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SHIN YEONG KANG ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

ㅁ ㅣ ㄷ ㅇ ㅡ ㅁ


Who may ascend the hill of the Lord? Who may stand in his holy place? He who has clean hands and a pure heart, who does not lift up his soul to an idol or swear by what is false. Psalm 24:3~4


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Shin Yeong Steve Kang Stephankang@hotmail.com 311-28 Hollywood Avenue Toronto, ON M2N 6S4 +647 880 6444 OCAD University 100 McCaul Street Toronto, ON M5T 1W1 Bachelor of Environmental Design

Selected works of 2008 - 2013


contents Prologue .......................................... vii Preface . ............................................ 1

*Colour plates appear between pages

The Annex Park Statement ........................................................ Site map .......................................................... Site analysis...................................................... P1: Landscaped park....................................... P2: Transformed park ......................................

3 4 5 6 8

Habitat Statement .........................................................11 Site map & Analysis......................................12-13 Concept development..................................14-15 Plan & Elevations..........................................16-17 Detail drawing....................................................18

37 Bulwer Residence Statement ......................................................... 21 Site analysis....................................................... 22 Plan & Detail drawings...................................... 23 Interior boards .................................................. 24 Interior plans...................................................... 26

Grange Gatehouse Statement ......................................................... 27 Site analysis....................................................... 28 Concept development....................................... 29 Plan & Elevations............................................... 30


Grange Temple Statement ........................................................35 Site analysis......................................................36 Concept development......................................37 Plan & Elevations........................................ 38-39

Bethel Church Statement ........................................................45 Site map & Analysis.................................... 46-47 Program development................................ 48-49 Concept development................................ 51-53 Plans, Sections & Elevations ..................... 56-58

professional experience school projects Breathe Statement ....................................................... 67 Concept development............................... 68-69 Elevations ................................................. 70-71 Plan.................................................................. 72

Richmond Springs Statement ........................................................75 Site map & Design Brief............................. 76-77 P1: Clubhouse Loungue............................. 78-81 P2: Lawn Bowls Loungue........................... 82-86 P3: Therapeutic Indoor Pool....................... 86-89 Exterior Perspectives.................................. 90-91


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A photography by Dongsung Choi Dongsung Choi Photography速 At Cusco, Peru during 2010 Bolivia mission trip


“You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it made salty again?” “You are the light of the world. A city on a hill cannot be hidden.” Matthew 6:13-14

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A photography by Dongsung Choi Dongsung Choi Photography速 At Machu Picchu, Peru during 2010 Bolivia mission trip


“You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it made salty again?” “You are the light of the world. A city on a hill cannot be hidden.” Matthew 6:13-14 Three years ago I first heard this verse at a sermon. The verse resonated in me, but I did not understand why or what it meant. Since then, it had been my earnest desire to find what it means to become the salt and light of the world. In a recent mission trip to Bolivia, it has finally unveiled and spoke to me: that they can only be used when they sacrifice themselves. As everyone did, I have always dreamed to become a light. But I did not know what was required to become one. Now that it has been made clear, I see a very long journey. Yet, I take hold of hope and strength, and choose this path, the path of the salt and light. A path of maturity. I believe that this portfolio is a steppingstone in the journey. It contains seven projects that I completed during my undergraduate education. I hope that one may find an evolvement of design, thoughts, and myself through them. Shin Yeong (Steve) Kang

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the annex

Project type Urban & Landscape Term of design 2009.10~2009.11 Site Area 22,500 sq.ft. Building Area 45,000 sq.ft.


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T

he Annex Park was the first architectural project in my undergrad-

uate school. The most exciting part of it was the engagement with a neighbourhood throughout numerous visits to the site. The project consisted of two phases. The first phase was to design a landscaped park. The second phase was to transform the first park into an architectural social space.


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Yonge St.

Avenue Rd.

Spadina Rd.

Bathurst St.

Christie St.

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The Annex

Bloor St.

Site map


The Annex neighbourhood The Annex is a neighbourhood in downtown Toronto. Created in 1886 by Simeon Janes, a developer, it has become one of best neighbourhoods with a long and rich history in Toronto. The Annex is mainly residential, with Victorian and Edwardian homes and mansions. Most of them were built between 1880 and the early 1900s. According to the Annex Neighbourhood Profile written by the City of Toronto, The Annex shows a diverse culture and ethnicity. Major ethnic groups residing there are British, Italian, Portuguese, Hungarian, Chinese, and Korean (listed from the highest population). It also shows that working age group (24-60 years old) compromises a majority of the population. Along with its long history, The Annex takes an advantage with its geographical location. By being located by Yonge Street and Bloor Street, two major streets in Toronto, the neighbourhood has access to various social and cultural programs and services.

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The Annex Park - Phase one

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The park was designed in response to social elements that comprise the Annex neighbourhood. The design challenge was on expressing the diverse culture and ethnicity of the neighbourhood through physical elements of landforms. Creating an inviting and exciting landform in a gentle slope was not an easy task. I had to look closely into nature, which creates a perfect unity amongst varieties and imitate it. The final landscape expresses a natural flow of the landform throughout the park with a few designed forms. A hill on the north-east corner is a focal point of the park. It is a represention of a long history of immigrants who have been a major population of the town. Their hardships, trials, and difficulties were expressed through a slope of the hill, which is steep. Victory, which they gained through their endurance and perseverance, was expressed on the top of the hill, as in an observation platform. There, one may gain a victorious prospect of the neighbourhood. A major public domain is a playground and sports field on the south-east corner. This was provided a tool to bring harmony and unity amongst their diverse culture and ethnicity. Having an immigrant background myself, the design was an honest expression and narrative of me and my family. Underground view of the park (right)


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The Annex Park - Phase two

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The second phase of the project was to transform the landscaped park into an architectural social space. Some restrictions were given: the park must have three different types of roofs, two non-flats and one flat; these roofs must cover one-third of the park and provide spaces for different activities and events. In this phase, a major scale and shape for architectural elements was referred from a surrounding of the neighbourhood, mainly from the Victorian and Edwardian homes and mansions. Another large-scaled domain was added on the south-west corner of the park as a space to provide more various events such as weddings and concerts. Underground view of the park (right) Elevation view of the park (below)


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habitat

Project type Small Residential Term of design 2009.10~2009.11 Site Area 150 sq.ft. Building Area 150 sq.ft.


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abitat was about making transitional, intimate and informal architec-

ture that would become a place for me for one year of work and study. The project remains special to me as, through its process, it evoked my childhood memories—an awakening call for imagination. As a result, I was driven to and engaged with the project in a deeper level throughout the entire process.


Habitat

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Bloor Viaduct is located in the centraleastern part of Toronto, where Don River meets Bloor Street. As the river formed the earth in a valley shape, Bloor Street, therefore, is now connected by Prince Edward Viaduct at 131 feet (40 metres) above the river. As soon as one steps out of the bridge and walk down on the valley, one may notice a dramatic change of atmosphere. There is neither traffic noise nor any industrial objects, but a quiet welcoming gesture of nature. In a short period of time, one may become closely connected with it. (The ecology system has been preserved since the construction of the bridge and now offers wonderful scenery to the site.) The site is on the edge of the land on the northern side of the bridge. As if prepared for dwelling, the site has an opening land among the fullness of nature on all sides. (as seen in the photo). On the front, it overlooks the quiet surf of the river. All other sides are covered by deciduous trees. From the site, the bridge is seen in the south, but is read differently—with its big spanned truss arch, it becomes beautiful scenery and spirits to the site. Overall, the atmosphere of the site is calm and quiet, yet breathing and alive. These environmental characteristics make the site become both a hiding and dwelling space with many design opportunities.


travelled path from public transit access to the site (above) A view of the site (below) Scenaries near the site (right)

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Narrative


Work area sketch

Organic and inorganic

Plan study

Movement analysis

Concept Development As this was a site specific project, a strong narrative regarding to the site was necessary. Taking an advantage of the site (that is, there is no tree only on this specific area), an imaginary narrative was created: a chopper crashed during its rescue mission. This narrative soon was developed into a concept. From the concept, then, to schemes; schemes to a design; and design to an architectural form.

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form study (body)

form study (head)


Roof plan 16

Floor plan


West Elevation

North Elevation

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East Elevation

South Elevation


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Detail drawing

Metal Rod Joint

Metal Framed Glass

Insulated Metal Panel

Sheating

Wood Stud

Solar Panel


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37 bulwer

Project type Residential Term of design 2010.09 Site Area 1,260 sq.ft. Building Area 3,020 sq.ft.


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7 Bulwer Residence was a residential project with multiple design stages: from a schematic design to construction drawings, along with an interior design and its detailed interior drawings. An involvement and configuration of construction process resulted in many revisions from its original design. Through it, I learned to consider further thoughts when designing building(s).


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Bulwer Street is located in downtown Toronto. It is a rather quiet street compared to a vibrant energy at Queen and Spadina Corner, one of Toronto’s major fashion districts. The street was once residential only, but now is with some commercial units as well. The client is a musician and his family. In expressing his creativity, a 16’x16’ cube studio was placed only in a different angle. As a quiet and darker atmosphere was preferred in the studio space, no windows were placed on its walls, except one skylight above. As frequent visitors were expected, social programs were placed on first floor level, while all private programs were placed on second floor level.

Spadina Avenue

37 Bulwer Residence

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Bulwer Street

Queen Street

Site map

South Elevation

Section


Construction plan drawing

North Elevation

Interior detail drawing

West Elevation

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chris martin’s house powder staircase

chris martin’s house living

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chris martin’s house studio

Inteior board samples

chris martin’s house kitchen


Floor plan (second level)

Floor plan (ground level)

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gatehouse

Project type Pavillion Term of design 2010.10 Site Area 2,200 sq.ft. Building Area 865 sq.ft.


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range Gatehouse was an architectural design project that asked to

develop a creative expression for a design problem: to create a gatehouse. The project began by creating a strong statement of threshold: entry, portal, of passage into and through into a place. The statement, then, was delivered into an expression through architectural language­– axes, orders, forms, and materials.


Grange Gatehouse The site is Grange road. This road only exists to serve one role: for pick-up and drop-off of children for a day-care service at a community centre. It becomes the busiest during the afternoon pick-up hours, with parents waiting for their children. The surrounding is richly exciting. Right next to it is the Grange Park, an old and large park in downtown Toronto, and to the north are two of famous post-modern architecture in the city.

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Hence, a notion of waiting became a steppingstone for the design, with an idea about providing a visual travelling experience of the site from the threshold. The design simulates a train station, where both waiting and transporting experience exist. N

Site map

Site section


Concept sketches (plan study)

Concept sketches (elevation study)

Site elevation

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South Elevation

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4 North Elevation

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1. Circulation 2. Exhibition Space 3. Sitting Area 4. Bulletin Board

Floor plan

On the platform, spaces are divided into three areas by column axes. The centre is a circulation. To the east is an art exhibition space for local artists. Lastly, to the west is a waiting and sitting space. A staircase is covered with a layering of wood screens for a visual pattern and safety. A ramp provides accessibility, transportation for art works, and scenic beauty of the surroundings in all directions.

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temple

Project type Pavillion Term of design 2010.11 Site Area 2,200 sq.ft. Building Area 450 sq.ft.


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G

range Temple was another architectural design project that was to

develop a creative expression for a design problem: to create a temple. The project began by developing ideas of memory, anticipation, interpretation, etc. as elements in the creation of architecture. Then, several of the following aspects of ideas were expressed through axes, orders, forms, and materials.


Grange Temple The site is the Grange Park. It is a large rectangular park located in downtown Toronto. As one walks in the park, a great number of tall aged trees cover up the city view and connect one back to nature. There is a longitudinal axis running in the centre of the park, creating a symmetrical balance. There is also a lateral axis, which runs perpendicular to the domain and which also runs in the centre of the park. Two more minor axes run diagonally from upper corners to the centre. In the park, Passageways are created along these axes. At the central hub of the park, where all circulations meet, a temple was designed in response to an axis system as well as the environmental aspects of the park.

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Site map

Site section


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Concept sketches (plan and elevation study)


South Elevation

Roof plan

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Big structural columns were arranged in a symmetrical order to provide a sense of space, balance, and protection. A solid timber for its material and 25 feet for its height were given for columns, to be associated with the surrounding environment of the park. Between the columns, one may capture different frames and prospects of the city.

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West Elevation


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Scale model: perspective view

North Elevation


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“All the believers were together and had everything in common.

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Selling their possessions and goods, they gave to anyone as he had need. Every day they continued to meet together in the temple courts. They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts, praising God and enjoying the favor of all the people.” Acts 8:42­‑47

church

Project type Institutional Term of design 2011.09~2012.04 Site Area 16,042 sq.ft. Gross Floor Area 39,400 sq.ft.


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ethel Church was a thesis project in my undergraduate education.

Upon beginning the project, verses shown left, taught me a definition of ‘church’. From a year of intensive exercise including research, programs and concept development, and prayers, I worked hard to deliver the definition of the church, that is holy and loving, to the St. Clair West neighbourhood.


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Avenue Road

Russell Hill Road

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Spadina Road

Bathurst Street

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St. Clair Avenue West

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C L H

D E

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Service Map

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avi n

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200m

Site service map (above) View of the site from west (below)

1000 ft

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Nursing Home Church Day Care School Library Employment Centre Homeless Shelter Public Transit


Bethel Church – in St. Clair West St. Clair West, an area in the central part of Toronto, is located on a hill, capturing a highland of the city. This geographical aspect of the site becomes the most important element for project type–church architecture (Indeed, Jerusalem, known as a holy city is on a high point of Israel.) From the site, one can overlook a prospect of downtown Toronto (refer to a next page.) Another particular aspect that the site offers is a scale of ecology. The great scale of nature, then, separates the site from its surrounding elements and creates the protective spirit of a place–A Genius loci. St. Clair Reservoir Underneath the site is an underground reservoir. Therefore, nothing could be built on top, but only on a slope and/or a foot of the hill. A slope was chosen for the project location to avoid any confliction with community’s routine at the site, which has been well maintained for a long period of time.

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48H

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St. Clair Avenue West

Provide large meeting spaces Provide spiritual counsellings Provide activities (e.g. gardening) Organize affordable programs for their needs (e.g. child-care)

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Church

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Na-Me-Res Shelter

- Send individual(s) who are willing to work - Community work

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Outreach program(s) Provide volunteer works Invite re-hab professionals Provide group/sports activities Provide program(s) that welcomes homeless individual(s)C - Provides basic skills D S (e.g. food prep, gardening)

Avenue Road

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- Send individual(s) who N are willing - Provide community information C

Russell Hill Road

Spadina Road

Bathurst Street

St. Stephen’s S Community House

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Provide a theatre space Organize community sales Organize community garden Organize morning outdoor exercise program - Provide classrooms for different programs

Senior and nursing homes Programs for Seniors http://janienne-jennrich.suite101.com/fun-activities-for-active-seniors-a35811 http://www.seniorservicedirectory.com/recreation_travel/social_activities.html

- Community Sales (baked goods and knitted work) - Provide sharings to younger generation - Gardening work

- Provide community and social information - Book donation N

ord hei - Provide a theatre space me r Ra vin community garden - Organize e - Provide classrooms, which suit their programs - Organize community sales and exhibition - Provide facilities for active outdoor programs

200m

N C D S L E Wychwood Library H M 1000 ft

Programs for Unemployed http://www.eaea.org/index.php?k=12084 http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/ story?id=6445355&page=1#.TtBMRnGt4mY

Programs for Homeless http://www.providencerow.org.uk/meaningfulactivity http://www.homeless.org.uk/meaningful-occupation

Programs for Children http://www.providencerow.org.uk/meaningfulactivity http://montessorimuddle.org/2010/03/15/realplay-and-the-ideal-playground/

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A view toward downtown from the site (above)

Program Study Diagrams Needs for St. Stephen’s Commmunity House

Needs for Senior Nursing Homes

•  Social gatherings with others (as people who are unemployed often feel easily discouraged and ignored)

•  Involvements in the community

•  Opportunities to organize selfrun programs that help them keep up with their hobbies, talents, and professionals (if possible) •  Affordable programs in childcare service

•  More programs that help develop their hobbies (e.g. photography, gardening) •  Theatre space •  Friendship as well as people with whom they can spend time together

Needs for Na-Me-Res Shelter

Needs for Wychwood Library

•  Acceptance and involvement within the community

•  More active programs as well as more spaces for their day-care and children education service program

•  Volunteers to run different programs and activities through the day. •  Financial funds •  Group activities like organized sports programs (with other teams if possible)

•  Theatre space •  A size of the library is small; therefore, more spaces for its service. •  Outdoor programs

Upon starting the project, the most number of criticisms I received was, ‘why build another church when many of them are dying today?’ As I go to church and use its facilities, I have found that the church has tremendous ideas and programs to share with the neighbourhood. However, it often fails by not having proper facilities. Therefore, finding and providing proper facilities, which meet the current needs for both church and community was a major challenge to resolve.

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Topographic site map


Elevation sketch (right) Plan sketch (below)

The site condition became a difficult challenge and many restrictions for the project. The first restriction was the surrounding ecology. A scale of the building had to be very carefully thought out in order to fit in the site. It could not overwhelm or disturbs the flow of its nature. Yet, sufficient spaces had to be also provided to deliver necessary programs for the neighbourhood. Second was an orientation, due to having multiple access points to the project.

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Concept development

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Geometry:

Origin:

The circle signifies eternity.

God loves the world and offers a plan for everyone.

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The square signifies Man was created to the world. have fellowship with God. Green*: Architectural analysis Blue*: Spiritual analysis

God’s Love “God so loved the world that He gave His one and only Son, that who ever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life.” (John 3:16)

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Tension:

Separation:

It was difficult to directly connect two primary geometries in accordance to the site condition.

Because of his own stubborn self-will, Man chose to go his own independent way and fellowship with God was broken.

Therefore, the two shapes had to be disconnected. As a result, tension was generated.

Man is separated from God. Thus, he can no longer know or experience God’s love for his life.

God’s Plan

Man has fallen

“I came that they might have life, and might have it abundantly” (John 10:10)

“All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.” (Romans 3:23)


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Axis:

Direction:

The square was moved down to provide a direct horizontal axis to the circle.

Since the separation from God, man is continually trying to reach God and the abundant life through his own efforts, such as a good life, religion, or philosophy.

Nonetheless, tension between the two shapes still exists. The axis could not connect the two shapes together.

However, he inevitably does not succeed on reaching the abundant life.

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Intercession:

Jesus Christ:

A decision had to be made in order to connect the two shapes. A bold move was a diagonal axis, which interceded for one for another.

God has bridged the gulf that separates us from Him by sending His Son,53 Jesus Christ, to die on the cross in our place to pay the penalty for our sins.

The diagonal axis not only connects the two buildings, but also connects the top of a hill to the bottom of the ravine.

Through Jesus Christ, who was raised on the third day, an eternal glory and gift, the abundant life is restored in us.

Jesus is the Only Way to God

He Died In Our Place

“Jesus said to him, ‘I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father but through Me’ ” (John 14:6)

“God demonstrates His own love for us in this: while we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8)


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Site plan


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Section A 56

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Section B

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Floor plan (second level)

1. Entrance 2. Santuary 3. Gallery 4. Office 5. Reception 6. Conference room 7. Library 8. Classroom 9. Indoor playground 10. Children’s chapel 11. Social space 12. Foyer 13. Fellowship hall 14. Cafe 15. Kitchen 16. Stage 17. Storage 18. Mechanical

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Floor plan (ground level)


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Floor plan (fourth level)

Roof plan 57

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17 14 15 16

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Floor plan (third level)

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Floor plan (fifth level)


West Elevation

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East Elevation


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Light study model (above)


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breathe

exhibition work

Project type Residential Term of design 2010.09 Site Area 2,175 sq.ft. collaborated with

The Design Exchange

Building Area 1,695 sq.ft.


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REATHE was my first outside school project. Samantha Sannella, a

former president and CEO of the Design Exchange, requested that I design and build her future residential house model, which was to become one storey tall and sustainable. This project was featured in CityTV program, Extreme HomeBuild.


BREATHE – Ms. Sannella’s House BREATHE was developed through integrated design strategy. From the beginning to its finishing process, there had been constant meetings with a client discussing improvements. The result was invaluable, enhancing its design as well as practical quality of the project. The design began with two simple rectangles connected by a hallway. One side was to serve for social activities and the other for private spaces. The hallway was a major circulation and entrance. The gap between buildings also allowed more natural light to be brought into private spaces.

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Samantha Sannella posed with a model (above) Sketched plan with Samantha Sannella (below)


Once the masses of buildings were defined, architectural elements were applied as a communication tool to the environment and surroundings. Big vertical platform windows were placed on the building of the social wing, to create more open views toward outside and brighten the atmosphere inside. On the contrary, horizontal windows were placed on the building with private spaces, to create more privacy as well as a comfortable atmosphere. Creating a balance between two buildings was the major challenge to the project. It was solved by creating a linear axis on the elevation. (Please see East Elevation) Sketch drawings

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East Elevation

West Elevation


South Elevation

North Elevation

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Floor plan


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richmond springs

professional experience

Victor J. Heinrichs Architect Inc


Project type Multi-Unit Residential Term of design Current Site Area 444,808 sq.ft. Building Area 130,975 sq.ft.

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ichmond Springs is a senior housing complex with slightly less than

one thousand units, which will be built and serve the elderly population of Richmond Hill. Designed by Victor J. Heinrichs, a Toronto-based architect devoted to community housing development for seniors, Richmond Springs is designed to be an urban community that meets all of the needs of residents.


Richmond Springs – in Richmond Hill community

“Architecturally we have created a piazza, the heart of the community.” In this project, the corridor on the main floor is a distinct feature. One return trip on this 35 feet-wide two storey high corridor is over half a mile! Along the corridor, services include offices, medical cares, general stores, banking services, and therapy pool and gymnatorium will provide all the daily needs of the residents. This corridor is designed to be an urban community.

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Site map

Richmond Springs offers a new daily living experience in the urban community. With a reminiscent design of the town squares of Europe along with the charcters of building reflecting Canadian resorts, the corridor has transformed into a “street”. The “street” is active–it includes lawn bowling, cafés, lounges, and resting areas.

INDOOR SWIMMING POOL DESIGN PG.78-81

Ground floor plan

FRONT ELEVATION RENDERING PG.90


CLUBHOUSE LOUNGUE DESIGN PG.82-85

LAWN BOWLS LOUNGUE DESIGN PG.82-85

NORTH ELEVATION RENDERING PG.91

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“Pebble Beach” Clubhouse Loungue At the northwest corner of the building, golf simulators open onto the corridor. Utilizing this condition, A “clubhouse” theme was chosen for this corridor. A client also asked for a request to reflect Pebble Beach golf clubhouse design.

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As requested, interior design of Pebble Beach clubhouse, as well as a few other clubhouses were carefully examined, and then rendered into a quick conceptual sketch. Once a basic structure was defined within the space, detailed elements were added: columns and railing design, lightings, material types, colour schemes, and furnitures.

Research materials

The major design challenge was to simulate an outdoor background set of Pebble Beach into wall spaces. It was achieved by adding artificial outdoor elements, trees and rocks into the space and by a lighting set up.


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Concept sketch (above) Detail sketches (below)


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Research materials (left) Location diagram (right)

“Olde England� Lawn Bowls Lounge

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A corridor in the centre of the building measures the second longest in length. It was a suitable place for Lawn Bowls, which is a sport that was first found in United Kingdom and is now popular in Europe and Canada. Therefore, Olde England, Stratford theme was chosen for this corridor. Through research, various building types in historical Stratford town were examined, to study architectural patterns and styles of that era. Once become familiar, they were converted into an elevation sketch. Therefore, a replica of Stratford town was brought into Richmond Springs. A design challenge was to find a balance between different patterns of buildings. It was achieved through a compositional connection (of windows, doors, and etc).


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Elevation sketch


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Research materials (left) Location diagram (right)

“Therapy Pool” Therapeutical Indoor Pool

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Upon designing an indoor swimming pool, the client wanted to name it “Therapy Pool.” With this request, therefore, we came to the conclusion that the swimming pool would be connected to as many natural environments in order to create a therapeutical space. A concrete structure was chosen as it is the safest material in humid atmospheres of the pool. Windows were carefully designed and added to the structure and into the roof to meet the following design considerations: to maximize the surrounding view; to bring sunlight into the pool; and to create an aesthetically pleasing building–all these in the most cost-effective and energy-efficient way. Though a budget was the major restriction for design, the guidance of an experienced architect on the budget helped overcome the challenge.


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Section sketch (above) Detail sketch (right)


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Front Elevation

North Elevation


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“You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it made salty again?” “You are the light of the world. A city on a hill cannot be hidden.” Matthew 6:13-14

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Shin Yeong Steve Kang ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN & DREAM STEPHANKANG@HOTMAIL.COM + 647 880 6444


RESUME EDUCATION

OCAD University

HONOURS

Ontario Association of Architects Scholarship

OCAD U

OCAD U Student Design Competiton

OCAD U

bachelors of environmental design

Toronto, Ontario

graduated 2012

Selected to be a recipient of Scholarship awarded through OAA Trust Fund

2011

Won a First Place : Re:Assembly Toronto Police 52 Division Courtyard Redesign Won a Honourable Mention : The Deisgn for Humanity : Access for All

Falstaff Charrette

George Brown

Won a Honourable Mention in the Charrette run by Institute Without Boundaries, Toronto Community Housing Corporation, and Susan Speigel Architects.

2009

Extreme HomeBuild

DX

Selected to be a designer for Extreme HomeBuild featured by CityTV.

EXPERIENCE

ABBarch Architecture Inc.

I produced 3D rendering, conceptual sketches, CAD drawing, and cost estimation for a multi-unit senior housing project, which consists of slightly less than a thousand unit. It will be built in Richmond Hill.

2009

Toronto, ON

2012 - 2013

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ABBarch Architecture Inc.

Toronto, ON

Design Exchange (DX)

Toronto, ON

Newcomer Service for Youth

Toronto, ON

As an assistant, I helped on various tasks: from documentation to production work. I was engaged in construction details and AutoCAD production.

As a weekly volunteer, I helped on various tasks: documentation and reception works, exhibition set-up, packaging, and exhibition guide.

As a program run by Toronto District School Board, I volunteer as a mentor; and my role is to share qualitative times and programs with highschool students, who are new to Canada.

ADVANCED SKILLS

2010 2008

Adobe CS4 Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Light room. AutoCAD, Sketch-up Pro, Artlantis Renderer. Model Making, Hand Sketches and Rendering. Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Powerpoint) References available upon request .

2009 - 2011

2007 - 2009

2009 - Present


thank you

my parents brother kevin ocad university dongsung choi miyun oh allison koornneef toronto korean bethel church design exchange ed class of 2012, and many more..


Architecture Portfolio 2013