Page 1

Assets of Community Value Elephant and Walworth Neighbourhood Forum

Deniz Nisancioglu | Hang Xie | Stephanie Parr | Yunyi Huang March 2015


CONTENTS // CHAPTER 1

// CHAPTER 4

Further Case Studies

03 Project Brief and Methodology

19 Research and Analysis

// CHAPTER 2

Policy and Legislation

// CHAPTER 5

Conclusion

33 34 35 35

06 Community Right to Bid 08 Community Asset Transfer

23 Research and Analysis

Dickens Square - Moving Forward

Case Studies

// APPENDIX

Introduction

09 London's first Co-operative Pub

Dickens Square Park

Nominating an asset & asset transfer

12 Community Development Trusts 13 Social Enterprises

Case Studies

Community Management funding

14 High Trees Community Trust 15 Up Tutoring Services

31 Funding Sources for Community Development Trusts and Social Enterprises

Community Management forms

Crystal Palace Community Trust Exeter and St James Community Trust Friends of Nursery Row Park Friends of Burgess Park

36 Future Consultations

27 Application Tips and Review of E&W Assets 28 Step-by-step guide for nomination form: Fareshares | Darwin Court | REPA 30 Useful reading 30 Information needed for the Formal expression of interest form

// CHAPTER 3

32 Quarrington Hill Community

Interview Transcript 37 Rockingham Tenants Association

Reference 42


Chapter 1 Introduction

1


2


Introduction This report will help to connect Elephant & Walworth Neighbourhood Forum with the listing of assets of community value and provide valuable management and funding information, through the delivery of case studies, to support the Jack Hobbes and Rockingham Community Centres. The Jack Hobbes Centre provides an important community service of afterschool/childcare clubs but their continued service is being threatened due to a lack of funding from Southwark Council. This report seeks to connect the centre to current legislation, possible funding streams and management/ownership models to facilitate further thought into potential options. This information is also delivered through various case studies. Similarly, these case studies and discussion are also of use to the Rockingham Centre, as well as an analysis on the problematics of Dickens Square and priorities for local residents. Additional information is provided in the Appendix which supplements information contained in the main report. This includes a step-by-step guide for filling out the nomination form for the listing of assets of community value (which will assist the Forum in relation to potential assets that they have identified), additional case studies and suggestions for future consultation with various stakeholders in regards to Dickens Square. Our methodology has included policy analysis, case study research and consultation with stakeholders, including representatives of the Jack Hobbes and Rockingham Community Centres. Further to this, contact was made with REPA management who recommended that the Forum should contact the Trustees in order to develop a dialogue with the Rockingham Centre. We hope that this report plays a role in future protection and enhancement of local assets.

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4


Chapter 2 Policy and Legislation

5


Community Right to Bid Identifying assets of community value

1

Community assets mapping is an important way of identifying buildings or amenities that play a significant role in local life.

• Use different methods to map and generate suggestions about which assets matter: online surveys, group discussions, walkabouts, local media etc. • Record all the suggested assets visually (e.g. on a wall map or online map). • Discuss the possibility to prioritise the suggested assets together, and identity which assets are most valued by the community or have the most potential for being revived, preserved or transformed.

Act For different assets, there can be different actions that you can take considering the benefit of the community.

What action? Is the asset in public ownership or private ownership? Private

Do you want to buy it at some point?

Could it be transfereed into community ownership?

YES

Community Asset Transfer

6

NO

According to the Assets of community Value (England) Regulations 2012 (the Regulations), the following assets are excluded from being listed: • Land or buildings that are used as a residence (e.g. homes, holiday dwellings to let, hotels) including gardens and other associated land, unless the land or building is only partly used as a residence (e.g. a pub with accommodation);

YES

Community Right to Bid

Does the asset meet the criteria stated in the Act? YES The nomination is approved.

NO The nomination is unsucessful.

• Operational land of statutory undertakers (e.g. the post office, transport providers); • Licensed and some unlicensed caravan sites.

Map >> Visualise >> Prioritise

Public

Decision

Exclusions

Making a nomination

2

Before being included on the list of assets of community value, a building or land must be nominated by community organizations with a local connection.

Who can nominate? Those who want to nominate a property must first check their eligibility to do so. The following community organizations with a local connection are eligible to make a nomination: • a Neighbourhood Forum designated according to section 61F of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990; • a parish council; • an unincorporated body that consists of at least 21 members who are on the Electoral Register in Southwark; • a charity; • a company that guarantee not to distribute profits among their members; • a community interest company; • an Industrial and Provident Society that does not distribute profits among their members. Evidence of eligibility (e.g. registration number) must be provided to nominate an asset.

How to nominate? • Eligible community organisation that wnat to nominate an asset must fill out the nomination form provided by Southwark Council. For step-by-step guide and examples of filling out the form, please refer to Appendix 2.

The council will give written notice to: the owner; the occupier; the nominator; the parish council.

The asset will remain on the list of assets of community value for a maximum of 5 years.

The council will give written reasons for disapproval to the nominator.

The building or land will stay on the list of land nominated by unsuccessful community nominations for at least 5 years.

• The decision will be made within 8 weeks of receiving the nomination. If an asset is removed from the list, the council will give written notice to the owner, occupier, nominator and parish council. • When the five years have expired you can submit a new nomination.

Review • Within 8 weeks of receiving written notice of inclusion, the property owner has the right to ask for a review of the decision. • The review must be carried out within 8 weeks of receiving the written request. • If the owner does not request an oral hearing in writing, the review process will be carried out and recorded in writing. • If the decision of the review remains to list the land, the owner can appeal to a First Tier Tribunal. • There is no right of appeal against the decison for disapproval. However, a complaint can be made through the council's complaint procedure.


Getting ready to bid

3

Due to a tight timescale, it would be good to plan to have everything in place ahead of being informed of an owner's intention to sell an asset of community value.

Attracting investment As soon as you consider bidding for an asset of community value, you should start to research and find out: • Potential sources of investment for your project (e.g. grants, loans or community investment) • Funders' criteria and relevant timescales

4

Project development • Project objectives: For more detailed information, see: To Have and To Hold 2010 (available on: http://locality.org. uk/wp-content/uploads/To-have-and-to-hold-210910-forweb-FINAL.pdf) • Site: all the property issues

Triggering the moratorium

The moratorium allows more time for community groups to develop plans for a bid and seek funding to buy the asset.

• People: • do you have enough people (e.g. volunteers or paid staff) with sufficient time and skills to complete the work and achieve the project objectives?

Local Authority receives written notice of owner's intention to sell the listed asset

• If you are not a constituted organisation, you will need to set up a new organisation depending on your aims and plans for the asset. Advice is available from the My Community Rights support service. • Finance: sufficient finance to bid for the asset

Interim Moratorium is triggered

Understanding the asset

• • • •

Building condition: a thorough Building Survey the Building Calculator the Green Asset Guide

• Current and recent uses • Constraints: on the use or management of the building • Fit with local plans

Does any community interest group express interest in bidding? YES

• full moratorium period: 6 months of receiving the notification from the owner

Exemptions There are a number of situations where assets are exempted from operation of the moratorium. Please refer to the Localism Act, sect.95(5) or the SCHEDULE 3 of Regulations.

Bidding for a listed asset

5

Please see later in the report for a case study of a successful bid, and the networking and financial support that is available to forums on successful purchase.

NO

Full Moratorium is triggered

Writing a business plan A business plan explains how you will purchase, develop and manage the asset. For more detailed guidance, refer to http://mycommunity.org.uk/resources/getting-ready-to-bid/.

• interim moratorium period: 6 weeks of receiving the notification from the owner

Within or at the end of the moratorium period, the community interest groups bid for the listed asset. They do not have the right of first refusal. Therefore, it is uncertain whether they can win the bid.

LA informs nominator and publicises to community

It is important to have a good understanding of the asset before making a desicion to bid for it:

• community interest group: • a charity • a company limited by guarantee that is non profit distributing • a community interest company • Industrial and Provident Society that is non profit distributing • express interest in biding: to register an expression of interest in bidding for the asset, you must fill out the Expression of interest/intention to bid form

Owner can sell to whoever they choose at end of full moratorium

Owner can sell to whoever they choose after the interim moratorium.

7


Community Asset Transfer

Community Asset Transfer (CAT) is the process of passing management and/ or ownership of a piece of land or building from a public sector body to a communitybased organisation.

the process

your organisation

Contact an officer

Complete Expression of interest form and submit it to council

The first step to take recommended by the council is to contact Ian Brinley, a Voluntary Sector Premises Policy Officer, from whom you may get an initial response and guidance.

Is expression of interest complete? Does the organisation meet the criteria?

• an initial response: based on the council's own intentions for the property or its actual legal interest in the property. • guidance on: - completion of the Fomal expression of interest form; - more suitable alternative approaches for you.

YES

officer

• Ian Brinley Complete council sections of the expression of interest

- 020 7525 5571

officer

the Council and your organisation

YES

Make a decision: Will the asset transfer be progressed?

Written notice: progress to feasibility study stage

Carry out a feasibility study

- ian.brinley@southwark.gov.uk

Formal expression of interest

Write a report for the head of property

Head of property

1

2

If you have a specific property in mind, you can fill out the Formal expression of interest form, so as to enter the first stage of asset transfer.

NO

Written notice: reasons for not being progressed

For what information you need to provide in the form, please refer to Appendix 4.

Carry out a feasibility study

3

If you receives a positive response, the next step is to carry out a detailed feasibility study in cooperation with a council officer. This does not guarantee a transfer of the asset. At this point, the council would advise you on the next steps of the process.

8


Ivy House Pub - London's first co-operatively owned pub

Community Benefit Society • Ivy House is a Community Benefit Society - a co-operative where each member has the same vote irrespective of their investment

Where are they based?

• The Ivy House Community Pub Limited was formed and they launched a community share offer, enabling residents and businesses to invest in the pub

The Ivy House 40 Stuart Road London SE15 3BE Tel: +44(0)207-277-8233 Email: info@ivyhousenunhead.com - General Enquiries Website: www.ivehousenunhead.com

• They set a target of £100,000 which they surpassed, generating £142,600 from 371 shareholders • Money used as working capital so that they have a reserve to pay staff wages/suppliers • The Community Share gave the local community an opportunity to become directly involved with the pub as owners and consumers and help contribute to the development of their local area

History • In April 2012, Enterprise Inns - the freeholder of the premises - sold the pub to a property developer whose intention was to develop the building into residential accomodation

• Key to the viability of the business - those with a stake in the business would be more inclined to use and promote it

• Local community listed the pub as an asset of community

Challenges Faced and lessons to be be learned

• New owner decided to sell the pub - the community formed a Community Benefit Society to acquire the building

• Biggest challenge - engaging and sharing information with the local community

• The building became the first asset of community value to be purchased on behalf of Community Right to Bid provisions in the Localism Act 2011

• Important to link campaign to broader concerns of the local - emphasise the importance on the social value to the community

• Re-opened as London's first co-operative, not-for-profit, pub, community hub and performance space

• Made good use of social media - (over 1,000 followers on facebook page in 24 hours), their own website and created a mailing list

Importance of listing the building? • Important planning implications - Council's take into account a building listed as an asset of community value when deciding a planning application (e.g. change of use) - this protected the pub against development • 6-month moratorium triggered by their intention to bid bought them time to prepare a bid • Once Southwark have listed a building as an asset of community value, you are referred to an organisation called Locality who signpost you in the direction of other helpful groups.

• Ivy House were advised of potential lenders to help them finance the purchase • Locality advised them to contact the Architectural Heritage Fund, from whom they successfully applied for a loan worth £550,000 • Ivy House were advised of business advisory organisations • Locality referred them to the Plunkett Foundation who gave them business development support, legal advice and helped them convert to a Community Benefit Society

• Also traditional methods were just as important: leafleting, posters, public meetings, print press. • Put on live music and comedy acts to promote the campaign and generate funding • Gained support from local councillors and their MP

Need their advice? • The Ivy House provides help, advice and support for community groups for their own projects • Email - advice@ivyhousenunhead.com

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10


Chapter 3 Community Management Forms

11


Development Trusts What are development trusts? Principles Development Trusts are organisations which operate in the United Kingdom that are: • community based, owned and led.

How do I set up a trust? Information resource: http://www.partnerships.org.uk/pguide/trusts.htm http://www.dtawales.org.uk/creating-a-developmenttrust/

1. Get started

• engaged in the economic, environmental and social regeneration of a defined area or community. • independent but seek to work in partnership with other private, voluntary and public sector organisations. • self-sufficient or aiming for self-sufficiency, and not for profit.

Form There is no set form of legal structure, and a development trust may be registered as: • a company limited by guarantee, • a community interest company or • an industrial and provident society.

People in a community come together to set up a development trust to tackle local issues and bring about change Step 1: start out • Find out what skills, energy and commitment you can give to make a difference or tackle the problem you have identified. • Agree what skills are missing and who else should you involve. Step 2: develop a plan

• Many register as charities.

• Identify opportunities that could develop into an enterprise.

Activities

• Take note of the barriers that your research may have thrown up. Such as raising money and advertising.

The activities undertaken by development trusts are various and include:

• Prioritise your ideas and decide what you should do ‘now’, ‘soon’ and ‘later’.

• running the local shop and post office • developing play park and recreational facilities • managing a housing development • developing renewable energy projects such as wind farms • setting up training programmes.

12

2. Deciding on your legal structure There is no model legal structure for trusts, but there are some common elements of most development trusts. • Company Limited by Guarantee is the most frequently used legal structure which has members instead of stakeholders. It does not distribute any surpluses as profits, but recycles money back into the business to maintain and improve services and products. • Charitable status is also secured by many trusts operating. This provides some tax advantages, a public identity which assures their probity, and also enables the trust to apply to charitable foundations for funding. • Subsidiary trading companies can covenant profits back to the main charitable company and are frequently set up by trusts registered charities.

There are many funding options available to Community Trusts For more information on examples of suitable management structures and funding sources for Community Development Trusts, please see Appendix 5.

The next section provides a case study of a successful trust. Please see Appendices 7 and 8 for further case studies of successful Community Trusts.


High Trees Community Development Trust - Tulse Hill Where are they based?

The key to success?

St Martins Learning Centre 220 Upper Tulse Hill London SW2 2NS 020 8671 3132 learningcentre@high-trees.org www.high-trees.org

Forming partnerships with local and national initiatives to raise your profile The trust has extensive experience of community development and a track record of contract delivery and partnership collaboration across Lambeth:

Background • High Trees Community Development Trust is a registered charity and a company limited by guarantee. • Established in 1998 and based in Lambeth.

Personal development and skills courses for parents and vulnerable adults

Employability consultancy for unemployed people

Family support for parents referred from social care and schools for children at risk of exclusion

Term time and Holiday programmes and a Homework club.

• Improve your English To gain overall confidence in everyday reading skills for work, studying or helping children with homework.

• Local contracts for Early Years and Adult Learning

• Managing your Money

• Youth activities and employment support for Metropolitan Housing Partnership and Lambeth Living.

A practical, entry level course to learn simple maths

• Preferred provider of Lambeth Adult Learning Services

• Offers personal and skills development courses for all sections of the community:

Examples of successful educational courses for you to consider:

Success Story - working with PR Newswire • PR Newswire and High Trees came together through UBM events bringing together not-for-profits, social enterprises and businesses to explore mutually beneficial partnerships. • Volunteers at PR Newswire secured extensive coverage of Liberty's Human Rights 'Close to Home' Award, given to High Trees students for the creation of a 'Stop and Search App'. • Assisted with the launch of a new High Trees website.

• Universal Credit Teaching some of the skills needed to make the transition to the new system for claiming benefits. • Office Skills A practical course to understand and practice the essentials • Volunteering An accredited course • Effective Team Building Skills An accredited course to develop the necessary skills • Silver Surfers • Basic IT • IT Digital Skills – Create a Photobook

Tools (PR Newswire)

Skills (PR staff)

Triangular Mutual Impact

Stories (High Trees) 13


Social Enterprises What are social enterprises? Principles Social enterprises are businesses that trade to tackle social problems, improve communities, people’s life chances, or the environment. They make their money from selling goods and services in the open market, but they reinvest their profits back into the business or the local community. Social Enterprises should: • Have a clear social and/or environmental mission set out in their governing documents

2. Deciding on your legal structure • Unincorporated association: you need to know that you will be carrying all the responsibilities of the organisation personally. • Incorporation: puts clear legal water between you and your venture. There are three principal options if you want to incorporate your venture as a limited company: please see the diagram opposite.

• Reinvest the majority of their profits to further the social mission

How do I set up one? Information resource: http://www.socialenterprise.org.uk/advice-services/ publications/start-your-social-enterprise http://www.socialenterpriseworks.org

1. Getting started: a business plan Some hard thinking to do before you invest lots of time, money and energy into something. • Vision: What are your ambitions? • Mission: What are you hoping to achieve? • Goals: What specific actions are you going to take – and over what timeframe?

14

Trust

Unincorporated Association Charity Incorporated Society for the Benefit of the Community Co-operative

• Be autonomous of state/local authority

• Be accountable and transparent

Unincorporated

Industrial and Provident Society (IPS)

• Generate the majority of their income through trade

• Be majority controlled in the interests of the social mission

Corporate status

There are many funding options available to different forms of Social Enterprises. For more information on funding sources for Social Enterprises, please see Appendix 5 and refer to the next section for further information on the resources available through social impact advisory services.

Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO)

Company Limited By Guarantee (CLG)

Company Limited By Shares (CLS)

Charitable Company Community Interest Company limited by Guarantee (CIC CLG) Community Interest Company limited by Shares (CIC CLS) Sole Trader/ Limited Liability Partnership/ Public Company


Social Enterprises - Case studies in support assistance Up Tutoring Services Where are they based? This social enterprise, based in Ruislip, is currently in

Clarence Centre London SE1 6FE 020 7609 4198 stephenk@prevista.co.uk www.prevista.co.uk

early stages but the founder has been able to discuss options and develop a business plan through Prevista. Using Up Tutoring Services as an example, the following section provides information on some of the local and national facilities available.

Background

SPIRE Programme

• Emma Hanbury decided to set up a tutoring business in partnership with her teacher husband Richard, following her redundancy.

• T h e P re v i s t a H u b e n t e r p r i s e t e a m r u n s t h e S P I R E programme which offers FREE support to existing and new businesses in SOUTHWARK.

• She sought assistance from Prevista, and their Business Advisor, Stephen Kain, provided her with specialist business start-up advice and guidance.

• SPIRE offers group workshops and seminars as well as individual consultations.

• The advice from Stephen included:

Access to finance

How to write a business plan

Business planning

Guidance on financial forecasting processes

Cashflow

Defining the social impact of the service - this developed to the tagline: 'Educational Solutions for Ethical Parents'

Public Relations and Marketing

Improving ‘Green Credentials’

How to launch new products

How to expand at the right pace

When and how to employ staff

Employment law

Project management

Sustainable Education and Training • Like the Elephant and Walworth Community Centres, Up Tutoring hopes to target underprivileged pupils who would not normally have the opportunity to access private tuition. • Stephen recommended a social enterprise model to open up routes to funding. He advised on how and where to find funding to support a sustainable business based committed to social value.

Making the most of what's on your doorstep

Prevista - Where are they based?

There is a social enterprise hub based at: The Fire Station 139 Tooley Street London SE1 2HZ The following organisations share the facilities, and offer an array of training and funding support:

Social Enterprise UK 020 3589 4950 info@socialenterprise.org.uk www.socialenterprise.org.uk

The Centre for Social Impact 020 8133 5759 training@centre4socialimpact.org www.centre4socialimpact.org

• The enterprise team has experts in specialist areas:

• Through initial discussions with Stephen Kain, he encourages the Forum to view the website and make an appointment with him soon.

The School for Social Entrepreneurs 020 7089 9120 Office@sse.org.uk www.the-sse.org

Social Enterprise UK • This is a membership organisation offering a wealth of information to members paying annual fees. • For non-members, the website offers plenty of information:

Case studies. However, please be that most of the success stories are large-scale businesses.

Updates on policies, campaigns and terminology.

Advice on partnerships and national funding.

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Chapter 4 Dickens Square Park

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Redeveloping Dickens Square Park

Research and Analysis

Following Southwark Council's award of £1,500,000, to redevelop the park, the group was tasked with researching the needs of the local community and community centres. The group consulted with two important stakeholders: A member of Trinity Newington Residents' Association and Head of Rockingham Tenants Association

1. Collaboration • Communication channels have been broken.

• Barriers to using the park:

• The muddy surface makes it unappealing. • The uneven surface is inaccessable for wheelchairs and buggies.

• Form lasting relationships so that the REPA and the Rockingham Community centre can collaborate:

• Debris in woodland is unattractive and dangerous

• Poor lighting and sight lines make the park inaccesible at night. • Pedestrians often have to walk through dog walking routes - dog foul is not cleaned up regularly. • The REPA fence and locks are intimidating.

Unfortunately the historic relationship between the Rockingham Estate and REPA has been hindered with changes to residents and staff over time.

Anti-social Behaviour

The group was able to confirm that the REPA trustees are:

• Large youth groups intimidate other users.

Mrs Lorraine Rossiter (Chairperson),

• The park has a reputation for drug use and crime.

Miss Aden Quinn, Mr David Iglesias, Miss Michelle Farrell

• Anti-social behaviour is noisy in the summer months.

Attend forum/association/committee meetings. Plan activities such a families fun-day, utilising the green space, and the facilities on the estate.

• Concentrate exercise and fitness activities at REPA and keep the park as a green open space with a wild garden. • Reconfigure the car park so that it serves as an official car park with designated spaces and walkways.* • Extending REPA opening hours

(Information found at www.findthecompany.co.uk)

2. Current assessment of the problems with the space

3. Key priorities for local residents

There are no structured paths or pavements

No 'drawing-in' features • The art installation lacks focus • Park benches are not maintained

• Underused asset:

• Wild garden lacks aesthetic appeal.

REPA is only open 3 hours a day between 3.30-6.30pm.

• No social areas for picnics or sports games.

• The adventure playground cannot be enjoyed by the local community.

Car parking between the Mosque and REPA

• REPA previously had a toddlers club in the morning and the Rockingham residents would be very keen to see this initiative operating again.

• Cars block the entrance to REPA and the park.

• The Forum has a huge shortage of available rooms to hire for meetings, and the REPA would offer a solution in the day and in the evenings.

• It wasn't designed to be a car park, so it not particularly functional for parking.

• Extremely busy during prayer.

• Unattractive entrance at the car park: it wasn’t initially intended to be a car park, the random parking makes it lack sense of entrance

• Open access to REPA adventure playground for local residents. • Using REPA rooms for community activities - not just restricted to children: gardening and similar OAP-friendly activities. • Consult with Falmouth Road Group Practice for social prescribing. • Set up a friends of the park group • The representatives during the consultation disagreed on the future of the car park. It is recommended that the Forum consults with more stakeholders to reach agreement.

Moving Forward Due to the difficulties the group has with meeting certain stakeholders, and considering the analysis detailed above, the group have proposed meeting with key representatives and posing specific questions to enable the Forum to develop their plans further. For more information, please see Appendix 6. For case studies of Friends of Park groups, please see appendices 9 and 10.

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Chapter 5 Conclusion

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22


Conclusion The analysis detailed in the report and the Appendix offers a wealth of information to support the forum in its future aims for protecting its community assets. The guides to Community Right to Bid and Asset Transfer, along with the case studies of Ivy House and Quarrington Hill Community Centre, provide food for thought on how, when and why the Forum should consider nominating a building to be listed as an asset of community value and/or pursuing an asset transfer. Local assets have been reviewed in detail in the Appendix, and there are useful points to consider, and the steps that need to be taken to ensure successful nomination. The Appendix also includes suggested answers to complete the nomination form for Fareshares, REPA and Darwin Court Swimming Pool and Health Centre. Please use this table for your benefit; it is intended to aid the Forum’s assessment of local sites in the future. As well as community ownership models, the report also includes management models useful for the Jack Hobbes Centre and the Rockingham Centre. The summary of Community Development Trusts, and case studies of High Trees, Crystal Palace Trust, and the Exeter and St. James Trust provide successful ideas for the Forum to consider: partnerships with communications experts, offering a share scheme to members, local authority collaboration to become an accredited learning provider, and using Locality contacts to secure future funding. Similarly, the summary of social enterprise models and the case study of Up Tutoring, with support from Prevista offers the Forum an opportunity to access support mechanisms in Southwark. The Forum has so much support on its doorstep! Finally, the residents’ views on the relationship between the Rockingham Estate and the REPA have been documented, as well as an assessment of redeveloping Dickens Square Park to promote collaboration, and become a vital community space in the local community. Although the group was unable to consult with all key stakeholders, progress has been made in improving the communication channels. The Forum should take full advantage of its location and diversity to reach its full potential.

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24


Appendix

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26


Appendix 1 - Application Tips and a review of Elephant and Walworth Assets ▶ The application must have a clear demonstration that the Asset furthers the social wellbeing or social interests of the community

Elephant & Walworth Pontential Asset League Table

▶ The application must demonstrate realistically that there could be a non-ancillary use of the Asset within the next 5 years that would further the social wellbeing or social interests of the community

Site or building

▶ If the building is privately used and restricts community access then this would disqualify a valid listing being made

▶ The nomination must be from a qualifying group (e.g. An organisation with charitable status may apply in their own right, without the Forum. This needs to be considered.)

1 Crown Court Building

4

3

1

2

1

1

12

3

13

2 Darwin Court Swimming Pool

4

4

3

1

4

4

20

4

23

3 Elephant House

4

4

4

4

2

2

20

1

17

4 Fredericks Adventure Playground

4

4

2

1

2

1

14

4

17

5 Masons Arms

4

3

4

4

3

2

20

1

17

6 Medical Centre

4

1

3

2

4

4

18

3

19

7 Social Services

4

3

2

4

2

2

17

1

14

8 197 East Street (Shop Unit)

3

3

3

4

1

1

15

1

12

9 Congreve & Barlow T&RA Hall

3

4

4

3

4

4

22

2

21

3

3

4

2

3

3

18

3

19

11 Rockingham Community Centre & Nursery 3

4

4

3

4

4

22

2

21

12 Royal British Legion building

3

3

3

4

1

1

15

1

12

13 St John’s Pre-School

3

2

3

4

3

4

19

1

16

14 The Royal Standard (Royal Salsa)

3

2

3

4

3

3

18

1

15

15 The William (Budda Lounge)

3

2

3

3

3

3

17

2

16

16 Borough Police Station

2

1

2

1

1

1

8

4

11

17 Huntsman & Hounds

2

1

2

1

3

3

12

4

15

18 Southwark Playhouse

2

2

4

1

3

3

15

4

18

19 The Beehive Public House

2

3

4

1

3

4

17

4

20

20 Walworth Garden Farm

2

1

4

1

2

4

14

4

17

21 76 Elsted Street (Black Women's Group)

1

2

3

2

3

3

14

3

15

22 English Martyrs Catholic Church

1

1

2

1

4

4

13

4

16

23 Henry Wood Hall

1

1

2

1

1

1

7

4

10

24 Myrrh Education

1

1

2

2

3

3

12

3

13

25 Rockingham Estate Play Association

1

4

4

4

4

4

21

1

18

26 S R C Community Nursery

1

1

3

3

4

3

15

2

14

10 Fareshares

▶ If the owner of a building that is nominated is in administration then this disqualifies a valid listing being made, under the Insolvency Act

▶ It is considered that an operational building of the Metropolitan Police does not further social wellbeing - when a building is used as a police station, public access is limited to only a very small part of the overall building and so does not support the assertion that it furthers social wellbeing - in Southwark alone, nominations to list two police stations have been unsuccessful

▶ In 2018, Southwark Playhouse will return to London Bridge as part of a Section 106 agreement. As a result, the nomination will need to clearly demonstrate that there could be a non-ancillary use of this potential Asset within the next 5 years that would further social wellbeing or social interests of the community in order for it to be listed

▶ The service provided must be of benefit to the wider community e.g. specialist services provided to people with specific issues or interests only promotes the social wellbeing of a very limited section of the community

rep loc risk ava loc airs al sup con total of ilab atio nee nee por diti adju loss ility n ded d t total on sted

Average 2.6 2.4 3.0 2.4 2.7 2.8 16.0 2.6 16.1

1

▶ Potential Assets that provide specialist services such as the REPA afterschool club must increase activities at the centre in order to further the social wellbeing of the wider community in order to be listed

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Appendix 2 - Step-by-step guid for filling out nomination form Nomination Form

Part A

Part B

Contact details of nominator

Organisation name, address and type

Confirm the asset is not exempted from nomination Address or location of the asset

Description of the asset and its boundaries

Ordnance Survey Map Does the main use of the building or land further the social wellbeing or social interests of the local community? Or has recently done so? Is it realistic to think it can do so in the future? Part C

Provide reason for ticking the boxes above and your detailed reasons why the authority should conclude this is land of community value.

Step-by-step guide · The nominator must be a person from an eligible community organisation. · We advise this should be a senior member of the forum, such as a nominated chairperson or 'Community Asset Officer'. · The council will not accept nominations from ineligible organisations. Therefore, the forum needs to be an approved Neighbourhood Forum before submitting a nomination. · If the organisation is a registered charity or community interest company (CIC), the forum could approach the organisations to nominate in partnership. (see p.6 for who can nominate) · Registration number or evidence of your organisation’s status should be provided. See p.6 for exemptions. Provide full address and postcode · Is the building Grade Listed? · When was the it built? · What are the uses of all spaces within the asset? · Give detail about the extent of the asset (e.g. it may include extensive basements, car parks); mark the boundary on a map or plan if possible. Please provide if possible. · Social interests include cultural, recreational and sporting interests. · Social well being may relate to social integration, social engagement, social coherence, social acceptance etc. This is applicable if an asset has recently closed down. · What are the opportunities (e.g. potential uses) for this the asset? · What is the expectation of the local community for the asset?

· Give as much information as possible to support your idea that the asset currently contributes to social interest and social wellbeing or did so in the past, and could do so in the future. · You can give details regarding the current uses and user groups of the asset, as well as the services or activities provided by the asset.

(The group has sent an email to Fareshares, but has not got any response yet. So the Forum has to find out whom to contact.)

Manager - Mark Saunderson mark.saunderson@peabody.org.uk.

Elephant and Walworth Neighbourhood Forum

Elephant and Walworth Neighbourhood Forum

OR

OR

Fareshares - an all-volunteer food co-operative (need to find out more information about the constitution).

Peabody - a registered charity (no. 206061) that owns Darwin Court.

√ 56 Crampton Street, London SE17 3AE

√ 45 Westminster Bridge Rd , London

REPA REPA Manager - Maya Lipski mayalipski@repa.org.uk. Trustees - Mrs Lorraine Rossier (Chairperson), Miss Aden Quinn, Mr David Iglesias, Miss Michelle Farrell (Information found at www.findthecompany.co.uk)

Elephant and Walworth Neighbourhood Forum OR REPA - a registered charity (no. 297054).

√ SE1 7JB

10 Dickens Square, London SE1 4JL

The asset is part of the Pullens Estate that was built in 1901 and falls within the conservation area. It is a small wholefoods shop turned from the squatted ex-grocery. It now shares space with 56a Infoshop (a radical social centre and bookshop) and 56a Bikeroom (a free D.I.Y bicycle repair space).

The asset is a resource centre on the ground floor of Darwin Court building (built in 2003), comprising health facilities, social spaces, a café, IT suite and pool. (The flats on the upper floors cannot be nominated as asset of community value)

The Play Centre sits within Dickens Square Park and is adjacent to the Bait-ul-Aziz Islamic Cultural Centre on Harper Road. The Play centre consists of play rooms, kitchen, toilets and small offices for use daily after school hours, with a substantial outdoor play area.

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

The Darwin Court resource centre serves both the tenants of Darwin Court and other groups of local people in the community. It provides a range of health, fitness and relaxation activities. The swimming pool is the only pool in local community, and thus is regularly used by school children during the day. The pool also offers sessions for different groups. Other health and fitness facilities include exercise classes and a therapy room that offers treatments. Peabody operates a café in the centre that is a good place for work and used by various organisations. There is a conference room in the centre available for hire. The centre also provides employment advisory services and training.

"REPA (Rockingham Estate Play Association) is a voluntary organisation which aims to enhance children lives by providing safe and challenging play opportunities for all local 5-16 yr olds. Many children from the Rockingham Estate attend the after school club and the organisation charges minimal fees to ensure that the facility is accessible to low-income families. Due to many of the children coming from single parent families, the centre offers an important school pickup service, and provides a safe and fun environment for children to bond before returning to their families at 6.30pm. Although the organisation offers many structured activities, most significantly, there is an onsite adventure playground. The site, encompassing the building and adventure playground, is protected by a boundary fence which is locked outside of opening hours. Adventure play means that children test their boundaries and take acceptable risks. The site, building and structures are regularly checked and all hazards removed. However, children are encouraged to test their physical limits and judge risks when playing on the slides and swings. This is essential for healthy growth especially in inner city areas - offering a safe environment to develop physical skills and develop social skills with other children. The REPA plays a large part in the history of the Dickens Square and Rockingham Estate community, with second and third generation families attending the centre. One current staff member grew up on the Rockingham Estate and regularly

Fareshares food co-op was founded by local people in 1988. As a non-profit making community project, it aims at providing low priced wholefoods and related products to anyone in need. Holding the belief that decent food is essential for human health, it stocks unadulterated vegan food such as grains, fruit, nuts and beans. It has been an vital source of food for the local people. Currently the store only opens on three days of the week for limited time. In this light, the site is not effectively used and thus of opportunity. Fareshares is a precious experiment as an all-volunteer, DIY-basis project in community. All their staff are unpaid volunteers who are also users of the store. The users help themselves in the store and need to calculate the total cost by themselves. The staff in the store is in charge of collecting money from the users, as well as providing help for new users. In addition, Fareshares gives support to other co-operatives that have the same aim by sharing experience with them. Since its foundation, Fareshares has been located in 56 Grampton Street that is part of the Pullen Buildings (also known as Pullen Estate). The estate is of great architectural importance, being some of the last survived

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Examples Darwin Court Resource Centre

Fareshares


continued Victorian tenement buildings in London.

attended the REPA after school club as a child. Her mother is the current Chairperson and this shows the family values attached to the organisation and the local area. Without this facility, many parents would struggle to pick up their children from school; this is the only facility in the local area. As the facility is only used during after school hours, there is potential for the rooms to further enhance the social wellbeing of local residents by offering the rooms to hire for local residents groups, community groups, and social/sports functions and events. "

Overall, Fareshares is not only a place valued by the local people in terms of the service it provide and its location, but also a place of potential considering the limited opening time.

Are the proposed social interests cultural? Are the proposed social interests recreational? Are the proposed social interests sporting? Other interests?

Please give full details

Current owner's (or last-known) name and address Current occupiers/ leaseholders name and contact address

You may attach photos, maps, plans and other documents to help identify the asset and to support your nomination.

Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Ethical/Environmental /Food and Drink Fareshares has contributed to the quality of life of local people by providing affordable healthy food. Apart from this, it also brings environmental and ethical benefits. To be specific, it promotes social justice by catering for anyone in the community without discrimination. It seeks to provide local and ethically sourced food, so as to support consumption patterns that promote sustainable agriculture and make people aware of the political and ecological effects of their consuming behavior. Explain in detail how the asset furthers certain area(s) of social interest.

The council will need to inform the owner of the nomination and its result. Therefore, it is important to provide details about the current owner. The council will also need to contact the current occupier regarding the nomination if the occupiers are not the owner of the asset. Details about them should also be provided. · Continuation sheets for reasons for nomination and details about social interest or social wellbeing furthered by the asset · Community consultation report · The constitution of the organisation · Some nice photos of the asset

Challenges or difficulities

In terms of social wellbeing, Fareshares has promoted social interaction engagement. According to community views about this project (available on:http://fareshares.org.uk/community/), many people have enjoyed meeting and chatting with other people from all kinds of backgrounds in Fareshares. By encouraging users to be actively involved in running the project, the co-op has enhanced the engagement in the community.

Educational

(needs to be completed)

(needs to be completed)

Fareshares will deliver wider benefits to the community if it can open through the week for a longer period of time. Southwark Council Property Division

Peabody Trust 45 Westminster Bridge Rd , London

SE1 7JB

Fareshares food co-op 56 Crampton Street, London SE17 3AE

Peabody Trust 45 Westminster Bridge Rd , London

SE1 7JB

Further suggestion of information: · Positive comments from both the users and staff of Fareshares · The constitution of Fareshares · Number and backgrounds of people/ families using Fareshares · Photographs

Further suggestion of information: · Consultation results from both the tenants and other local people · Number of children/families using the REPA · Photographs

Fareshares currently has financial difficulties. They add a small margin to the food price. However, this is not enough to cover running costs, especially when both monthly rent paid to the council and their business rates are raised. They hope to get donations or regular income from standing orders. If this does not work, they may have to put up the food price.

Southwark Council

REPA - Manager Maya Lipski 10 Dickens Square, London SE1 4JL

Further suggestion of information: · Positive quotations from local families using the REPA · Number of children/families using the REPA · Photographs

There are several challenges that the centre is facing. The first challenge lies in the co-ordination of the needs of the tenants and those who do not live in Darwin Court. It is said that some tenants were surprised when knowing the resource centre was shared with the public. Another challenge is to make the café appealing to both tenants and other local people. Finally, it has been extremely expensive to run the swimming pool as a community resource. Peabody has expressed reluctance to build another swimming pool. In this light, the existing pool is important for the community.

The nomination form is available on: http://www.southwark.gov.uk/downloads/download/3262/assets_of_community_value_forms The completed form should be submitted by email to CommunityRighttoBid@southwark.gov.uk.

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Appendix 3 - Further Reading to support the nomination process

Appendix 4 - Information needed for filling out the Formal expression of interest form for community asset transfer

Example of completed nomination form - Friends of Burgess Park

Assets of community value guidance notes - Harrogate Borough Council

available on: http://www.friendsofburgesspark.org. uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Community-Assetapplication-Feb-2014.pdf

available on: https://www.harrogate.gov.uk/cpi/ Documents/Assets%20of%20community%20value%20 guidance%20notes.pdf

30

▶ Section 1: Checklist A checklist of all the documents (copies) you should provide for your application, including: - evidence that your organisation meets the criteria listed in the Council’s Conditions of Grant Funding - your organisation's constitution; - memorandum/ articles of association; - audited accounts; - committee membership details; - latest annual report and equal opportunities policy. ▶ Section 2: Contact details ▶ Section 3: Structure and governance You must be at least one of the following to get direct support from the council: registered charity; company limited by guarantee; an unincorporated association; trust; community interest company; Industrial and provident society (IPS) - cooperative; IPS - community benefit society; charitable incorporate organisation. ▶ Section 5: The property details - address and other specific information; - any links/ interests your organisation currently has (i.e. tenant, occasional use etc.). ▶ Section 6: Your proposal - reasons for expression of interest; - details of your proposal and how the community can benefit from the transfer; - the financial details, critical dates and conditions of identified funding streams; - evidence of any your organisation's previous experience of raising funds for capital works and developing social enterprises; - qualifications of the personnel who will undertake the necessary work to support the application. ▶ Section 7: Your organisaiton's funding - how is your organisation funded? how do you intend to fund the maintenance and improvement of the property? ▶ Section 8: Your property history and experience If your organisation currently occupies a property: Are you tenants or leaseholders? Do you sublet the property? Are you responsible for the repair and maintenance for any part of the property? If so, please provide planned and reactive maintenance strategies. Are you responsible for the compliance with relevant legislation and regulations for any part of the property? If so, please provide evidence of compliance. Landlord contact details and contact of person responsible for your property (i.e. facilities manager).


Appendix 5 - Funding Sources for Community Development Trusts and Social Enterprises Management structure of development trusts The constitution of a company is known as its memorandum and articles of association, and it is that which sets out the objects, powers and control.

Lloyds Bank Foundation’s Invest fund: http://www. lloydsbankfoundation.org.uk/our-programmes/invest Lloyds Bank Foundation’s Enable fund: http://www. lloydsbankfoundation.org.uk/our-programmes/enable Big Potential: http://www.sibgroup.org.uk/bigpotential/ Power to Change: https://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/ powertochange

Investment and funding resource of social enterprises ▶ Types of finance: Grants, Venture philanthropy, Debt finance, Equity finance, Quasi-equity. ▶ Grant-making trusts:

Taking the management structure of a company limited by guarantee as an example:

Community Investment Fund: http://socialandsustainable. com/community-investment-fund/

Finding information: www.grantfinder.co.uk/ and www.fundingcentral.org.uk/Default.aspx

▶ A company limited by guarantee has as its management committee a Board of directors, who must operate under company law. They are usually unpaid, and must certainly derive no personal benefit if the company is also a charity. The directors often have specialist skills such as finance, legal or HR experience.

Our Urban Shop: http://www.communityshops.coop/urban

Big Lottery: www.biglotteryfund.org.uk

Awards for All: https://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/globalcontent/programmes/england/awards-for-all-england

The Esmée Fairbairn Foundation: www.esmeefairbairn.org. uk/ and www.trustfunding.org.uk

▶ The members of the company (equivalent to shareholders) will have powers defined by the memorandum and articles. They may be individuals or organisations, and may be given powers to elect or appoint directors - the legal structure is very flexible. ▶ The Board is the governing body, responsible for policy, but not day to day management. ▶ The paid staff, headed by an executive director or chief executive carry out day to day management. ▶ Sub-commitees and working groups can be appointed by the Board with delegated authority

Investment and funding resource of development trusts Development trusts have raised money from a range of sources: ▶ gift and loans from the community, by issuing shares and using community loan finance. ▶ Many also apply for grants from a range of trust and government sources.

▶ Funds aimed at start-ups UnLtd: www.unltd.org

Management structure of social enterprises

▶ Venture philanthropy organisations The Impetus Trust: www.impetus.org.uk CAN: www.can-online.org.uk ▶ Social investors and social lenders

Taking the management structure of Community Interest Company (CIC) as an example ▶ Governing body: “The directors” or “the board of directors” ▶ Management structure: a CIC must first be registered as a limited company. Essentially it is a two-tier management structure, with a board of directors accountable to a wider membership. Members will typically hold voting rights at general meetings and will elect all or some of the directors.

Big Issue Invest: www.bigissueinvest.com Bridges Ventures: www.bridgesventures.com CAF Venturesome: www.cafonline.org/Venturesome The Social Investment Business: www.thesocialinvestmentbusiness.org Social Finance: www.socialfinance.org.uk/

▶ Profit distribution permitted? First, If it is a CIC Limited By Guarantee, a level of profit distribution is permitted, in the form of bonuses, but is subject to the discretion of the CIC Regulator. Second, If it is a CIC Limited By Shares, profit distribution is permissible in the form of a dividend payment on the shares held by a member. Dividends must be declared by the members of the CIC and cannot be declared by the governing body alone. ▶ Charitable status available: CICs are NOT eligible for charitable status.

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Appendix 6 - Asset Transfer - Quarrington Hill Community Centre Where are they based? 4 Front Street North Quarrington Hill County Durham, DH6, 4QD Tel: +44 (0) 191-377-0247 Email: keith.pounder@hotmail.co.uk - Chairman Website: parishes.durham.gov.uk/coxhoe/Pages/ QuarringtonHillCommunityCentre.aspx

Timetable of activities

Background ▶ Community centre threatened with closure due to the cost of running the building ▶ The management committee produced a viable 5-year business plan and agreed an asset transfer, with a 30-year lease at peppercorn signed in April 2014 ▶ Committee took over full operational responsibility

Problems Faced

>>>

The Process

>>>

▶ Small Management Committee that needed to increase their capacity

▶ Public meetings with members to share ideas for the future use of the building and generate public support

▶ Centre limited in its activities - this meant that the centre required additional funding to make the project sustainable

▶ Application made for Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO) - Community Association changing from a registered charity to a CIO which would limit the personal liability of Trustees in the unlikely event of the centre hitting financial problems

▶ An existing charity without limited liability ▶ Concerns from members of the management about taking on increased responsibilities if they agree to an asset transfer - but if they don't then the likelihood is that the centre will close ▶ Future of the centre reliant on greater usage and involvement of residents in order to keep the centre open and financially viable

Monday

Youth Club 4.30-6pm

Tuesday

Coffee Morning & Bingo 10.30-11.30am

Wednesday

Bingo 7.30-9pm

Thursday

Metafit 6-6.30pm

Friday

7-11 year old's kids club 4.30-6pm

Metafit 6-6.30pm

Carpet Bowls 7.15pm onwards

Success ▶ Asset successfully transfered under a 30-year lease ▶ CIO status achieved and former charity wound up to take on the new building ▶ Funding received from local AAP and County Councillor's Fund, as well as a more substantial amount from an external source - Lararge Tarmac through a landfill community fund

▶ Training offered in liaison with the Council who provided business plan support and training

▶ Increase in activities at the centre (timetable above) which contributed to a more sustainable future

▶ A 5-year financial forecast was undertaken

▶ Management Committee numbers increased - this provided additional skills and opportunities

▶ The Committee identified potential funding streams - they received help from the East Durham Rural Corridor Area Action Partnership (local AAP) who provided knowledge on potential sources

▶ Cost-saving benefits from new energy-saving improvements - the price of annual fuel bills reduced by £460 per annum ▶ Repair and refurbishment - new kitchen, new lights, carpets, blinds, new sports changing rooms ▶ Hall available for hire for functions and events

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Appendix 7 - Crystal Palace Community Development Trust The role of the One Stop Shop

Where are they based? Where are they based? Anerly Town Hall

Partnerships to empower the community

Run by a shop co-ordinator with the support of volunteers, the Kingswood Estate Community Shop provides local people with access to a wide range of services to help enhance their social, financial and emotional well-being.

Anerly SE20 8BD 020 8676 5666 admin@cpcdt.org.uk www.cpcdt.org.uk

Kingswood Estate Community Shop works closely with the Local Authorities and NHS Trusts to encourage the community to meet its mission to play an active part in its future.

Background

Kingswood Estate Community Shop

▶ The trust was launched in March 2004, created by the Crystal Palace Community Forum, formed in 1997.

▶ Low cost computer use, print out and photocopy service

▶ Due to the high levels of obesity and other health problems in children and adults in the area, the community shop offers a range of NHS services such as:

▶ Citizens Advice drop in service

▶ The forum brought together community and voluntary representatives from five surrounding areas

▶ Three local councillors hold weekly to monthly surgeries to ensure that a representative from each of the local authorities can 'provide a voice' to the local residents.

▶ IT & Employment Training

▶ “Fit Feet” podiatry service

▶ Benefits those who live and work in the neighbourhoods and estates that comprise the Crystal Palace Trust.

▶ Councillor Surgeries

▶ Aims to empower local people to improve their quality of life, playing an active part in the regeneration of the area.

▶ Food Bank Distribution Centre

▶ Sexual health checks and advice

▶ Chair Based Exercise

▶ Mental wellbeing events ▶ Lets get cooking” workshops

▶ The trust is also a member of Locality. Time Mon Tues Weds Thurs Fri

A decade of successful projects: ▶ Managing the Anerley Business Centre and Halls in Anerley, Bromley, to provide support for small businesses. ▶ Opening of the Kingswood Estate Community Shop in Southwark, equipped with computers and internet access for use by the people living on the estate. ▶ Youth activities, including a youth club and art classes for children aged 8 to 15 years with support from the Jack Petchey Foundation. ▶ Activities for the elderly. ▶ Learning and employment support.

10am 5pm

Shop open daily, providing: Tea and Coffee Photocopying Internet

10.00 10.30

11.00

French Class

11.30 12.00 12.30 1.00 1.30 2.00 2.30

Citizens Advice Drop in Service

Over 50s Exercise

Beginners IT Class

Zumba

Bric a Brac Housing Sale Bidding Support for Residents

Food Bank Distribution Knitting Club

Sewing Club

Over 50s Computer Drop In

Intermediate IT Class

Over 50s Beginners Computer Class

33


Appendix 8- Exeter St James Community Trust Ltd Case Study Where are they based? c/o St Sidwell’s Community Centre Sidwell Street Exeter Devon EX4 6NN www.exeterstjamesforum.org

The key to success? Forming partnerships with local and national initiatives to raise your profile

Background ▶ The Exeter St James Community Trust is an independent off-shoot from the Exeter St James Neighbourhood Forum, set up in July 2014. ▶ The Trust has been established with help and advice from Wessex Community Assets and financial support from a locality grant from Devon County Council. ▶ Membership is open to anyone over the age of 16 who supports the Trust's aims and objects, and also clubs, associations and companies can all join. ▶ The Trust has been set up to enable the projects identified in the Exeter St James Neighbourhood Plan, such as: ▶ Redevelopment of Queen's Crescent Garden

▶ Shares are available to individuals, unincorporated organisations such as clubs and societies, and incorporated organisations.

▶ Development of sustainable homes

▶ Identifying allotments

▶ To become a member, individuals or organisations need to make a one-off minimum purchase of 5 £1 ordinary shares.

▶ Improving heritage walks

▶ Shares can be jointly owned by up to 3 individuals.

A new, revenue-led approach: Shares The Trust is campaigning for local individuals and organisations to become members and buy shares, to support the provision of recreational facilities: "for the public at large or those who by reason of their youth, age, infirmity or disablement, poverty or social circumstances, have need of such facilities."

34

▶ Each shareholder gets a vote at Trust meetings regardless of investment.

More small funding ideas to get your feet off the ground... ▶ Each County Councillor in Devon has an allocation of £10,000 per year to enable them to respond to local needs in their divisions, supporting projects or activities that benefit the communities they represent. Check your Local Authority website for local information.

▶ All shares are withdrawable.

▶ Exeter St James Community Trust Ltd offers online advertising to businesses. They charge a small £35 annual fee linking straight to the business website. Companies include local florists, and housing providers, as well as large organisations such as John Lewis with a strong commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility

▶ The society may return the money paid, or the reduced capital of the shares, or any interest accrued, depending on the value of shares at the time of withdrawal.

"for the public at large or those who by reason of their youth, age, infirmity or disablement, poverty or social circumstances, have need of such facilities.

▶ Members are encouraged to make investment of sums larger than £5. ▶ Shareholders will receive a share certificate.


Appendix 9 Case Studies of Friends of Park Groups in Southwark Friends of Nursery Row Park http://www.nurseryrowpark.org.uk/ Email: nurseryrow@gmail.com Telephone: 07881 914 728 (afternoons only) Twitter: @FriendsofNRPark The strong relationship with other groups and the clear future vision and strategy of Friends of Nursery Row Park may be useful for REPA and Dickens Square.

1. About the group The Friends of Nursery Row Park aims to protect and enhance the park of local residents who initially came together in 2007 to defend the park from the threat of housing development. The Friends strive to ensure the park stays intact through ongoing campaigning, community events and collaboration with other groups which have similar aims.

2. Strong relationship with other groups ▶ Southwark Council Park and Open Spaces http://www.southwark.gov.uk/parks Tel:020 7525 2000 Email:parks@southwark.gov.uk ▶ The Walworth Society–campaigning to protect Walworth’s heritage http://walworthsociety.co.uk/ Email: info@walworthsociety.co.uk Twitter: @WalworthSociety ▶ Southwark Friends of the Earth–providing expert advice and have been working hard on Bee Cause campaign http://www.foe.co.uk/groups/southwark/ Twitter: @wwwfoecouk Contact by Email: http://www.foe.co.uk/groups/ southwark/contact ▶ Elephant Amenity Network–submitting to the Elephant and Castle Supplementary Planning Guidance consultation https://elephantamenity.wordpress.com/ Email: elephantamenity@gmail.com

▶ The Conservation Volunteers–laid the first part of Nursery Row Park’s Wildlife Hedge http://www.tcv.org.uk/ Tel: 01302 388 883 Fax: 01302 311 531 Email: information@tcv.org.uk ▶ Peoples’ Republic of Southwark–independent community information resource http://www.peoplesrepublicofsouthwark.co.uk/ ▶ Southwark Notes–blog about the regeneration of the Elephant and Castle and its effect local people https://southwarknotes.wordpress.com/ ▶ Walworth past and present–providing photos of Walworth https://www.facebook.com/groups/69569490746/ ▶ Community Action Southwark–Supporting Southwark's voluntary and community sector http://casouthwark.org.uk/ Tel: 020 7358 7020 Fax: 0845 305 2160 Email: info@casouthwark.org.uk ▶ Volunteer Centre Southwark–corporating volunteers work http://www.volunteercentres.org.uk/ Tel: 020 7703 4205 Fax: 020 7358 6198 Email: info@volunteercentres.org.uk ▶ London College of Communication–re-branding the Frieds group and coming out with a future strategy of the park A researcher-Naseem Khan's contact detail: http://www.naseemkhan.com/ Email: naseem360@googlemail.com. Mobile: 44 (0)7748 490114

3. Future strategy

4. Signage and interpretation gets high priority, which maximise the linkage with East Street 5. Actions be set in motion to address the problems of dogs and of drinkers – an education programme for the former and joint collaboration between social services, police, park rangers for the latter. 6. Consideration be given to green gym equipment, possibly dispersed around the park, so as to avoid corralling exercise into one corner.

Friends of Burgess Park http://www.friendsofburgesspark.org.uk/ Email: friendsofburgesspark@gmail.com Twitter: @BurgessPk Members and Non-Members meetings: First Tuesday every month 7-9pm, Burgess Park Community Sports Centre, 106 Cobourg Road, SE5 0JV The clear aims and consutation of plans for Burgess Park of Friends of Burgess Park may be useful for REPA and Dickens Square.

1. About the group The Friends of Burgess Park is an association of people and other interested groups who are concerned to protect, promote and enhance Burgess Park. ▶ Protect the park from inappropriate development, inappropriate use and with high regard for protecting the environment and ecology. ▶ Promote appropriate use of and events in the park, to facilitate other park user organisations and to encourage new visitors.

Naseem Khan OBE worked with the Friends of Nursery Row Park in 2011 to develop a future strategy for the park,“Nursery Row Park – the Heart of the Community” (http://www. nurseryrowpark.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/)

▶ Enhance areas of improvement for the park and work to improve this enormous asset for all the community.

1. The park builds on its core character of biodiversity by developing its role as a site for local health and well-being, capitalising on its strength in providing a natural environment.

From November 2014 to March 2015 the council have been consulting about the Phase 3 plans for Burgess Park. The council approach has been to set out a broad long term vision for future park enhancements; sports, heritage, ecology etc. FOBP are broadly supportive of the approach to look thematically across the park. More details in the FOBP masterplan response 13 March 2015. (http://www. friendsofburgesspark.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/ FOBP-masterplan-response-12032015.pdf)

2. Becoming a registered charity (or a CIC) would help substantially with fundraising as many grants are only available to these bodies. 3. A clearer picture of the respective rights and duties of the Friends and Southwark Council is established

2. Consultation of plans for Burgess Park

35


Appendix 10 - Dickens Square - Moving Forward Moving forward In light of the information gathered so far, the group would propose meeting with the following representatives and posing questions to enable the Forum to develop their plans, and work in collaboration.

1. Head of Parks - Southwark Council The group was unable to make contact with the Parks team, however, the following questions are posed for a future meeting: finding attitudes and interests of local council towards the park

The purpose should be to understand the usage of the site. Q1: How many children attend the activities of REPA? How many of them are from Rockingham? Q2: What kind of groups are now organising activities on REPA asset? What kinds of activities? Q3: Can new activities be injected to the site to increase usage? E.g. toddlers club/exercise activities/Saturday market on Dickens Square Q4: Does the management of REPA have the capacity to increase its intake of children and/or activities?

4. Manager of GP surgery

Q2: Is there a specific breakdown of the funding allocation?

The group was unable to make contact with the GP surgery however, the following questions are posed for a future meeting:

Q3: How often do they maintain the park? What kinds of maintenance?

Q1: Is it possible to establish social prescribing at Falmouth Road Group Practice? If not, what are the difficulties?

Q4: What kind of measures will be applied in the park to prevent ant-social behaviour? Q5: What potential ideas/activities does the Council have in mind for the park?

Q2: In order to improve the accessibility of the park for the disabled, what kind of facilities could be put in the park? E.g. hand railings, smooth concrete surfaces for safe vehicular movement, park furniture

Q6: What recommendations could they make based on practice elsewhere in the Borough?

5. The Mosque

2. REPA trustees

Also finding needs of the neighboring mosque is important.

Q1: What is the timescale of redevelopment of the park?

As mentioned earlier, the group was able to confirm the current REPA trustees. The group has been advised that the Forum should make a written request to the Trustees initially, to then develop a communication channel. The following questions are posed for a future consultation: finding activities and usage of the asset.

Q1: Will the building works include a car park, therefore do they need the current car park next to REPA?

Q1: Is it possible for the outside play area of REPA to extend its opening hours or be open on the weekends?

Q4: Is Dickens Square required for outdoor activities?

Q2: Would they like to see more collaboration with the Rockingham? Q3: How can the Rockingham Residents Association and the wider Forum support them with future collaboration? Q4: Would improving the attractiveness of the location encourage greater usage of the site?

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3. Manager of REPA

Q2: What could be done about the hard-standing park area where people come to the mosque? Q3: What time of the day is the mosque used?

Q5: What are the implications of relocating the car park? Q6: There needs to be a clear definition of what that space is used for - will it become a deliberate car park (rather than a random one) or will there be a redesign for another use? Q7: Can the mosque take on more responsibility in terms of stewarding? E.g - Asking people to move to the jail park or play area after prayers for socialising


Appendix 11 - Transcript from an Interview with Rockingham Estate Tenants - 7 March 2015 Students: We want to know more about how you want to connect the Rockingham Community Centre to REPA? Rockingham Member 1: OK, so just to give you the history. The REPA was born out of the community centre. So we decided a long, long time ago that we needed to provide a play area for children and this wasn’t sufficient so we lobbied and got a bit of Dickens Square for it to be apportioned and a play area built. Now, between those years the management of it has split up. So it used to be that we managed it and then they formed their own committee and then we sent representatives to that committee. But in the last 5/6 years we haven’t sent anybody there because that committee hasn’t been functioning or vibrant or relevant to us anymore. So even though we do still require the facilities, they’re not as linked with us as they used to be. Because the committee that they have isn’t functioning, and we don’t have a direct influence into what happens there. So we don’t know how much money they have, when they need money, who the employees are, we don’t know anything. Just Space Representative: Do you still have the impression that children from this estate are…? Rockingham Member 1: I don’t know. Sometimes they have events there but I’m not sure if the events there are for us or for the children that go there in the week. They don’t really reach out to us I think. Rockingham Member 2: We’ve got neighbours that have tried to take their children there on an ad hoc basis and they’ve been sent away. Rockingham Member 1: And that’s because the management of the centre isn’t as robust as it used to be.

Rockingham Member 3: They also had a church there. Rockingham Member 2: So they do certainly rent out the property to other groups but as residents we feel a bit separated from the running of REPA.

Rockingham Member 1: If they invite me to their meetings I will go, it’s just that they haven’t invited me to their meetings.

Just Space Representative: Yes, because it is Rockingham Estate… Play Association – so something has gone wrong virtually from where I am looking at it.

Rockingham Member 2: Some sort of review of the constitution and what their responsibilities are and how they are required to relate with the community would be a good thing.

Rockingham Member 2: Yes I think we all agree with that.

Rockingham Member 3: We’re planning another fun day on the estate in September and if they would work with us on planning that then it would be a good thing to work together on because we are planning activities and it’s an obvious integration.

Just Space Representative: And just before the students move onto their next question, we’ve struggled to find out who the Trustees are at the moment. Do you have any ideas who the Trustees might be? Rockingham Member 1: I’ve tried to find out, I’ve been invited to join as well. But they haven’t formally sent me a note to come and join or when they are having a meeting. So I don’t know who they are now. Just Space Representative: Because the Liberal Democrat Councillor for this area, Tim, who was a Trustee but is not anymore as he is no longer a Councillor. Rockingham Member 1: So the answer is no, I don’t know how it is run or what they do with the money either. Students: If we want to build a link between REPA and the Community Centre, what sort of information do you need or that we can provide to support you?

Rockingham Member 2: Last year we were having an event on the estate and I went there to try and talk to somebody about their involvement and the person who I needed to speak to was never there and I never got any message back from them at all.

Rockingham Member 1: First of all we need to communicate, so either they need to come to our meetings or we need to invite them to our meetings and they need to do the same to us. Now, there was a lady – a girl – whose dad used to come to meeting and his daughter used to work there and she used to come but I haven’t seen her for a while.

Rockingham Member 3: It’s not open very often.

Rockingham Member 2: I think she lost her job didn’t she?

Rockingham Member 1: It’s open two hours a day during the week and that’s it. Between four and six – something like that.

Rockingham Member 1: She lost her job? Yeah, so I used to invite her and ask her to kind of tell us whether they needed anything and that was the link we had but I haven’t seen her for a while. So it’s about communication. We need to find who to send this stuff to and they need to come to ours meetings if we know who to invite. Because I did invite the manager to come to our meetings and she said she would but she hasn’t.

Rockingham Member 2: We do hear children playing there because we live just across the road from it. They do have events during the weekend which involves very loud music sometimes during the summer – virtually every weekend. They have loud music and lots of exciting noise.

Students: So maybe some sort of bridge between the two centres and some sort of integration.

Rockingham Member 2: The problem we have is that Harper Road is a barrier between the estate and REPA when it comes to having a festival on the estate because you then have to have extra crossing. Rockingham Member 3: We could have a lollipop person. Students: Last time we met a member of the Trinity Newington Residents Association (TNRA) and she talks a lot about Dickens Square and maybe she thinks that it is underused or that it can be used better. So do you have any idea about the park outside REPA and do you have any ideas of how to develop it? Rockingham Member 1: OK, we do. And it was fed into a whole load of stuff. Because they got some money to develop it I believe – a year or two ago. £150,000* – a big splash about what they are going to do with it and we are still waiting for them to do something and consult with us. So I know they want to keep it as a nature park and in terms of usage, I’m not sure because it’s over the road from us so most of the people from the estate kind of walk that way but if it’s made attractive then I’m sure people would use it. It’s just that it’s behind barriers and it’s only used as a shortcut to go to Dover Street. If I asked people on the estate if they’ve been there then most of them haven’t been there. Rockingham Member 2: Because we live on that side we’ve quite often used it as a shortcut to cut the corner. Rockingham Member 3: It’s also been used as a rough-sleeping hotspot. Rockingham Member 2: People are put off going there particularly during the summer months in the morning and the evening. If you go through there are people sleeping in tents and makeshift shelters. It’s a sign of the times.

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Rockingham Member 1: So it’s not conducive to families hanging around. Rockingham Member 2: People are worried that there may be something in the grass that they do not want the children to encounter. Students: So the problem that Dickens Square has are barriers – perhaps in the future proposals they should be removed. Rockingham Member 1: Definitely. Students: Is there any possibility to inject new activities, for example something that is noisy. Rockingham Member 1: Exercise activities and a Saturday market. A Saturday market I’d prefer. Exercise activities I’d say – we have got a jail park and really, I think, if we’re going to do that sort of thing then we need to put that in there to make it more used basically, rather than spread it across the two sites. Rockingham Member 3: There is some stuff in Dickens Square. Some wooden stuff that is like for parallel bar type things. But it’s not very nice. It’s a bit neglected. Rockingham Member 1: Perhaps we need to move it. I would be suggesting that you need to concentrate the exercise and fitness stuff in the built up, brown site and the green site we do green stuff. Rockingham Member 3: You could imagine people doing tha chi in Dickens Square. Just Space Representative: And all the hard standing area where people park when they come to the mosque. Do you have ideas on what could be done about that because that is an obvious area to really change? Rockingham Member 2: As somebody who lives across from the mosque I don’t think it’s particularly sensitive. I don’t think it was intended to be a car park so if you want it to be something other than a car park then you simply redesign it so that it isn’t one – that is my view. If you want people to drive in there then you keep it as a road. If you want it as access to the mosque then you leave a bit of it as access to the mosque and you turn the rest of the square into something more like a park rather than a parking area. Rockingham Member 1: Let me difficult. What if it was a parking area – deliberately so – then do we have a problem?

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Rockingham Member 2: Yeah, partly. The access to REPA is right on the square. One of my problems with the square is that if you want your children to go to REPA you’ve got a very unattractive area that often has a lot of broken glass on it and rubbish of all sorts. It got cleaned up at the end of the summer last year because we complained about it but I’m pretty sure it’s deteriorated again. Rockingham Member 1: OK, so let’s put it this way. If the access to the play area was changed to the front of Harper Road itself, that would change a whole load of whatever that is.

Rockingham Member 2: We would appreciate that. Rockingham Member 1: I think that is one within our control. Just give them yellow jackets and say after prayers that they can announce in the mosque if they can move to the play area or move to the jail park and actively push people there. So I will see if I can get that in before the end of this month. I’ll have a chat with them. Students: If some functions of the Rockingham centre moved to REPA, what would the Rockingham site be used for in the future?

Rockingham Member 3: And no access to the park from the car park. Because that is one of the things that makes the park feel scary at night. People can drive up and back and you don’t know what they’re doing.

Rockingham Member 1: OK, so the first thing I would say, but that’s just me personally, is that it would be social housing or another community space. So, I’m going to use the word social housing because it covers a whole load of meanings, so social housing or community space.

Rockingham Member 1: Because everyone is saying that they think it should be something else. I’m thinking ‘OK – but why should it be something else?’

Rockingham Member 3: I would like to keep a community space. But because this building is so low compared to the surrounding buildings, I think we could build social housing on top of it.

Rockingham Member 2: But what I’m saying is that it is not properly designed to be anything. That’s the issue. It is used in an ad hoc way.

Rockingham Member 2: We could use the space a bit more creatively to provide a bit more social housing and still have that quality community space.

Rockingham Member 1: If the answer it is a path, and the access to REPA is from Harper Road, and the access to the gardens is from Harper Road and even if there is a fence it is a low level fence, so you can actually see what is happening in there, I think that would work a little bit better than us having to go in there, in my opinion. Just Space Representative: So given that we have a mosque there and that people will come from far away by car and therefore will park somewhere, is it better to keep that as a parking space?

Just Space Representative: So does the REPA building carry some more attraction for being a base for you guys in some respects? Or not? Because what would you move from here if there was a big change to the space here?

Rockingham Member 3: Keep it as a designed parking space rather than a random one. Rockingham Member 2: The only thing I can add do that is that during the period of Ramadan, Harper Road becomes an area where people stand around at one or two in the morning, talking very animated. We’ve been asking them to go to the jail park – there’s a place to go if you want to spend time. We have no issue with people socialising alongside the whole process of Ramadan. But maybe Dickens Square might be another place to have some seats in there. Rockingham Member 1: OK, so in that case I think the mosque needs to take a bit more responsibility. So when they finish their ceremony or service, stewards need to actually actively move people away. Basically saying ‘Can you move, can you move’ every day.

Rockingham Member 1: The problem with the REPA building is that it is not actually on the estate. You have to cross the road and as I said earlier most people face this way. Their business is this way. It would be difficult to encourage them to go across the road. I don’t know why but it is just a psychological barrier. I would still want meetings here. I want this to be the heart of our community. Rockingham Member 3: It’s our community isn’t it? Rockingham Member 1: If you just take it to the other side, it is just the other side. Just Space Representative: So what could move then? Could it be the nursery or could some of the bookings here move to REPA? Rockingham Member 1: We could have a lot more here. Rockingham Member 3: Yeah, we don’t have very much here.


Rockingham Member 1: We would have a lot more here. The only thing that REPA had that we didn’t have is that play area for the kids. That whole area we just couldn’t replicate here. We just couldn’t. So I’d rather we did a lot more of those things there than bring that thing here. Rockingham Member 3: One of the things that doesn’t happen is that there is a nursery here but other places where I’ve lived there’s been a 1 o’clock club where people with pre-school kids can just come and drop into and it would seem to me that REPA would be ideal for having some kind of 1 o’clock provision for childminders and parents with kids can just drop into. Rockingham Member 1: Yeah, and they used to have it a long time ago. Now they have an after-school club which is 4-6 but they used to have a toddlers club as well. In the morning you could drop off your kids for 3 hours and then come back and pick them up. But apparently they just don’t have the money to do it or the connections or the service. There is something wrong with that. Because they have a building. They have the facilities, so I just don’t know what the problem is. Between 4-6 is the only time that it is open.

Rockingham Member 1: Raising the funds isn’t an issue – I think it’s just the management. We have invited and said ‘If you need anything let us know and we will support you’ but they haven’t. So in answer to the question I’m not sure I’d want to take something away from here to take over there. I’d want to do something different here, do more here but also do more and different over there. To be honest, what we have here is just what is here but once they start developing those other buildings there will be a lot more people in and around this area who will probably like access to facilities like that if they exist. Rockingham Member 2: There’s a huge amount of potential. It is just completely untapped. We feel a bit frustrated by the whole thing as residents.

Rockingham Member 3: You could have like 12-3.

Just Space Representative: I don’t know if the two of you know the member of the (TNRA) – Charles has met her – she lives nearby. We met with her a few weeks ago to get her take on all of this. And some of the ideas she had was to make relations with the health centre – the GP practice. Because some of the things you were mentioning about activities for the older person – health based activities – that actually the GP practice might well be interested. They wanted to approach the GP practice manager about that.

Rockingham Member 1: Well, you could have the morning – I don’t know why it’s not open in the morning.

Rockingham Member 3: There’s a lot of health money at the moment.

Students: And it is shut on weekends?

Rockingham Member 1: There is. Not to be negative but that health practice isn’t as vibrant or as communicative as it could be. We invited them and we had a chat with them and I’m not sure that they’re going to take on what we said to them.

Rockingham Member1: It is entirely shut on weekends unless you have private hire. So for private hire you can go in there and use it. Rockingham Member 2: That is one of the times it should certainly be a supervised play area. Rockingham Member 3: You know the things we’ve got with the allotments – there’s no reason why you can’t have some kind of gardening type activity. And I’d imagine that – and I’ve not tried this out with anybody – but there are older people that go there because it will be a pleasant place to go. It will be green and it will be like a drop in for older people as well as having a drop in for kids. But it’s about the funding isn’t it? You need the funding to open the building and run it. You need a manager of the building whose job it is to develop community activities like that. They could trial things and raise funds for it.

Just Space Representative: What were you trying to encourage them to do? Rockingham Member 1: Well, provide a better service, come and see us more, tell us what’s happening there, tell us what’s going on. Not just tick the boxes that government tells them to tick. Rockingham Member 3: Meaningful consultation. Rockingham Member 1: Absolutely. Rockingham Member 2: I did go to them when we were running the last community festival and they didn’t even want to put notices in the reception about it. “It’s not health related so I don’t see how we should be allowed to put them in”. So I then started to tell them how health related community activities were. And that was it – the total of their engagement.

Rockingham Member 1: I am. And a lot of people are. Rockingham Member 3: We deliberately didn’t go there because we read their reports and thought that this wasn’t a good practice so we now go to Princes Street. Rockingham Member 1: So it isn’t. But that’s not to say that they shouldn’t be doing what they’re supposed to be doing. So we continue to keep in touch and invite them. We’ve invited them once already this year and I think they’re supposed to come back in three or four months so we’ll have to see how that goes. Rockingham Member 3: We’ll see if we can get them to do a stool at the event. Just Space Representative: Do you know about their patient population group? Rockingham Member 1: Yes, what we said to them was that it was OK to have it between 2-3pm on a Wednesday or a Thursday but that excludes a whole host of people. Rockingham Member 2: They were completely surprised by that – as if it was a bit inconvenient for them. Rockingham Member 1: So we gave them that homework to say that they have to stagger the meetings so we’ll see what they have to say. Just Space Representative: And the other thing that the Trinity Newington had raised – could there be a Friends of the Park group, given the potential investment that is going to be made by the Council and maybe a number of changes. Could there be a community stakeholder group like a Friends of the Park group? Rockingham Member 1: Let me see, we haven’t had time to discuss this, but I did ask Rockingham Member 2 to look at this and we’re reviewing what that means. What a ‘Friends of ’ means – because I’m thinking of a Friends of Rockingham first of all. What does that mean? What would they be entitled to do? What authority would they have? And where the legitimacy would come from. I’m sure once we’ve got that settled down we can look at a Friends of the Park and whether the Rockingham includes the park or not. But it is a concept I have broached. Just Space Representative: Because we have loads of such groups in Southwark within our area. Friends of Nursery Row Park is quite a famous one.

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Rockingham Member 1: I know but where do they get their legitimacy from? How do they get their legitimacy? How do they get their authority to do stuff? Just Space Representative: They get recognition from the Council. Rockingham Member 1: Right, OK. Just Space Representative: That’s the key starting point and it seems that in this area of parks, there is a lot of willingness because they can’t afford to have somebody to look after the park. Rockingham Member 2: It’s about passing the responsibility of the park to the manager. But are there any resources? Just Space Representative: You’ll have to investigate. Because I’m not part of a Friends of the Park Group but that’s the question isn’t it? Rockingham Member 1: That is the question and that is what I’m asking. I’m asking if there was a Friends of Something – what responsibility will they have, what ability will they have, what capacity will they have, what can we ask them to do? It is dependent on the volunteers simply and their inherent skills they have or are they going to be given stuff? Rockingham Member 2: One of the things you have to do with something like that is actually write a very good controlling document that explains what the areas of responsibility are, what the boundaries are so that, for example, the park across there you have got the people from the Trinity Square who have an interest because their houses back onto it. So there may be a conflict of interest where people of the Rockingham say they want to have some social event on here and the people from the Trinity Street saying that it will disturb them and that they don’t want it. You need to have a document that says who has ultimate decision. But also what the actual interests of running the park are, what is the purpose of doing that. So the Friends of the Park operate on that principle. But the principles that they are operating on might be slightly different to the interests of the Rockingham and the interests of the Trinity. So it’s not insurmountable in any way. Rockingham Member 1: I think we do need one of those that is bigger than the Rockingham basically. Can we involve people that are not on the Rockingham per se. Just Space Representative: If you want any contacts of Friends of Parks Groups then I’m happy to help because I know a number of people who are doing this.

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Rockingham Member 2: That would be really helpful. And the other thing as Rockingham Member 1 said – we’re talking about the whole area as well and the fact that there are all sorts of pressures put on not just this area but the Trinity Square. We’re actually a small pocket of homes and lives that need to be protected. Rockingham Member 1: And when that stowage place – Swan Mead or Swan Street – that will bring a lot more people in who will have different interests to us. But we need to live together. Just Space Representative: Further research is needed but if you could give some other ideas and put it in this project as some recommendations? If anything that you feel needs doing around this sort of question? Rockingham Member 1: For me its sustainability. If they gave us a couple of million and said do something here, would we have the capacity to do it? So first of all the answer is probably no. Would we then hand it over to someone else, say a friendly housing organisation to do it? There probably aren’t any friendly housing organisations which would work on the principles of social housing. I’m sure they’re disappearing fast but that is what we would like. Rockingham Member 3: I know one – I have the contacts. Rockingham Member 1: OK, that’s fine. Because that is what we would need. So if somebody says, what would you want to do. So for instance, they have £150,000* to spend in that park, and they came to me and said ‘Here’s £150,000’* – I don’t have the capacity to deal with it. Now, in the forum there are a lot of people who have capacity now, I believe. And we could probably link into them, but that is where we would go naturally. But that’s it. Rockingham Member 2: But how do we continue with it over the years – it’s part of this sustainability issue. Rockingham Member 1: It is, but again hopefully if that organisation comes in and they’ve had a track record, they will let us know. Rockingham Member 2: For me the management of this building is still in question as well.

Rockingham Member 1: It is, the management of this building is clouded a little bit. Because it used to be run by us. And then it had its own management committee to separate the responsibilities from the residents and the management committee. The management committee for whatever reasons fell out with themselves and the Council took it over and the Council now runs it on our behalf. Now what that means is that they secure the building, they keep it maintained, but they don’t actively go out to get stuff into the building. They don’t actively facilitate activities in there. We have to jockey around and make sure everything is alright. They wanted to give me something called a Tenancy at Will – I refused to take Tenancy at Will because a Tenancy at Will is not a document you can rely on in court in terms of responsibilities that it puts on you. So the Council says ‘We’ll give you this just to show that you’re running it’. But however, if anything goes wrong you’re responsible. And I said to them ‘that’s fine – as long as you tell me all the liabilities that exist in the building’ and they haven’t been able to tell all the liabilities that exist in the building. Including copies of the lease agreement with everybody that uses the building. So I’ve said to them that you can run but as long as you give me something I’m not going to take it over. So that’s one. Second thing is that the building costs a lot to run – it costs more to run that they get in their £20-£25 an hour we charge for people to use it. The gas bill is probably £20,000 a year on average and if you add that on top of paying someone to work then that is a lot of money. I’m not sure as it stands it could pay for itself, without doing drastic things like opening up on a Sunday all day. And on a Saturday all day which we don’t do. We used to do it on a Sunday but it just got noisy for everybody around here. So we don’t do something anymore. So that’s the kind of thing I’m talking about – I’m saying as it stands taking it over is going to be taking up stuff you can’t deal with. Rockingham Member 3: It needs to be viable. Rockingham Member 2: And the condition of it is a serious issue. Rockingham Member 1: That’s right, if you take it over you have to do lots of things and I’m saying to them that that is OK but you need to tell me what my responsibilities are. And if you can hold onto the risks and liabilities then that’s fine but if you hand it over to me then I can’t deal with that. So that’s where we are. Just Space Representative: Have you thought about whether there is a Social Enterprise that could take on and do some of those things that you have just described – have you looked at that as an option?


Rockingham Member 1: If I was them, they would need to have a lease that they can live with and at the moment they’re not willing to give anything. Because if they were willing to do that, then I could have a look and think ‘OK well who could we have?’. So that’s where we are. But the thing is, because this is in the bank of regeneration projects – as in when the section 106 money comes through – hopefully when our number comes up they will say ‘here is some money, what do you want to do?’ and then we will have a discussion and hopefully we will have capacity to have that discussion. Just Space Representative: Jack Hobbes is a building similar to yours actually – it is a Tenants Hall plus loads of other community things going on there but still managed in part by the Tenants Association but the Council has slowly started withdrawing any grant support for the building so one of the things that the students were asked to do was to do some research on social enterprise support because that was an issue that was raised by the Jack Hobbes Centre for ways in which they could generate more income for themselves so when the project report comes out it will include the Jack Hobbes Centre and maybe there will be some issues you can pick up there. *Funding received is actually £1.5m and not £150,000 End of Interview

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Assets of Community Value  

A report and analysis on Assets of Community Value for the Elephant and Walworth Neighbourhood Forum. The report was written by a student gr...

Assets of Community Value  

A report and analysis on Assets of Community Value for the Elephant and Walworth Neighbourhood Forum. The report was written by a student gr...

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