complete the application and turn it by the 1st due date will be eligible to receive funds for 2010 from the WNCC. Directions: Please respond to the following criteria (see second page) in the areas of witness, outreach, nurture, and sustainability. The first three sections are to be completed by the campus minister/ director and the last section on sustainability is to be completed by the chair of the local campus ministry board. The complete application should be no more than eight pages in length (not including the cover sheet). Both the campus minister/director and the chair of the local campus ministry board must sign the application. Submit application no later than November 14, 2008 by mailing it to: Jonathan Coppedge-Henley WNCC Council on Campus Ministry P.O. Box 1268 Etowah, NC 28729 We appreciate your time and input in properly completing this grant application and evaluation. It is the belief of the WNCC Council on Campus Ministry that by utilizing this tool the council can provide better support for all of our campus ministry sites. Thank you for all that you are doing to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world through the distinctiveness of campus ministry! Blessings, Jonathan Coppedge-Henley & Robb Web, co-chairs

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Campus Ministry Grant Application and Evaluation Due November 14, 2008 Application Cover Sheet: Title (WNCC Campus Ministry Grant Application and Evaluation) Name of ministry Name and signature of the campus minister Name and signature of the local campus ministry board chair Year of the report and date of submission Complete list of campus ministry board members indicating officers Section I: Witness What worship opportunities are offered and how many attend? What Bible study and other small group opportunities are offered and how many attend? What ministry of presence in the University is maintained and what results can be documented? Section II: Outreach What systems of contacting and inviting new students into the ministry are being utilized? What mission/service opportunities are offered and how many attend? Describe not only what you are doing, but the impact it is making in your community and in the world. Section III: Nurture How do you nurture the spiritual development and growth of students? How does this ministry raise up spiritual leaders? What fellowship opportunities are offered and how many attend? What counseling relationships are offered and how often are they utilized? Section IV: Sustainability (to be completed by the board chair) How often does the local board meet? How is the board being developed and trained? What process do you utilize to evaluate the campus ministry and the campus minister/director? How often is an evaluation done and when was the last one performed? Is the current model for doing campus ministry effective? Where do you see the focus of your campus ministry being in three years? Is there adequate day-to-day care of the facilities (where applicable)? How financially stable is the ministry? What is the grant amount you are requesting for 2010? Please provide the rationale for your request. Provide a detailed budget that includes previous fiscal year data, current fiscal year data, and projections for future fiscal year. Revenue and expenses (including salaries, buildings, programming, etc) shall be included. Thank You!

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Section 13

Annual Review of Financial Records Procedures for Financial Examination Prepared October 21, 2003 by the United Methodist State Commission on Campus Ministry

Write a narrative describing the office procedures involving receiving, disbursing and recording funds. Note who performs each task and how often each task is performed. The narrative may be written by an employee, but must be discussed with and reviewed by the reviewer. Verify that bank statements are reconciled in a timely manner. At random, choose 3 checks written by the ministry and verify that an invoice or other documentation is available to support the disbursement. Also, verify that these checks are properly reflected in an expense account in the financial records. These random items must be chosen by the independent reviewer. At random, choose 3 checks deposited by the ministry and verify that they are properly reflected in an income account in the financial records. These random items must be chosen by the independent reviewer. Please have the independent reviewer write a letter noting that the above procedures were performed and any unusual items found. Also, please send a written narrative describing your procedures and a copy of the income statement for the year.

page 35


Board of Directors Handbook

Cooperative Christian Ministry in Higher Education

page 36

Section 13

Annual Review of Financial Records Name of Reviewer:

____________________________

Date of Review:

__________________________

Name of Treasurer:

____________________________

Signature: ________________________________

CHECKS

DATE

PAYABLE

REASON

AMOUNT

APPROVAL

FROM

REASON

AMOUNT

APPROVAL

DEPOSITS DATE

I, _________________________________, of ________________________________________________________, Reviewed the financial management practices and records of Cooperative Christian Ministry in Higher Education, Inc. dba United Christian Fellowship (UCF). This is to report that I have verified that bank statements are reconciled in a timely manner. Moreover, I have reviewed with the treasurer his/her narrative describing the office procedures involving receiving, disbursing, and recording funds. At random, I choose three checks written by the ministry and verified that an invoice or other appropriate documentation was available to support the disbursement. I also verified that these checks are properly reflected in an expense account in the financial records. Furthermore, at random, I choose three checks deposited by the ministry and verified that they were properly reflected in an income account in the financial records. Signature:

_________________________________

Printed Name: _________________________________ Address:

_________________________________

City, State Zip: _________________________________


Board of Directors Handbook

Cooperative Christian Ministry in Higher Education

Section 14

Notes

page 37


Cooperative Christian Ministry in Higher Education

Board of Directors Handbook

page 38

UCF Board Handbook  

Board of Directors

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