Page 1

2010-11www.stchas.edu/catalog CATALOG

S T. C H A R L E S CO M M U N I T Y CO L L E G E


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

WELCOME! 2010-2011 Catalog

St. Charles Community College 4601 Mid Rivers Mall Drive • Cottleville, Missouri 63376-2865 636-922-8000 • www. stchas.edu 1-1


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

SCC at a Glance St. Charles Community College Established in 1986; first classes in 1987. A public, comprehensive two-year community college with associate’s degree and certificate programs in the arts, business, sciences, and career-technical fields. Provides community-based classes, workshops, seminars, and events and develops educational partnerships with schools, colleges, businesses, agencies, and institutions.

Our Students

EDUCATIONAL OPTIONS IN A NEW CENTURY OF LEARNING Emerging technology has taken its place in the classroom, providing new ways to learn and allowing more flexibility in scheduling. Telecourses, video courses, teleweb, and online courses provide alternative options for students with busy schedules. Start dates are variable and allow students to take a variety of credit classes at home or from their place of work. No matter what your schedule or style of learning, SCC can meet your needs!

1-2

Credit Enrollment Full year (unduplicated) for ‘09-‘10 . . . . . . . .11,629 Fall 2009 Semester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,911 58% female, 42% male 4,068 full-time, 3,843 part-time Average age of students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Traditional students (age 18-22) . . . . . . . .60.1% Nontraditional students (age 23+) . . . . . . .37.7% High school dual-enrolled & others (age 14-17) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2% Minority students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.7% Main county of origin St. Charles County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87.6% Percent of spring 2009 St. Charles County high school graduates attending SCC in fall of 2009 . . . . . . . . . . .26% Non-Credit Enrollment Continuing Education participants 2008-09 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56,024

Our Faculty & Staff Full-time faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 Part-time faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .273 Full-time staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .324 Part-time staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112

Our Campus Acres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .235 Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Square feet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .550,000

Our Service Area The College District covers nearly all of St. Charles County, comprising the Francis Howell, St. Charles, Wentzville, Fort Zumwalt, and Orchard Farm school districts. SCC’s broader service area includes the counties of Callaway, Lincoln, Montgomery, and Pike.

Corporate & Community Development Programs Adult Education/Literacy/ELL/GED Preparation • Career Development • Computer Training • Day Trips • Online Classes • Personal Development • Recreation/Fitness • Senior Interests • Workforce Development • Youth Classes

Transfer Programs • Art & Graphic Design • Biology • Business • Chemistry • Communication • Computer Science • Criminal Justice • Economics • Education • English • Foreign Language • Geography • Health Information Technology • History • Liberal Arts • Mathematics • Music • Nursing • Political Science • Pre-Engineering • Pre-Health Professions • Psychology • Social Work • Sociology • Theater

Career-Technical Programs • Business Administration – Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing • Business Administrative Systems – Business Administrative Systems, Clerical Assistant, Customer Service, Desktop Publishing • Child Care & Early Education • Computer-Aided Drafting – Architectural Technology, Computer-Aided Drafting, Industrial Technology • Computer Science – Advanced Network Design (Cisco Networking Academy), Business Computing, Computer Programming, Database Management, Data Management, Management Information Systems, Multimedia, Multimedia/ Web Design, Networking, Programming Languages, Telecommunications, Web Design • Criminal Justice – Law Enforcement • Education Paraprofessional • General Technology • Global Studies • Graphic Design • Health Information Technology • Human Services – General, Gerontology, Substance Abuse, Victimology, Youth Services • Massage Therapy • Nursing (RN & LPN) • Occupational Therapy Assistant • Skilled Trades


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

St. Charles Community College St. Charles Community College is a publicly supported, comprehensive community college serving St. Charles County and the surrounding area.

The college maintains a complaint procedure for the purpose of investigating and providing prompt and equitable remedy.

Non-Discrimination And Equal Opportunity

Student inquiries concerning the complaint procedure or discrimination concerns may be made to the vice president for academic and student affairs, 636-922-8356, or as an alternative, to the director of student development, 636-922-8238.

The college is committed to non-discrimination and equal opportunity regarding the treatment of students, faculty, and staff. The college adheres to a strict non-discrimination policy in student admission, educational programs, activities, and employment regardless of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, age, veteran status, or disability. The college is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

For detailed information concerning sexual harassment, other types of harassment, or consensual sexual or romantic relationships, refer to Policy 434.0/534.0, Prohibition of Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Other Forms of Harassment, or Policy 434.1/534.1, Romantic or Sexual Relationships.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY FOR CATALOG INFORMATION This catalog is effective beginning Sept. 1, 2008, for the 2008-09 and 2009-10 academic years. Each student is responsible for compliance with the information appearing in the catalog. Failure to read the regulations and policies will not be considered a reason for noncompliance. The college reserves the right to change regulations, policies, and fees or to revise certain curricula as deemed necessary and desirable. Should such changes become necessary, students will receive appropriate notice. 1-3


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

President’s Message Welcome to the online St. Charles Community College catalog. We welcome the opportunity to help you begin your college journey at SCC, whether that journey begins in person with our faculty or admissions staff, or electronically via the Web. We value and celebrate the tens of thousands of people in our community whose lives have been changed and enriched by attending SCC. Since its inception in 1986, SCC has provided access to high-quality education that is close to home and affordable. We have prepared nurses, police officers, teachers, managers, childcare workers, computer specialists, and many others to enter the local workforce. We have prepared our students for successful transfer to four-year universities. We have provided training and business partnerships to benefit local employers and employees. And the college has helped to stimulate the local economy and improve the quality of life in our communities. Your community college – locally governed and supported – is here to help you identify and reach your personal and professional goals. Our beautiful, architectural award-winning campus is a safe, friendly, and nurturing environment for learning, while our talented and caring faculty and staff provide the inspiration and guidance to help you make the most of your college experience. I invite you to use this catalog as your guide to planning your education. And once you have made the wise decision to attend SCC, you’ll find plenty of assistance along the path to success in your chosen course of study. We’ll be happy to give you a tour of the campus. As you walk through campus, you will find students taking advantage of our expanded learning center, socializing in one of the many college clubs and organizations, and surfing the ‘net using free wi-fi in the vibrant Café-Bookstore. I hope you will visit us soon – in person and at our website. Find out for yourself the many ways that we can build brighter futures together! Sincerely,

John M. McGuire, Ph.D. President 4 1-4

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Table of Contents

1:6 . . . . .Official College Calendars Beginning and ending dates of terms, holidays, etc.

1:7 . . . . .What We’re About Mission, vision, values, accreditation

1:8-9 . . . . .College Maps 2:1-10 . . . . .Admissions & Records Admissions and placement requirements, registration, transcripts, credit for transfer work

3:1-10 . . . . .Tuition & Financial Assistance Cost of attending the college, business regulations, and information on grants, loans, and scholarships

4:1-12 . . . . .Student Support Services Counseling and advisement, activities and clubs, child care, Bookstore, job placement, study help, and academic support

5:1-50 . . . . .Academic Programs – Degrees & Certificates Listings of degrees, certificates, and graduation requirements for career and transfer programs; schedule guides; developmental studies

6:1-10 . . . . .Academic & General College Policies Grading system, planning programs of study, graduation, academic progress, attendance, records

7 . . . . . . . . .Course Descriptions Descriptions are found online: www.stchas.edu/coursedesc

8:1-8 . . . . .Corporate & Community Development Non-credit courses, adult education and literacy, GED, Workforce Development

9:1-8 . . . . .General Information Campus, governance, service area, history, partnerships, Foundation, memberships

10:1-12 . . . .Personnel A listing of Board of Trustees members, faculty, and administrative and professional staff

1-5


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Academic Calendars

For a complete and up-to-date Academic Calendar, visit the Current Students section of the SCC website: www.stchas.edu.

Fall Semester – 2010

Summer Semester – 2011

Aug. 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Classes Begin

June 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Classes Begin

Sept. 4-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No Classes: Labor Day

July 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No Classes: Independence Day

Nov. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No Classes: Thanksgiving Break

July 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Semester Ends

Dec. 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Last Day of Classes Dec. 8-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Final Exams Dec. 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Semester Ends

Spring Semester – 2011 Jan. 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Classes Begin Jan. 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No Classes: M. L. King Day March 14-20 . . . . . . . . . . . .No Classes: Spring Break April 22-24 . . . . . . . . . . . .No Classes: Spring Holiday May 10-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Final Exams May 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Commencement May 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Semester Ends

1 1-6


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

SCC – What We’re About Mission SCC enriches our community by providing lifechanging educational and cultural opportunities focused on personal growth and student success in a global society.

Vision We will be a community college recognized for leadership in academic excellence, student success, instructional and technological innovation, and community responsiveness.

Values

Decentralized and Democratic Decision Making: We value informed decisions made by people closest to the issue. Instructional Innovation: We encourage the highest quality instructional programs, using the best of current and emerging instructional methods and technology. Cooperation: We value teamwork. Service: We value service to students, the community, and one another.

Communication, Trust, and Respect: We value mutual trust and respect and encourage open communication within the college community. Commitment to Student Success: We are committed to providing the finest instruction, resources, and support services to enhance the growth and development of our students. Lifelong Learning: We recognize learning as a continuous process.

Accreditation St. Charles Community College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, telephone: 800-621-7440; fax: 312-263-7462; Web site: www.ncacihe.org. The North Central accreditation, along with transfer agreements with four-year colleges and universities, assures the value of credits earned at SCC. Courses taken for credit at SCC will be accepted in transfer by other colleges, provided they are appropriate to the degree sought.

1-7


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

SCC Location

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

Campus Location 4601 Mid Rivers Mall Drive Cottleville, MO (St. Peters Post Office) 63376 About 3 miles south of Interstate 70 and 2 miles north of Highway 94 South www.stchas.edu 636-922-8000

Note:

8 1-8

Additional classroom locations are added as needed in the college’s service area.

L

L

E

G

E


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Campus Map

12

3

11 2 1 10

all Drive

6

Mid Rivers M

5 4 7 9 8

Cottleville

Parkway

1-9


S

1-10

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS General Admissions & Registration Credit for Prior Learning Transcripts Evaluation of Transfer Work Transferring Your Credits

2-1


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Policies to Know Before You Register for Classes at SCC

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

Below is a list of policies, many of which are based on state and federal regulations. This list is a basic overview of each policy. Check the page noted at the beginning of the listing for the complete policy.

Confidentiality of Financial Records The General Education Provision Act of 1974, as amended by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, provides for privacy safeguards for students and families by setting up guidelines for the disclosure of education records and personally identifiable information.

Confidentiality of Student Records In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, St. Charles Community College affords students the right to inspect official records directly relating to them. The act does not permit the college to provide information regarding grades, transcripts, or schedules to parents of SCC students without written consent of the student. Consent forms are available in the Admissions Office or online at www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html.

Directory Information/ Public Information *In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, St. Charles Community College considers the following to be a student’s directory information: student name, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of athletic team members, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student. Names and addresses of SCC graduates or candidates for graduation will be released to four-year institutions upon the institution’s request. * In accordance to FERPA guidelines, any third party who wishes to register (add/drop) or make a payment for a student will need to be listed on a Authorization for 3rd Party Registration and Payment form that has been completed by the student. The consent forms can be found at www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html, or in the Registration or Student Development offices.

Drug-Free Work Place St. Charles Community College provides a drug-free campus and workplace and operates within the guidelines as set forth in the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 and the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988.

Prohibition of Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, And Other Forms of Harassment 2-2

All forms of discrimination and harassment degrade the quality of work and diminish the academic mission and will not be tolerated.

Immunization Against Communicable Diseases It is strongly recommended that all entering freshmen and transfer students be immunized for measles and rubella before they register for classes at SCC. Certain immunizations are required for admission to selected health programs. See specific program for details.

Non-Discrimination And Equal Opportunity The college is committed to non-discrimination and equal opportunity regarding the treatment of students, faculty, and staff. The college adheres to a strict non-discrimination policy in student admission, educational programs, activities, and employment regardless of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, age, veteran status, or disability. The college is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The college maintains a complaint procedure for the purpose of investigating and providing prompt and equitable remedy. Student inquiries concerning the complaint procedure or discrimination concerns may be made to the vice president for academic and student affairs, 636-922-8358, or as an alternative, to the dean of student development, 636-9228238. For detailed information concerning sexual harassment, other types of harassment, or consensual sexual or romantic relationships, refer to Board Policy 434.0/534.0, Prohibition of Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Other Forms of Harassment, or Policy 434.1/534.1, Romantic or Sexual Relationships. Policies are found on the college website at www.stchas.edu.

Services for Students With Disabilities It is the policy of St. Charles Community College to provide accessibility to its programs/activities and reasonable accommodations for persons defined as disabled under the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990.

Tobacco-Free Campus Tobacco use is prohibited both indoors and outdoors on the SCC campus, which includes all common areas, building entrances, athletics fields, walking trails, and parking lots.

Weapon-Free Campus Possession or use of firearms – whether concealed or in sight – or any explosives, dangerous chemicals, or other weapons are prohibited on college property and at college-sponsored or supervised functions.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Policies to Know Before You Register for Classes at SCC Student Responsibility For Catalog Information

your enrollment based on Academic Skills Assessments, interviews, previous achievement, and other criteria as explained in this section.

This catalog is effective beginning Sept. 1, 2010, for the 2010-11 academic year. Each student is responsible for compliance with the information appearing in the catalog. Failure to read the regulations and policies will not be considered an excuse for noncompliance.

If you do not meet the standards for admission into college-level courses, you may enroll in developmental courses designed to help you strengthen your skills. These developmental courses may be offered on a credit or non-credit basis. Students applying for the programs with selective admissions criteria may be required to take additional tests for admissions purposes.

St. Charles Community College maintains an open-admissions policy providing higher education to all persons who can benefit from its programs and courses. The college serves students from a variety of educational backgrounds in keeping with its goals of providing quality, low-cost education to residents throughout the area.

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

Before you register for credit courses, you must be admitted to the college. You may apply for admission anytime during the year. Admission policies and procedures are explained in this chapter.

Once admitted to SCC, you may enroll in any course or program as long as individual course prerequisites are met and space for effective instruction is available. The college may guide

Admissions & Records What Is a Credit Hour? A semester hour (credit hour) is the unit of credit usually earned by attending a non-laboratory class for at least 50 minutes a week per semester. A class that meets three times a week is usually considered a 3-semester-hour course. In laboratory courses, one semester hour of credit is granted for two or three hours of laboratory per week.

Semesters And Summer Session Day, Evening, And Saturday Classes The primary function of St. Charles Community College is to meet the post-secondary needs of the college district. To attain this objective, the college offers a wide variety of day, evening, and Saturday classes. The evening and Saturday classes are identical in credit and in course content to day classes. Evening classes are held Monday through Thursday. Library and student services are available during the evening hours. The term length of evening classes usually parallels that of the day program.

Students attending full time during the day may be able to complete their program within two years. The evening class cycle generally allows the Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, Associate of Arts in Teaching, or Associate of Applied Science degree to be earned in three years. Offerings of both day and evening summer term classes allow students to progress by earning additional credits.

Summer Sessions For some academic programs, attendance at summer session may be required as an integral part of the program. Most other programs offer courses that may be taken during the summer at the option of the student. Recent high school graduates planning to enter college as freshmen in the fall semester are encouraged to register for the summer session as are adults who may find evening summer classes convenient. Students home from other colleges for the summer may enroll at St. Charles Community College. Courses offered in the summer session are identical in credit and cost to those of the regular academic year. St. Charles Community College’s main summer session is an eight-week term. Various shorter length terms are also offered. 2-3


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

Admissions Policy Any person seeking regular admission to SCC must meet one of the following requirements:

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

• Earn a high school diploma. • Earn the GED certificate. • Reach the age of 18 and demonstrate the ability to benefit through the student assessment process. The following persons also may be admitted with special student status as defined below: • High school juniors and seniors 16 years of age or older who have completed dual enrollment requirements. Dual enrollment is a special program whereby high school students may enroll in up to 6 hours a semester of college courses with the permission of high school and college officials and parents. For more information on the dual enrollment program, contact your high school guidance office or the SCC Student Development Office. • Young adults 16 years of age or older who can verify that they have severed all connections with their high school district and demonstrate the ability to benefit through the student assessment process. • Students under 16 years of age who are enrolled in a gifted or accelerated learning program. For more information, see “Special Admission for Students Under Age 16” on page 16 in this chapter. Admission to the college does not guarantee entrance into a particular course or program of study. The college reserves the right to establish selective admissions procedures and to give preference to residents of the St. Charles Community College District. Allied health majors must meet with a career-technical counselor before they can declare a major in the program.

Registration Twice a year the college publishes a credit class schedule that includes detailed information on the courses available, registration procedures and dates, add/drop periods, and refund policies. Registration is only official when all tuition and fees have been paid. *Student registration and payment of all tuition, fees, and fines can be made at the walk-up windows in the main hallway of the Administration Building (ADM), by mail, or through the SCC Connection with a valid user ID and password (see next section). 2-4

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

* In accordance to FERPA guidelines, any third party who wishes to register (add/drop) or make a payment for a student will need to be listed on a Authorization for 3rd Party Registration and Payment form that has been completed by the student. The Authorization for 3rd Party Registration and Payment forms can be found on the Web at www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html or in the Registration or Student Development offices.

The SCC Connection The SCC Connection is an easy and convenient way for students to access information online about their academic records as well as information about the community college. To obtain a login ID and password you must be a current student with an active e-mail address on file. You may then sign up by logging onto the SCC website at www.stchas.edu. Click on the SCC Connection logo, and under the “For Students” heading, click on “Activate my login” and follow the directions. Your login and temporary password will be sent to the e-mail address that you have selected. Once you have received your password you will be able to activate your account by again accessing SCC Connection through the SCC website. Forgotten student ID numbers must be obtained in person with a photo ID. Due to privacy reasons, ID numbers will not be given over the phone. You may then use the SCC Connection to register and pay for classes and access your personalized academic records. Additionally, you can check course availability, look up grades, print a class schedule, and run a degree audit – all online.

How to Apply For Admission Any person who wishes to enroll in SCC should apply for admission under one of the following categories:

Students Seeking Degrees Students enrolling in credit courses that may be applied towards a certificate or degree should: • Complete SCC application for admission. • Request that high school transcripts or verification of GED be sent directly to the SCC Office of Admissions. If you have taken 15 or more semester hours of college credit, you need not send your high school transcript unless required for admission to a specific program.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

• All first-time entering freshmen are encouraged to take the ACT test and forward their scores to the Admissions Office. ACT test scores will be primarily used for institutional research, academic advising, course placement, and outcomes measurement purposes. ACT scores may be required before admission to specific degree programs. • Take the SCC Academic Skills Assessment in Room 133 of the Student Center. • Schedule an appointment with a counselor to register. Students who are eventually transferring to a four-year university should make an appointment with an academic counselor in Room 1204 ADM. Students with the goal of completing a careertechnical program should make an appointment with a career-technical counselor in Room 1204 ADM. All first-time students who have never completed college credits and who plan to take 6 credit hours or more (two or more classes) are required to have a counselor’s signature in order to enroll. Students taking fewer than 6 hours are encouraged, but not required, to see a counselor.

Students Not Seeking Degrees

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Ability to Benefit It is in each student’s best interest to receive either a high school diploma or its equivalent (GED) before beginning college work. However, there is another process by which your ability to benefit can be determined. Students who want to enroll at SCC who have not received a high school diploma or a GED are required to complete an Academic Skills Assessment to determine their ability to benefit from course work offered at the college. The test will assess your ability in reading, writing, computational, and algebra skills. When you complete the Academic Skills Assessment, your test results will be reviewed and you will be counseled by a member of the Student Development Office as to the appropriateness of course work offered by SCC. All assessment results must be finalized and readily available to the responsible SCC officials prior to registration. If it is determined that you are not able to benefit from college-level course work, or, if remedial course work is recommended exclusively, the counselor will either refer you to the Adult Basic Education/GED preparation program or place you into appropriate developmental course work. All students referred to the GED program are expected to complete the GED in a reasonable amount of time. You should present the GED certificate to the registrar for verification of completion, and it will be noted in your file.

Credit: If you are taking a limited number (5 semester hours or fewer) of courses for credit but are not interested in pursuing a certificate or degree, you must still complete an SCC application for admission. Testing and placement are required only if you want to enter English or mathematics courses or courses with a math or English prerequisite. Testing is also required when a student decides to add credit hours beyond the 5-credit-hour limit. Course enrollment may be adjusted based on placement results. See page 34 for more information on developmental courses and the Success Semester.

If you have demonstrated the ability to benefit from college-level course work, an academic counselor will discuss any suggested limitation in the number of credit hours in which you may enroll and any suggested remedial course work.

Note: Non-degree-seeking students who later decide to enter a certificate or degree-granting program will be required to complete testing.

Home-schooled students will be required to complete an Academic Skills Assessment to determine their ability to benefit from course work offered at the college. You must see a counselor to register. All assessment results must be finalized and readily available to the responsible SCC officials prior to registration. If you are under the age of 16, your enrollment can be restricted to certain disciplines, and you must see the dean of student development to register. Students are restricted to a maximum of 6 credit hours or two courses until the college receives graduation documentation. See the following sections for further instructions. For more information, contact the dean at 636-922-8238.

Non-Credit: If you are enrolling in non-credit courses that are offered through the Division of Corporate & Community Development, you must provide limited registration information but need not complete an application for admission.

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

Home-Schooled Students Students who are schooled at home and who do not have a high school diploma or its equivalent (GED) may be admitted to the college with special student status in the same manner in which ability-to-benefit students are admitted.

2-5


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

Dual Enrollment

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

High school juniors or seniors who want the challenge of college-level academic studies may consider the Dual Enrollment Program. Consult your parents/guardian and your high school counselor to expand your educational background by taking college-level courses. Application procedure: 1. Complete the dual enrollment application. A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 is required. Some districts may require a higher GPA. www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html.

2. See your high school counselor/principal for approval and completion of the dual enrollment form. 3. Have your parent/guardian sign for approval to enroll. 4. Mail or bring the completed form, along with an Application for Admission, to the SCC Admissions Office. 5. Students without previous college credit who plan to take 6 credit hours or English or math courses are required to take the Academic Skills Assessment before enrolling. NOTE: Developmental courses in mathematics and English are not available to dually enrolled or home-schooled students until they have completed their high school curriculum without special permission. 6. An SCC counselor’s signature is required for registration in your first semester of dual enrollment. 7. Up to 6 credit hours may be taken each semester. 8. You must complete the registration process and pay fees before you attend class. 9. Dual-enrolled and/or home-schooled students may only enroll in physical education activity courses with special permission from the dean of student development. A written letter of appeal must be sent to 1204 ADM explaining the necessity of an physical education activity course. 10. Dual-enrolled and/or home-schooled students do not qualify for financial assistance.

Special Admission For Students Under Age 16 2-6

Students who are under age 16 should obtain an application for special admission from the Admissions Office. This special application must be

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

completed each semester in which you wish to enroll. You and your family will be required to: • Submit a high school transcript and a completed SCC Application for Admission to the Admissions Office. www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html.

• Take the Academic Skills Assessment exam in Room 133 of the Student Center before meeting with the dean of student development. After the assessment exam has been completed, call the dean of student development at 636-922-8238 to schedule an appointment. The following information should be given to the director during the appointment: • A completed Special Admission Form including your signature and the signature of your parent/guardian and high school principal. • A letter from the school principal explaining why you should be served by SCC and which areas of study are recommended. You (and your family if you wish) should come to the interview prepared to select specific courses. The dean of student development, in consultation with the faculty, will determine if the course(s) and content are appropriate for you. The dean will notify you of your admissions status, and then you may proceed to register and pay for the course(s). Be advised that the special admission process may require several visits to SCC and several weeks to finalize. It is recommended to begin the process as early as possible.

International Student Admissions International students who are requesting I-20s for F-l visas to study at St. Charles Community College must fulfill the following requirements for admission: • Secure an “International Student Application Packet” from the Admissions Office and follow the procedures outlined. www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html.

• Complete an SCC application for admission. • Score 500 or above on the written TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), score 173 or above on the computerized TOEFL, or score 61 or above on the Internet TOEFL, and have an official score report submitted to the Admissions Office. • Submit official transcripts of records from all secondary schools attended. Such records


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

must be translated into English. • Submit a Certified Financial Responsibility Statement, demonstrating proof of adequate finances for the entire period of planned attendance. A current bank statement must accompany certification. • Submit a signed Conditions of Enrollment statement. • File all of the above documents with the Admissions Office 60 days before the beginning of the semester. • Proof of medical insurance is required prior to enrolling in classes. • Transfer students must submit the Supplemental Information Form (included in the Admissions Packet).

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Credit by Examination And Prior Learning St. Charles Community College recognizes that some people may have gained knowledge and experience during their lifetimes that qualifies as course work credit. Therefore, you may be able to translate your previously acquired knowledge into college credit through one of the non-traditional avenues that SCC offers. Credit by proficiency examination is one method of earning college credit. In some instances, a student may be able to complete a department exam and be eligible to receive college credit.

• Students attending SCC on a Visa will pay the international student tuition rate.

Students also may be awarded credit for the successful completion of the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) or the Proficiency Examination Program (PEP) or the Advanced Placement Program (AP).

• Transfer students must provide a letter from their transfer institution stating that they are in good standing.

College credit may be earned through other processes such as military experience, retroactive credit, articulation, and certification exams.

Admissions for ESL/ELL Students – Citizens and Legal Residents/Resident Aliens Non-native speaking citizens and residents/resident aliens enrolling in 6 or more credit hours will be required to complete the Math and English assessment that is required of all students entering SCC; additionally, they will be required to take the ESL assessment for reading and listening /comprehension. Depending on the assessment score, it may be recommended that you complete specific courses in the academic (credit) ESL program. It should be noted that resident aliens must present their Resident Alien card at the time of enrollment. Contact the Student Development Office for more information.

Additional Requirements For Specific Programs Admission to the college does not guarantee entrance into a particular course or program of study. The college has established selective admissions procedures and gives preference to residents of the St. Charles Community College District. Any additional admissions requirements or application fees for specific programs are listed next to those career-technical programs as outlined in the chapter on Academic Programs.

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and Proficiency Examination Program (PEP) The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and Proficiency Examination Program (PEP) evaluate knowledge that you might have gained through reading, job experience, non-college training programs, etc. The programs, sponsored by the College Entrance Examination Board and the American College Testing Program, may allow you to earn credit at SCC. Check with the Admissions Office and the Student Development Office before you take the examination to determine the requirements for credit. Send previous test scores to the Admissions Office for evaluation.

Departmental Examination Several instructional departments offer examinations for students who have acquired knowledge in a particular subject area. You may petition to receive credit in a course by taking a departmental examination. The college can refuse permission if you are considered insufficiently prepared. Students must be a SCC credit student and have completed 15 hours of SCC credit or be currently enrolled in 6 credit hours at SCC prior to eligibility for credit by exam. The exams will be given after the drop date for the current semester. The cost of examination is equal to one credit hour of in-district tuition. Tutoring is not provided, nor is passing the examination guar2-7


S

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

anteed. If you are planning to transfer, be advised that some colleges and universities do not accept such credit.

Transfer And Articulation Credits

Military Experience Evaluation

High School and College

If you have served in the military, you may be granted two hours of college credit in physical education. In some limited situations, you may qualify for additional credit. Inquiries should be directed to the Admissions Office.

To help students avoid repeating coursework unnecessarily, SCC has developed articulation agreements, or coordination of curriculum, with a number of area high schools. If you are thinking about a twoyear career-technical degree, taking articulated courses in high school is a smart idea. You can potentially earn college credit toward an AAS degree at SCC while you’re in high school. Students must present SCC with a completed copy of the articulation agreement at the time of enrollment.

Retroactive Credit In Foreign Language Retroactive credit is available to students who enroll for the first time in a foreign language course and who have already studied the target language before attending St. Charles Community College. SCC will not grant credit for course work in which a student has already earned credit through another source, such as advanced placement, testing, or transfer. Only students who complete language courses 102, 201, or 202 with a grade of 75 percent or better may receive retroactive credit for foreign language courses 101 or 102. Since native speakers may not enroll nor be given credit for foreign language courses in their native language, they are not eligible to receive retroactive credit for these courses. Retroactive credit is available only to students who are eligible to enroll in the courses that they are bypassing. If you are planning to transfer, be advised that some colleges and universities do not accept retroactive credit. For more information, contact the Arts & Humanities Division.

Full-Time Course Load And Freshman-Sophomore Classification Students at SCC are classified according to hours enrolled and hours completed. Part-time students earn fewer than 12 hours per semester, while full-time students carry 12 or more. During the summer semester, full-time student status requires 6 or more credit hours. Course Load Full time Part time

Fall, Spring

Summer

12 or more hours 11 hours or less

6 or more 5 or less

A freshman is any student who has completed fewer than 28 credit hours; a sophomore has completed 28 credit hours or more.

2-8

M

Articulation Criteria: – Articulated courses have been designed for credit both at your high school and for credit at SCC toward an Associate of Applied Science Degree, but not for the Associate of Arts (transfer) Degree. – A grade of “B” or better is required in all high school coursework that is articulated. – The student must complete the SCC application form and request his or her high school to send an official transcript copy to the SCC Enrollment Services Department (ADM 1113). – When meeting with an SCC academic counselor or registration assistant, students must identify themselves as having articulated credit through their high school. Students must present the white copy of the Certificate of Credit to Enrollment Services. – Students must complete six hours of college-level coursework toward an AAS Degree at SCC with a 2.5 or higher GPA before articulation credit will be posted to the SCC transcript. – Students must request that the SCC Enrollment Services Department record the Articulated High School Courses to the SCC transcript. – Should students wish to transfer any of these articulated credits from SCC to another college or university, they should check with an academic counselor at the transfer institution to determine if credit will transfer. For individual high school articulation agreements, please see www.stchas.edu/degrees/aas/highschoolarticulations.shtml.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Students Transferring to SCC

Most universities set a limitation of 64 credit hours on the number of credits accepted for transfer from a two-year college.

Students transfer many courses into and out of SCC. SCC is signatory to the Statewide (Missouri) General Education and Credit Transfer Policy Agreement (www.dhe.mo.gov/principlescredit.html). This agreement assists students who transfer their general education core from one signatory institution to another. Courses taken for credit at SCC are generally accepted in transfer by other colleges, provided grades are satisfactory and courses taken are appropriate to the degree sought.

It is important that you obtain catalog information from the intended transfer institution, decide on a major field of study, and select SCC courses appropriate to that curriculum.

Students transferring from other colleges or universities are eligible for admission to SCC with advanced standing. Credits for courses in which passing grades have been earned may be accepted in transfer at the registrar’s discretion. Students who want to transfer credits to SCC from an accredited college or university may do so by requesting that official transcripts from each institution attended be sent directly to the Enrollment Services Department. Please allow two to four weeks for SCC to receive the transcript(s). In order for your credits to be evaluated, you must complete a Request for Transfer Evaluation form. Request forms are available online at www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html or in Enrollment Services. Transcripts sent to SCC will not be automatically reviewed unless you have requested in writing that a review be made by the registrar. Accepted transfer credits will be included in the cumulative hours of credit at SCC but will not be calculated into your grade point average.

Transferring Your SCC Credits Courses taken for credit at St. Charles Community College are generally accepted in transfer by other colleges, provided grades are satisfactory and courses taken are appropriate to the degree sought. Admissions requirements for transfer students vary among colleges and universities. Therefore, if your plans include a transfer to a four-year institution, you should work closely with an academic counselor regarding transferability of credit earned at SCC.

Generally, college transfer program courses at SCC will satisfy various departmental, general education, elective, and degree requirements at other colleges. However, career-technical program courses may not transfer because these programs are designed to prepare you for employment rather than for the pursuit of a four-year degree.

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

Academic counselors are available to assist you in the transfer procedure. Check with the Student Development Office for information on transfer agreements with area four-year institutions. If you experience difficulty transferring your SCC coursework to another institution, contact the transfer and articulation counselor in the Student Development Department for assistance with an appeal to the receiving institution. For more information on the transfer process, see Academic Programs – Degrees and Certificates (Chapter 5).

Transcript Services A transcript of your grades and credits at SCC is available through the Registrar’s Office. You can request your transcripts in person or by writing directly to that office. Phone or e-mail requests will not be accepted. Written requests should include semester and year of last attendance, name under which you were enrolled, and your student identification number or Social Security number. Provide the complete street address of the institution where the transcript is to be mailed. A form is available at www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html. A stamp indicating completion of the 42-hour general education block is automatically included for students who have completed the 42-hour block. If a student was approved for a degree substitution or waiver in the general education requirements, the automatic assignment of the stamp may be affected. In this case, contact the Enrollment Services Department to request a manual review and stamp on your transcript.

SCC does have articulation agreements and transfer guides that identify transferable courses with some colleges and universities, but ultimate responsibility lies with the student to obtain a guarantee of course transferability with the institution of choice. 2-9


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

All holds on your record must be cleared before a transcript will be released.

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

Please allow two working days for processing. Additional time is required at the end of the semester. You may obtain a student copy of your transcript through the SCC Connection.

Confidentiality Of Student Records In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, St. Charles Community College affords students the right to inspect their official records. You have the right to challenge any statement that you consider inaccurate, misleading, or inappropriate. * Furthermore, the college will require your written consent before releasing any information except directory information from the records. If you wish to examine your official records, you may do so by applying to the registrar. * In accordance to FERPA guidelines, any third party who wishes to register (add/drop) or make a payment for a student will need to be listed on an Authorization for 3rd Party Registration and Payment form that has been completed by the student. The Authorization for 3rd Party Registration and Payment forms can be found on the Web at www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html, or in the Registration or Student Development offices.

Directory Information/ Public Information In accordance with the *Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, St. Charles Community College considers the following to be a student’s directory information: student name, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of athletic team members, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student. The Privacy Act of 1974 does not permit the college to provide information regarding grades, transcripts, or schedules to parents of SCC students without written consent from the student. Any student who does not want any or all of the above information to be released without his or her prior

2-10

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

written consent must inform the Admissions Office before the end of the second week of classes of a regular term (by the end of the first week of classes of a summer term). The information listed above will become directory information or public information as of the specified time. Forms to request the withholding of directory information will be available during registration. The request to withhold directory information must be renewed each semester or term. Names and addresses of SCC graduates or candidates for graduation will be released to four-year institutions upon request of the institution. * In accordance to FERPA guidelines, any third party who wishes to register (add/drop) or make a payment for a student will need to be listed on a Authorization for 3rd Party Registration and Payment form that has been completed by the student. The consent forms can be found on the Web at www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html, or in the Registration or Student Development offices.

Withdrawal Procedures All students who wish to drop a course or all courses must obtain and complete a Registration Form from the Registrar’s Office. It is the student’s responsibility to then return the Registration Form to the Registrar’s Office. A student may also drop classes through SCC Connection. Discontinuing a course will affect your transcript (permanent record) as follows: If you withdraw officially from a 16-week course before the end of the 10th week of class meetings, you will receive a “W” for the course. Courses that are fewer than 16 weeks in duration will have prorated dates for withdrawing. Refer to academic calendar online at www.stchas.edu/calendars/index.shtml. If you simply stop attending class and do not officially withdraw from the course, you will receive an “F” grade for the course. Leaving the Registration Form with your instructor does not constitute an official withdrawal from the course. The form must be returned to the Registrar’s Office in accordance with withdrawal procedure and dates. Important course withdrawal dates are listed in the academic calendar online at www.stchas.edu/calendars/index.shtml. These dates are also published in the Credit Class Schedules. The approved withdrawal dates are prorated for all courses that are less than 16 weeks. All students who receive any type of financial assistance or veterans benefits should notify the Financial Assistance Office before withdrawing from courses.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

Outcomes Assessment SCC is committed to the assessment of college programs and services to improve and maintain their quality and effectiveness. Classroom and program activities, including surveys and focus groups, will be used to assess the outcomes of college education. Students completing the Associate of Arts 42-hour general education block are required to take COL 299 Sophomore Portfolio Assessment, which will assess their acquisition of knowledge and skills. Students who complete career-technical programs will be assessed on their mastery of essential occupational skills and general education knowledge. The method of assessing these skills will vary by discipline. Some of the methods used by the programs will be portfolios, culminating projects, field specific national tests, and tests developed by the department. Most programs will assess general education knowledge using multiple modules from ACTWorkKeys. These are taken in the Assessment Center. The nursing program uses the ACT-CAAP Critical Thinking module to pre- and post-test students.

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

The results of these assessments will be used to modify the curriculum as needed to assure program completers are ready to proceed to employment in their chosen field or to further their education.

Immunization Against Communicable Diseases

ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

It is strongly recommended that all entering freshmen and transfer students be immunized for measles and rubella before they register for classes at SCC.

2-11


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

TUITION & FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Cost to Attend Business Regulations Scholarships, Grants, Loans Veterans Programs

3-1


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Tuition & Financial Assistance TUITION & FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

In order to make education affordable for you – the student – fees have been set as low as possible. Students pay only a portion of the cost of their education because much of the support for St. Charles Community College comes from the state of Missouri and from property taxes paid by St. Charles Community College District residents. Qualified students may apply for financial assistance through scholarships and funding by federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. If you live within the St. Charles Community College District, the fees you pay will be the most affordable rates around. Many out-of-district students also benefit from low rates and the convenient location of SCC. The SCC district includes all of St. Charles County except for a small area that is within the Washington School District.

Tuition

Students who register to audit a course without earning grades or credits will pay the regular tuition rate. Students auditing a course must meet course prerequisites. Financial Assistance does not apply to audited courses.

Course Fees An additional fee may be charged for private music lessons, nursing clinicals, and allied health malpractice insurance or other courses with related special costs. Course fees are published in each credit class schedule.

Telecourse Fee There is a $38 fee per telecourse/teleweb course in addition to credit hour tuition and books.

Students enrolling at St. Charles Community College will pay the following tuition:*

Other Fees

In-District Students**

Associate Degree in Nursing

$80 per credit hour.

$25 application fee.

Out-of-District, In-State Students $118 per credit hour.

Out-of-District, Out-of-State, And International Students $175 per credit hour. International students holding an F, H (except H1B), J, M, 0-2, P, or Q visas will pay the out-of-district, out-of-state, international student tuition rate.

Change in Residency In order to receive the in-district tuition rate, you must submit any changes in residency that affect tuition charges before the first day of class of the semester in which the change will take place. Proof of residency must accompany a request for change from out-of-district to in-district residency. * Tuition rates are subject to change at any time. ** See page 24 for an explanation of in-district residency.

3-2

Auditing a Course

Graduation A $30 non-refundable fee covers the cost of the diploma, cap and gown, and graduation program. This fee is required even for those students who choose not to participate in the commencement ceremony. A $50 fee is required if you apply during the late application period (dates are listed on the graduation application). If you fail to apply during the “late application” period you will be required to pay a fee of $100. If two degrees or certificates are earned at the same time, the graduation fee for the second is $10. If the second degree or certificate is earned in another semester, the $30 graduation fee must be paid each semester that a degree is awarded.

Returned Checks $15 per check.

Departmental Exam $80 per exam if course credit is requested.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Replacement I.D. Cards

Alternate Payment Plan

$3 each.

The college has contracted with a “payment plan” vendor for students who wish to make extended payments. For more information, visit www.stchas.edu/students/paying.shtml. A separate enrollment must be completed online for each available term on or before the “all fees due” date for that term. You will be assessed a fee for this service. A small portion of this fee is remitted to SCC to cover administrative expenses.

Special Expenses Lab coats, uniforms, name tags, and other specialized equipment may be needed for courses with clinical or practicum components.

Senior Citizen Scholarships Any Missouri resident 65 years of age or older on or before Aug. 1 of an academic year may enroll tuition free in credit courses at the college. This is based on available class space after tuition-paying students have enrolled. The scholarship does not cover special fees, books, or materials. You will be required to present proof of age at the time of registration. All courses may be taken on a credit or audit basis and all course prerequisites must be met prior to registration.

Payment of Tuition And Fees Tuition and fees are payable before or on the published deadlines. All checks and money orders should be made payable to St. Charles Community College. Tuition and fees may be paid by Visa, MasterCard, or Discover. *Payments can be made at the Cashier’s Office, by mail, or online at www.stchas.edu (click onto SCC Connection). You may obtain a user ID and password by logging onto the SCC Connection and selecting “I am new to SCC Connection.” If you fail to pay tuition and fees in full by the day they are due, you will be removed from all of your classes. It will then be necessary for you to re-register in person again and pay, assuming that registration is still in progress and the courses are available. * In accordance to FERPA guidelines, any third party who wishes to register (add/drop) or make a payment for a student will need to be listed on an Authorization for Third Party Registration and Payments form that has been completed by the student. The forms can be found on the website at www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html, or in the Enrollment Services or Student Development offices.

TUITION & FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Third-Party Billing The college will permit students to enroll in classes if financial authorization is presented from an agency such as an employer or a sponsor. Payment arrangements should be made in advance with the cashier in circumstances requiring third-party billing.

Tuition Refund Policy Per Board Policy 417, the tuition refund policy is as follows: If a student withdraws from a course or from the college during the first three weeks after the start of the semester, a refund will be processed based on the date that the student withdraws. If a student withdraws from a course or from the college, the student may receive a tuition refund for that session or semester provided an Add-Drop Form is completed and filed with the Admissions Office within a specified time, or the student withdraws online via SCC Connection. The date of the AddDrop form or the date the online drop is completed is used to determine the percentage of eligible refund. Refunds are calculated based on calendar days from start date of the term. Percentage of Refund

Time Frame of Refund

100%.........................12:00 a.m. on the 1st day of the semester through 11:59 p.m. on the 7th day. 80% ..........................12:00 a.m. on the 8th day of the semester through 11:59 p.m. on the 14th day. 60% ..........................12:00 a.m. on the 15th day of the semester through 11:59 p.m. on the 21st day. Registration closes at 7 p.m. Monday-Thursday and at 4:30 p.m. on Friday. You may drop online at any time with an activated SCC Connection account. Refunds will be prorated for courses less than 16 weeks in length. When a refund date occurs over a weekend, it will be necessary to drop online through SCC Connection in order to qualify for the scheduled refund amount. 3-3


S

TUITION & FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Estimate of Other Costs

Financial Assistance

Other expenses incurred by students include books and supplies, approximately $100 per class, plus travel to and from campus. While it is difficult to determine in advance what a student will spend while attending SCC, we estimate that full-time, in-district students will probably spend $1,200-$1,500 per semester for expenses (tuition and fees, books and supplies, etc.).

Grants, loans, scholarships, and part-time employment are available to St. Charles Community College students who qualify. Most awards are based on need and require you to maintain a minimum grade point average. Most awards are made for one academic year only.

Residency In The College District Tuition and fees are assessed based on a student’s legal residency. A post office box address will not be considered as a residence for determination of tuition charges. The three categories of residency are: In-District – A person whose residence is within the boundaries of St. Charles County with the exception of the Washington School District (see Chapter 9, The District). Out-of-District – A person whose residence is in Missouri, but outside of the St. Charles Community College District. Out-of-State & International – A person whose residence is not within the state of Missouri (international students are classified as out-of-state students). NOTE: Refer to Chapter 3 for information regarding changes in residency.

Penalty for False Information If you intentionally give false or inaccurate information regarding residency or you fail to inform the college of a change of address that alters your residence classification, you will be subject to the following penalties: 1) disciplinary action; 2) your academic records will not be released to any agency until you have paid the district the difference between the fees and tuition already paid and the amount that would be owed by a person of your residency classification.

For Further Explanation You may call the registrar for a clarification of the residency policy.

3-4

M

Students who wish to be considered for financial assistance should apply for admission to SCC and submit an application for federal financial assistance. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Each student submitting an application will be considered for a financial assistance package, which is any combination of a loan, grant, and/or part-time job tailored to fit your particular needs and qualifications. Students whose files are complete before June 1 for the fall semester and/or Nov. 1 for the spring semester will be given priority consideration for the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG).

How to Apply For Financial Assistance 1. Apply for admission. 2. Request an official transcript from each institution you have previously attended. These should be sent directly to the SCC Enrollment Services Department. Complete a “Request for Transcript Evaluation” form. Your Financial Aid application will not be processed until this step has been completed. 3. Complete an application for federal financial assistance at www.fafsa.ed.gov. 4. Allow 2-4 weeks to receive a Student Aid Report (SAR) at your home address or call the Enrollment Services Department to see if your Electronic Student Aid Report has been received. 5. The Enrollment Services Department cannot credit Pell Grants to your account before it receives an accurate electronic Student Aid Report. 6. You must apply for financial assistance each academic year. The money you receive is not automatically renewable. 7. You should apply for fall semester financial assistance as soon as you have completed your income tax forms from the prior year. 8. Eligibility is determined based on a predetermined formula as set by U.S. Congress. 9. If you do not have a high school diploma or GED certificate, you will be required to take an additional test during your placement assessment for Ability-to-Benefit purposes. Ability-to-Benefit students must complete all computerized assessments on the same day.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Students who enroll in late-start classes (including distance learning) that begin after the first day of the semester will be paid for those classes at varying points in the semester depending on the start date of the class.

All Financial Aid refunds will be available via ACH to a bank of the student’s choice or to a HigherOneR debit card.

High school students are not eligible for financial assistance.

Qualified students may apply for low-interest loans to help finance their education. Both subsidized and unsubsidized student loans are offered through the U.S. Department of Education. Each student’s budget and family contribution will be evaluated to determine maximum loan eligibility. Award amounts depend upon your academic grade level.

Grants Grants, which do not have to be repaid, are awarded to students on the basis of financial need. SCC participates in three federal grant programs: Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), and the Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG). The state of Missouri also has the ACCESS Missouri grant available to eligible students based on financial need. Pell Grant recipients whose paperwork is received in the Financial Assistance Office in a timely manner should receive grant refunds during the fifth week of the semester. This allows the Enrollment Services Department time to verify the number of credit hours you are taking and to process all bookstore credits. If your file is completed after the fourth week of the semester, you can expect your refund to take approximately two to three additional weeks to process. Students enrolled in courses that begin later in the semester will not be paid until after those classes begin and attendance has been verified. Students whose files are complete before the scheduled deadline for a given semester are not required to prepay their tuition. Those students are allowed to purchase their books on a bookstore credit issued from the Enrollment Services Department. When your Pell refund is processed, it will be for the amount remaining after all tuition charges and/or bookstore credits have been deducted. If you are considering withdrawing from your courses, you must notify the Enrollment Services Department of your plans before you complete the withdrawal process so you can be informed of any consequences of such withdrawal. You will be paid based on the actual number of credit hours in which you are enrolled at the end of the second full week of classes for fall and/or spring semesters. Under no circumstances can a student be paid for a semester in which he or she enrolls but does not attend any classes. Therefore, if you have decided not to attend classes, you must notify the Enrollment Services Department to prevent charges from being posted to your account and/or grades of “F” appearing on your transcript.

Loans

TUITION & FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

The following information also should be noted: • Students can complete the loan application process at www.stchas.edu/students/finance/onlineloans.shtml.

• Your loan cannot be processed until you have applied for a Pell Grant and the Student Aid Report has been received and verified. • Student loan recipients will be allowed to delay payment of tuition, fees, and books until their funds have been received provided they meet the scheduled deadlines for a given semester. • One-semester loans will be certified for one half of the amount of the student’s annual loan limit. • All Financial Aid refunds will be available via ACH to a bank of the student’s choice or to a HigherOneR debit card two to three weeks after attendance has been verified. • Students who drop below 6 hours of enrollment after their attendance has been verified and prior to their funds being disbursed will not receive loan funds in excess of their incurred tuition, fee, and book charges. • Student loan recipients must notify the Enrollment Services Department before withdrawing from any/all courses so you can be informed of any consequences of such withdrawal. An exit interview is required when you withdraw from classes. An exit interview is also required when you graduate from college. This may be completed at www.nslds.ed.gov.

3-5


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

EXAMPLE OF REPAYMENT

TUITION & FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Loan Balance At Repayment Pymt $1,000 $50.00 $2,000 50.00 $5,000 55.51 $10,000 111.02 $15,000 166.52

6%

8% Interest*

Pymt

Months

Interest*

Pymt

Months

Interest*

22 45 120 120 120

$56.25 237.03 1,661.50 3,322.46 4,983.96

$50.00 50.00 60.66 121.33 181.99

22 47 120 120 120

$76.87 333.94 2,280.01 4,559.31 6,839.31

$50.00 50.00 66.07 132.15 198.23

22 49 120 120 120

$98.49 442.94 2,929.47 5,858.09 8,787.13

*Total interest over the life of your loan using the Equal Payment Plan.

Repayment Loan repayment begins six months (the grace period) after you graduate, withdraw, or drop below half-time (6 credit hours) enrollment status. During the grace period on a subsidized loan, you don’t have to pay any principal, and no interest will be charged. During the grace period on an unsubsidized loan, you don’t have to pay any principal, but interest is your responsibility. You can either pay the interest as it accrues, or it can be capitalized. If your interest is capitalized, it will increase the amount you have to repay and could extend the repayment term. If you choose to pay the interest as it accumulates, you will repay less in the long run (see chart above).

Work-Study Work-Study (part-time campus employment) is often an option for eligible students. Hours worked (not to exceed 15 per week) are determined by need and by credit-hour enrollment. Application forms for the federal Work-Study program are available in the Enrollment Services Department. Work-Study payroll is processed bi-weekly through direct deposit at a bank of the student’s choice.

Scholarships Scholarships are funds that do not require repayment. They range from a specific amount given in a particular semester to a full scholarship of tuition, fees, and books for up to four consecutive semesters. A number of scholarships have been established at SCC and through our local community. The scholarships at SCC include those established through the Board of Trustees, Foundation Office, Athletic Department, various SCC clubs, organizations, faculty, and staff. These scholarships are based on a wide range of criteria that include academic achievement, career programs being followed, leadership involvement, talent, athletic ability, and financial need. 3-6

10%

Months

Scholarship information including instructions and applications can be accessed online at www.stchas.edu/students/finance/ scholarshipinfo.shtml. Since there are literally thousands of scholarships nationwide, you may want to contact the public library for reference. If you have Internet access, you may find scholarships through various Internet addresses that are provided in the SCC Scholarship Guide at www.stchas.edu/students/finance/ scholarshipinfo.shtml.

Notification of Award You will be informed of the decision on an application for financial aid as early as possible. Final awards cannot be made until you are actually enrolled and your enrollment status and cost of education are determined. No awards will be made until all required documents have been received and your previous course work at St. Charles Community College and all other institutions attended has been evaluated for satisfactory academic progress standards.

Satisfactory Academic Progress All students receiving any form of financial assistance are expected to make satisfactory academic progress (SAP). The standards for academic progress are listed on page 3:7. All first-time financial assistance applicants must have their previous grades from SCC and their cumulative completion rate from all previous course work evaluated prior to disbursement of any type of federal financial assistance. NOTE: All financial assistance awards are pending until this process has been completed. If you have not met the minimum standards for grades and completion rate, you will be placed on probation or suspension even if you have not received assistance in the past. A student on financial assistance may repeat one time a course in which a required grade was not earned.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

You will be advised to select courses that will fulfill your educational goals. These courses must follow published degree requirements. Students will be evaluated at the end of each fall and spring semester in order to determine eligibility of assistance for the next term. Please be aware of the fact that some scholarships may have a higher renewal GPA requirement. To maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress, you must meet the following minimum requirements: • Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) as follows: Cumulative Credit Hours Attempted

Cumulative GPA*

1-15 16-30 31 or more

1.5 1.8 2.0

The first column shows the number of cumulative credit hours attempted and the second column shows the minimum cumulative GPA a student is expected to earn based on those credit hours. For example, if you have attempted 18 credit hours, you are required to have a minimum cumulative GPA of 1.8. *Includes grades of A, B, C, D, and F. (Grades of I, P, R, V and W are not counted in a student’s cumulative grade point average). Students may repeat classes for which they received a failing grade to improve their GPA; however, financial assistance will pay only one time for classes to be repeated and all attempts will count towards maximum hour eligibility and completion ratio. • Completion (with a passing grade) of at least 66% of cumulative credit hours attempted. To calculate completion ratio, divide the total number of hours completed by the total number of hours attempted. For example: you have completed 30 hours and you actually attempted 45 hours 30/45 = 66%. In addition to these standards of SAP, there may be additional requirements for enrollment in certain financial assistance programs, such as eligibility for the Title IV programs and/or eligibility for veterans benefits.

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Suspension of Aid A student’s financial aid will be suspended for any of the following reasons: • Failure to meet the minimum required cumulative GPA (see chart) during the semester(s) following notification of probation. • Failure to complete 66% (2/3) of the cumulative credit hours attempted.

TUITION & FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

To calculate completion ratio, divide the total number of hours completed by the total number of hours attempted. For example: you have completed 30 hours and you actually attempted 45 hours 30/45 = 66%. • Complete withdrawal from SCC during any semester, whether or not aid was received. • Failure to complete a minimum of 3 credit hours attempted during a given semester with a passing grade (A,B,C,D,P). • Receiving failing or incomplete grades for all courses in a given semester. • Completion of the maximum number of financial assistance credit hours allowed at the community college level. The maximum number of credit hours for which a student enrolled in an associate’s degree program at SCC is entitled to received financial assistance is 96 attempted credit hours. This includes hours transferred in from other colleges, hours previously completed at SCC (whether or not financial assistance was received), and withdrawals. You may change programs, but program changes do not automatically extend the maximum number of credit hours for which you will be paid. The maximum number of credit hours for a certificate program will be based on the number of credit hours required for completion of those individual programs. For example: For a certificate program that requires 36 credit hours, you will be allowed no more than 54 hours in order to complete the certificate program. Student records will be reviewed at the end of each semester (including summer term).

Students who fail to meet the above minimum requirements will be placed on SAP probation. Students are eligible to receive federal financial aid funds while on SAP probation.

3-7


S

TUITION & FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

Students who are placed on financial assistance suspension due to extenuating circumstances may appeal their suspension through the Financial Assistance Appeals Committee. Appeals will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. For more information on appealing your suspension, please refer to the guidelines below. If you fail to meet the standards for financial assistance eligibility, you may continue to enroll at your own expense.

Financial Assistance Appeals Process To file an appeal, you must submit the following items to the Enrollment Services Department: • A completed Suspension Appeal form (available from Enrollment Services Department or online at www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html). • A letter explaining the extenuating circumstance that led to your lack of satisfactory academic progress. Examples of extenuating circumstances are: an unexpected hospitalization, death of an immediate family member, physicians orders restricting school attendance. • Supporting documentation, e.g. doctor’s letters, hospitalization papers, death certificates, etc. Provide as much documentation as possible as this will enable the committee to verify the events that occurred. The Appeals Committee meets the third Wednesday of every month. The documents listed above must be submitted by noon on the Thursday preceding the meeting date. Information submitted after this time will be held for the next month’s meeting. One additional meeting time will be scheduled in January, May, and August to coincide with the payment due dates for the next semester. You will be notified by mail of the committee’s decision. Should you wish to contest the original decision of the committee, you may do so in person at the next appeals meeting. To schedule an appearance, call 636-922-8270 no later than 4:30 p.m. on the Monday preceding the meeting. Students on financial assistance suspension whose appeals have not been read and/or approved by the payment deadline for a given semester are required to pay for their tuition and fees (by the payment deadline) in order to secure the classes in which they have enrolled. 3-8

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Students whose financial assistance has been reinstated as a result of an appeal will be given the status of “Financial Assistance Suspension Return.” Progress will then be monitored on a term basis rather than on a cumulative basis. Students are then required to maintain a term grade point average of at least 2.0 and a completion ratio of at least 75 percent for each future term of enrollment. If you fail to meet the term requirements after being reinstated you will not be eligible for any future financial assistance until your cumulative GPA is a minimum of 2.0 and your cumulative completion ratio is 66 percent. Additional appeals will not be considered. You may continue to attend at your own expense. Appeals must be received no later than three weeks after the start of the semester in which you are enrolled. Appeals received after three weeks will be considered for the following semester.

Other Financial Assistance Programs The following agencies provide funds for eligible students and should be contacted for application forms: State Vocational Rehabilitation, Social Security Administration, Veterans Administration, Employment Training Programs, Dislocated Worker Program.

A+ Schools Program Students at qualifying high schools throughout Missouri may apply to receive benefits at St. Charles Community College under the A+ Schools Program. The program is made possible through grants from the State of Missouri. To find out whether your high school is part of the A+ Schools Program, contact your high school counselor or the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. The college’s Financial Assistance Office can provide you with additional information.

Ability to Benefit If you need financial assistance and are seeking admission using the Ability to Benefit criteria, you must take an extra component of the assessment test. All four sections of the test must be completed on the same date. Your ability to use financial assistance is determined by your test scores. Consult the Enrollment Services Department for more information.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

Veterans Benefits Your local Veterans Administration Office has information about veterans benefits. The college will provide counseling and other assistance to you on request. The campus veterans representative is available to assist you with any problems that affect your academic life. Veterans benefits are available according to the following course-load guidelines: Course Load Full time Three-fourths time Half time Less than half time

Fall, Spring 12 or more hours 9-11 hours 6-8 hours 1-5 hours

Veterans Standards of Progress The Veterans Administration may refuse to pay educational benefits to a veteran who fails to make satisfactory progress toward a specified educational goal. The Veterans Administration will be notified if the veteran: • Fails to declare an educational goal (major) within the first semester. The veteran must become a regular student in a specific program. • Fails to have previous college transcripts evaluated and applied toward the current program. • Fails to convert an “I” grade to a letter grade before the midterm of the following semester. • Accumulates more than 12 hours of F grades. • Allows the cumulative grade point average to fall below the minimum standards for two semesters in a row. See “Satisfactory Academic Progress” on page 3:7. The Veterans Administration will not pay for repeat courses for which a passing grade (A, B, C, D) has already been received unless the program being followed requires a specific passing grade. The VA will not pay for courses that do not earn credit and/or are not computed into the GPA and/or are not necessary for progress toward the specified educational goal.

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Confidentiality Of Financial Records The General Education Provision Act of 1974, as amended by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, provides for privacy safeguards for students and families by setting up guidelines for the disclosure of education records and personally identifiable information. The law provides that financial assistance records of a student may be inspected by that student with the following exception: the Financial Assistance Office will not release to a dependent student the financial records of his or her parents without the written consent of the parents.

TUITION & FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Financial Assistance Refund Policy St. Charles Community College has instituted a refund policy for all Title IV grant and loan recipients who withdraw from all classes during an enrollment period for which they have been charged. This refund policy complies with current federal government regulations. These regulations require that, when you withdraw during a period of enrollment, the amount of Student Financial Assistance money you have earned up to that point is determined by a specific formula. If you received (or SCC received on your behalf) less assistance money than the amount that you earned, you will be eligible to receive those additional funds. If you received more assistance than you earned, the excess funds must be returned. The amount of assistance you have earned is determined on a pro-rata basis. That is, if you attended classes for 30 percent of the enrollment period, you earned 30 percent of the assistance you were originally scheduled to receive. Once you have completed more than 60 percent of the enrollment period, you have earned all of your assistance funds. If you received excess money, SCC must return to the U.S. Department of Education a portion of the excess equal to the lesser of • the college’s institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of the funds, or, • the entire amount of the excess funds. If the college is not required to return the entire amount of excess funds, the student must return the remaining amount of the funds. Any loan funds that you must return must be repaid in accordance with the terms of the promissory note 3-9


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

(the binding legal document that you signed when you received the student loan). You must make scheduled payments to the holder of the loan over a period of time.

TUITION & FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

If you are responsible for returning grant funds, you do not have to return the full amount. The law provides that you are not required to return more than 50 percent of the grant assistance. You must make arrangements with the college or with the U.S. Department of Education to return any grant overpayments. The date a student officially withdraws through the Registrar’s Office will be used to calculate aid earned when a student withdraws from all of their coursework in a given semester.

3-10

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

The midpoint date of a semester will be used to calculate aid earned for students who fail all of their coursework in a given semester. If a student attends beyond the midpoint, he/she may obtain signatures from faculty for verification of attendance in order to obtain an updated calculation. Any funds a student is required to return will be deducted from the account they submitted when enrolling in the Nelnet Deferred Plan. Enrollment in this plan is required of Financial Aid recipients prior to the payment due date. Enrollment in Nelnet will secure a student’s class schedule for a particular term.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES Advisement & Counseling Career Services Academic Support Bookstore Child Care Student Activities Conduct Code Parking & Public Safety

4-1


S

4-2

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Student Support Services Attending college is a time for developing your own life direction, learning about yourself and your interests and strengths. To this end, St. Charles Community College offers academic counseling, assessment, advisement, academic support, career planning, and job search services. We also offer activities through organizations and clubs because your personal development is just as important as your career decisions. At SCC, we wish to help you become a lifelong learner who knows how to analyze, make decisions, solve problems, and relate well with others. We are here to help you find and further develop these qualities in yourself.

What Are Your Goals? Ask yourself: • Do you wish to complete the first two years towards a bachelor’s degree at a reasonable cost and close to home? • Do you seek career training to directly enter the job market with skills to help you gain a competitive edge? • Do you want to improve your present job skills or make a career change? • Are you interested in enhancing your individual talents? Are community and cultural resources important to you? Could you benefit from guidance in human development and goal-setting? If you answer yes to any of these questions, then life-changing opportunities await you at St. Charles Community College.

How Can We Help? Written material can sometimes be confusing. For this reason, we urge you to seek personal advice and information from a wide variety of sources: academic counselors, faculty, administrators, library staff, Financial Assistance Office, Enrollment Services Office, Career Services Center, etc.

New Student Orientation It is important to start a college experience with a strong understanding of its demands and rewards. An online orientation is available at www.stchas.edu/nso/index.shtml.

COL 101 Orientation to College (COL 101) is required of all first-time freshmen students taking 9 or more credit hours (5 hours or more in the summer session). This class helps students understand the many aspects of college life, such as procedures, campus resources, faculty expectations, study skills necessary for success, career exploration, and technology used in college classes (including the use of SCC Connection and WebCT). The course is offered in five-day intensive sessions during early August as well as eight-week and full semester sessions. ESL 100 is the appropriate orientation to college course for non-native speakers.

Services for Students With Disabilities It is the policy of SCC to provide accessibility to its programs/activities and reasonable accommodations for persons defined as disabled under the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. To be considered for eligibility, you must provide disability documentation to the coordinator of accessibility services. Accommodations provided to students are based upon appropriate/current documentation. Accommodations requests should be made eight weeks in advance. Securing alternate textbooks will take longer. Plan accordingly. If you need accommodations for classes, you may contact the accessibility services coordinator at 636-922-8247 or e-mail pbova@stchas.edu. Office of Accessibility Services procedures are available on the college website: www.stchas.edu.

Advisement and Counseling Direct any questions concerning educational planning to an academic counselor in the Student Development Office. Counselors are available to assist you through every step of planning and achieving educational goals. Advisement is a joint responsibility shared by both the student and the counselor. Because of this, it is important for you to remain in continuous communication with the counseling staff in order to utilize their expertise while developing your educational plan at SCC.

4-3


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

Student’s Responsibilities

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

• Be knowledgeable about general education requirements, program requirements, and college policies and procedures. This information is available in the college catalog. • Transfer students need to choose a major field of study at their chosen transfer institution as soon as possible. You should become familiar with the requirements needed for your major at the institution to which you plan to transfer. • Schedule appointments early during registration periods and be prepared for the appointment. You should have reviewed the class schedule, have an idea of courses you plan to take, and be able to discuss your interests and goals with the counselor.

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Assessment Center The Assessment Center offers various testing services to meet the needs of students, faculty, and the community. • An Assessment Series in basic academic skills including writing, reading comprehension, and mathematics is administered to entering students. Results are used to place you into appropriate courses. Any first-time freshman taking an English or mathematics course or enrolling in 6 or more credit hours must take the assessment tests. Students who test into developmental courses in all three areas (math, reading, and English) must enroll in the Success Semester (see below).

• Promptly keep appointments. If this is impossible due to an unexpected emergency, call to reschedule.

• ACT scores may be required before admission to specific degree programs and will also aid in course placement. The ACT exam is given on the SCC campus. Information packets are available in the Student Development Office.

• Consult with a counselor when experiencing academic difficulty.

• Makeup tests are proctored at the instructor’s request.

• Accept responsibility for decisions that need to be made.

• The Productivity Environmental Preference Survey (PEPS) is given to students enrolled in COL 101.

• Follow through with appropriate action after meeting with a counselor. Counselor’s Responsibilities

• The C-BASE is offered for transferring education majors.

• Provide accurate information about educational options, requirements, policies, and procedures.

• A computerized Dosage Calculations Test is administered to prospective nursing students.

• Help students develop an educational plan consistent with their interests and abilities.

• Departmental exams are given that offer credit for CPT 103, CPT 106, and CPT 115.

• Help students meet special educational needs through referrals to other resources of the institution.

• Proctoring of exams for correspondence courses is available for a fee.

• Help students understand the nature and purpose of higher education. • Help students learn to accept responsibility for their own actions and decisions. • Help students clarify their values and goals. • Help students plan for transfer to a four-year university.

Personal Counseling SCC contracts with Bridgeway Behavioral Health Services to provide personal counseling at no charge to credit students. The contracted mental health counselor is defined as an SCC school official. Services are available on-campus or at Bridgeway’s St. Charles location. Call 636-288-6533 for an appointment. 4-4

M

• Outcomes assessment is provided for students who complete a degree or certificate. • The GED test is administered monthly.

Success Semester The college has designed a program for students who test into developmental courses in all three of these foundation areas: English, mathematics, and reading. Building your skills in these areas will aid in your success in college. The college has compiled a list of additional courses that can be completed while you are enrolled in the Success Semester. Early enrollment is encouraged especially if you are concerned about your status as a full-time student (12 credit hours or more). Students are required to successfully complete foundation courses before enrolling in other classes that are not on the approved Success Semester course list.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

Assessment Appeals The assessment tests for entering students result in mandatory placements but can be appealed as indicated below. English Appeals – If you feel that your English placement does not accurately reflect your ability, you are encouraged to speak with an academic counselor. The appeal is a two-part process that requires students to create and submit additional pieces of writing for review. You must complete the appeals process before attending an English class. Reading Appeals – If you feel that your reading placement does not accurately reflect your ability, meet with an academic counselor and discuss the option to appeal by taking the COMPASS reading assessment one additional time. You must complete the appeals process before attending a reading class. Mathematics Appeals – If you feel your math placement does not accurately reflect your ability, you are encouraged to speak with an academic counselor about taking an appeal exam. If after completing the appeal exam you wish to further appeal your math placement, you may also discuss your situation with the mathematics department. You must complete the appeals process before attending a mathematics class.

Class Preparation A minimum of two hours of outside study and preparation per week is normally recommended for each hour of regular classroom work.

Course Syllabi Students may research previous and/or current course syllabi by visiting the Student Development office in 1204 ADM or by visiting the departmental offices.

Planning Programs of Study Schedule Guides Suggested schedule guides are available for the Associate of Arts degree. These guides indicate how you may complete your course of studies within two years. These are only guides and should not be seen as a required course of study. Keep in mind that many students spread their studies over more than two years to allow for jobs and/or family responsibilities. Your time until graduation can also be affected by initial placement into classes. See pages 5:8-17.

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Schedule guides are also available for the Associate of Science and Associate of Applied Science degrees and Certificate programs that require specific courses to be taken. These can also be completed over more than two years. All schedule guides are available in the Student Development Office, Room 1204 ADM.

Plan Ahead Students who wish to graduate from SCC and transfer with junior standing should carefully plan a program of study to meet the requirements needed for the major at the transfer institution. Contact the Student Development Office concerning academic counseling and the transfer process.

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

Evaluating Your Progress Toward Your Degree Degree Audits Degree audits (a calculation of courses needed for a degree or certificate) are available in the Student Development Office, 1204 ADM, or students may access a computerized audit through SCC Connection. The degree audit is for advisement purposes only. It is not a substitute for the official degree audit required by the registrar for graduation. It is not to be considered as an application for graduation.

Cashier and Registration Student registration and payment of all tuition, fees, and fines can be made at the walk-up windows in the main hallway of the Administration Building. You may also register and pay online through the SCC Connection with a valid user ID and password. For more information, see Chapter 2.

Career Services Center Selecting a major and choosing a career are very important decisions that require careful thought and planning. Career counselors are available to provide assistance in this selection process. Computerized career guidance systems, interest inventories, and a vast array of career information are used by career counselors as they guide you into making career-related decisions. Counselors can also assist in locating job shadowing opportunities so you can talk with people in the community who are currently working in careers of interest.

4-5 35


S

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

In addition, you are encouraged to visit with the division dean, program coordinator, or faculty members for more advising in your major pathway of study. If you are undecided, you may consider taking a career development course (COL 110) to help learn more about yourself and the courses that closely match your interest, values, and aptitudes. Career counselors can also help you develop job search skills, including resume preparation, networking, interviewing, and other aspects of the job search. Numerous full- and part-time jobs and internship opportunities are posted in the Career Services Center. An online job posting service is available, free of charge, to SCC students and alumni. Internships and hands-on opportunities within your field of study can greatly improve your ability to get a job after graduation. These experiences enable you to make valuable contacts with professionals and explore and clarify career options. Career counselors can help you locate opportunities while you are attending SCC. The Career Services Center is located in the Student Development Office, 1204 ADM. Career and job search resources are available as you research information. The website, www.stchas.edu/students/ counseling/careerservicescenter/index.shtml, offers a great deal of information as well. To schedule an appointment with a career counselor, call 636-922-8241.

Gateway Community College Consortium is a cooperative initiative between East Central College, Jefferson College, Mineral Area College, and SCC. The Consortium provides a broad selection of distance learning courses; cooperative arrangements allow you to enroll in courses from the other colleges while maintaining SCC as your home institution.

4-6

Academic Support Library The library, located on the first and second floors of the Learning Resource Center, contains a collection of books, periodicals, audio-visual materials, and electronic databases specially selected to support the college’s programs of instruction. During fall and spring semesters, the library is open MondaySaturday; hours vary. For people who are looking for a place to study, the LRC contains small group study rooms as well as plenty of quiet study space. The library is fully automated, and desktop computers are networked to provide easy access. Wireless laptop computers are available to registered students for a two-hour checkout on a first-come, first-served basis at the circulation desk. Resources available in the LRC include books, videos, and periodical subscriptions. Electronic databases provide access to the full text of another 7,000 periodicals. A high-speed Internet connection links the library to Web resources throughout the world. Currently enrolled students,

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

faculty, and staff can check out circulating materials with a valid SCC ID card. SCC’s participation in the MOBIUS consortium provides access to millions of volumes owned by Missouri’s institutions of higher education. Books from MOBIUS libraries are delivered in two to three days. Library staff members are dedicated to helping you succeed in your library research. Classes are offered to explain how to use the library and its resources, and trained librarians are available to assist students during all hours the library is open. Many instructional materials are available on the library website. For all registered students, the library catalog and all electronic resources are available from home by connecting to www.stchas.edu/library.

Academic and Career Enhancement Services The Academic and Career Enhancement (ACE) Center provides academic support, including computer-aided instruction and word processing, tutoring, and study skills assistance. The ACE Center is open for student and faculty use weekdays, evenings, and Saturdays during the regular semester. Assistance is only available for courses students are taking at SCC. The ACE Center provides enrichment and supplementary materials for many classes. Students encountering academic problems or simply wishing to improve their perfor-mance will find the help they need in the ACE Center. It assists students in building stronger academic skills in note-taking techniques, test-taking strategies, and overall reading/writing improvement. Diverse instructional methods allow you to learn in the way you are most comfortable. DVDs, CDs, handouts, and computer programs are some of the options available. Students experiencing difficulty in developmental or certain first-level classes may be referred by their instructor or a counselor to the First Alert Program. This program provides counseling assistance and a structured remedial program.

Distance Learning Distance learning courses provide alternatives to on-campus courses. The WebCT course management system is used for many of these courses. If you wish to take these alternative learning courses, you will need access to the Internet and have experience with e-mail and the World Wide Web. Distance learning courses do not require students to come to campus on a regular basis. Many of these courses will require you to use technology to receive instruction. They may require attendance


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

on campus for orientation, and midterm and final examinations. These courses are equivalent to on-campus courses in terms of content, degree of difficulty, and transferability. Students use textbooks, complete written assignments, and receive assistance from faculty. Students who are unable to come to classes on campus are encouraged to enroll in these courses. Visit the distance learning home page on the Web at www.stchas.edu/distance.

Computer And Internet / Wi-Fi Access You may search the Internet using computers located in the library, ACE Center, Student Center, and other designated locations. Wireless access to the Internet is available to currently enrolled students. The SCC website at www.stchas.edu provides online information about the college, including credit and non-credit class schedules, admissions, and registration information.

Help Desk The SCC Help Desk is available for all students who need technical assistance with SCC online services: • Activating your account • WebCT • SCC Connection • Online registration • Accessing class schedules • Viewing your grades • Transcripts • Password and login assistance

Returning Learners Workshops Special workshops are held each semester to help students who have been out of school for a number of years ease back into the classroom situation. Topics covered are goal setting and decision making, career exploration, assertiveness training, time and stress management, college services, and study skills improvement. For more information, call the Student Development Office, 636-922-8241.

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Financial Assistance St. Charles Community College offers a comprehensive financial assistance program funded by federal, state, and local agencies. If you need financial assistance in order to attend SCC, you should contact the Financial Assistance Office for information and required forms. Information is also available at www.stchas.edu/students/finance.shtml. Financial assistance falls into four categories: grants, loans, scholarships, and part-time employment. Most awards are based on need and require the student to maintain a minimum grade point average. Most awards are made for one academic year only.

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

For information on how to apply for financial assistance, turn to the Tuition and Financial Assistance chapter of this catalog.

Bookstore New and used books, supplies, and other related items are available in the SCC Bookstore. Textbooks are usually available three to four weeks before the start of each semester. As a service to students, a “Used Book Buyback” is held at the end of every semester during finals week. Some conditions may preclude the Bookstore from purchasing back every used textbook from the previous semester (visit the Bookstore for details). The Bookstore is located in the Café-Bookstore on the west side of campus.

Order Textbooks Online Students may order textbooks on the Internet. You may have them delivered to your home by UPS or reserve them for pickup at the Bookstore. For more information, visit http://bookstore.stchas.edu.

Other Services • College apparel, college logo items, postage stamps, gift certificates, paperback books, and specialty books may be purchased at the Bookstore. • Students and staff may special order books and software at an educational discount. • Graduating nurses may purchase class pins.

4-7 37


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

Return Policies

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

• Book refunds will be available only through the third week of the fall and spring semesters or through the first week of the summer session. Classes that start later than the regular semester schedule may receive a refund through the first week of the start date of the class. • The Bookstore will consider extenuating circumstances regarding the return of books past the deadline. However, the final decision is the Bookstore’s. • Defective books are exchangeable at any time. • All refunds require proof of purchase (sales slip). • Don’t mark or write in your books until you are sure you have the correct book and that your course has not been cancelled. Marked books are used books! • There is a used book buyback scheduled each semester during finals week. • Any item that is shrink-wrapped is nonrefundable if opened. No exceptions.

Food Services The Plaza Bistro is in the Student Center. During fall/spring semesters, services include a hot cook-toorder grill, full-service deli, hot buffet, and self-serve snacks. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner are available Monday-Friday (dinner not available on Friday). During summer session, services are limited to breakfast and lunch Monday-Thursday only. Campus catering is available year-round – call 636-922-8391. The SCC Bookstore convenience area will save you some steps by offering you items that you need most for class. You can purchase pens, pencils, disks, notebooks, and exam books along with snacks, drinks, and other school supplies. The SCC Café-Bookstore is located north of the College Center at the opposite end of campus from MRK. It has a fresh menu featuring paninis, wraps, salads, sandwiches, baked goods, hot and cold beverages, and an espresso bar as well as grab-n-go items. You’ll find yourself stopping at the CaféBookstore in between classes for convenience store items and grabbing a bite to eat while hanging out or studying. Visit food services online at www.stchas.edu/geninfo/mrk/Mid_Rivers_ Kitchens.shtml.

4-8

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Insurance The college does not carry an insurance program (accident, hospitalization, or health insurance) for students. Students who want coverage are encouraged to secure insurance with a reputable company or maintain protection as a part of a family plan. A brochure detailing student insurance coverage from outside sources is available in the Student Development Office. To purchase insurance, arrange for coverage directly with a carrier.

Student Handbook A student handbook is published by the Student Development Office and is free to students. The handbook, which is also available online, describes in detail all student services, college regulations, student conduct policies, and the student discipline process. Students are encouraged to obtain a copy or to visit www.stchas.edu/current_students and look under the “Publications” heading.

Student Identification Card An official student ID card and number is issued at registration; you must be able to produce this ID card if requested by an SCC official. This card will admit you to college social functions, events, etc. A current, valid SCC ID is required in order to check out material from the SCC library and to utilize various student services.

Child Development Center The college operates a not-for-profit Child Development Center for children from infant to 8 years old. Children of students, employees, and the general public are accepted on a space-available basis. The center has a capacity of 156 children. Child care services may be scheduled on a full-day basis for all patrons. Contracted hourly care is available for children of SCC students only. The program provides educationally appropriate activities that meet the social, physical, and intellectual needs of the child. Information about the center is available at the CDC, the information desk, and other locations on campus.

Student Activities At St. Charles Community College, you will be able to take part in a variety of social and cultural activities and events. They include the activities of student organizations, on- and off-campus recreation, films, concerts, lectures, dances,


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

exhibits, club sports, and other activities as student interest warrants. Activities are designed to promote enjoyable and informal learning opportunities. The Student Activities Office welcomes student input in the planning of new activities and encourages all students to stop by Room 102 in the College Center to use the student lounge and recreational computers.

Student Senate The Student Senate is formed each year by a process of appointment and general election. Its officers are elected by the members. The Senate acts as the voice of the student body. All students are encouraged to participate in Student Senate.

Student Honor Society Phi Theta Kappa Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society for two-year colleges. Students are invited into the society based on their record of academic excellence, moral character, and citizenship. The Alpha Xi Chi chapter has two inductions for new members each year and elects its own officers. Members participate in many activities on and off campus, and may attend four major conferences per year.

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

and women’s softball competitive seasons are played in the spring with baseball playing a 56-game schedule and softball playing a 30-game schedule. All teams conduct practice and scrimmage games in their off-season. Each sport is eligible for national post-season competition within the National Junior College Athletic Association. For information about athletics at SCC, contact the Athletic Office in Room 104, College Center.

Non-Discrimination And Equal Opportunity The college is committed to non-discrimination and equal opportunity regarding the treatment of students, faculty, and staff. The college adheres to a strict non-discrimination policy in student admission, educational programs, activities, and employment regardless of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, age, veteran status, or disability. The college is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The college maintains a complaint procedure for the purpose of investigating and providing a prompt and equitable remedy. Student inquiries concerning the complaint procedure or discrimination concerns may be made to the vice president for academic and student affairs, 636-922-8356, or as an alternative, to the dean of student development, 636-922-8238.

Student organizations provide enriching learning and social experiences beyond the classroom. Descriptions of each student organization can be found online at the Student Activities page: www.stchas.edu/students/activities/clubs.shtml.

For detailed information concerning sexual harassment, other types of harassment, or consensual sexual or romantic relationships, refer to Policy 434.0/534.0, Prohibition of Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Other Forms of Harassment, or Policy 434.1/534.1, Romantic or Sexual Relationships.

Additional clubs and organizations are encouraged. New proposals should be brought to the student activities coordinator. Approval forms for proposed clubs or organizations may be picked up in the Student Activities Office in Room 102, College Center.

Prohibition of Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, And Other Forms of Harassment

Student Organizations

Intercollegiate Athletics St. Charles Community College has four intercollegiate athletic teams – men’s baseball and women’s fast-pitch softball and men’s and women’s soccer. Teams hold memberships in the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) Region XVI at the Division I level, and the Midwest Community College Athletic Conference (MCCAC). They compete against other two-year college teams. The men’s and women’s soccer competitive seasons are played in the fall with each team playing a schedule consisting of 20 games. The men’s baseball

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

All forms of discrimination and harassment degrade the quality of work and diminish the academic mission and will not be tolerated. Sexual harassment, because of its nature, has received special attention within Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Further, because of the unique relationship between student and faculty member or supervisor and subordinate, and the inequities in power, sexual harassment is especially troublesome in the academic environment. Sexual harassment not only violates the law and college policy but also can damage personal and professional relationships, cause career or economic disadvantage, and expose

4-9 39


S

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

the college to legal liabilities and other financial consequences. Sexual and other forms of harassment can be prevented through instilling knowledge and awareness. This policy is intended to increase awareness and provide practical information regarding sexual harassment by making available information, resources, and the availability of guidance on the subject. Even consensual sexual or romantic relationships may be perceived as or become occasions of sexual harassment. For more information, refer to Policy 434.1/534.1, Romantic or Sexual Relationships.

Reporting Discrimination And Harassment Any student who believes that he or she has been the subject of sexual or other harassment should report the alleged act immediately to the vice president for academic and student affairs, 636-922-8358 or as an alternative, the dean of student development, 636922-8238. The college will respond in a prompt and equitable manner to allegations of harassment and will respond appropriately to those who violate this policy, up to and including termination of employment or dismissal from the college, as applicable. The method for reporting harassment is also outlined in the St. Charles Community College Reporting Discrimination and Harassment (Complaint Procedure). A copy of that document may be obtained from the following locations: Information/Welcome Center (ADM Building), Office of the Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs, Office of Human Resources, or the Office of Administrative Services. This policy (434.0) may be viewed in its entirety on the college website at www.stchas.edu/policies/ board/400/434.0-ProhibitionOfDiscrimination AndHarassment.shtml

Student Conduct Code

4-10

Students enrolling at SCC are to conduct themselves in a manner compatible with the educational purposes of the college. If you fail to do so, the college will institute appropriate disciplinary action, which may include dismissal. Specifically, students are expected to comply with federal, state, and local laws concerning activities prohibited on public school property and at college-sponsored functions. Civil disobedience, assault, forgery, gambling, immoral conduct, libel, theft, use and sale of alcoholic beverages and other dangerous drugs, vandalism, or possession of firearms, explosives, dangerous chemicals, or other weapons are prohibited while on college property or at a college-sponsored event. Students who hold a conceal and carry permit or endorsement may not bring firearms on campus.

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Disciplinary Proceedings Students accused of violating the Student Conduct Code will be referred to the dean of student development, who will review the charges and oversee disciplinary proceedings as outlined in the student handbook.

Emergency Services Policy If a person is seriously injured or becomes ill on campus, the community assistance 911 number or the Department of Public Safety (922-8545) should be called immediately. In any injury incident, whether or not it is an emergency, the Department of Public Safety should be immediately notified. An incident report must be filed with Department of Public Safety in all cases of injury and emergency. If emergency transportation and treatment at a health care facility are necessary, all costs are the responsibility of the person who is transported.

Emergency Phone Calls Students may not receive phone calls at the college through a college phone number except in cases of emergency. In the event of an emergency, you will be contacted in class to return a phone call. The caller will be asked to provide a phone number to the Department of Public Safety and the nature of the emergency in order for the college to determine if the call warrants a student being removed from class. DPS may be reached at 636-922-8545.

Unattended Children You are not permitted to bring children to class, nor should children be left unattended in the halls, offices, library, student lounges, or outside on campus or in cars in parking lots.

Posting/Distributing Materials on Campus Students and district residents may post/distribute certain materials on campus after obtaining authorization through the student activities coordinator in the Student Activities Office, Room 102, College Center, or in the Marketing and Communications Department, Room 1121, Administration Building. Placing materials on the windshields of cars in the college parking lots is not permitted. Solicitation by outside vendors is not allowed on campus except as part of a collegesponsored activity. See the college’s website under “General Information� for guidelines regarding posting materials on campus.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

Campus Publications And Official Calendar The Marketing and Communications Department publishes a newsletter, Chaz, for students, faculty and staff. In addition, The e-Outlook is e-mailed to employees and features events, news, and employee kudos. Chuck is a printed publication for students. The one-page, bi-weekly newsletter features news you can use, important deadlines, and special events. It can be found on top of tables in the Café, the Plaza Bistro, and in kiosks. Both publications are distributed free of charge on campus. News and calendar items may be submitted for publication. For the most current information about events happening on campus, visit www.stchas.edu/calendars, the official SCC calendar of events. The online calendar is the most up-to-date resource of events, meetings, deadlines, academic dates, athletic schedules, etc. The calendar is searchable and may be printed out by month, week, or day. College employees and students may submit items pertaining to the college community by contacting the marketing/Web assistant in the Marketing and Communications Department at 636-922-8475 or by e-mail at mac@stchas.edu Free student e-mail/online storage accounts are available to all students; bi-weekly “Cougar News” and other college updates are distributed to all students through the e-mail system.

Student Publication Written and edited by student volunteers and students in an SCC journalism practicum credit class, The SCCougar is the college’s student publication and may be accessed online at sccougar.com. It may be published several times each semester and can be picked up from poster kiosks throughout the campus. For more information, contact the Arts & Humanities Division.

Marketing And Communications The Marketing and Communications Department provides publications, publicity signage, photography, design, editing, and marketing consultation services for the college and directs all advertising and releases of information to the media and to the general public. It maintains and develops the college’s website as well as the poster display kiosks on campus. Public relations, special events, advertising, and other promotional consultations may be arranged through this department. Individuals and groups are encouraged to contact Marketing and Communications as they become aware of newsworthy events.

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Information Center The Information Desk/Welcome Center is located inside the main entrance Atrium of the Administration Building. General information, directions, and special events listings are available to students and visitors by telephone or in person.

Parking and Traffic

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

As a commuter college, the institution recognizes the necessity of adequate traffic control, safety, and parking facilities. The vice president for administrative services is responsible for the development and enforcement of college traffic control procedures and for the general safety of the campus. Citations may be issued for violations of regulations. The following should be observed: • Parking hang tags are issued by the Department of Public Safety, free of charge with a paid tuition receipt. Hang tags must be properly displayed and expire each school year. • Park only in authorized areas. • Campus speed limit is 25 mph. • All accidents are to be reported to the Department of Public Safety located in the Campus Services Building. Parking privileges are available for persons with disabilities and authorized individuals or groups. Temporary parking permits for special events may be obtained in the Cashier’s Office or the Department of Public Safety. Fines and towing charges are the responsibility of the person to whom the vehicle is registered. More information is provided in the SCC Campus Parking Regulations brochure. A Student Traffic Court meets as needed to review student parking ticket appeals. Students may request a form to appeal in the Student Activities Office in Room 102 in the College Center.

4-11 41


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Public Safety

Lounge/Meeting Areas

Campus Security, Clery Information, and Annual Crime Statistics

Lounges in the Daniel J. Conoyer Social Sciences Building, Learning Resources Center, and College Center, as well as a game room, television, and recreation area in College Center Room 102, and other study areas and club/organization meeting rooms are provided on campus for students.

The Department of Public Safety provides building and grounds security services throughout the year. All students, faculty, staff, and visitors are encouraged to report any suspicious or criminal activity to the Department of Public Safety located in the Campus Services Building. DPS maintains copies of the Annual Report on Crime Awareness and Campus Safety for public distribution (Clery Act). DPS also provides information about registered sex offenders identified through the state offender registration and community notification programs. For a list of registered sex offenders in this area, visit the website www.mshp.dps.missouri.gov. To access information pertaining to the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (1990), visit www.stchas.edu/geninfo/safety/crimereport00.shtml.

4-12

M

Recreational Computers Personal computers are available for use by students in various buildings on campus. The ACE Center (Social Sciences Building) and the Technology Building contain walk-in labs for student academic use. Students also have access to computers for recreational use (e-mail and Internet) in the Student Center lobby and in the Student Activities Office (Room 102, College Center). These computers may be monitored and are not secure for confidential information.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES Transfer Programs Career-Technical Programs Developmental Studies Graduation Requirements Programs With Other Colleges

5-1


S

5-2

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Academic Programs – Degrees & Certificates Instructional programs at St. Charles Community College offer you several options in attaining long-term or short-term educational goals. If your goal is to complete requirements for the first two years of a bachelor's degree, you can enroll in SCC's college transfer program. The transfer program contains courses that parallel the first two years of study at many four-year institutions. Another option is the career-technical program pathway. You can earn a certificate or degree that leads directly into the job market upon graduation from SCC. These one- and two-year programs allow you to match your career skills with jobs available in today's rapidly changing work force.

A listing of courses offered for a specific semester can be found at www.stchas.edu/distance. Of course, not everyone comes to college seeking a degree, so SCC offers you the option to take credit classes one at a time to update job skills or for personal enrichment. Or, if you need to improve basic reading, writing, and math skills before enrolling in college-level work, we encourage you to find out more about developmental programs and special study skills classes. Descriptions of SCC credit courses are found online. Look under the “Academics” section online at www.stchas.edu.

If you would like to take college-level classes but are unable to come to campus on a regular basis, you may take advantage of distance learning courses such as online, teleweb, telecourse, and video courses.

Academic Pathways College Transfer • Associate of Arts in Teaching (A.A.T.) • Associate of Arts (A.A.) • Associate of Science (A.S.) Transfer Pathways Art & Graphic Design Biology Business Chemistry Communication Computer Science Criminal Justice Economics Education-Elementary-Secondary English Foreign Language Geography Health Information Technology History Liberal Arts/Undecided Mathematics Music Nursing Political Science Pre-Engineering Pre-Health Professions Psychology/Sociology Social Work Theater

Career-Technical Associate of Science (A.S.) • Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) • Certificate of Achievement • Certificate of Specialization Career-Technical Programs Accounting Option Advanced Network Design Architectural Technology (CAD) Option Business Administrative Systems Business Computing Option Child Care & Early Education Clerical Assistant Computer-Aided Drafting Computer Programming Option Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Customer Service Database Management Option Data Management Desktop Publishing Educational Paraprofessional Finance Option General Education General Technology Gerontology Option Global Studies Graphic Design

Health Information Technology Human Services, General Option Industrial Technology (CAD) Option Management Info. Systems Management Option Marketing Option Multimedia Multimedia & Web Design Option Networking Option Nursing (ADN/RN) Occupational Therapy Assistant Practical Nursing (LPN) Programming Languages Skilled Trades Substance Abuse Services Option Telecommunications Option Victimology Option Web Design Youth Services Option

Joint Education Programs

5-3


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

COLLEGE TRANSFER PROGRAM ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Start a Four-Year Degree at SCC The college transfer program at St. Charles Community College allows students to take the same freshman and sophomore courses that they would take anywhere else and at a much lower cost. The transfer program is built around a comprehensive blend of traditional and contemporary subjects that are intended for transfer to most four-year institutions. At SCC, you can fulfill the general education requirements needed for a bachelor’s degree and take the prerequisite foundation courses for your intended major. Undecided students can explore different fields before making a final decision about a major field of study and spend considerably less money while doing so.

Transfer Degrees Two associate’s degrees are available in the SCC College Transfer Program. They are: Associate of Arts (A.A.) Associate of Arts in Teaching (A.A.T.) Associate of Science (A.S.) The degree you select will be determined by your educational or occupational goals.

Associate of Arts Degree The Associate of Arts degree is awarded to students completing the requirements of the academic transfer program with a minimum of 64 semester hours including 42 hours of general education courses. This is the degree that is most appropriate for the majority of transfer students because it generally parallels the work done in the first two years of a bachelor’s degree at a four-year institution.

Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree The Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree is a transfer degree for future educators. Students TEACHING completing this degree will observe and participate in K-12 classrooms and will examine theories of human growth and development, learning theories, assessment strategies, classroom management principles, integration of technology into the K-12 curriculum, and the legal, 5-4

historical, and philosophical foundations of the American education system.

Associate of Science Degree The Associate of Science degree is awarded to students completing the requirements of specifically identified programs with a minimum of 64 semester hours. The work generally parallels the first two years of a Bachelor of Science degree at four-year institutions. The programs leading to the Associate of Science degree at SCC include Health Information Technology, Nursing, and Pre-Engineering.

Undecided? “I am interested in pre-med ... pre-dentistry ... forestry ... and my major isn’t shown on your list. I guess I’ll have to go to another school.” No, you won’t. Regardless of intended major pathway at another school, students can obtain the necessary foundation courses at SCC. The freshman and sophomore years at any college are a time to complete the basic, general education requirements in English, math, science, humanities, and social science. So, if you are interested in a career field that requires at least a bachelor’s degree, plus years of additional study and specialization like medicine, law, or veterinary science, don’t overlook SCC. See pages 5:8-17 for a listing of many of the major pathways (including schedule guides) that are a part of the college transfer program at SCC.

Graduation Requirements Each major in the college transfer program requires the completion of at least 62 hours of credit in specific categories. Turn to pages 5:6-7 (chart) for detailed requirements of the Associate of Arts degree. See the individual program guidelines (pages 5:1718 and 5:20) for requirements specific to the Associate of Science degree. Courses not listed in the general education requirements for your degree will not count toward this requirement. Most college-level courses (100 level or above) will count as electives toward graduation. Career-technical courses may not count toward electives for the Associate of Arts degree.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

Students must take the responsibility to apply for a degree one semester before the completion of that degree. The college does not automatically award degrees. For more information, contact the Registrar's Office. If you plan to earn a degree at SCC, you will need to meet the requirements of the catalog in effect when you first enrolled or of any subsequent catalog as long as you enroll in at least one fall or spring term each academic year (August-May).

The Transfer Process To prepare for worry-free transfer of credits, know what you want. Narrow your choices as soon as possible, ideally in the first semester of your freshman year. The following information also should guide you: • Obtain and study catalogs from the institutions you are considering. Become familiar with their entrance, graduation, and major requirements. • Create an educational plan with an SCC counselor, using schedule guides and transfer information from your transfer institution. Schedule guides are available through the Student Development Office and on pages 5:8-17 of this catalog. • Assume responsibility for your successful transfer to another institution by establishing contact with your transfer institution to confirm transferability of each course.

Need Help With Transferring? Agreements with four-year colleges and universities and accreditation by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools help assure that credits earned toward a degree at St. Charles Community College will transfer to a four-year institution. However, it is important that you obtain a catalog of your transfer institution, decide on a major field of study, and follow a transfer guide that outlines courses appropriate to that curriculum. Academic counselors can assist you. Check with the Student Development Office for information on transfer agreements with Missouri four-year institutions. If you experience problems with transferring courses to other colleges/universities, contact the transfer and articulation officer for assistance with an appeal to the receiving institution.

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

If you experience problems with transferring courses to other colleges/universities, contact the transfer and articulation officer (1204 ADM) for assistance with an appeal to the receiving institution. If your issue is not resolved by SCC, you may contact the Committee on Transfer and Articulation. COTA will review the case and make non-binding recommendation to all institutions involved. This recommendation will be reported to the Coordinating Board for Higher Education. For more information on this process, please see Missouri Department of Higher Education document, “Transfer Students, Your Rights & Responsibilities” at www.dhe.mo.gov/files/transferstudents_rr_p3.pdf.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

High School Students Welcome Dual Enrollment High school juniors or seniors who want the challenge of college-level academic studies may consider the Dual Enrollment Program. Consult with your parents/guardian and your high school counselor to expand your educational background by taking college-level courses. See page 2:6 for a list of requirements and application procedures. Under age 16? Students 16 and under may enroll in college credit classes if they are part of a gifted or accelerated program at their school and have the written permission of their high school principal, their parents, and the director of student development at SCC. For more information about application procedures, see page 2:6.

Graduation Requirements (See chart on next page.)

General Education Requirements General education studies at St. Charles Community College guide students into a deeper understanding of themselves and of their responsibilities as citizens, and they provide the knowledge and skills on which to build a richer appreciation of their world. • NOTE: The courses in the chart on page 5:6 detail the general education requirements for SCC and the state of Missouri. This sequence of courses is for students who wish to transfer to a four-year institution. To obtain the Associate of Arts degree from SCC, students must also meet the institutional requirements (see page 5:6 below the chart).

5-5


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Associate of Arts Degree – General Education Requirements COMMUNICATION

SOCIAL SCIENCE

HUMANITIES

MULTICULTURAL /VALUING

MATHEMATICS

NATURAL SCIENCE

CAPSTONE

To develop students’ effective use of the English language and quantitative and other symbolic systems essential to their success in school and in the world. Students should be able to read and listen critically and to write and speak with thoughtfulness, clarity, coherence, and persuasiveness.

To develop students’ understanding of themselves and the world around them through study of content and the processes used by historians and social and behavioral scientists to discover, describe, explain, and predict human behavior and social systems. Students must understand the diversities and complexities of the cultural and social world, past and present, and come to an informed sense of self and others. Students must fulfill the state statute requirements for the U.S. and Missouri constitutions.

To develop students’ understanding of the ways in which humans have addressed their condition through imaginative work in the humanities and arts; to deepen their understanding of how that imaginative process is informed and limited by social, cultural, linguistic, and historical circumstances; and to appreciate the world of the creative imagination as a form of knowledge.

To develop students’ abilities to understand the moral and ethical values of a diverse society and to understand that many courses of action are guided by value judgements about the way things ought to be. Students should be able to make informed decisions through identifying personal values and the values of others and through understanding how such values develop. They should be able to analyze the ethical implications of choices made on the basis of these values.

To develop students’ understanding of fundamental mathematical concepts and their applications. Students should develop a level of quantitative literacy that would enable them to make decisions and solve problems and which could serve as a basis for continued learning.

To develop students’ understanding of the principles and laboratory procedures of life and physical sciences and to cultivate their abilities to apply the empirical methods of scientific inquiry. Students should understand how scientific discovery changes theoretical views of the world, informs our imaginations, and shapes human history. Students should understand that science is shaped by historical and social contexts.

To assess students’ acquisition of knowledge and skills.

9 Credit Hours ENG 101 ENG 102 SPE 101

9 Credit Hours 1 Course From Group I: ART 101, 150, 151, 160, 170

9 Credit Hours

MUS 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 229, 230, 231, 232, 234

1 Course From Group I:

THE 122, 123, 124, 229, 230

HIS 101, 102, 115, 270 POL 101, 102 1 Course From Group II:

1 Course From Group II: Any LIT

ANT ECO 100, 110, 120 Any GEO PSY 101 SOC 101, 102 CRJ 140, 175 1 Additional Course From Group I or II or: Any HIS Any POL

Any PHL Any Foreign Language Course BUS/CPT 105 1 Additional Course From Group I or II

3 Credit Hours ANT 102, 103, 151, 161, 171, 201, 202, 220, 224 BUS 255, 105, or CPT 105 ESL 101, 102 GEO 100, 101, 102 HIS 145, 146, 160, 201, 240 MUS 111 POL 201, 210, 220, 255 SOC 241 Any Foreign Language Course LIT 200, 207, 241, 271, 272, 273, 275 PHL 201 Any GLC, GLS SPE 215

3-4 Credit Hours MAT 160 (4) or 165 (3) or higher NOTE: A student who completes a three hour math course to meet the mathematics requirement will need to take an additional general education credit hour, e.g. an additional science lab or an hour GLC course to meet the 42 credit hour general education requirement. Speak with your academic counselor.

1 Credit Hour COL 299

7 Credit Hours 1 Course From Group I: BIO 100, 101, 105/106, 110/113, 120, 121, 122, 125 1 Course From Group II: CHM 101/103, 110/113 PHY 105/107, 111/113, 125/127, 130/131, 150/153, 225/227, 240/243 At least one lab must be taken with a corresponding lecture course.

Higher Order Thinking – to develop students’ ability to distinguish among opinions, facts, and inferences; to identify underlying or implicit assumptions; to make informed judgments; and to solve problems by applying evaluative standards. (These skills are addressed by the General Education courses across the curriculum.) Managing Information – to develop students’ abilities to locate, organize, store, retrieve, evaluate, synthesize, and annotate information from print, electronic, and other sources in preparation for solving problems and making informed decisions. (These skills are addressed by the General Education courses across the curriculum.) NOTE: The same course cannot be used to satisfy more than one general education area.

SCC Institutional Requirements For Graduation • Complete a minimum of 64 credit hours, including 42 credit hours of general education courses adhering to the minimums in the chart above. 5-6

• Complete 22 credit hours of elective courses as advised by an academic counselor, including one of the following: BAS 103, CPT 103, 115, EDU 220, or test for competency. • Complete a minimum of 15 credit hours at SCC. • Earn a 2.00 cumulative grade point average. • NOTE: Travel courses do not fulfill general education courses.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Transfer Program Guidelines Transfer Student General Education Block The Missouri Department of Higher Education has established guidelines for transfer policies. For a complete listing of these policies, and the list of colleges and universities that accept the 42-hour general education block of credit, review the DHE website, www.dhe.mo.gov/gectinstitutions.shtml. SCC’s 42-semester-hour general education block of credit (see chart on page 5:6) complies with the statewide general education policy. Students who complete this 42-hour block of credit will meet the requirement for the general education credit at most public and signatory institutions in the state of Missouri. Courses taken in addition to general education requirements need to be carefully chosen to ensure that each course applies to the baccalaureate graduation requirements for the program of study at the college to which you intend to transfer. It is your responsibility to become familiar with the specific major and graduation requirements of the institution to which you intend to transfer.

Schedule Guides Since so many freshmen are unsure of their major and transfer institution, SCC provides schedule guides as a tool to help in planning a general pattern of coursework. These guides show the types of courses commonly needed for majors at the institutions to which many SCC students transfer. Most students need some assistance with the career exploration and college selection process. You are encouraged to start working with the Student Development Office staff during your first semester at SCC to help you with these important decisions. Once you know your major and transfer institution you will be better able to choose valuable electives.

If you wish to earn an Associate of Arts degree, you need to complete the Associate of Arts Degree Graduation Requirements found in the specific SCC catalog from which you plan to graduate. Check www.stchas.edu, for additional comments regarding specific majors, as well as any changes that may have occurred since the publication of the catalog.

Choose a Pathway

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

The following academic areas of study are included in the college transfer program: Art & Graphic Design (A.A.) Biology (A.A.) Business (A.A.) Chemistry (A.A.) Communication (A.A.) Computer Science (A.A.) Criminal Justice (A.A.) Economics Education (A.A.T.) Education (Elementary & Secondary) (A.A.) English (A.A.) Foreign Language (A.A.) Geography (A.A.) Health Information Technology (A.S.) History (A.A.) Liberal Arts/Undecided (A.A.) Mathematics (A.A.) Music (A.A.) Nursing (A.S.) Political Science (A.A.) Pre-Engineering (A.S.) Pre-Health Professions (A.A.) Psychology (A.A.) Social Work (A.A.) Sociology (A.A.) Theater (A.A.) With proper planning, the A.A. and A.S. degrees will prepare you for general transfer to most other colleges or universities.

ABOUT SCHEDULE GUIDES The following two-year guides are suggestions to help students in developing their own educational plans. Individual courses may in most cases be taken in different semesters. The whole program may be stretched out over more than four semesters. If you test into developmental courses, you must complete those courses before enrolling in ENG 101 or MAT 160. To ensure that your individual courses are appropriate, contact the institution to which you are planning to transfer. Underlined courses on the schedule guides are recommended to be taken for elective credits. COL 101 is required for all first-time freshmen taking 9 or more credit hours during their first semester, or 5 or more hours in the summer. Elective courses should always be chosen based on your major and the transfer institution.

5-7


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Associate of Arts Schedule Guides Art & Graphic Design

ABOUT SCHEDULE GUIDES The following two-year guides are suggestions to help students in developing their own educational plans. Individual courses may in most cases be taken in different semesters. The whole program may be stretched out over more than four semesters. If you test into developmental courses, you must complete those courses before enrolling in ENG 101 or MAT 160. To ensure that your individual courses are appropriate, contact the institution to which you are planning to transfer. Underlined courses on the schedule guides are recommended to be taken for elective credits. Elective courses should always be chosen based on your major and the transfer institution. COL 101 is required for all first-time freshmen taking 9 or more credit hours during their first semester, or 5 or more hours in the summer.

BUSINESS COURSES Business requirements vary widely at different institutions. Be sure to check transferability to your specific transfer school before choosing business electives. Common electives include: BUS 101 Introduction to Business BUS 201 Principles of Management BUS 230 Principles of Marketing BUS 246 Legal Environment of Business MAT 210 Survey Calculus

5-8

FIRST SEMESTER ART 110 . . . . . . . . . .Drawing I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 150 . . . . . . . . . .Art History I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160/165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-17

SECOND SEMESTER ART 120 . . . . . . . . . .Drawing II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 160 . . . . . . . . . .Art History II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 170 . . . . . . . . . .Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 Nature Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 17-18

THIRD SEMESTER ART 180 . . . . . . . . . .Design II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group II) . . . . . . . .3-4 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science With Lab . . . . . . . .4 15-16

FOURTH SEMESTER ART 210 . . . . . . . . . .Figure Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101. . . . . . . . . . Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16

Biology FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 . . . . . . . . .College Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 BIO 101 . . . . . . . . . .General Biology I (includes lab) . .4 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 15 THIRD SEMESTER CHM 110/113 . . . . .General Chemistry I and Lab . . . . .5 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 BIO 125 . . . . . . . . . .General Botany (includes lab) . . .4 Humanities/Foreign Lang. . . . . .3-4 15-16

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Comp. II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 BIO 102 . . . . . . . . . .General Biology II (includes lab) . .4 Transferable advanced mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Multicultural/Valuing/ Foreign Language . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 16-18 FOURTH SEMESTER Humanities/Foreign Lang. . . . . .3-4 CHM 111/114 . . . . .General Chemistry II and Lab . . . .5 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 18-19

Business Administration (Accounting, Computer Info. Systems, Finance, Management, Marketing) FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 . . . . . . . . .College Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 17-18 THIRD SEMESTER ECO 120 . . . . . . . . . .Principles of Microeconomics . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 ACT 110 Financial Accounting I . . . . . . . . . .4 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 103 . . . . . . . . . .Microsoft Applications -orCPT 115 . . . . . . . . . .Intro to Data Processing . . . . . . . . .3 16-17

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 175 . . . . . . . . .Introductory Statistics . . . . . . . . . .3 ECO 110. . . . . . . . . . Principles of Macroeconomics . . . .3 Lab Science course . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Humanities (Group II) . . . . . . . . . .3 16 FOURTH SEMESTER Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (PHL 160 rec.) . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 ACT 130 . . . . . . . . . .Managerial Accounting . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science – Group II . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Associate of Arts Schedule Guides Chemistry FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 180 . . . . . . . . .Calc. and Analytic Geom. I . . . . . . .5 CHM 110/113 . . . . .General Chemistry I and Lab . . . . .5 Humanities (Group II) . . . . . . . .3-4 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 17-18

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 CHM 111/114 . . . . .General Chem. II and Lab . . . . . . .5 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Natural Science (Biology) . . . . .3-4 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 17-19

THIRD SEMESTER

FOURTH SEMESTER SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 CHM 241/243 Organic Chemistry II/Organic Chemistry I Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 15

Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 CHM 240 . . . . . . . . .Organic Chemistry I . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 Multicultural/Valuing/For. Lang. .3-4 CHM 122 . . . . . . . . .Quantitative Analysis . . . . . . . . . . .3 15-16

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Communication FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group II) . . . . . . . .3-4 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-18

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science and Lab . . . . . . . . .4 COM 102 . . . . . . . . .Intro. to Mass Communication . . .3 SPE 102 . . . . . . . . . .Public Speaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 16-17 FOURTH SEMESTER

THIRD SEMESTER SPE 110 . . . . . . . . . .Interpersonal Communication . . . .3 Courses in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 Multicultural/Valuing/ Foreign Language . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 15-16

Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-17

Computer Science FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 115 . . . . . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . . . . .3 MAT 180 . . . . . . . . .Calc. and Analytic Geom. I . . . . . . .5 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 15 THIRD SEMESTER Lab Science course . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 240 . . . . . . . . .Calc. and Analytic Geom. III . . . . . .5 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 18

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 230 . . . . . . . . .Calc. and Analytic Geom. II . . . . . .5 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group II) . . . . . . . . . .3 17 FOURTH SEMESTER MAT 242 . . . . . . . . .Intro. to Linear Algebra . . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science course . . . . . . . .3-4 Humanities course . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-17

TWO PATHWAYS FOR BUSINESS, COMPUTER SCIENCE, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE Choose from two career/professional paths. 1) One path leads to the Associate of Arts degree that can be transferred toward an advanced degree at a four-year institution. 2) The other path leads to an Associate of Applied Science degree to prepare you for immediate entry into a career – but not all courses are meant for transfer. See the career-technical programs in business on pages 5:26-32, computer science options outlined on pages 5:36-42, and criminal justice career program options on page 5:43.

5-9


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Associate of Arts Schedule Guides Criminal Justice

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 140 . . . . . . . . . .Intro. to Criminal Justice . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-17 THIRD SEMESTER Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Humanities courses (Group II) . . .6 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 202 . . . . . . . . . .Correctional Institutions . . . . . . . .3 15-16

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 205 . . . . . . . . . .Juvenile Justice System . . . . . . . . . .3 15 FOURTH SEMESTER Natural Science Lab (Group II) .3-4 Social Science (Group I or II) . . . .3 CRJ 201 . . . . . . . . . .Conflicting Perspectives . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 265 . . . . . . . . . .Internship or transferable elec. . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-17

Economics FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 . . . . . . . . .College Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science – ECO 110 . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 17

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 180 or MAT 210 or Foreign Language 101 or other course(s) in major for transfer institution . . .4-5 Humanities (Group II) . . . . . . . .3-4 Social Science – ECO 120 . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 16-17

THIRD SEMESTER MAT 230 or Foreign Language 102 or other course(s) in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . .4-5 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science (Group I) . . . . .3-4 ECO 220 . . . . . . . . . .Money and Banking . . . . . . . . . . . .3 13-15

FOURTH SEMESTER MAT 240 or Foreign Language 201 or other course(s) in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . .4-5 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science (Group II) . . . . .3-4 Computer Science Requirement . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 14-16

English FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities/Foreign Lang. . . . . .3-4 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 16-18

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 LIT 250 . . . . . . . . . .Sur. of English Lit. Before 1800 . . .3 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities/Foreign Language . .3-4 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 15-16 FOURTH SEMESTER

THIRD SEMESTER Natural Science and Lab . . . . . . . . .4 Multicultural/Valuing/ Foreign Language . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 LIT 210 . . . . . . . . . .Am. Lit. From 1620-1865 . . . . . . . .3 LIT 260 . . . . . . . . . .Survey of English Lit. After 1800 . .3 16-17 5-10

Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 LIT 220 . . . . . . . . . .Am. Lit. From 1865-Present . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Associate of Arts Schedule Guides Foreign Language (French, German, Spanish) FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Foreign Language 101 . . . . . . . . . .4 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 14-15

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 Foreign Language 102 . . . . . . . . . .4 Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 16-17

THIRD SEMESTER

FOURTH SEMESTER

Natural Science and Lab . . . . . . . . .4 Foreign Language 201 . . . . . . . . . .4 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 17

Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 Courses in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 Computer Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Foreign Language 202 . . . . . . . . . .4 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 17

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Geography FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 GEO 100 . . . . . . . . .Principles of Geography . . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 16-18 THIRD SEMESTER GEO 101 . . . . . . . . .Geo: The Eastern World . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science and Lab . . . . . . . . .4 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 16

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .4 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 15-16 FOURTH SEMESTER Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 GEO 102 . . . . . . . . .Geo.:The Western World . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16

ABOUT SCHEDULE GUIDES The following two-year guides are suggestions to help students in developing their own educational plans. Individual courses may in most cases be taken in different semesters. The whole program may be stretched out over more than four semesters. If you test into developmental courses, you must complete those courses before enrolling in ENG 101 or MAT 160. To ensure that your individual courses are appropriate, contact the institution to which you are planning to transfer. Underlined courses on the schedule guides are recommended to be taken for elective credits. Elective courses should always be chosen based on your major and the transfer institution. COL 101 is required for all first-time freshmen taking 9 or more credit hours during their first semester, or 5 or more hours in the summer.

5-11


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Associate of Arts Schedule Guides History

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 HIS 101 . . . . . . . . . .U.S. History to 1877 . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 16-18

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 HIS 102 . . . . . . . . . .U.S. History Since 1877 . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities/Foreign Lang. . . . . .3-4 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 15-16 FOURTH SEMESTER

THIRD SEMESTER Natural Science and Lab . . . . . . . . .4 HIS 145 . . . . . . . . . .West. Civ. Anc./Med. Heritage . . . . .3 Elective/Foreign Language . . . . .3-4 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 16-17

Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 HIS 146 . . . . . . . . . .West. Civ. Modern Europe . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16

Liberal Arts/Undecided

ABOUT SCHEDULE GUIDES The following two-year guides are suggestions to help students in developing their own educational plans. Individual courses may in most cases be taken in different semesters. The whole program may be stretched out over more than four semesters. If you test into developmental courses, you must complete those courses before enrolling in ENG 101 or MAT 160. To ensure that your individual courses are appropriate, contact the institution to which you are planning to transfer. Underlined courses on the schedule guides are recommended to be taken for elective credits. Elective courses should always be chosen based on your major and the transfer institution. COL 101 is required for all first-time freshmen taking 9 or more credit hours during their first semester, or 5 or more hours in the summer.

5-12

FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 Elective course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 COL 110 . . . . . . . . . .Career Development* . . . . . . . . . . .1 17-18 THIRD SEMESTER Elective courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Humanities/Foreign Lang. . . . . .3-4 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 *For undecided major. 15-16

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science and Lab . . . . . . . . .4 Elective course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Multicultural/Valuing/For. Lang. 3-4 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 16-17 FOURTH SEMESTER Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities/For. Language . . . . .3-4 Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Elective course(s) . . . . . . . . . . . .3-6 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 13-17

Mathematics FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 Humanities/Foreign Lang. . . . . .3-4 MAT 180 . . . . . . . . .Calc. and Analytic Geom. I . . . . . . .5 15-16 THIRD SEMESTER Multicultural/Valuing/ Foreign Language . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Lab Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 MAT 242 . . . . . . . . .Introductory Linear Alg. or Elec. . . .3 MAT 240 . . . . . . . . .Calc. and Analytic Geom. III . . . . . .5 14-16

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities/Foreign Lang. . . . . .3-4 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 MAT 230 . . . . . . . . .Calc. and Analytic Geom. II . . . . . .5 17-18 FOURTH SEMESTER Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 250 . . . . . . . . .Differential Equations . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-17


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Associate of Arts Schedule Guides Music (Voice, Piano, or Instrumental) FIRST SEMESTER COL 101 . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MUS 021 . . . . . . . . .Recital/Concert Attendance . . . . . .0 Social Science Group II . . . . . . . . .3 MUS 119 . . . . . . . . .Piano Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Applied Music I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 MUS 131 . . . . . . . . .Music Theory I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 MUS 133 . . . . . . . . .Eartraining & Sight Singing I . . . .1 Large Ensemble I . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 18 THIRD SEMESTER Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 MUS 021 . . . . . . . . .Recital/Concert Attendance . . . . . .0 MUS 219 . . . . . . . . .Piano Proficiency III . . . . . . . . . . . .1 MUS 231 . . . . . . . . .Music History I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 MUS 281 . . . . . . . . .Music Theory III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 MUS 283 . . . . . . . . .Eartraining & Sight Singing III . . .1 Large Ensemble III . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Applied Music III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 20

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group II) . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or higher level math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 MUS 120 . . . . . . . . .Piano Proficiency II . . . . . . . . . . . .1 MUS 132 . . . . . . . . .Music Theory II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 MUS 021 . . . . . . . . .Recital/Concert Attendance . . . . . .0 MUS 134 . . . . . . . . .Eartraining & Sight Singing II . . . .1 Large Ensemble II . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Applied Music II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 20 FOURTH SEMESTER Natural Science with Lab . . . . . . . .4 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 MUS 021 . . . . . . . . .Recital/Concert Attendance . . . . . .0 MUS 220 . . . . . . . . .Piano Proficiency IV . . . . . . . . . . . .1 MUS 232 . . . . . . . . .Music History II (Hum. Group I) . .3 MUS 282 . . . . . . . . .Music Theory IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 MUS 284 . . . . . . . . .Eartraining & Sight Singing IV . . .1 Large Ensemble IV . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Applied Music IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 19

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Political Science FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 POL 101 . . . . . . . . . .American Government . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities/Foreign Language . . . .4 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 14-15 THIRD SEMESTER Natural Science and Lab . . . . . . . . .4 Multicultural/Valuing/For. Lang. 3-4 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 POL 210 . . . . . . . . . .Comparative Politics . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Courses in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 16-17

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 POL 201 . . . . . . . . . .International Relations . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities/Foreign Lang. . . . . .3-4 Courses in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 18-19 FOURTH SEMESTER Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16

Pre-Health Professions FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 180 . . . . . . . . .Calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 BIO 101/103 . . . . . .Gen. Biology I and Lab . . . . . . . . . .4 CHM 110/113 . . . . .Gen. Chemistry I and Lab . . . . . . . .5 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 18 THIRD SEMESTER CHM 240/243 . . . . .Organic Chemistry I -orPHY 150/153 . . . . . .Gen. Physics I and Lab . . . . . . . .4-5 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group II) . . . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science requirement . . .3 16-17

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 BIO 102/104 . . . . . .Gen. Biology II and Lab . . . . . . . . .4 CHM 111/114 . . . . .Gen. Chemistry II and Lab . . . . . . .5 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 15 FOURTH SEMESTER CHM 241/244 . . . . .Organic Chem. II /Lab -orPHY 151/154 . . . . . .Gen. Physics I and Lab . . . . . . . .4-5 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 17-19 5-13


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Associate of Arts Schedule Guides Psychology/Sociology

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 PSY 101 . . . . . . . . . .Intro. to Psychology - or SOC 101 . . . . . . . . . .Intro. to Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-17 THIRD SEMESTER SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities/Foreign Language . . .3-4 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Courses in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 15-16

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities/Foreign Language . .3-4 Courses in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Natural Science and Lab . . . . . . . . .4 16-17 FOURTH SEMESTER Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Multicultural/Valuing/For. Lang. 3-4 Courses in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-17

Social Work FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 PSY 101 . . . . . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . . . . .3 SOC 101 . . . . . . . . . .Introduction to Sociology . . . . . . . .3 POL 101 . . . . . . . . . .American Government . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-17 THIRD SEMESTER BIO 110, 120, 122, or 240 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Humanities/Foreign Lang. . . . . .3-4 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 15-17

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities/Foreign Language . .3-4 ECO 100 Survey Economics -orECO 110 Prin. of Macroeconomics . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 15-16 FOURTH SEMESTER Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Humanities (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . .3 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Multicultural/Valuing/For. Lang. 3-4 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-18

Theater FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 THE 122 . . . . . . . . . .Introduction to Theater . . . . . . . . .3 THE 128 . . . . . . . . . .Fundamentals of Acting . . . . . . . . .3 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-17

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science and Lab . . . . . . . . .4 SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 THE 228 . . . . . . . . . .Acting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities (Group II) . . . . . . . .3-4 16-17

THIRD SEMESTER

Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Course in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299. . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 16-17

Social Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . .3 Courses in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Social Science (Group II) . . . . . . . .3 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 15-16

5-14

FOURTH SEMESTER


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree – General Education Requirements COMMUNICATION

SOCIAL SCIENCE

HUMANITIES

MULTICULTURAL /VALUING

MATHEMATICS

NATURAL SCIENCE

CAPSTONE

To develop students’ effective use of the English language and quantitative and other symbolic systems essential to their success in school and in the world. Students should be able to read and listen critically and to write and speak with thoughtfulness, clarity, coherence, and persuasiveness.

To develop students’ understanding of themselves and the world around them through study of content and the processes used by historians and social and behavioral scientists to discover, describe, explain, and predict human behavior and social systems. Students must understand the diversities and complexities of the cultural and social world, past and present, and come to an informed sense of self and others. Students must fulfill the state statute requirements for the U.S. and Missouri constitutions.

To develop students’ understanding of the ways in which humans have addressed their condition through imaginative work in the humanities and arts; to deepen their understanding of how that imaginative process is informed and limited by social, cultural, linguistic, and historical circumstances; and to appreciate the world of the creative imagination as a form of knowledge.

To develop students’ abilities to understand the moral and ethical values of a diverse society and to understand that many courses of action are guided by value judgements about the way things ought to be. Students should be able to make informed decisions through identifying personal values and the values of others and through understanding how such values develop. They should be able to analyze the ethical implications of choices made on the basis of these values.

To develop students’ understanding of fundamental mathematical concepts and their applications. Students should develop a level of quantitative literacy that would enable them to make decisions and solve problems and which could serve as a basis for continued learning.

To develop students’ understanding of the principles and laboratory procedures of life and physical sciences and to cultivate their abilities to apply the empirical methods of scientific inquiry. Students should understand how scientific discovery changes theoretical views of the world, informs our imaginations, and shapes human history. Students should understand that science is shaped by historical and social contexts.

To assess students’ acquisition of knowledge and skills.

EDU 242, 246

3 Credit Hours

MUS 109, 111, 112, 113, 114, 229, 230, 231, 232

ANT 102 GEO 100, 101, 102

NOTE: A student who completes a three hour math course to meet the mathematics requirement will need to take an additional general education credit hour, e.g. an additional science lab or an hour GLC course to meet the 42 credit hour general education requirement.

9 Credit Hours ENG 101 ENG 102 SPE 101

9 Credit Hours POL 101 PSY 101 1 Course From Group I: HIS 101, 102, 115

9 Credit Hours 1 Course From Group I:

3-4 Credit Hours Elementary MAT 160, 201, 202 Secondary MAT 160 or 165 or higher

ART 101, 150, 160, 170

THE 122, 123, 124, 229, 230 1 Course From Group II: EDU 125, 225 Any LIT Any PHL Any Foreign Language Course 1 Additional Course From Group I or II

Speak with your academic counselor.

1 Credit Hour EDU 290 Pass all areas of C-BASE Test.

7 Credit Hours 1 Course From Group I: BIO 101/103, 110/113, 125 (101/103 suggested) 1 Course From Group II: CHM 101/103, 110/113 PHY 111/113, 125/127, 130/131, 150/153, 225/227, 240/243 Elementary Include two labs with corresponding lecture. Secondary Include at least one lab with corresponding lecture.

Higher Order Thinking – to develop students’ ability to distinguish among opinions, facts, and inferences; to identify underlying or implicit assumptions; to make informed judgments; and to solve problems by applying evaluative standards. (These skills are addressed by the General Education courses across the curriculum.) Managing Information – to develop students’ abilities to locate, organize, store, retrieve, evaluate, synthesize, and annotate information from print, electronic, and other sources in preparation for solving problems and making informed decisions. (These skills are addressed by the General Education courses across the curriculum.) NOTE: The same course cannot be used to satisfy more than one general education area.

5-15


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Associate of Arts in Teaching Schedule Guides Secondary Education

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 PSY 101 . . . . . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . . . . .3 MAT 160 or 165 or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 U.S. History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science (Group I) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 16-18

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . .3 Teaching Field Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 EDU 210 . . . . . . . . .Intro to Classroom Teaching . . . . .3 EDU 240 . . . . . . . . .Education Psychology . . . . . . . . . . .3 15

THIRD SEMESTER EDU 220 . . . . . . . . .Educational Technology . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities Courses . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Teaching Field Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 EDU 211 . . . . . . . . .Foundations of Education . . . . . . .3 COL 299 Sophomore Portfolio Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . .1 (Take CBASE and ACT exams by end 16 of this semester)

FOURTH SEMESTER Humanities Course . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 POL 101 . . . . . . . . . .American Government . . . . . . . . . .3 Natural Science (Group II) . . . . .3-4 EDU 290 . . . . . . . . .Portfolio Assessment in Education .1 ENG 240 . . . . . . . . .Teaching, Learning, & Assessment .3 Teaching Field Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 16-17

Elementary Education ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN TEACHING In fall 2007, community colleges throughout Missouri began offering the AAT degree for education majors. The degree consists of 42 credit hours of general education, 13 credit hours of required professional education, and 7 credit hours of electives/institutional requirements, for a total of 62 credit hours. All Missouri public universities and more than 13 private four-year institutions have agreed to accept the AAT degree in transfer. Students enrolled in EDU 210 and/or EDU 211 must submit to a background check. People who have been convicted of a felony are not allowed to observe in K-12 schools and will not be allowed to remain enrolled in EDU 210 or EDU 211. If you have questions about the AAT degree or the SCC education program, visit www.stchas.edu/divisions/ bss/education/index.shtml.

5-16

FIRST SEMESTER ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 101 . . . . . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . . . . .3 Biology and Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 MAT 160 . . . . . . . . .College Algebra, Contemporary College Math . . . .3-4 POL 101 . . . . . . . . . .American Government . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 17-18 THIRD SEMESTER Education Elective – MAT 201 or 202 recommended . . .3 EDU 220 . . . . . . . . .Educational Technology . . . . . . . .3 Multicultural/Valuing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 EDU 240 . . . . . . . . .Teaching, Learning, & Assessment .3 Humanities Course (Group II) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 COL 299 . . . . . . . . . .Sophomore Portfolio Assessment . .1 16 (Take CBASE and ACT exams by end of this semester)

SECOND SEMESTER ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . . . . . .3 EDU 211 . . . . . . . . .Foundations of Education . . . . . . .3 ART 101/MUS 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 HIS 101, 102, or 115 . .U.S. History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Teaching Field Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 15 FOURTH SEMESTER SPE 101 . . . . . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Course(s) in major for transfer institution . . . . . . . . . . .6 Physical Science or Chemistry and Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 EDU 290 . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Assessment in Education .1 17

Associate of Arts in Teaching Schedule Guides Additional Requirements To Earn the AAT Degree • EDU 210, 211, 220, and 240 are required to earn an AAT degree. • Students must complete a mid-preparation portfolio. To complete this requirement, take EDU 290. • A “C” or better is required in any EDU course. • Students must achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better. (Some four-year institutions may require higher.)

• Students must achieve a minimum score of 235 on each section of the C-BASE. (Some four-year institutions may require higher.) • Students enrolled in EDU 210 or EDU 211 will be required on first day of class to give permission for SCC to request a background check. Students who have been convicted of a felony will not be allowed to observe/ participate in P-12 schools and must appeal to the Missouri State Board of Education before completing a Teacher Education Program.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Associate of Science Schedule Guides Pre-Engineering FIRST SEMESTER MAT 180 . . . . . . . . .Calc. and Analytic Geom. I . . . . . . .5 CHM 110/113 . . . . .General Chemistry I and Lab . . . . .5 ENG 101 . . . . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. History or Am. Govt. . . . . . . . .3 COL 101 . . . . . . . . . .Orientation to College . . . . . . . . . . .1 17 THIRD SEMESTER MAT 240 . . . . . . . . .Calc. and Analytic Geom. III . . . . . .5 PHY 240/243 . . . . . .College Physics I and Lab . . . . . . . .5 EGR 170 . . . . . . . . .Eng. Mechanics-Statics . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities/Social Science . . . . . . .3 16

SECOND SEMESTER MAT 230 . . . . . . . . .Calc. II and Analytic Geom. . . . . . .5 CPT 182/186/280/284 .CPT course per transfer instit. . . . .3 ENG 102 . . . . . . . . .English Composition II or CHM 111/114 . . . . .Gen. Chemistry II and Lab . . . . .3-5 EGR 100 . . . . . . . . .Intro. to Engineering . . . . . . . . . . .1 EGR 104 . . . . . . . . .Engineering Design . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 15-17 FOURTH SEMESTER MAT 250 . . . . . . . . .Differential Equations . . . . . . . . . .3 PHY 241/244 . . . . . .College Physics II and Lab . . . . . . .5 ECO 110 or 120 . . . .Micro or Macroeconomics . . . . . . .3 EGR 210 . . . . . . . . .Eng. Mechanics/Dynamics or EGR 220 . . . . . . . . .Electrical Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 EGR 221 . . . . . . . . .Electrical Circuits Lab 1 (Optional) . . .1 14-15

Health Information

Nursing

Associate of Science

Associate of Science

This program prepares graduates for the national accreditation examination in Health Information Technology (HIT). Graduates of this program may wish to continue their education at a four-year institution. While the Associate of Science degree is transfer-oriented, it also prepares students for entry-level jobs. See the career program outline on page 5:21 for more information on earning your degree in Health Information Technology at SCC.

This program prepares graduates for eligibility to apply to take the national licensure exam for registered nurses (RN). Graduates of this program may also be eligible to continue their education at a four-year institution. SCC has developed transfer agreements with nursing programs at senior institutions. For complete course requirements on the associate’s degree nursing program, see the career program outline on page 5:20.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

5-17


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Career-Technical Programs The Training Edge

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

One of the major reasons people attend St. Charles Community College is to prepare for a career. Many of our students are pursuing training for careers that require fewer than four years of education. They know that at SCC they get the right training that can lead to immediate employment, a good salary, and professional satisfaction. You will learn the skills you’ll need to enter the job market for the first time, to make a career change, to advance more quickly with your current employer, or to keep pace with technological change. At SCC, our programs are in step not only with today’s job requirements but with the developments that will affect our students in years to come. Instructors are in touch with the realities of the working world. Our equipment, facilities, and courses for each program are reviewed and adjusted every year with the assistance and savvy of people from the local business and industrial market.

Your Career/Profession Career-technical programs concentrate on the practical skills and knowledge that you will need on the job. They are not designed for transfer to a fouryear institution. Students considering both a careertechnical program and the option of transferring should see an SCC counselor and review the College Transfer section of this catalog, pages 5:4-17. It is not uncommon, for instance, for students in business, nursing, health information technology, computer science, child care, criminal justice, and human services programs to continue their studies at another institution to work on a bachelor’s degree after graduating from SCC. With careful planning and the assistance of an SCC counselor, you can negotiate a successful transfer with few problems.

The Associate of Applied Science degree is awarded to students completing the requirements of one of the careertechnical programs. Although this is not intended to be a transfer degree, some courses do transfer to four-year institutions.

Associate of Science Degree The Associate of Science degree is awarded to students completing the requirements of specifically identified programs (Nursing, Health Information Technology, and Pre-Engineering) with a minimum of 64 semester hours. The work parallels the work done in the first two years of a Bachelor of Science degree at fouryear institutions.

Certificate of Achievement The Certificate of Achievement is awarded to students completing the requirements of one of the career-technical programs with a minimum of 30 semester hours. Certificate programs prepare you for entry-level employment. Career certificates are awarded upon completion of a prescribed sequence of courses for each program. Normally, two semesters are necessary to complete the requirements for a one-year certificate.

Certificate of Specialization

Two associate’s degrees and a certificate are available in the SCC career-technical program. They are:

The Certificate of Specialization is for people who desire information or skills in a specific area that is usually related to their current job. Students must complete specific program requirements as listed under each program in the catalog. They can usually be completed in a short period of time. The credit hours earned can be applied toward a Certificate of Achievement and/or an Associate of Applied Science degree in the related field, should the student wish to continue study.

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Associate of Science (A.S.) Certificate of Achievement Certificate of Specialization

A Certificate of Specialization contains a minimum of 15 and a maximum of 29 credit hours, with the actual number to be determined by the program area.

Degrees and Certificates

5-18

Associate Of Applied Science Degree


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

We Are User Friendly

Advisory Committees

In general, four-semester (two-year) programs leading to an Associate of Applied Science degree are designed for persons with little or no training or experience or for those who are changing careers. Shorter programs – one or two semesters in length that culminate in certificates – are better suited to the employed professional who seeks to upgrade or enhance current job skills for career advancement. The number of semester hours required in a program of study determines whether a student receives the degree or one of the certificates.

Each career-technical program of St. Charles Community College has an advisory committee comprising a cross section of representatives from business, industry, government, and education. Advisory committees give valuable advice not easily obtained elsewhere and lend assistance for program improvement, advising the college on current job needs, the relevance of programs being offered in meeting those job needs, and applications for vocational funding.

The program you ultimately select will, of course, depend on your present skills, personal obligations, and career goals. Course work completed in most of the short-term certificate programs as well as classes taken one at a time may be applied to the two-year degree in the same sequence should you wish to continue study.

Graduation Requirements

Job Preparation Employers know that SCC is a good labor pool resource in the area and that our graduates will come well-prepared for entry-level employment. The Career Services Center helps students prepare to work for area employers.

Updating Skills People who need to update their skills to meet technological changes in their jobs will find that courses at SCC are well suited. Persons who have lost their jobs can return to SCC to learn new job skills and return to the job market ... quickly, inexpensively, and close to home. At SCC, we know that not everyone taking career courses needs or wants a degree or certificate. Many people take courses on an as-needed basis to update their present skills and learn new ones to make a career change. Others attend SCC under a companysponsored tuition reimbursement plan for courses that will not only help them but also help their employers.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Students must apply for a degree one semester before the completion of that degree. The college does not automatically award degrees. For more information, contact the Registrar's Office. To graduate with the Associate of Applied Science degree, you must complete program requirements as outlined including 24 hours in general education courses. See the chart on page 5:20 for specific requirements for the Associate of Applied Science degree and the Certificate of Achievement. Unless a course is specifically listed in the general education requirements for your degree, it will not be counted towards these requirements. Most college-level courses will count as electives toward graduation. Career-technical courses may not count toward electives for the Associate of Arts degree. Some career programs will dictate which general education courses to take. If you plan to earn a degree at SCC, you will need to meet the requirements of the catalog in effect when you first enrolled or of any subsequent catalog as long as you enroll in at least one fall or spring term each academic year (August-May).

Admission To Specific Programs Admission to SCC does not guarantee admission to specific programs. Many of the programs described here require that you have mastered certain basic competencies before you begin the course of study. See the program outlines in this chapter for special admissions requirements pertaining to specific career programs.

5-19


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Associate of Applied Science Degree – Graduation Requirements

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

General Education Requirements

SCC Institutional Requirements

The courses in the chart below meet the college’s general education requirements for the Associate of Applied Science degree. General education studies at St. Charles Community College guide students into a deeper understanding of themselves and of their responsibilities as citizens and provide the knowledge and skills on which to build a richer appreciation of their world. Some career programs will dictate which general education courses to take.

• Complete a minimum of 60 credit hours, including 24 credit hours of general education courses adhering to the minimums listed below. • Complete specific program requirements as listed under each program in the catalog. • Complete a minimum of 15 credit hours at SCC. • Earn a 2.00 cumulative grade point average.

COMMUNICATION

SOCIAL SCIENCE

MATHEMATICS

NATURAL SCIENCE

HUMANITIES

To develop students’ effective use of the English language and quantitative and other symbolic systems essential to their success in school and in the world. Students should be able to read and listen critically and to write and speak with thoughtfulness, clarity, coherence, and persuasiveness.

To develop students’ understanding of themselves and the world around them through study of content and the processes used by historians and social and behavioral scientists to discover, describe, explain, and predict human behavior and social systems. Students must understand the diversities and complexities of the cultural and social world, past and present, and come to an informed sense of self and others.

To develop students’ understanding of fundamental mathematical concepts and their applications. Students should develop a level of quantitative literacy that would enable them to make decisions and solve problems and which could serve as a basis for continued learning.

To develop students’ understanding of the principles and laboratory procedures of life and physical sciences and to cultivate their abilities to apply the empirical methods of scientific inquiry. Students should understand how scientific discovery changes theoretical views of the world, informs our imaginations, and shapes human history. Students should also understand that science is shaped by historical and social contexts.

To develop students’ understanding of the ways in which humans have addressed their condition through imaginative work in the humanities and arts; to deepen their understanding of how that imaginative process is informed and limited by social, cultural, linguistic, and historical circumstances; and to appreciate the world of the creative imagination as a form of knowledge.

9 Credit Hours ENG 101 ENG 102, 115, or 125 SPE 101

3 Credit Hours MAT 105 or higher

3 Credit Hours

3 Credit Hours

HIS 101, 102, 115, 270 POL 101, 102

Any BIO Any CHM Any PHY

3 Credit Hours Any ART BUS/CPT 105 DAN 196, 197, 198, 199 EDU 125 Any LIT Any MUS Any PHL Any THE Any Foreign Language course

ELECTIVE 3 Credit Hours Any ANT Any ART Any BIO BAS/CPT 103, CPT 115 or EDU 125, 220 Any CHM Any ECO Any ENG Any GEO Any HIS Any LIT Any MAT Any MUS Any PHE Any PHL, PHY Any POL Any PSY Any SOC Any SPE, THE

Certificate of Achievement – Graduation Requirements • Using the chart above, complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including 12 credit hours of general education courses [one course from communication column, one course from mathematics (MAT 098 or above), one course from social science column, and one course from any of the three remaining columns, or one course from computer science].

• Complete specific program requirements as listed under each program in the catalog. • Complete a minimum of 15 credit hours at SCC. • Earn a 2.00 cumulative grade point average, or as specified by the specific certificate. NOTE: Travel courses may not be used to fulfill general education requirements.

Certificate of Specialization – Graduation Requirements 5-20

• Complete specific program requirements as listed under each program in the catalog. • Earn a 2.00 cumulative grade point average, or as specified by the specific certificate.

• Complete the application for graduation form and pay the associated fee.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Career-Technical Program Outlines Course outlines for specific career-technical program options follow. These outlines list general requirements with time frame to depend on the student’s selected schedule and on course availability.

For examples of two-year study plans for all academic areas of study, see the Student Development Office.

Allied Health Health Information Technology Students in Health Information Technology (HIT) will receive the guidance of a talented, caring faculty dedicated to producing competent health care professionals. Training includes courses in general education, anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, medical terminology, pharmacology, legal aspects of health care, health care statistics, health information technology, and practical experience in approved health care facilities. The HIT program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). Contact information: CAHIIM c/o AHIMA: 233 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 2150, Chicago, Ill., 60601-5800, (312) 233-1100, www.cahiim.org. After successfully completing the two-year HIT program, graduates are eligible to write the national exam leading to accreditation as a Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT). A 2.0 grade point average must be achieved in all of the Health Information and biology courses. Students need to have successfully completed Beginning Algebra before taking Health Care Statistics by either placing into Intermediate Algebra on the Academic Skills Assessment or earn a grade of “C” or above in Beginning Algebra. The Academic Skills Assessment is required before enrolling in math or English courses. If you place into lower level courses than those required for the degree, then you must first take those courses before beginning the curriculum. A student who has already taken college math or English courses may be able to waive the assessment. Contact the Student Development Office for more information. You must demonstrate acceptable health status in order to participate in directed practicums.

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 BIO 240/243 . . .Anatomy & Physiology I* . . . . .4 ENG 101 . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . .3 PSY 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . .3 BIO 241/244 . . .Anatomy & Physiology II . . . . .4 BIO 265 . . . . . .Pathophysiology . . . . . . . . . . . .3 PHL 160 . . . . . .Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 SOC 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Sociology . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . .3 BAS/CPT 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 Required Courses for HIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 HIT 110 . . . . . .Medical Terminology I . . . . . . .3 HIT 115 . . . . . .Pharmacology and Diagnostic Procedures . . . . . . .3 HIT 120/121 . . .Health Care Data and Lab . . . .3 HIT 125/126 . . .Health Care Technology and Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 HIT 150 . . . . . .Directed Practicum I . . . . . . . .1 HIT 200 . . . . . .Directed Practicum II . . . . . . .3 HIT 220/221 . . .Nosology & Lab . . . . . . . . . . . .3 HIT 235 . . . . . .Health Care & the Law . . . . . . .2 HIT 240 . . . . . .Health Care Statistics and Quality Improvement . . . .3 HIT 250 . . . . . .Directed Practicum III . . . . . . .3 HIT 260 . . . . . .Health Information Management Seminar . . . . . . .2 HIT 270/271 . . .CPT Coding & Lab . . . . . . . . . .2 HIT 280 . . . . . .Healthcare Billing and Reimbursement Issues . . .2 Other Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 ENG 102 . . . . . .English Composition II . . . . . .3 or any LIT course HIS** or POL .History or Political Science . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 NOTES: * Prerequisite: High school biology or equivalent coursework within the last five years. ** Choose one of the following: HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 115, POL 101, POL 102. To begin Health Information Technology courses, you must be ready to take ENG 101, MAT 098, and BAS/CPT 103, if they have not already been taken. Background checks and drug screens are required prior to beginning practicum courses. Adverse results may require withdrawal from the program.

HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Admission Requirements:

• Set up appointment with a career-technical counselor. • Meet all of the college admission requirements. • Submit high school transcript or GED certificate with scores. High school GPA of 2.0 required (based on a 4.0 scale). GED score of 260 required. If minimum GPA or GED scores are not met, 6 credit hours of college course work with 2.0 cumulative GPA will be considered (official transcripts are required). • Complete the assessment test given by the Student Development Office. You must test into at least English Composition I and Intermediate Algebra or take developmental course work. The Assessment test will be waived if English Composition I and Beginning Algebra (at the college level) have been completed (official transcripts are required). To begin Health Information Technology courses, students must be ready to take ENG 101, MAT 098, and CPT 103 if not already taken.

5-21


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Allied Health Nursing ADN PROGRAM Admission Requirements: • Set up appointment with career-technical counselor. • Meet all of the college admissions requirements. • Submit a high school transcript (required) indicating date of graduation, cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 or higher on a 4 point scale or GED certificate with scores (260 minimum score required). If minimum high school GPA or GED scores are not achieved, 12 credit hours of college course work with a 2.5 cumulative GPA will be considered (official transcripts are required). • Submit previous official college transcripts (hand carried transcripts not accepted) if you have already taken college courses. • Submit ACT scores. Tests must have been taken within the last five years. (Minimum acceptable composite score is 20). • Pass the Dosage Calculations Test with a score of 90 percent or above. Admission Procedure: After you are accepted to the college, the career-technical counselor will help you complete a Nursing Application Worksheet to plan course work and to establish a timetable for courses, tests, etc. At this time, you will be assigned to a specific year to start nursing courses. You must maintain contact each semester with a career-technical counselor. You will then have until the deadline specified in the application to complete other admission requirements. More specific information as well as any recent changes may be obtained from the careertechnical counselors.

5-22

The Nursing program includes courses in science, liberal arts and in nursing. The nursing courses consist of lecture and laboratory periods and provide carefully planned clinical experiences in local health care facilities. Clinicals begin early in the first semester and increase in length of time and complexity of skill as the program progresses. A well-equipped simulation and skills lab on campus allows students to practice their skills. Flexible scheduling allows students to choose between day and evening courses and clinical experiences. The total program must yield a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, and all nursing and science courses must have earned a grade of “C” or above. The nursing program is approved by the Missouri State Board of Nursing and fully accredited by the National League for Nursing. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are eligible to apply to take the National Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses. However, completion of this program does not guarantee licensure. The state board may refuse licensure to applicants who may jeopardize the well-being of Missouri citizens. “The Missouri State Board of Nursing may refuse to issue any certificate of registration or authority, permit or license required pursuant to this chapter for one or any combination of causes stated in subsection 2 of this section. (1-15) 2001.” RSMo 335.066

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 BIO 240/243 . . .Anatomy and Physiology I . . . .4 BIO 241/244 . . .Anatomy and Physiology II . . .4 BIO 245/247 . . .Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 CHM 101/103 . .Introduction to Chemistry . . . .4 ENG 101 . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . .3 *HIS or POL . .History or Political Science . . .3 Any literature (LIT) course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . .3 SOC 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Sociology . . . .3 Required Courses for Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 NUR 103/113 .Introduction to Nursing . . . . . .8 123 NUR 104/114 . .Nursing of Adults and 124 . . . . .Children I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 NUR 105/125 . .Nursing of Adults and Children II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 NUR 253/263 . .Nursing of Adults and 273 . . . . . .Children III . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 NUR 254/264 . .Nursing of Adults and 274 . . . . .Children IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 *Choose one of the following: HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 115, POL 101, POL 102. NOTE: Background checks and drug screens are required prior to beginning program courses. Adverse results may require withdrawal from the program. CPR for Healthcare Providers and updated immunizations are also required prior to beginning nursing courses.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Allied Health PRACTICAL NURSING

Practical Nursing

Admission Requirements:

The practical nursing program at SCC teaches students to provide direct care for patients through classroom and campus laboratory work as well as on-site training in hospital, geriatric, and other health care settings.

• Set up appointment with a career-technical counselor. • Meet all the college admissions requirements.

The practical nursing program is approved by the Missouri State Board of Nursing.

• Submit a high school diploma and transcript (cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher on a 4 point scale) or GED certificate with scores (260 score required).

Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are eligible to apply to take the National Licensure Exam for Practical Nurses. However, completion of this program does not guarantee licensure. The state board may refuse licensure to applicants who may jeopardize the well-being of Missouri citizens.

If minimum high school GPA or GED scores are not met, 6 credit hours of college course work with 2.5 cumulative GPA will be considered (transcripts must be submitted).

"The Missouri State Board of Nursing may refuse to issue any certificate of registration or authority, permit or license required pursuant to this chapter for one or any combination of causes stated in subsection 2 of this section. (1-14) 1990." RSMO 335.066. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 BIO 240/243 . . .Anatomy & Physiology I . . . . .4 BIO 241/244 . . .Anatomy & Physiology II . . . . .4 PSY 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . .3 Students must take one of the following: PSY 225 . . . . . .Psychology of Aging . . . . . . . . .3 SOC 151 . . . . . .Gerontology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 SOC 251 . . . . . .Aspects of Aging . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Required Nursing Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 NPN 100 . . . . . .Personal and Vocational Concepts . . . . . . . . .1 NPN 101/ . . . . .Fundamentals of Nursing . . . .7 111/121 NPN 102/ . . . . .Maternal Child Nursing . . . . . .6 112 NPN 151/ . . . . .Medical-Surgical Nursing I . .11 161/171 NPN 152/ . . . . .Medical-Surgical Nursing II . .8 162/172 Other Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ENG 096 . . . . . .Dev. Writing II - or - . . . . . . .3 ENG 101 . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 NOTE: Background checks and drug screens are required prior to beginning program courses. Adverse results may require withdrawal from the program. CPR for Healthcare Providers and updated immunizations are also required prior to beginning nursing courses.

Pharmacy Technician Pharmacy technician, a non-credit program, may be just the job you are looking for: • Training completed in just 10 weeks. • Learn medical terminology and drug calculations. • Be eligible for national certification upon completion. • Join a career in high demand. For more information, call 636-922-8280.

• Submit previous official college transcripts (hand carried transcripts not accepted) for any college courses already taken. • Submit ACT test scores. Tests must have been taken within the last five years (minimum composite score is 20). Exception: Students with 10 college hours with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above. • Must test into at least Developmental Writing II and Developmental Math II. • Pass the Dosage Calculations Test with a score of 90 percent or above. (No more than three attempts within one year, and the test results remain valid for one year only.)

5-23


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Allied Health

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM Admission Requirements: • Set up appointment with career-technical counselor. • Meet all of the college admissions requirements. • Submit a high school transcript or GED certificate with scores. High school GPA of 2.5 or higher on a 4 point scale or GED certificate with scores (260 minimum score required). If minimum high school GPA or GED scores are not achieved, 12 credit hours of college course work with a 2.5 cumulative GPA will be considered (official transcripts are required). • Complete the assessment given by the Student Development Office. You must test into ENG 101 and MAT 098 or take and pass ENG 096 and/or MAT 096. • Submit previous official college transcripts (hand carried transcripts not accepted) if you have already taken college courses. • Submit ACT scores. Tests must have been taken within the last five years. • Complete three observational experiences, consisting of two hours each, at three different sites with paperwork turned into the Counseling Office.

5-24

Occupational Therapy Assistant The Occupational Therapy Assistant program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O.Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220. AOTA's phone number is (301) 652-AOTA. Graduates will be able to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a certified occupational therapy assistant (COTA). Many states, including Missouri, require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT certification examination. Note: Clinical facilities require criminal background checks, drug screenings, child abuse clearance checks, etc. in order for students to participate in fieldwork activities and rotations. A felony conviction may affect a graduate's ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination and/or may prevent an individual from obtaining a license to practice. Student may wish to contact the program coordinator for additional information prior to enrolling in a program of study. Information obtained through various screening procedures may prevent entry into the OTA program. NOTE: All OTA students must complete Level II fieldwork within 18 months following completion of academic preparation.

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 BIO 240/243 . . .Anatomy & Physiology I* . . . . .4 BIO 241/244 . . .Anatomy & Physiology II . . . . .4 ENG 101 . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . .3 ENG 102 . . . . . .English Composition II - or - .3 ENG 115 . . . . . .Technical Writing - or - . . . . .3 ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 HIS/POL . . . . . .History or Political Science** .3 PSY 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . .3 PSY 210 . . . . . .Human Growth and Development . . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . .3 Required Courses in Occupational Therapy Assistant . .39 OTA 100 . . . . . .Fundamentals of OTA I . . . . . .4 OTA 102/112 . .Fundamentals of OTA II . . . . .4 OTA 103 . . . . . .Adaptive Activities I . . . . . . . . .2 OTA 104/114 . .Adaptive Activities II . . . . . . . . .2 OTA 203/213 . .Fundamentals of OTA III . . . . .5 OTA 204/214 . .Fundamentals of OTA IV . . . . .4 OTA 207 . . . . . .Health and Disease . . . . . . . . . .4 OTA 209 . . . . . .Health Occupations Seminar . .2 OTA 210 . . . . . .OTA Practicum I . . . . . . . . . . . .4 OTA 211 . . . . . .OTA Practicum II . . . . . . . . . . .4 OTA 218 . . . . . .Adaptive Living Skills . . . . . . . .4 Other Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 BIO 270/271 . . .Kinesiology*** . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 Humanities Elective . . . . . . . . .3 OTA 298 . . . . . .OTA Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 * Prerequisite must be completed (high school biology or equivalent) ** Choose from one History or Political Science course: HIS 101, 102, or 115, POL 101 or 102. This credit allocation is based on a credit ratio of one credit for two (2) hours of laboratory. NOTE: Students completing this program will be assessed in program-related competencies and general education. (OTA 298 - OTA Capstone). *** Prerequisite is required (BIO 240/243 – Anatomy and Physiology I).

Non-Credit Allied Health Options Several allied health courses and programs are offered through the Division of Corporate and Community Development on a non-credit basis. Programs include: • Certified Nurse Assistant • Certified Medication Technician • Intravenous Therapy • Medical Coding • Medical Terminology • Medical Transcription (online program) • Pharmacy Technician • Restorative Aide For more information, call 636-922-8284.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

5-25


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Business Administration

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION The Business Administration program provides graduates with basic knowledge and skills in preparation for business positions of a general nature. Within the Business Administration program, students choose a program option in Accounting, Finance, Management, or Marketing.

5-26

Accounting Option

Finance Option

The Accounting option aids students in developing skills, knowledge, and aptitudes related to the field of accounting. Graduates are prepared to seek employment in paraprofessional accounting, senior-level bookkeeping, or junior-level accounting positions.

The Finance option aids students in developing skills, knowledge, and aptitudes related to the field of finance. Graduates are prepared to seek employment in banking, credit institutions, and other businesses involved in credit and finance.

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ANY BIO, CHM, PHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 BUS 105 . . . . . .Business Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ECO 110 . . . . . .Prin. of Macroeconomics* . . . .3 ENG 101 . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . .3 ENG 115 . . . . . .Technical Writing -or- . . . . . .3 ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . .3 HIS 101/102/115 or POL 101/102 . . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 121 . . . . . .Inter. Algebra (or higher) . . . . . .3 Required Core Courses in Business Administration . . .26 ACT 110 . . . . . .Financial Accounting I* . . . . .4 ACT 130 . . . . . .Managerial Accounting I . . . . .3 BUS 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Business . . . . .3 BUS 201 . . . . . .Principles of Management . . . .3 BUS 220 . . . . . .Principles of Finance* . . . . . . .3 BUS 230 . . . . . .Principles of Marketing . . . . . .3 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications - or - . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 ECO 120 . . . . . .Prin. of Microeconomics* . . . .3 BUS 298 Plus Program Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Additional Courses Required for Accounting Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 ACT 115 . . . . . .Computerized Accounting . . . .3 ACT 210 . . . . . .Inter. Accounting I . . . . . . . . . .3 ACT 240 . . . . . .Individual Income Tax Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Two Electives from ACT, BUS, ECO, GEO 120, or MAT 175 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ANY BIO, CHM, PHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 BUS 105 . . . . . .Business Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ECO 110 . . . . . .Prin. of Macroeconomics* . . . .3 ENG 101 . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . .3 ENG 115 . . . . . .Technical Writing -or- . . . . . .3 ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . .3 HIS 101/102/115 or POL 101/102 . . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 121 . . . . . .Inter. Algebra (or higher) . . . . . .3 Required Core Courses in Business Administration . . .26 ACT 110 . . . . . .Financial Accounting I* . . . . .4 ACT 130 . . . . . .Managerial Accounting I . . . . .3 BUS 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Business . . . . .3 BUS 201 . . . . . .Principles of Management . . . .3 BUS 220 . . . . . .Principles of Finance* . . . . . . .3 BUS 230 . . . . . .Principles of Marketing . . . . . .3 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications - or - . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 ECO 120 . . . . . .Prin. of Microeconomics* . . . .3 BUS 298 Plus Program Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Additional Courses Required for Finance Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 ACT 105 . . . . . .Personal Accounting and Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ECO 220 . . . . . .Money and Banking . . . . . . . . .3 Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Two Electives from ACT, BUS, ECO, GEO 120, or MAT 175 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65

*Has a prerequisite of MAT 098 Beginning Algebra or assessment placement of Intermediate Algebra. NOTE: ACT 110 also has a prerequisite of ACT 101, high school accounting, or departmental approval.

*Has a prerequisite of MAT 098 Beginning Algebra or assessment placement of Intermediate Algebra. NOTE: ACT 110 also has a prerequisite of ACT 101, high school accounting or departmental approval.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Business Administration Management Option

Marketing Option

The Management option aids students in developing skills, knowledge, and aptitudes related to management and supervision. Graduates are prepared to seek employment in supervisory or entry-level management positions.

The Marketing option aids students in developing skills, knowledge, and aptitudes related to marketing and sales. Graduates are prepared to seek employment in entry-level positions in advertising, sales, retailing, and marketing.

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ANY BIO, CHM, PHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 BUS 105 . . . . . .Business Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ECO 110 . . . . . .Prin. of Macroeconomics* . . . .3 ENG 101 . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . .3 ENG 115 . . . . . .Technical Writing -or- . . . . . .3 ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . .3 HIS 101/102/115 or POL 101/102 . . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 121 . . . . . .Inter. Algebra (or higher) . . . . . .3 Required Core Courses in Business Administration . . .26 ACT 110 . . . . . .Financial Accounting I* . . . . .4 ACT 130 . . . . . .Managerial Accounting I . . . . .3 BUS 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Business . . . . .3 BUS 201 . . . . . .Principles of Management . . . .3 BUS 220 . . . . . .Principles of Finance* . . . . . . .3 BUS 230 . . . . . .Principles of Marketing . . . . . .3 ECO 120 . . . . . .Prin. of Microeconomics* . . . .3 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications - or - . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 BUS 298 Plus Program Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Additional Courses Required for Management Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 BUS 204 . . . . . .Total Quality Operations Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 BUS 206 . . . . . .Human Resource Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 BUS 210 . . . . . .Organizational Behavior . . . . .3 Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Two Electives from ACT, BUS, ECO, GEO 120, or MAT 175 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 *Has a prerequisite of MAT 098 Beginning Algebra or assessment placement of Intermediate Algebra. NOTE: ACT 110 also has a prerequisite of ACT 101, high school accounting, or departmental approval.

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ANY BIO, CHM, PHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 BUS 105 . . . . . .Business Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ECO 110 . . . . . .Prin. of Macroeconomics* . . . .3 ENG 101 . . . . . .English Composition I . . . . . . .3 ENG 115 . . . . . .Technical Writing -or- . . . . . .3 ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . .3 HIS 101/102/115 or POL 101/102 . . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 121 . . . . . .Inter. Algebra (or higher) . . . . . .3 Required Courses in Business Administration . . . . . . . .26 ACT 110 . . . . . .Financial Accounting I* . . . . .4 ACT 130 . . . . . .Managerial Accounting I . . . . .3 BUS 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Business . . . . .3 BUS 201 . . . . . .Principles of Management . . . .3 BUS 220 . . . . . .Principles of Finance* . . . . . . .3 BUS 230 . . . . . .Principles of Marketing . . . . . .3 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications - or - . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 ECO 120 . . . . . .Prin. of Microeconomics* . . . .3 BUS 298 Plus Program Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Additional Courses Required for Marketing Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 BUS 232 . . . . . .Advertising/Sales Promotion . .3 BUS 236 . . . . . .Consumer Behavior . . . . . . . . .3 BUS 238 . . . . . .Personal Selling . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Two Electives from ACT, BUS, GEO 120, ECO, or MAT 175 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

*Has a prerequisite of MAT 098 Beginning Algebra or assessment placement of Intermediate Algebra. NOTE: ACT 110 also has a prerequisite of ACT 101, high school accounting, or departmental approval.

5-27


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Business Administration

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Accounting

Finance

This certificate option prepares students for entry-level positions as accounting clerks or bookkeepers. It is also intended for those students who are currently employed and want to upgrade skills in accounting.

This certificate option prepares students for entry-level positions in banking, finance, or credit. It is also intended for those students who are currently employed and want to upgrade their skills.

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ANY ENG/SPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ECO 100 . . . . . .Survey Economics - or - . . . . .3 ECO 110 . . . . . .Prin. of Macroeconomics* . . .3 MAT 098 . . . . . .Beginning Algebra (or higher) . .3 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications - or - . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 Core Required Courses in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-7 ACT 101 . . . . . .Applied Accounting - or - . . . .3 ACT 110 . . . . . .Financial Accounting I* . . . . .4 BUS 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Business . . . . .3 Additional Courses Required for Accounting Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 ACT 115 . . . . . .Computerized Accounting . . . .3 ACT 130 . . . . . .Managerial Accounting . . . . . .3 ACT 240 . . . . . .Indiv. Inc. Tax Accounting . . .3 Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 One elective from ACT, BUS, ECO, GEO 120, or MAT 175 . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30-31

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ANY ENG/SPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ECO 100 . . . . . .Survey Economics - or - . . . . .3 ECO 110 . . . . . .Prin. of Macroeconomics* . . .3 MAT 098 . . . . . .Beginning Algebra (or higher) . .3 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications - or - . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 Core Required Courses in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-7 ACT 101 . . . . . .Applied Accounting - or - . . . .3 ACT 110 . . . . . .Financial Accounting I* . . . . .4 BUS 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Business . . . . .3 Additional Courses Required for Finance Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 BUS 220 . . . . . .Principles of Finance* . . . . . . . .3 ECO 120 . . . . . .Prin. of Microeconomics* . . . .3 ECO 220 . . . . . .Money and Banking . . . . . . . . .3 Plus one elective from any ACT, BUS, ECO, GEO 120, or MAT 175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30-31

*Has a prerequisite of MAT 098 Beginning Algebra or assessment placement of Intermediate Algebra. NOTE: • ACT 110 also has a prerequisite of ACT 101, high school accounting, or departmental approval.

Accounting BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION The Business Administration program provides graduates with basic knowledge and skills in preparation for business positions of a general nature. Within the Business Administration program, students choose a program option in Accounting, Finance, Management, or Marketing.

5-28

*Has a prerequisite of MAT 098 Beginning Algebra or assessment placement of Intermediate Algebra. NOTE: • ACT 110 also has a prerequisite of ACT 101, high school accounting, or departmental approval.

Banking/Finance

A Certificate of Specialization in Business Administration targets people already in the workforce who are seeking to improve skills or obtain new skills. The specialized certificate contains 15-16 credit hours, no General Education credits, and consists of five classes.

A Certificate of Specialization in Business Administration targets people already in the workforce who are seeking to improve skills or obtain new skills. The specialized certificate contains 15-16 credit hours, no General Education credits, and consists of five classes.

Accounting ACT 101 . . . . . .Applied Accounting** . . . . . . . .3 ACT 110 . . . . . .Financial Accouting . . . . . . . . .4 ACT 115 . . . . . .Computerized Accounting . . . .3 Two electives from any ACT, BUS, or ECO . . . . .6 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 ** If the student has an accounting background or experience, ACT 101 can be waived, and only two electives would be required.

Banking/Finance BUS 101 . . . . . .Intro to Business . . . . . . . . . . .3 BUS 220 . . . . . .Principles of Finance . . . . . . . .3 Three electives from any ACT, BUS, or ECO . . . .9 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Business Administration Management

Marketing

This certificate option prepares students for entry-level positions in supervision and management. It is also intended for those students who are currently employed and want to upgrade their skills.

This certificate option prepares students for entry-level positions in marketing and sales. It is also intended for those students who are currently employed and want to upgrade their skills.

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ANY ENG/SPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ECO 100 . . . . . .Survey Economics - or - . . . . .3 ECO 110 . . . . . .Prin. of Macroeconomics* . . .3 MAT 098 . . . . . .Beginning Algebra (or higher) . .3 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications - or - . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 Core Required Courses in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-7 ACT 101 . . . . . .Applied Accounting - or - . . . .3 ACT 110 . . . . . .Financial Accounting I* . . . . .4 BUS 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Business . . . . .3 Additional Courses Required for Management Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 BUS 201 . . . . . .Prin. of Management . . . . . . . .3 BUS 206 . . . . . .Human Resources Mgmt. . . . .3 BUS 210 . . . . . .Organizational Behavior . . . . .3 Plus one elective from any ACT, BUS, ECO, GEO 120, or MAT 175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30-31

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ANY ENG/SPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ECO 100 . . . . . .Survey Economics - or - . . . . .3 ECO 110 . . . . . .Prin. of Macroeconomics* . . .3 MAT 098 . . . . . .Beginning Algebra (or higher) . .3 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications - or - . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 Core Required Courses in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-7 ACT 101 . . . . . .Applied Accounting - or - . . . .3 ACT 110 . . . . . .Financial Accounting I* . . . . .4 BUS 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Business . . . . .3 Additional Courses Required for Marketing Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 BUS 230 . . . . . .Principles of Marketing . . . . . . .3 BUS 232 . . . . . .Advertising/Sales Promotion . .3 BUS 236 . . . . . .Consumer Behavior . . . . . . . . .3 Plus one elective from any ACT, BUS, ECO, GEO 120, or MAT 175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30-31

*Has a prerequisite of MAT 098 Beginning Algebra or assessment placement of Intermediate Algebra.

*Has a prerequisite of MAT 098 Beginning Algebra or assessment placement of Intermediate Algebra.

NOTE: • ACT 110 also has a prerequisite of ACT 101, high school accounting, or departmental approval.

NOTE: • ACT 110 also has a prerequisite of ACT 101, high school accounting, or departmental approval.

Management

Marketing

A Certificate of Specialization in Business Administration targets people already in the workforce who are seeking to improve skills or obtain new skills. The specialized certificate contains 15-16 credit hours, no General Education credits, and consists of five classes.

A Certificate of Specialization in Business Administration targets people already in the workforce who are seeking to improve skills or obtain new skills. The specialized certificate contains 15-16 credit hours, no General Education credits, and consists of five classes.

Management BUS 101 . . . . . .Intro to Business . . . . . . . . . . .3 BUS 201 . . . . . .Principles of Management . . . .3 Three electives from any ACT, BUS, or ECO . . . .9 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

Marketing BUS 101 . . . . . .Intro to Business . . . . . . . . . . .3 BUS 230 . . . . . .Principles of Marketing . . . . . .3 Three electives from any ACT, BUS, or ECO . . . .9 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

5-29


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Business Administrative Systems

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Business Administrative Systems Business Administrative Systems (BAS) programs at St. Charles Community College address the full range of technology and administrative office management skills. This degree option provides the training necessary to become an administrative assistant/executive secretary, office manager, receptionist, clerical assistant, desktop publisher, and areas of customer service. The BAS Program provides current computer/technical training in all facets of Microsoft Office, desktop publishing, and Internet use. Feel free to work with the Business Administrative Systems Program representatives for scheduling and job placement assistance at any time during your course work. You will also learn to apply skills in time management, personal organization, procedures, supervision and administration in the workplace. Administrative assistants are key players in every business and organization because they carry out a multitude of details each day to keep the office running properly.

5-30

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must include: ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 105 . . . . . .Applied Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Core Program Requirements in Business Administrative Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 BAS/CPT 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 BAS 105 . . . . . .Proofreading and Editing Business Documents . .2 BAS 122 . . . . . .Skillbuilding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 BAS 130 . . . . . .Customer Service Excellence (Online Course) . . . . . . . . . . . .1 BAS 131 . . . . . .Telephone Communication Skills (Online Course) . . . . . . .1 BAS 132 . . . . . .Time Management (Online Course) . . . . . . . . . . . .1 BAS 145 . . . . . .Business Technology Tools . . .3 BAS 160 . . . . . .Word Processing – Word . . . . .2 BAS 165 . . . . . .Presentations – PowerPoint . .2 BAS 170 . . . . . .Spreadsheet Applications – Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 175 . . . . . .Database Applications – Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 190 . . . . . .Planning and Design Concepts (Publisher) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 201 . . . . . .Machine Transcription . . . . . .3 BAS 245 . . . . . .Administrative Procedures . . . .3 BAS 247 . . . . . .Administrative Supervision . . .3 BAS 250 . . . . . .Business Simulations . . . . . . . .4 BAS 290 . . . . . .Publishing Projects (InDesign) . .2 Other Required Courses for Business Administrative Systems Option . . . . . . . . . .3 ACT 101 . . . . . .Applied Accounting . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Business Administrative Systems Business Administrative Systems This certificate program provides the graduate with entry-level skills as a secretary, administrative assistant, or receptionist. Learn to provide excellent office support services. You will acquire a broad range of skills that will allow you to choose an area of specialization once you are on the job. Earn this certificate and apply all these credits towards the two-year Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administrative Systems once you acquire employment. Work with the Business Administrative Systems program representatives for scheduling and job placement assistance at any time during your course work. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: BAS/CPT 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 MAT 105 . . . . . .Applied Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Required Courses in Business Administrative Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 BAS 105 . . . . . .Proofreading and Editing Business Documents . . . . . . . .2 BAS 122 . . . . . .Skillbuilding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 BAS 160 . . . . . .Word Processing – Word . . . . .2 BAS 165 . . . . . .Presentations – PowerPoint . .2 BAS 170 . . . . . .Spreadsheet Applications – Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 175 . . . . . .Database Applications – Access 2 BAS 190 . . . . . .Planning and Design Concepts (Publisher) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 245 . . . . . .Administrative Procedures . . . .3 BAS 247 . . . . . .Administrative Supervision . . .3 BAS 290 . . . . . .Publishing Projects (InDesign) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Clerical Assistant This certificate program provides the graduate with entry-level skills as a receptionist or office assistant performing general clerical tasks. Responsibilities may include operating basic office equipment, handling daily telephone calls, mail, and records management tasks. Current computer and technology skills are applied in all areas of Microsoft Office, desktop publishing, and use of the Internet.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Business Administrative Systems program representatives assist students with job placement efforts throughout the program. The courses for this certificate may be applied to the Associate of Applied Science degree in the same area. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: BAS/CPT 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 MAT 105 . . . . . .Applied Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Required Courses in Business Administrative Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 BAS 105 . . . . . .Proofreading and Editing Business Documents . . . . . . . .2 BAS 122 . . . . . .Skillbuilding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 BAS 160 . . . . . .Word Processing – Word . . . . .2 BAS 165 . . . . . .Presentations – PowerPoint . .2 BAS 170 . . . . . .Spreadsheet Applications – Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 175 . . . . . .Database Applications – Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 190 . . . . . .Planning and Design Concepts (Publisher) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 245 . . . . . .Administrative Procedures . . . .3 BAS 247 . . . . . .Administrative Supervision . . .3 BAS 290 . . . . . .Publishing Projects (InDesign) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Additional Required Courses for Clerical Assistant Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 131 . . . . . .Telephone Communication Skills (Online Course) . . . . . . .1 BAS 136 . . . . . .Business Communications (Online Course) . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

5-31


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Business Administrative Systems

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Customer Service

Desktop Publishing

This certificate program provides you with skills necessary to handle customers professionally, effectively, and successfully. You will become comfortable with business communication – written and verbal; improve time management skills; form professional work standards and image; review professional telephone skills; and brush up on keyboarding and computer skills.

This certificate program provides the graduate with entry-level skills as desktop publisher, clerical assistant, and capable of producing basic publishing documents. Training is provided in many computer software skill areas, page layout, design, and management techniques for use in small businesses and home publishing businesses. Current computer and technology skills are applied in all program areas of Microsoft Office, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, and the Internet.

Work with the Business Administrative Systems Program representatives for scheduling and job placement assistance at any time during your course work. The courses for this certificate may be applied to the Associate of Applied Science Degree. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: BAS/CPT 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 MAT 105 . . . . . .Applied Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Required Courses in Business Administrative Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 BAS 101 . . . . . .Keyboarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 BAS 105 . . . . . .Proofreading and Editing Business Documents . . . . . . . .2 BAS 160 . . . . . .Word Processing – Word . . . . .2 BAS 165 . . . . . .Presentations – PowerPoint . .2 BAS 170 . . . . . .Spreadsheet Applications – Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 175 . . . . . .Database Applications – Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Additional Required Courses for Customer Service Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 BAS 130 . . . . . .Customer Service Excellence (Online Course) . . . . . . . . . . . .1 BAS 131 . . . . . .Telephone Communication Skills (Online Course) . . . . . . .1 BAS 132 . . . . . .Time Management (Online Course) . . . . . . . . . . . .1 BAS 135 . . . . . .Your Professional Image (Online Course) . . . . . . . . . . . .1 BAS 136 . . . . . .Business Communications (Online Course) . . . . . . . . . . . .1 BAS 137 . . . . . .Interpersonal Skills (Online Course) . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

5-32

Work with the Business Administrative Systems Program representatives for scheduling and job placement assistance at any time during your course work. The courses for this certificate may be applied to the Associate of Applied Science degree in Business Administrative Systems. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: BAS/CPT 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 MAT 105 . . . . . .Applied Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Required Core Courses in Business Administrative Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 BAS 160 . . . . . .Word Processing – Word . . . . .2 BAS 165 . . . . . .Presentations – PowerPoint . .2 BAS 170 . . . . . .Spreadsheet Applications – Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 175 . . . . . .Database Applications – Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 190 . . . . . .Planning and Design Concepts (Publisher) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BAS 247 . . . . . .Administrative Supervision . . .3 BAS 290 . . . . . .Publishing Projects (InDesign) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Additional Required Courses for Desktop Publishing Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 CPM 170 . . . . . .Computer Graphics . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 210 . . . . . .Digital Photo Editing (Photoshop) . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Child Care & Early Education Child Care & Early Education This program provides students with the knowledge and skill necessary to care for and teach young children. Child care professionals promote the social, emotional, cognitive, and physical growth of the infant, toddler, preschool, and school-age children by guiding and supervising them through a variety of developmentally appropriate experiences. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 (See page 5:20) Required Courses in Child Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 CDC 101 . . . . . .Intro. to Early Childhood . . . . .3 CDC 102 . . . . . .Creative Act. for Children . . . . .3 CDC 103 . . . . . .Lit. and Literature for Young Children . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 104 . . . . . .Principles of Early Childhood Education . . . . . . . .3 CDC 105 . . . . . .Observation and Participation in Early Childhood Settings . . .2 CDC 107 . . . . . .Intro. to Young Children With Special Needs . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 109 . . . . . .Observation and Participation Seminar . . . . . . .1 CDC 112 . . . . .Child Growth and Development I . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 113 . . . . . .Child Growth and Development II . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 201 . . . . . .Cognitive Activities for Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 203 . . . . . .Child Care and Education Practicum I . . . . . .2 CDC 205 . . . . . .Children, Families, and Communities . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 206 . . . . . .Child Care and Education Practicum II . . . . . .2 CDC 208 . . . . . .Nutrition, Health, and Safety of Children . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 209 . . . . . .Child Care and Education Practicum Seminar . . . . . . . . .2 Elective Courses in Child Care (choose one) . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 106 . . . . .Issues in Early Childhood . . .1-3 CDC 108 . . . . . .Infant and Toddler Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 202 . . . . . .Movement and Music in Early Childhood . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 204 . . . . . .Management of Early Childhood Programs . . . . . . . .3 CDC 207 Curriculum and Materials for Young Children With Special Needs . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66

Child Care & Early Education This certificate prepares students for entry-level or assistant positions in early childhood programs. Students who have had experience in early childhood programs may also select the courses that are necessary to meet state licensing requirements for administrative positions in early childhood programs.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 (See page 5:20) Required Courses in Child Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 CDC 101 . . . . .Intro. to Early Childhood . . . . .3 CDC 104 . . . . . .Principles of Early Childhood Education . . . . . . . .3 CDC 105 . . . . . .Observation & Participation in Early Childhood Settings . . .2 CDC 107 . . . . . .Intro. to Young Children With Special Needs . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 109 . . . . . .Observation and Participation Seminar . . . . . . .1 CDC 112 . . . . . .Child Growth and Develop. I . .3 CDC 208 . . . . . .Nutrition, Health, and Safety of Children . . . . . . .3 Child Care Electives (choose two) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CDC 102 . . . . . .Creative Activities for Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 103 . . . . . .Literacy and Literature . . . . . . . for Young Children . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 106 . . . . . .Issues in Early Childhood . . .1-3 CDC 108 . . . . . .Infant and Toddler Develop. and Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 201 . . . . . .Cognitive Activities for Young Children . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 202 . . . . . .Music and Movement in Early Childhood . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 204 . . . . . .Management of Early Childhood Programs . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 NOTE: Students completing this program will be assessed in program-related competencies and general education (The Child Care Capstone is embedded in CDC 109).

NOTE: Students completing this program will be assessed in program-related competencies and general education (CDC 298 Child Care Capstone). 5-33


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Computer-Aided Drafting Computer-Aided Drafting

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

5-34

This program option provides students with a comprehensive knowledge of architectural drafting through the use of computer aided design. Additional courses in science and math are emphasized. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 (See page 5:20) ART 110 . . . . .Drawing I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 ENG 115 . . . . . .Technical Writing . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 150 . . . . . .Trigonometry - and - . . . . . . .3 MAT 160 . . . . . .College Algebra - or - . . . . . . .4 MAT 171 . . . . . .Pre-Calculus Math . . . . . . . . . .6 PHY 150/153 . . Physics I and Lab . . . . . . . . . .4 Required Courses in Computer-Aided Drafting and Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 CDM 103 . . . . .Introduction to CAD Systems . .2 CDM 104 . . . . .CAD Systems II . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 205 . . . . .Architectural Drafting I . . . . . .3 CDM 221 . . . . .Solid Modeling I . . . . . . . . . . . .3

Additional Courses (choose seven) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 CDM 120 . . . . .Descriptive Geometry . . . . . . . .2 CDM 206 . . . . .Architectural Drafting II . . . . .3 CDM 209 . . . . .Construction Materials . . . . . .3 CDM 210 . . . . .HVAC Drafting . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 211 . . . . .Structural Drafting . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 212 . . . . .Electrical/Electronic Drafting .3 CDM 222 . . . . .Solid Modeling II . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 223 . . . . .Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 235 . . . . .Manufacturing Process . . . . . .3 CDM 251 . . . . .Introduction to Piping and Electrical Drafting . . . . . .3 CDM 255 . . . . .Civil Drafting . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 270 . . . . .Externship* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 GEO 120 . . . . . .Introduction to GIS . . . . . . . . .3 General Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Additional Courses Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 CDM 298 . . . . .CAD/CAM Capstone . . . . . . . . . .1 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 * Externship oriented toward option area. Students completing this program will be assessed in program-related competencies and general education (CDM 298 CAD/CAM Capstone).


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Computer-Aided Drafting Computer-Aided Drafting This certificate provides you with skills comprehensive enough for entry-level employment in as little as one year. The student is afforded some latitude in upper-level course choices. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) MAT 098 . . . . . .Beginning Algebra . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 General Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Required Courses in Computer-Aided Drafting and Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 CDM 103 . . . . .Introduction to CAD Systems . .2 CDM 104 . . . . .CAD Systems II . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 221 . . . . .Solid Modeling I . . . . . . . . . . . .3

Additional Courses for Certification (choose four) . . .11 CDM 120 . . . . .Descriptive Geometry . . . . . . . .2 CDM 205 . . . . .Architectural Drafting I . . . . . .3 CDM 206 . . . . .Architectural Drafting II . . . . .3 CDM 209 . . . . .Construction Materials . . . . . .3 CDM 210 . . . . .HVAC Drafting . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 211 . . . . .Structural Drafting . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 212 . . . . .Electrical/Electronic Drafting .3 CDM 222 . . . . .Solid Modeling II . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 223 . . . . .Geometric Dimensioning/ Tolerance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 231 . . . . .Tool Path Generation . . . . . . .3 CDM 235 . . . . .Manufacturing Processes . . . . .3 CDM 251 . . . . .Intro. to Piping Drafting . . . . .3 CDM 255 . . . . .Civil Drafting . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Other Courses Required for Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 CDM 298 . . . . .CAD Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

5-35


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Computer Science

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Computer Programming Option Software development is the foundation of IT departments. As custom applications become more prevalent on the Web and on network systems, companies are seeking skilled programmers. Also needed are developers for operation systems and other system software, network software, and Internet software. IT professionals with strong programming skills in multiple languages are in greatest demand, particularly VB.NET, C, C++, and Java. General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must include: (See page 5:20) CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 MAT 121 . . . . . .Intermediate Algebra . . . . . . . .3 Required Courses in Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 CPT/BUS 105 . .Computer Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 106 . . . . . .PC Operating Systems . . . . . . .3 CPT 121 . . . . . .Basics of Data Comm. . . . . . . .3 CPM 120 . . . . . .Windows Multimedia . . . . . . . .3

5-36

Additional Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 CPT 165 . . . . . .Comp. Programming Logic . . .3 CPT 200 . . . . . .Systems Analysis and Design . .3 CPT 200 A+ Computer Maintenance and Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Plus, choose two of the following five sets . . . .12 CPT 174 . . . . . .COBOL Programming I - and - .6 CPT 175 . . . . . .COBOL Programming II CPT 182 . . . . . .Programming in C - and - . . .6 CPT 186 . . . . . .Object Oriented Programming in C++ CPT 280 . . . . . .Visual BASIC - and - . . . . . . . .6 CPT 282 . . . . . .Advanced Visual BASIC CPT 284 . . . . . .Java Programming- and - . . . .6 CPT 287 . . . . . .Advanced Java Programming CPT 240 . . . . . .SQL Basics - and - . . . . . . . . . .6 CPT 260 . . . . . .Oracle Programming Plus choose any other programming language . . . . . . .3 CPM 190 Dynamic Programming Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 250 . . . . . .Database Programming . . . . . .3 CPT 185 . . . . . .Programming in C# . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Computer Science Database Management Option

Management Information Systems Option

The database is now the underlying framework of the information system and has fundamentally changed the way many organizations operate. While databases are often created and maintained by information technology professionals, today’s business management professionals are designing and creating their own database applications.

Management Information Systems is one of the leading degrees in the world of IT and business. IT professionals who, in addition to technical skills, have strong business acumen and interpersonal communication competencies are sought after as they assume larger and more visible roles as corporate strategists.

Data is the lifeblood of computerized applications. Virtually every area of management uses databases: marketing professionals to analyze sales data, human resource managers to evaluate employees, operations managers to track and improve quality, accountants to integrate data across the enterprise, and financial analysts to analyze a firm’s performance. General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 MAT 121 . . . . . .Intermediate Algebra . . . . . . . .3 Required Courses in Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications .3 CPT/BUS 105 . .Computer Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 106 . . . . . .PC Operating Systems . . . . . . .3 CPT 121 . . . . . .Basics of Data Comm. . . . . . . .3 CPM 120 . . . . . .Windows Multimedia . . . . . . . .3 Additional Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 CPT 130 . . . . . .Introduction to UNIX . . . . . . . .3 CPT 165 . . . . . .Programming Logic . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 200 . . . . . .Systems Analysis and Design . .3 CPT 201 . . . . . .Introduction to Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 240 . . . . . .SQL Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 246 . . . . . .Computer Security . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 260 . . . . . .Oracle Programming . . . . . . . .3 Plus, choose two of the following courses: . . . . . . . . . . . .6 CPM 190 Dynamic Programming Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 250 . . . . . .Database Programming . . . . . .3 CPT 265 . . . . . .DB2 Programming . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 270 . . . . . .Programming in Perl . . . . . . .3 CPT 280 . . . . . .Visual Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 282 . . . . . .Advanced Visual Basic . . . . . . .3 GEO 120 . . . . . .Introduction to GIS . . . . . . . . .3 GEO 225 . . . . . .Advanced GIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

SCC’s MIS A.A.S. degree emphasizes the practical aspects of computing, plus the business background to be able to best serve the computer needs of the business community. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) MAT 121 . . . . . .Intermediate Algebra . . . . . . . .3 CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 Required Courses in Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 CPT/BUS 105 . .Computer Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 106 . . . . . .PC Operating Systems . . . . . . .3 CPT 121 . . . . . .Basics of Data Comm. . . . . . . .3 CPT 165 . . . . . .Programming Logic . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 201 . . . . . .Introduction to Database Management . . . . . .3 CPT 200 . . . . . .Systems Analysis and Design . .3 CPT 246 . . . . . .Computer Security . . . . . . . . . .3 Choose One of the Following Four Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 CPT 174 . . . . . .COBOL Programming I - and -6 CPT 175 . . . . . .COBOL Programming II CPT 182 . . . . . .Programming in C - and - . . .6 CPT 186 . . . . . .Object Oriented Programming in C++ CPT 280 . . . . . .Visual BASIC - and - . . . . . . . .6 CPT 282 . . . . . .Advanced Visual BASIC CPT 284 . . . . . .Java Programming - and - . . .6 CPT 287 . . . . . .Advanced Java Programming CPM 190 Dynamic Programming Languages - and - . . . . . . . . . .6 CPT 250 . . . . . .Database Programming Required Business Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 BUS 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Business . . . . .3 ACT 110 . . . . . .Financial Accounting I . . . . . .4 BUS 201 . . . . . .Introduction to Management .3 BUS 230 . . . . . .Introduction to Marketing . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

NETWORK DESIGN/ NETWORKING SCC offers the Cisco Networking Academy program to prepare you for the CCNA or CCNP industry certification. At the same time, you may earn credit towards an Associate of Applied Science degree or Certificate of Achievement. SCC offers Microsoft Networking classes to help prepare you for industry certifications such as the MCP, MCSE, or MCSA. At the same time, you may earn credit towards an Associate of Applied Science degree or Certificate of Achievement.

5-37


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Computer Science

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Multimedia & Web Design Option

Networking Option

Multimedia has changed the way America works! This program gives you the capability of developing software for a variety of uses by utilizing authoring tools, development tools, and multimedia software. The program allows you to develop presentation, multimedia, and tutorial packages and Web pages.

Computer Networking programs at St. Charles Community College provide hands-on, skills-based training in state-of-the-art classroom labs. The Cisco Networking Academy, Microsoft Academy, and A+ programs prepare you for the corporate workplace and industry certifications. Learn how to configure, manage, and troubleshoot network workstations, servers, routers, and switches. Learn how to properly secure your network, how to set up a wireless network, and how to repair and troubleshoot PCs.

Our degree in Multimedia and Web Design helps prepare you for career opportunities in Multimedia authoring and programming, CD-ROM development, Web Page design, and photo, sound and video editing using up-to-date software programs employers are seeking. General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) CPT 115 . . . . . .Introduction to Data Processing . . . . . . . . . . . .3 MAT 121 . . . . . .Intermediate Algebra . . . . . . .3 Required Courses in Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications .3 CPT/BUS 105 . .Computer Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 106 . . . . . .PC Operating Systems . . . . . . .3 CPT 121 . . . . . .Basics of Data Comm. . . . . . . .3 CPT 165 . . . . . .Programming Logic . . . . . . . . .3 Additional Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 CPM 120 . . . . . .Windows Multimedia . . . . . . . .3 CPM 160 . . . . . .Introduction to HTML . . . . . . .3 CPM 170 . . . . . .Computer Graphics . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 210 . . . . . .Digital Photo Editing (Adobe PhotoShop) . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 250 . . . . . .Web Page Animation (Macromedia Flash) . . . . . . . .3 CPM 251 . . . . . .CBT Development (Macromedia Flash) . . . . . . . .3 Plus choose three of the following courses: . . . . . . . . . . .9 CPM 190 Dynamic Programming Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 200 . . . . . .XML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 220 . . . . . .3D Animation (LightWave) . . .3 CPM 240 . . . . . .Web Design (Macromedia Dreamweaver) .3 CPM 255 . . . . . .ActionScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 260 . . . . . .Advanced Multimedia (Macromedia Director) . . . . . .3 CPM 270 . . . . . .Digital Video Editing (Adobe Premiere) . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 280 . . . . . .JavaScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 290 . . . . . .Topics in Multimedia . . . . . . . .3 CPT 250 . . . . . .Database Programming (SQL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66

5-38

The Computer Networking program offers free consultations with program representatives to discuss how our training fits into your career goals. Technology is here to stay and the need for trained professionals will continue to grow. Now is the time to join the exciting field of Information Technology. For more information, visit http://stchas.edu/networking. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) MAT 121 . . . . . .Intermediate Algebra . . . . . . . .3 A+ Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPT 107 . . . . . .A+ (Computer Repair and Maintenance) . . . . . . . . . .5 Cisco Certification – CCNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 CPC 170 . . . . . .CCNA 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 171 . . . . . .CCNA 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 172 . . . . . .CCNA 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 173 . . . . . .CCNA 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Microsoft Certification (MCP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 CPC 125 . . . . . .Windows Desktop OS . . . . . . . .3 CPC 202 . . . . . .Windows Server . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 225 . . . . . .Microsoft Exchange Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 UNIX & Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 CPT 180 . . . . . .UNIX for Networking . . . . . . . .5 CPT 105 . . . . . .Computer Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 *NOTE: May be waived by permission of computer networking program coordinator. For more information, call 636-922-8241.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Computer Science Telecommunications Option

Data Management

A telecommunications network is an array of facilities that provide custom routing and services for a large number of users so they may distribute or exchange information simultaneously.

Databases are used to store, manipulate, and retrieve data in nearly every type of organization including business, healthcare, education, government, and libraries. Database technology is routinely used by people on personal computers, by workgroups accessing databases on network servers, and by all employees using enterprise-wide distributed applications. Managers in all industries seek to use knowledge derived from databases for competitive advantage.

Telecommunications services can become congested during periods of peak demand, so some potential communication is delayed or, worse, refused service. Managing this congestion is essential to business success. Knowledge of protocols is of paramount importance. SCC’s program gives you the background to work in the world of computer networks, telephones, facsimile, radio, television, and electronic mail. General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 MAT 121 . . . . . .Intermediate Algebra . . . . . . . .3 Required Courses in Computer Science Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT/BUS 105 . .Computer Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 106 . . . . . .PC Operating Systems . . . . . . .3 CPT 121 . . . . . .Basics of Data Comm. . . . . . . .3 CPM 120 . . . . . .Windows Multimedia . . . . . . . .3 Additional Required Courses for Telecommunications Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 CPC 170 . . . . . .CCNA 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPC 202 . . . . . .Windows 2000 Professional . . .5 CPT 130 . . . . . .Introduction to UNIX Operating System . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 243 . . . . . .Intranets and E-Commerce . . .3 CPT 245 . . . . . .Telephony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 246 . . . . . .Computer Security . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 249 . . . . . .Network Architecture and Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

E-commerce is fueling the demand for dataintensive websites that merge Web and database technologies. In addition, companies are widely using intranets to provide managers and employees with a readily accessible interface to internal databases. General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . . . . .3 Courses Required for Data Management Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 106 . . . . . .PC Operating Systems . . . . . . .3 CPT 121 . . . . . .Basics of Data Comm. . . . . . . .3 CPT 201 . . . . . .Intro. to Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 190 Dynamic Programming Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 240 . . . . . .SQL Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

5-39


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Computer Science Multimedia

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Multimedia has changed the way America works! You will learn the fundamentals of multimedia authoring and design using the latest programs on the market leading to entry-level positions. Multimedia developers produce and develop CDROMs, online training, kiosks and media development using video, audio, programming, animations and graphics. General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) CPT 115 . . . . . .Intro. to Data Processing . . . . .3 Required Courses in Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 CPM 120 . . . . . .Windows Multimedia . . . . . . . .3 CPT 106 . . . . . .PC Operating Systems . . . . . . .3 Additional Courses for Multimedia Option (choose four) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 CPM 170 . . . . . .Computer Graphics (Adobe Illustrator) . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 190 Dynamic Programming Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 210 . . . . . .Digital Photo Editing (Adobe PhotoShop) . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 220 . . . . . .3D Animation (LightWave) . . .3 CPM 250 . . . . . .Web Animation (Macromedia Flash) . . . . . . . .3 CPM 260 . . . . . .Advanced Multimedia (Macromedia Director) . . . . . .3 CPM 270 . . . . . .Audio/Visual Capture Methods (Adobe Premiere) . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

Multimedia A Certificate of Specialization in Computer Science provides an additional option for students to upgrade skills in a focused area of study. Students will be awarded certificates only upon successful completion of all the following courses under each header: Multimedia CPM 120 . . . . . .Windows Multimedia . . . . . . . .3 CPM 170 . . . . . .Computer Graphics (Adobe Illustrator) . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 210 . . . . . .Digital Photo Editing (Adobe Photoshop) . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 220 . . . . . .3D Animation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 250 . . . . . .Web Animation (Adobe Flash) .3 CPM 270 . . . . . .Digital Video Editing (Adobe Premiere) . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 5-40

Web Design Web designers design Web pages graphical content and animation, using HTML and Web editors. Learn the fundamentals of Web page authoring and design using the latest programs on the market leading to entry-level positions. Companies everywhere need Web masters to compete in today’s business world. General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Required Courses in Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 CPT 106 . . . . . .PC Operating Systems . . . . . . .3 CPM 120 . . . . . .Windows Multimedia . . . . . . . .3 CPM 160 . . . . . .HTML (Web Design) . . . . . . . . .3 Additional Courses Required for Web Design Option (choose three) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 CPM 190 Dynamic Programming Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 200 XML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 240 . . . . . .Web Design (Dreamweaver) . .3 CPM 250 . . . . . .Web Animation (Flash) . . . . . .3 CPM 255 . . . . . .ActionScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 280 . . . . . .JavaScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

Web Development A Certificate of Specialization in Computer Science provides an additional option for students to upgrade skills in a focused area of study. Students will be awarded certificates only upon successful completion of all the following courses under each header: Web Development CPM 160 . . . . . .HTML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 190 . . . . . .Dynamic Programming Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 240 . . . . . .Advanced Web Design (Adobe Dreamweaver) . . . . . . .3 CPM 250 . . . . . .Web Animation (Adobe Flash) .3 Plus two electives from the following for six credits CPM 200 . . . . . .XML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 255 . . . . . .ActionScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 280 . . . . . .JavaScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 240 . . . . . .SQL Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 250 . . . . . .Database Programming . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Computer Science Advanced Networking

Networking

This certificate program provides you with advanced skills as a network engineer through hands-on, skillsbased training in state-of-the-art classroom labs. Learn advanced aspects of how to configure, maintain, and troubleshoot network workstations, servers, routers, and switches.

This certificate program provides you with basic skills as a network engineer through hands-on, skills-based training in state-of-the-art classroom labs. Learn to provide end user support and how to configure workstations, servers, routers, and switches.

This certificate takes you beyond the two-year Associate of Applied Science Degree in Computer Networking through training in advanced networking. Prerequisite: A.A.S. degree in networking or CCNA and MCP CPC 225 . . . . . .Microsoft Exchange Server . . .3 CPC 270 . . . . . .CCNP 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 272 . . . . . .CCNP 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 275 . . . . . .CCNP 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 276 . . . . . .CCNP 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Specialty Option (Pick Two) CPC 240 . . . . . .Wireless LANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 245 . . . . . .Network Security I . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 247 . . . . . .Voice Over IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Earn this certificate and apply all these credits towards the two-year Associate of Applied Science degree in computer networking.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) Required Courses for the Networking Option . . . . . . . .23 CPT 107 . . . . . .A+ Computer Repair and Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 125 . . . . . .Windows XP Professional . . . . .3 CPC 170 . . . . . .CCNA 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 171 . . . . . .CCNA 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CPC 202 . . . . . .Windows Server . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

NETWORKING SCC offers the Cisco Networking Academy to prepare you for the CCNA or CCNP industry certification. At the same time, you may earn credit towards an Associate of Applied Science degree or Certificate of Achievement. SCC offers Microsoft Networking classes to help prepare you for industry certifications like the MCP or MCSA. SCC also offers computer repair classes to help prepare you for A+ certification, as well as a UNIX class geared toward network administrators. At the same time, you may earn credit towards an Associate of Applied Science degree or Certificate of Achievement. 5-41


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Computer Science

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

5-42

Programming Languages

Telecommunications

Software development is a foundation of IT departments, and this certificate prepares you for entry-level positions that develop, manufacture, and support a wide range of software products

A telecommunications facility includes the equipment, services, and associated support persons that facilitate communication between two users. Managing these facilities is essential to business success.

Operation systems and other system software, productivity software, network software, and Internet software are some of the exciting programs that are continuously enhanced and expanded.

SCC’s certificate gives the student entry-level skills needed to work in the world of computer networks, telephones, facsimile, radio, television and electronic mail.

General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 (See page 5:20) Additional Courses Required for Programming Languages Option (Choose Six) . . . . . .18 CPT 172 . . . . . .FORTRAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 174 . . . . . .COBOL Programming I . . . . . .3 CPT 175 . . . . . .COBOL Programming II . . . . .3 CPT 182 . . . . . .Programming in C . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 186 . . . . . .Object Oriented Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 280 . . . . . .Visual Basic for Windows . . . . .3 CPT 282 . . . . . .Advanced Visual Basic . . . . . . .3 CPT 284 . . . . . .Java Programming . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 287 . . . . . .Adv. Java Programming . . . . . .3 CPT 185 . . . . . .Programming in C# . . . . . . . . .3 CPM 190 . . . . . .Dynamic Programming Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 240 . . . . . .SQL Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 250 . . . . . .Database Programming . . . . . .3 CPT 260 . . . . . .Oracle Programming . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Required Courses in Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 CPM 120 . . . . .Windows Multimedia . . . . . . . .3 CPT 106 . . . . . .PC Operating Systems . . . . . . .3 Additional Courses Required for Telecommunications Option . . . . . . . . . .12 CPT 121 . . . . . .Basics of Data Communications . . . . . . .3 CPT 245 . . . . . .Telephony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 246 . . . . . .Computer Security . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 249 . . . . . .Network Architecture and Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Criminal Justice Law Enforcement This program is planned for three types of students: • Those who plan to work with law enforcement agencies. • Those already employed as officers who wish to advance in their jobs. • Those preparing for advanced study in police management, criminology, or social welfare. SCC offers both the Associate of Applied Science-Law Enforcement Option outlined here and the Associate of Arts degree with a Criminal Justice emphasis. The A.A.S. will help you obtain employment in the law enforcement area of the criminal justice system. The A.A. is a transfer program for students who plan to pursue an advanced degree at a four-year college or university. The college grants up to 14 credit hours toward the A.A.S. degree for students who already have completed the 960-hour course at Eastern Missouri Law Enforcement Training Academy. These credit hours apply to specific courses – CRJ 110/170/ 224/230. See an academic advisor if you have attended or plan to attend the academy. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) MAT 105 . . . . . .Applied Mathematics or higher . . .3 Criminal Justice Core Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 CRJ 140 . . . . . .Intro. to Criminal Justice . . . . .3 CRJ 170 . . . . . .Crim. Law and Procedures . . . .3 CRJ 171 . . . . . .Rules of Evidence . . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 175 . . . . . .Criminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 201 . . . . . .Conflicting Perspectives . . . . . .3 CRJ 205 . . . . . .Juvenile System . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Law Enforcement Option (Select From the Following) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 CRJ 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Victimology . .3 CRJ 110 . . . . . .Criminal Investigations . . . . .3 CRJ 202 . . . . . .Correctional Instit. . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 210 . . . . . .Crime Victimization . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 224 . . . . . .Constitutional Law . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 230 . . . . . .Crisis Intervention . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 240 . . . . . .Probation and Parole . . . . . . .3 CRJ 250 . . . . . .Police Administration . . . . . . .3 CRJ 260 . . . . . .Police Comm. Relations . . . . .3 CRJ 266 . . . . . .Internship II . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-6 CRJ/HMS 290 . .Special Topics . . . . . . . . . . . .1-3 CRJ 291 . . . . . .Mock Trial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-3 CRJ 292 . . . . . .Mock Trial Competition . . . .1-3 Other Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-9 CRJ 265 . . . . . .Internship I (Capstone) . . . .1-6 SOC 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Sociology . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61-66

Law Enforcement Complete a minimum of 32 credit hours, including 12 credit hours of general education courses (one course from communication, one course from mathematics [MAT 098 or above], one course from social science, and one course from any of the three remaining categories listed in the A.A.S. chart or one course from computer science).

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 (See page 5:20) Must include: MAT 098 . . . . . . . . .Beginning Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Criminal Justice Core Courses (Choose three) . . . . . . . . .9 CRJ 140 . . . . . .Intro. to Criminal Justice . . . . .3 CRJ 170 . . . . . .Criminal Law* . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 171 . . . . . .Criminal Evidence . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 175 . . . . . .Criminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 201 . . . . . .Conflicting Perspectives . . . . . .3 CRJ 205 . . . . . .Juvenile Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Law Enforcement Option (Select From the Following) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-9 CRJ 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Victimology . .3 CRJ 110 . . . . . .Investigations I . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 202 . . . . . .Correctional Instit. . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 210 . . . . . .Crime Victimization . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 224 . . . . . .Constitutional Law I . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 230 . . . . . .Crisis Intervention* . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 240 . . . . . .Probation and Parole . . . . . . .3 CRJ 250 . . . . . .Police Administration . . . . . . .3 CRJ 260 . . . . . .Police Comm. Relations . . . . .3 CRJ 266 . . . . . .Internship II . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-6 CRJ 291/292 . . .Mock Trial** . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Other Required Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-6 CRJ 265 . . . . . .Internship I (Capstone) . . . .2-6 Total Required Hours (Minimum) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-36 * Graduates of the Police Academy are given credit for 12 hours (courses marked with an asterisk*) toward the program certificate. Police Academy graduates can also receive 2 additional hours toward the A.A.S. degree for Physical Education. ** Students who take CRJ 291 are required to take CRJ 292 as well.

5-43


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

Education Paraprofessional

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

EDUCATION PARAPROFESSIONAL MAT 108 MAT 108, understanding K-8 Mathematics, has been created specifically for the paraprofessional degree. MAT 108 students will learn through hands-on activities, stories, group discussions, and problem-solving. A primary focus of MAT 108 is understanding the math concepts behind the math skills that many of us have simply memorized. Students will discover that math can be fun, when underlying principles are understood. In addition to paraprofessionals, MAT 108 will be helpful to practicing teachers, parents of K-8 students (including home-schooling parents), and anyone else who is curious about math.

5-44

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

General Education

Education Paraprofessional

General Education

This degree offers classes in general education, professional education, and early childhood. Many of the courses will transfer to a four-year institution and will count toward a bachelor’s degree; others offer content specific to the needs of students with whom paraprofessionals are likely to work. Note: MAT 108 has been designed especially for this program (see margin for description).

This is a 42-hour program that is part of the requirements for the Associate of Arts in Art and Sciences. As designed, it allows students to explore a variety of disciplines and introduces the fundamentals of a college education from the perspectives of different subject areas. In addition to giving a broad foundation for preparation for any future area of study, it allows students to explore subjects they are most interested in and may want to major in after transferring to a four-year institution. Any student who completes this 42-hour program and applies for it will be entitled to receive a Certificate of Achievement General Education.

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) BIO 101/103 . . .General Biology I and Lab . . . .4 ENG 101 . . . . . .English Comp. I . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ENG 102 . . . . . .English Comp. II - or - . . . . . .3 ENG 115 . . . . . .Technical Writing - or - . . . . .3 ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . .3 HIS 101/102/115/POL 101 (choose one) . . . . . .3 MAT 108 . . . . . .Understanding K-8 Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 101 . . . . . .Intro. to Psychology . . . . . . . . .3 Fine Arts Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . .3 Professional Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 EDU 210 . . . . . .Teaching Profession With Field Experience . . . . . . .3 EDU 211 . . . . . .Foundations of Education . . . .3 EDU 240 . . . . . .Educational Psychology . . . . . .3 EDU 225 . . . . . .Lit. for Children - or - . . . . . . .3 CDC 103 . . . . . .Literacy and Literature for Young Children EDU 242 . . . . . .Art for Children . . . . . . . . . . . .3 EDU 220 . . . . . .Technology for Teachers . . . . .3 EDU 280 . . . . . .Practicum for Paraprofessionals . . . . . . . .2 CDC 107 . . . . . .Intro. to Young Children With Special Needs . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 112 . . . . . .Child Growth and Dev. I - or - . .3 CDC 113 . . . . . .Child Growth and Dev. II -or- 3 PSY 201 . . . . . .Child Psychology - or - . . . . .3 PSY 215 . . . . . .Adolescent Psychology . . . . . . .2 Choose one of the following electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EDU 244 . . . . . .Physical Education for the Elementary Grades . . . .3 EDU 246 . . . . . .Music for Children . . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 102 . . . . . .Creative Activities for Young Children . . . . . . . . . 3 CDC 201 . . . . . .Cognitive Activities for Young Children . . . . . . . . .3 CDC 207 . . . . . .Curriculum and Materials for Young Children With Special Needs . . . . . . . . . .3 Open Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Any EDU or CDC course not already taken, except CDC 106 . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 201 . . . . . .Child Psychology . . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 215 . . . . . .Adolescent Psychology . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

ENG 101 . . . . . .English Comp. I . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ENG 102 . . . . . .English Comp. II . . . . . . . . . . .3 SPE 101 . . . . . .Oral Communication . . . . . . . .3 Social Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 One Social Science course from Group 1: HIS 101, 102, 115, 270, POL 101, 102 . . . . . . .3 One Social Science course from Group 2: Any ANT, CRJ 140, CRJ 175, ECO 100, 110,120, Any GEO, PSY 101, SOC 101, 102 . . . . . . . . . . .3 One additional course from Group 1 or 2 or: Any HIS or Any POL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 One Humanities course from Group 1: ART 101, 150, 160, 170, MUS 111, 112, 231, 232, 234, MUS 113 or 229 or THE 229, MUS 114 or 230 or THE 230, THE 122, 123, 124 . . . . . . . . . . . .3 One Humanities course from Group 2: BUS 105 or CPT 105, Any LIT, Any PHL, Any Foreign Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 One additional course from Group 1 or 2 Choose one of the following Multicultural/Valuing . . . .3 ANT 102, 103, 151, 161, 171, 201, 202, 220, BUS 105 or CPT 105, BUS 255, ESL 101, 102, GEO 100, 101,102, Any GLC, Any GLS, HIS 145, 146, 160, 201, LIT 200, 271, 272, 273, 275, LIT 241 or SOC 241, MUS 111, PHL 201, POL 201, 210, 220, 255, Any Foreign Language, SPE 215 MAT 160, 165, or higher* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 One Natural Science course from Group 1: BIO 100, BIO 101/103, BIO 110/113, BIO 120, BIO 122, BIO 125/127 One Natural Science course from Group 2: CHM 101/103, 110/113, PHY 111/113, 125/127, 130/131, 150/153, 225/227, 240/243 At least one lab must be taken with a corresponding lecture course COL 299 . . . . . . . . . .Sophomore Portfolio Assmnt. . . . . .1 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 * A student who does not take MAT 160 to meet the Mathematics requirement may need to take an additional credit hour, e.g. an additional science lab or an hour GLC course to meet the 42-credit hour general education requirement. Speak with your counselor or advisor.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

General Technology

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Global Studies

General Technology

Global Studies

This degree program provides a broad scope of technical skills applicable to technician employment in appropriate industry or service companies. A core foundation including computer hardware/software applications, math, science, CAD, and electronics is combined with specialized study areas relative to student/employer interest. Program opportunities exist for graduates as entry level technicians or for skill advancement of currently employed personnel in technical fields.

Students will develop a fundamental level of international and intercultural competence and prepare for a role in an increasingly complex, interconnected, and interdependent world. The coursework will also reinforce the four State-Level Skill Area Goals and the State-Level Knowledge Area Goals of the new General Education structure using an explicit global focus.

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) Elective must be from Social Sciences Required Core Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 EGR 100 . . . . . .Intro to Engineering . . . . . . . .1 ETC 101 . . . . . .Fund. of Electronics . . . . . . . . .3 CDM 103 . . . . .Introduction to CAD . . . . . . . .2 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Apps. -or- . . .3 CPT 106 . . . . . .PC Operating Systems . . . . . . .3 QUA 110 . . . . . .Intro. to Quality Systems . . . . .3 Program Major Concentration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 (Electronics, Networking, Telecommunications, CAD, etc., including 200 level technology courses of student’s interests.) Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 (Technology, management, computers, graphic design, multimedia, and more according to student’s interests and needs.) Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) Choose one course from: ENG 101, ENG 102, ENG 125, or SPE 101 . . . .3 Choose one course from: CPT/BAS 103, CPT 115, MAT O98, BIO 100, BIO 101/103, BIO 110/113, BIO 120, BIO 122, BIO 125/127, CHM 101/103, CHM 110/113, PHY 111/113, PHY 125/127, PHY 130, PHY 150/153, or PHY 240/243 . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Required Courses for Global Studies Certificate . . . . . . .6 Choose one course from Group I: . . . . . . . . .3 ART 101, ART 150, ART 160, GLC 290, LIT 200, LIT 271, LIT 272, LIT 273, LIT 275 MUS 111, MUS 231, MUS 232, PHL 201, SPE 215, THE 122, or any GLC course. Choose one from Group II: . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ANT 102, ANT 151, ANT 161, ANT 171, ANT 220, BUS 255, GEO 100, GEO 101, GEO 102, GLS 290, HIS 145, HIS 146, HIS 160, HIS 201, HIS 240, POL 201, POL 210, POL 220, POL 255, or any GLC course (other than 101). Additional Required Courses for Global Studies . . . . . . .6 GLS 101 . . . . . .Intro. to Global Studies . . . . . .3 Foreign Language 201 (or higher) . . . . . . . . . .3 The remainder of the certificate courses to reach the minimum of 30 hours will be chosen from the two lists of approved Global Studies Certificate courses. At least two course prefixes must be represented in each group. Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

5-45


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

Graphic Design Graphic Design

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Combining traditional art fundamentals with cutting-edge technology, the Graphic Design A.A.S. degree program consists of comprehensive coursework that prepares students for a variety of jobs, including Web design, video editing, computer animation, print production, and others. These skills can be applied to many jobs, including advertising, promotion, printing, broadcast, the cinema, etc. This degree encompasses all current and near-future baseline skills required by graphic employers and includes information and techniques designed to maximize students’ employability. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must Include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) PHL 160 . . . . . .Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 101 . . . . . .Intro. to Psychology -or- . . . . .3 SOC 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Sociology . . . .3 Required Courses for Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 ART 110 . . . . . .Drawing I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 120 . . . . . .Drawing II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 150 . . . . . .Survey of Western Art History I: Pre-History to End of the Middle Ages . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 170 . . . . . .Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ART 180 . . . . . .Design II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ART 190 . . . . . .Macintosh Basics . . . . . . . . . . .2 ART 285 . . . . . .Sculpture I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 290 . . . . . .Page Layout – InDesign/QuarkXPress . . . . . . .4 ART 291 . . . . . .Digital Imaging . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 292 . . . . . .Graphic Design for the Web . . .3 ART 293 . . . . . .Video Production/ Portfolio Development . . . . . . .3 Additional Courses for Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 ART 220 . . . . . .Photography I . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 260 . . . . . .Printmaking I . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 270 . . . . . .Commercial Illustration I . . . .3 ART . . . . . . . . .Art Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

Graphic Design Earning a Certificate of Specialization in Print Media provides a way for students to upgrade existing or to learn new skills in the area of print media. Students will be awarded this certificate only upon successful completion of all the following courses:

5-46

ART 110 . . . . . .Drawing I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 170 . . . . . .Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ART 190 . . . . . .Macintosh Basics . . . . . . . . . . .2 ART 260 . . . . . .Printmaking I . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ART 290 . . . . . .Page Layout on the Mac . . . . . .4 ART 291A . . . . .Digital Imaging . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Human Services General Option This program option provides a basic social science framework and perspective for a career in human services and for upgrading current skills. Persons interested in this program should enjoy working with people. They should possess good verbal and oral communication and problem solving skills and have a positive attitude about themselves and others. Graduates are qualified for positions as alcoholism education counselors, directors of GED (General Education Development) tutoring programs, house parents, nursing home activity directors, case workers, corrections officers, vocational rehabilitation workers, teacher's aides for exceptional children, and personnel assistants. Graduates are prepared for positions in social welfare, mental health, juvenile and adult correction, geriatrics, education, counseling, and related fields in business and industry. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . .3 Required Courses in Human Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 HMS 100 . . . . . .Intro. to Human Services . . . . .3 HMS 101 . . . . . .Theories and Skills . . . . . . . . . .3 HMS 102 . . . . . .Policy and Politics . . . . . . . . . .3 HMS 201 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. I* . . . . .3 HMS 202 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. II* . . . .3 HMS 203 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. Sem. I .3 HMS 204 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. Seminar II (Capstone) . . . . . . .3 Additional Courses for General Option† . . . . . . . . . . . .12 HMS 111 . . . . . .Group Practice in Human Services . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Choose from the catalog prefixes CRJ, HMS, PSY, SOC, as well as computer and business courses approved by the Human Services Program coordinator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Other Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applic. Using MS Office . . . . . . . . . . . .3 SOC 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Sociology . . . .3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 * Practicum oriented toward option area.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Human Services Gerontology Option This program provides students with a basic social science framework and perspective for pursuing a career in human services. The program also provides currently employed human services workers the opportunity to upgrade their skills. Persons interested in this program should enjoy working with people. They should possess good verbal and oral communications and problemsolving skills and have a positive attitude about themselves and others. Graduates are qualified for positions as alcoholism education counselors, directors of GED (General Education Development) tutoring programs, house parents, nursing home activity directors, case workers, corrections officers, vocational rehabilitation workers, teacher's aides for exceptional children and personnel assistants. These positions are available in the areas of social welfare, mental health, juvenile and adult correction, geriatrics, education, counseling, and related fields in business and industry. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . .3 Required Courses in Human Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 HMS 100 . . . . . .Intro. to Human Services . . . . .3 HMS 101 . . . . . .Theories and Skills . . . . . . . . . .3 HMS 102 . . . . . .Policy and Politics . . . . . . . . . .3 HMS 201 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. I* . . . . .3 HMS 202 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. II* . . . .3 HMS 203 . . . . . .Human Services Practicum Seminar I . . . . . . . .3 HMS 204 . . . . . .Human Services Seminar II (Capstone) . . . . . . .3 Additional Courses for Gerontology Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 BIO 242 . . . . . .Physiology of Aging . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 225 . . . . . .Psychology of Aging . . . . . . . . .3 SOC 151 . . . . . .Gerontology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 SOC 251 . . . . . .Aspects of Aging . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Other Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 SOC 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Sociology . . . .3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 * Practicum oriented toward option area.

Substance Abuse Services Option This program provides students with a basic social science framework and perspective for pursuing a career in human services. The program also provides currently employed human services workers the opportunity to upgrade their skills.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Persons interested in this program should enjoy working with people. They should possess good verbal and oral communications and problem solving skills and have a positive attitude about themselves and others. Graduates are qualified for positions as alcoholism education counselors, directors of GED (General Education Development) tutoring programs, house parents, nursing home activity directors, case workers, corrections officers, vocational rehabilitation workers, teacher's aides for exceptional children and personnel assistants. These positions are available in the areas of social welfare, mental health, juvenile and adult correction, geriatrics, education, counseling, and related fields in business and industry. General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . .3 Required Courses in Human Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 HMS 100 . . . . . .Intro. to Human Services . . . . .3 HMS 101 . . . . . .Theories and Skills . . . . . . . . . .3 HMS 102 . . . . . .Policy and Politics . . . . . . . . . .3 HMS 201 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. I* . . . . .3 HMS 202 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. II* . . . .3 HMS 203 . . . . . .Human Services Practicum Seminar I . . . . . . . .3 HMS 204 . . . . . .Human Services Practicum Seminar II (Capstone) . . . . . . .3 Additional Courses for Substance Abuse Services Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 HMS 103 . . . . . .Addictive Disease Concepts . . .3 HMS 104 . . . . . .Treatment-Alcohol and Drug Abuse . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 230 . . . . . .Crisis Intervention . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 205 . . . . . .Juvenile Justice System -or- . .3 HMS/CRJ 290 . .Special Topics in Human Services/ Criminal Justice . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Other Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 SOC 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Sociology . . . .3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 * Practicum oriented toward option area. 5-47


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Human Services

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Victimology Option

Youth Services Option

This program provides students with a basic social science framework and perspective for pursuing a career in human services. The program also provides currently employed human services workers the opportunity to upgrade their skills.

This program provides students with a basic social science framework and perspective for pursuing a career in human services. The program also provides currently employed human services workers the opportunity to upgrade their skills.

Persons interested in this program should enjoy working with people. They should possess good verbal and oral communications and problem solving skills and have a positive attitude about themselves and others.

Persons interested in this program should enjoy working with people. They should possess good verbal and oral communications and problem solving skills and have a positive attitude about themselves and others.

Graduates are qualified for positions as alcoholism education counselors, directors of GED (General Education Development) tutoring programs, house parents, nursing home activity directors, case workers, corrections officers, vocational rehabilitation workers, teacher's aides for exceptional children and personnel assistants. These positions are available in the areas of social welfare, mental health, juvenile and adult correction, geriatrics, education, counseling, and related fields in business and industry.

Graduates are qualified for positions as alcoholism education counselors, directors of GED (General Education Development) tutoring programs, house parents, nursing home activity directors, case workers, corrections officers, vocational rehabilitation workers, teacher's aides for exceptional children and personnel assistants. These positions are available in the areas of social welfare, mental health, juvenile and adult correction, geriatrics, education, counseling, and related fields in business and industry.

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . .3 Required Courses in Human Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 HMS 100 . . . . . .Intro. to Human Services . . . . .3 HMS 101 . . . . . .Theories and Skills . . . . . . . . . .3 HMS 102 . . . . . .Policy and Politics . . . . . . . . . .3 HMS 201 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. I* . . . . .3 HMS 202 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. II* . . . .3 HMS 203 . . . . . .Human Services Practicum Seminar I . . . . . . . .3 HMS 204 . . . . . .Human Services Practicum Seminar II (Capstone) . . . . . . .3 Additional Courses for Victimology Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 CRJ 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Victimology . .3 CRJ 140 . . . . . .Introduction to Criminal Justice System . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 210 . . . . . .Victim Services . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 230 . . . . . .Crisis Intervention -or- . . . . . .3 HMS/CRJ 290 . .Special Topics in Human Services/ Criminal Justice . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Other Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 SOC 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Sociology . . . .3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 * Practicum oriented toward option area. 5-48

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Psychology . . .3 Required Courses in Human Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 HMS 100 . . . . . .Intro. to Human Services . . . . .3 HMS 101 . . . . . .Theories and Skills . . . . . . . . . .3 HMS 102 . . . . . .Policy and Politics . . . . . . . . . .3 HMS 201 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. I* . . . . .3 HMS 202 . . . . . .Human Services Prac. II* . . . .3 HMS 203 . . . . . .Human Services Practicum Seminar I . . . . . . . .3 HMS 204 . . . . . .Human Services Practicum Seminar II (Capstone) . . . . . . .3 Additional Courses for Youth Services Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 CRJ 230 . . . . . .Crisis Intervention . . . . . . . . . .3 CRJ 205 . . . . . .Juvenile Justice System -or- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HMS 106 . . . . . .Introduction to Youth Services Management . . . . . . .3 HMS 104 . . . . . .Treatment – Alcohol and Drug Abuse . . . . . . . . . . . .3 PSY 215 . . . . . .Adolescent Psychology . . . . . . .3 her Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications . .3 SOC 101 . . . . . .Introduction to Sociology . . . .3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 * Practicum oriented toward option area.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

Skilled Trades Skilled Trades This degree program is for students who have completed an approved apprenticeship training program. It allows a union apprentice or journeyman to receive college credit for previously acquired knowledge, skills, and experience by applying those credits towards the associate’s degree. The A.A.S. in Skilled Trades may enable students to pursue an advanced degree at a four-year institution in fields such as construction technology, construction management, or related areas. The Skilled Trades Apprenticeship Training Program at SCC recognizes the core curriculum of any apprenticeship training program that is approved by the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. If your training meets these standards, your journeyman status can be transferred to SCC as credit to satisfy a portion of the specific program requirements needed for an associate’s degree.

OPTIONS IN SKILLED TRADES APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING A.A.S. DEGREE • Asbestos Worker • Boilermaker • Bricklayer • Carpenter • Cement Mason • Construction Craft Laborer • Electrician • Elevator Construction Worker • Floor Layer • Glazier

• GM/United Auto Workers • Iron Worker • Operating Engineer • Painter • Pipefitter • Plasterer • Plumber • Roofer • Sheet Metal Worker • Tile Setter • Wallpaperer and Drywall Taper

General Education Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Must include: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(See page 5:20) CPT/BAS 103 . .Microcomputer Applications, -or- . . . . . . . . . . .3 CPT 106 . . . . . .PC Operating Systems . . . . . . .3 ENG 102 . . . . . .English Composition II -or- . .3 ENG 125 . . . . . .Business Writing . . . . . . . . . . .3 *Required Courses in Skilled Trades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 This requirement is fulfilled by the approved completion of the Journeyman’s Certificate from the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, a division of the U.S. Department of Labor Total Required Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 * The Journeyman’s Certificate courses must be transferred in as a block and are only accepted after the student receives the certificate. Proof of receipt of the journeyman’s license is required.

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Joint Educational Agreements Transfer Agreements With Four-Year Institutions St. Charles Community College has developed several 2+2 and 2+3 academic articulation agreements with local and regional four-year colleges and universities. These agreements provide transfer students with a seamless transition from the Associate of Arts degree to the Bachelor of Arts degree and, in some instances, through the Master of Arts degree.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Programs in art, engineering, education, nursing, chiropractic, and business administration are among those that have predetermined arrangements with SCC for specific degree completion after the sophomore year. Colleges include Lindenwood University, St. Louis University, Maryville University, Southeast Missouri State University, Chicago Art Institute, University of Missouri, Missouri University of Science and Technology, University of MissouriSt. Louis, and Logan College of Chiropractic. Internet-based programs allow SCC students to complete a bachelor’s degree online in several specific programs with Franklin University of Columbus, Ohio, and the University of Phoenix of Phoenix, Ariz.

University Courses On Our Campus As a service to St. Charles County residents who wish to continue their education beyond the associate’s degree, SCC has developed a policy to allow fouryear colleges to offer advanced-level courses on its campus in select completion programs. Under that policy, the University of MissouriSt. Louis offers junior and senior-level courses at SCC. The course offerings follow a prescribed, approved 2+2 sequence in several program pathways. The junior- and senior-level courses do not duplicate courses offered by SCC. They are taught by university faculty in classrooms and labs on the SCC campus. For more information, contact the UMSL Office at SCC at 636-922-8675 or visit ADM 2123.

College Credits While in High School SCC has agreements with area high schools whereby high school students can take credit classes at SCC to get a head start on meeting college requirements. For more information on dual enrollment, see Chapter 2. 5-49


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Developmental Program Keys to Success

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS – DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

Not all students who wish to attend college are equipped with the academic background and study skills needed for a successful college experience. Some students may excel at math and science, but in English and communications they struggle. Other students may have bypassed a college prep course or two in high school and now find they are in need of catching up. Still more students, especially those who have been out of school for awhile, just need to brush up on rusty academic skills. At one time or another, everybody needs some kind of help; that is why the college offers developmental studies. The courses directly relate to SCC careertechnical and college transfer programs, making it possible for students with skills deficiencies in any academic area to prepare for regular college-level courses and to succeed. In fact, one of the primary missions of the college is to provide life-changing opportunities for all our residents to succeed on the job, at home, and at the college. For many people, developmental studies can offer a second chance at education.

Success Semester Students who assess into developmental English, mathematics, and reading 091 or 092 must enroll in the Success Semester (see Chapter 4.

Concentrating On the Basics Developmental courses represent a broad spectrum of classes that include the areas of math, reading, writing, and study skills. Each course is designed to help students develop new academic skills or refresh old skills in order to complete an academic major of choice. Some developmental classes are available as individual study units through the Academic and Career Enhancement (ACE) Center while others are taught in the classroom. Before you enroll, your skills will be assessed to assure placement in appropriate course work. Sometimes, students take developmental courses voluntarily because they realize their skills in one area may not be as sharp as they should be or because they are unsure of their present skill proficiencies. Others take developmental studies at the recommendation of an SCC counselor because their high school transcripts, test scores, and other data concerning past academic achievements indicate a need for further study of basic skills. 5-50

Selecting courses to match your present level of abilities is a smart way to assure that your first experience at SCC will be a good experience. Developmental studies can make the margin of difference.

Focusing on Your Needs Through smaller classes and carefully sequenced instruction, you can work through the progression of developmental courses. Because most of these courses award grades of “P” (pass), “R” (repeat), or “F” (fail), the pressure of the usual grading scale is removed and you can concentrate on mastering the basics before moving on to college-level work. The “R” grade, which is only available in developmental courses, indicates that you are making progress through the course objectives but have not yet achieved the mastery necessary to move to the next level. By re-enrolling in the course, you have another semester to master the course material. Developmental studies courses are distinguished from other courses by prefix codes numbered below 100 and are sequenced according to their level of difficulty. They cannot be used to fulfill the requirements of the associate's degree and they cannot transfer, but they may be used toward a careertechnical certificate if no other course is specified in its curriculum. Developmental course credits will be counted toward full-time enrollment status. Students completing developmental classes are in most cases well prepared for college-level credit courses. Developmental course credits will be computed in credits attempted and credits completed. Developmental courses will not be computed in the GPA.

Study Assistance Students experiencing difficulties in class should, at the first sign of trouble, go to the Academic and Career Enhancement (ACE) Center for assistance. Help is available on a walk-in and appointment basis in math, foreign languages, reading, several of the sciences, and study skills. English assistance is available by appointment. The ACE Center provides assistance six days (Monday-Saturday) and four nights (Monday-Thursday) a week during the fall and spring semesters. During the summer semester, the center is open five days (Monday-Friday) and four evenings (Monday-Thursday) per week.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

ACADEMIC & GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES Planning Your Programs Applying for Graduation Academic Progress Grading System & Assessment Attendance & Withdrawal Policies

6-1


S

ACADEMIC & GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES

94 6-2

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Academic & General College Policies Students are responsible for keeping themselves informed on the policies that govern educational studies at St. Charles Community College. In this section you will find answers to your questions about earning credits, course loads, graduation, academic progress, and other concerns. Feel free to seek advice and assistance from counselors, administrators, and other staff as you familiarize yourself with SCC policies. You can find out where to direct any further questions by checking the information directory in the current credit class schedule.

Planning Programs of Study Students often have an idea of their areas of educational interest. Some only wish to take a few courses related to their jobs or for personal enjoyment. Although St. Charles Community College recognizes that the first responsibility for selection of programs of study rests with the student, the college provides career and financial assistance counseling as well as academic advisement and orientation to general college services and opportunities. The contact for students who want help in planning programs of study is the Student Development Office. If you are concerned about transfer of credit to SCC, you should contact the registrar.

Assessment and Placement St. Charles Community College expects students to exhibit certain academic skills and competencies before they take college-level courses. • Students may be required to take assessment tests for placement and to predict readiness for college-level courses. • You may be required to enroll in appropriate developmental courses before being allowed to take college-level courses. • Students who test into three developmental courses must take the Student Success Semester. You will only be able to register for developmental courses or courses from an approved list available from the academic counseling staff. • Students testing into ENG 095, ENG 096, RDG 091, RDG 092, and/or MAT 095/096, should enroll in the developmental courses for the deficient area that semester. • You could be advised to withdraw from a college-level course and take assessment tests if the instructor believes you lack necessary skills to continue. A student with an identified deficiency may then enter a recommended developmental course to address the deficiency. All first-time entering freshmen are encouraged to take the ACT test and forward their scores to the Enrollment Services Office. ACT test scores will be used for institutional research and course placement. Students enrolled in selected Allied Health programs are required to submit ACT scores before admission.

6-3


S

ACADEMIC & GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Outcomes Assessment

Maximum Course Load

SCC is committed to the assessment of college programs and services to improve and maintain their quality and effectiveness. Classroom and program activities, including surveys and focus groups, will be used to assess the outcomes of college education.

It is recommended that the maximum course load for each of the following academic sessions be observed:

Students completing the Associate of Arts 42-hour general education block are required to take COL 299 Sophomore Portfolio Assessment, which will assess their acquisition of knowledge and skills. Students who complete career-technical programs will be assessed on their mastery of essential occupational skills and general education knowledge. The method of assessing these skills will vary by discipline. Some of the methods used by the programs will be portfolios, culminating projects, field specific national tests, and tests developed by the department. Most programs will assess general education knowledge using multiple modules from ACT-WorkKeys. These are taken in the Assessment Center. The nursing program uses the ACT-CAAP Critical Thinking module to pre- and post-test students. The results of these assessments will be used to modify the curriculum as needed to assure program completers are ready to proceed to employment in their chosen field or to further their education.

Credit by Examination Testing programs at SCC may allow you to receive college credit for knowledge or skills acquired through non-traditional approaches to learning. For more information on this type of credit, see the section in the Admissions and Records chapter, page 2:7.

Summer . . . . . . . . . .10 credit hours Fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 credit hours Spring . . . . . . . . . . .18 credit hours Repeated courses count as part of the course load. Students with a superior scholastic record may be permitted to register for more than the recommended maximum providing they meet the following GPA prerequisites: 2.75 GPA – approved to take 19 hours 3.00 GPA – approved to take 20 hours 3.50 GPA – approved to take 21 hours Students wishing to take more than 21 hours must receive special permission from the Office of Academic and Student Affairs. A veteran, in order to receive maximum assistance under the Veterans Education Law (G.I. Bill), must carry at least 12 hours of credit per semester.

Graduation Requirements The requirements for graduation at St. Charles Community College are those specified in the college catalog at the time a student enrolls or of any subsequent catalog as long as the student enrolls in at least one fall or spring term each academic year (August-May). If you change programs, you will be expected to meet the graduation requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of your program change. (See sections on Graduation Requirements in the chapter on Academic Programs – Degrees and Certificates in this catalog.) In the case of curriculum changes, instructional deans may make adjustments to your educational plan to meet program requirements. Every effort will be made to count earlier course work in a way most beneficial to the student in fulfilling current requirements. Students are subject to all policies/ regulations stated in the most recent catalog.

6-4


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

Evaluation of Credits Earned Elsewhere You may request an evaluation of credits you earned at other institutions by filling out the Request for Transfer Evaluation form in the Enrollment Services Office.

Applying for Graduation To be eligible for graduation from SCC, you must adhere to the following: • File an application for graduation with the Enrollment Services Office during the semester before you wish to graduate. Check the current academic calendar for specific application deadlines. The calendar can be found online at www.stchas.edu/calendars A summer graduate who wishes to participate in the May commencement ceremony must file an application for graduation by Feb. 1. The deadlines allow the college ample time to review student applications, to ensure that all requirements for graduation have or will be met, and to allow students the time to make course adjustments before the close of registration of their final semester. • Submit the $30 graduation fee. This fee is non-refundable if degree requirements are not met by graduation. You will be required to pay this fee each time you apply for graduation. However, if you decide to postpone your graduation to the following semester, the fee is transferrable so long as the Registrar’s Office is notified in writing three weeks before your original anticipated date of graduation. • Meet all requirements of the degree/ certificate program as outlined in the college catalog, with at least 15 of these credit hours actually earned at SCC. • Earn a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 and be in good academic standing. • Resolve all financial obligations to the college and return all library and college materials. • Students who plan to earn a degree at SCC will need to meet the requirements of the catalog in effect when they first enrolled or of any subsequent catalog as long as they enroll in at least one fall or spring term each academic year (August-May).

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Issuance of Diplomas Diplomas earned for December and May graduates will be issued shortly after the May commencement. August diplomas will be mailed at the end of August. Degrees earned in December will be posted on the student transcript at the time all degree requirements are met.

Commencement Exercises Commencement exercises are held annually in May. Students who are graduating in May and graduates from the previous December may participate in the exercises, along with those who have applied for and been tentatively accepted to graduate in the coming August.

ACADEMIC & GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES

Earning More Than One Degree • A separate application must be filed for each degree or certificate whether they were earned at the same time or during different semesters. • The specific requirements of each degree or certificate must be completed. • When two degrees are being earned, a student must choose the degree that requires the highest number of total semester hours and earn at least 15 additional hours. Example: If one degree requires 64 credits and the other requires 66, you must complete 81 total semester hours (66 + 15). If both degrees require 64 semester hours, you must complete a total of 79 credits. • If two degrees or certificates are earned at the same time, the graduation fee for the second is $10. If the second degree or certificate is earned in another semester, the $30 graduation fee must be paid each semester that a degree is awarded.

Final Examinations To complete courses and receive passing grades, all students must complete a comprehensive final examination. Absences from final examinations, with the privilege of taking makeup tests, must have prior approval of the instructor.

6-5 97


S

ACADEMIC & GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Scholastic Honors

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Full-time students who earn a 3.50 or above semester grade point average in 12 or more semester hours of credit and part-time students who earn at least a 3.50 GPA for each cumulative 12 credit hours will be named to the Dean’s List. Developmental courses, pass/fail courses, transfer credits, and courses in which incomplete grades were received do not count toward the credit hours.

Students are not subject to academic standing sanctions until they have attempted 12 hours of 100 level or above courses.

The Associate of Arts, Associate of Arts in Teaching, Associate of Science, and Associate of Applied Science degrees and certificates will be granted with the following designations to candidates of superior academic achievement: Cumulative GPA of at least 3.50-3.74 – Honors; cumulative GPA of 3.75-3.99 – High Honors; and cumulative GPA of 4.0 – Highest Honors. Indication of scholastic honors at the commencement ceremony will be based on the previous fall semester cumulative GPA.

Academic Progress Because the college wants each student to have successful learning experiences, students are expected to participate fully in instructional activities. Instructors will assess your progress in completing course objectives. Academic progress will be measured during the term and throughout your enrollment. The college academic progress policy establishes specific standards that must be met by all persons enrolled in credit courses at the college. Students placed on academic warning or probation are required to meet with a college counselor before enrolling in the next semester and will be limited to 12 semester hours. Students who are on suspension may appeal their academic status to the associate dean or dean of student development. If you have already enrolled for more than 12 credit hours and you are placed on warning or probation after enrolling, you will be required to meet with a counselor and you will be limited to 12 credit hours for the semester following the semester you were placed on warning. If a student in this situation does not speak to a counselor and drop his or her load to 12 credit hours, then an administrative drop will be done to limit the student’s credit hours to 12. If you experience academic difficulty, you will be required to meet with a counselor to discuss the cause of academic difficulty and to determine the best course of action for you to follow to improve your academic performance. 6-6

M

Credit Hours On Record

Cumulative Grade Point Average

12

1.5

13-24

1.6

25-36

1.7

37-48

1.9

49+

2.0

Academic Warning – You are placed on academic warning when your grade point average falls below satisfactory academic progress for the first time. Academic Probation – You are placed on academic probation the second time that your grade point average falls below satisfactory academic progress. Academic Suspension – You are placed on academic suspension the third time your grade point average falls below satisfactory academic progress. You will not be allowed to register for classes for the semester after being placed on suspension. When you return, you must meet with the associate dean or dean of student development each semester. Academic Dismissal – You will be dismissed if you do not maintain a 2.0 or greater grade point average (GPA) after returning from academic suspension. A student earning a 2.0 or greater GPA each semester after returning will be considered making satisfactory academic progress. Failure to maintain a 2.0 GPA in any given semester after being suspended will result in academic dismissal. If you have returned from suspension and bring your cumulative GPA up to a 2.25, you will be placed on a less restrictive status. This status will allow you to register without the mandatory meeting with the dean or associate dean of student development. Students can continue to self-advise and register as long as their cumulative GPA remains above 2.0. If the cumulative GPA falls below 2.0, the student will be dismissed. Academic Reinstatement – If you have been academically dismissed from SCC, you may apply to the vice president for academic and student affairs for consideration of academic reinstatement. To be considered, you must: wait for a minimum of one semester (summer session excluded) after having been academically dismissed from the college; submit a letter indicating the reasons why you should be considered for reinstatement; and be interviewed by the vice president. Consideration


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

for reinstatement may be based on an evaluation of life changes and circumstances that would merit reinstatement or an official transcript from another college or university indicating that you have been academically successful since being dismissed from SCC. For a detailed list of procedures to apply for academic reinstatement, see the office of the vice president for academic and student affairs.

Review of Academic Status The college recognizes that extenuating circumstances occur from time to time that may warrant further review of a student’s academic progress. Contact the Student Development Office or the Office of Enrollment Services for more information. NOTE: Students with concerns about course requirements, class procedures, teaching styles, or grades should follow the procedure outlined on page 6:9.

Transcripts And Grade Reports A transcript of your grades and credits at SCC is available through the Enrollment Services Office. You may request your transcripts in person or in writing (see Chapter 2). Final grades are available online through the SCC Connection. Final grade reports will not be mailed to students. At midterm of the fall and spring semester, only grades of “D,” “F,” and “R” are mailed to students. Midterm grades are not recorded on your academic transcript and therefore cannot be mailed to other institutions. Final grades and transcripts may be withheld from students who have not met their financial commitments to the college or who have not returned all outstanding library and/or college materials.

Auditing a Course If you wish to attend a course without taking an examination or receiving credit for the course, you may register on an audit basis. Students who register on an audit basis will pay the regular tuition rate and must meet the course prerequisites or receive special permission from the instructor. Audit students must adhere to the same policies and procedures as all students. If you wish to change from audit to credit or from credit to audit after the course is under way, you must process the change through the Enrollment Services Office within the first four weeks of classes (prorated for summer classes). Students cannot count audited courses to establish full-time status.

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Requirements for Students Taking English and Math All students taking English and math courses are required to make a grade of “C” or better in prerequisite courses before progressing to the next course in sequence. For example, you are required to make a “C” (“P” for pass/fail developmental courses) or better in English Composition I before being allowed to register for English Composition II.

ACADEMIC & GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES

In the event that you have registered for the next course in a sequence and are currently enrolled in a prerequisite course, and upon completion have not earned a “C” or better, you will be administratively withdrawn from the next level course. You will be refunded the tuition for the course from which you were withdrawn. It is your responsibility to provide documentation that all prerequisites have been met before being allowed to register.

Repeat of a Course You may repeat one time any credit course for which you did not receive at least a “C” for graded courses, or a grade of “P” for pass/fail courses. Exceptions to this rule include PE activity courses and some music courses. If the course can be repeated and have multiple attempts count toward graduation hours, then all attempts count in the cumulative GPA. “Ws” or withdrawals from a course are treated as an attempt. All grades from each attempt are recorded on the transcript, but SCC will use the higher grade to calculate the grade point average (GPA). Some colleges and universities will recalculate the grade point average for admissions purposes and include both grades earned. Students wishing to attempt a course for the third time must speak with a counselor or the department chair to obtain permission to enroll. In general, courses may not be attempted a fourth time. Where courses are a part of a sequence (English, math, reading), students may enroll in or audit the prerequisite course in order to acquire the prerequisite skills necessary for a successful fourth attempt. For financial assistance eligibility, all attempts will count towards maximum hour limits and completion ratio.

6-7 99


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

Corequisite Courses

ACADEMIC & GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES

Certain courses offered at SCC require that a student be concurrently registered for another course. For example, most science lecture courses require concurrent (same time) registration in an appropriate laboratory course. When registering, you must sign up both for the course and for any corequisite. If you later wish to drop the course, you must also drop the corequisite course. If you should fail one of the courses, you will be allowed to repeat that course without retaking the corequisite. However, you will not be allowed to advance in a sequence of courses until both have been successfully completed.

M

M

U

N

Variable Credit Course Consult with the instructor before you register so you know what number of hours to declare when you register for the class. The range of credit available is shown with the course in college class schedules that are available online before each registration period.

Grading System Grading symbols and points they earn are listed below. Some symbols are not grades but designations of administrative action regarding course work. A

(Excellent) Student has demonstrated outstanding proficiency in mastering course objectives. (4 grade points per credit hour in computation of grade point average.)

B (Above Average) Student has demonstrated above-average proficiency in mastering course objectives. (3 points) 6-8

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

D (Below Average) Student has demonstrated below-average proficiency in mastering course objectives. (l point) F

(Failing) Student has not demonstrated a minimum passing proficiency in mastering course objectives (O points)

I

(Incomplete) Due to extenuating circumstances, a student may be given an extension of time by the instructor to complete course objectives. The “I” can be issued only at the discretion of the instructor. Once you are issued an “I,” you may not withdraw from the course in which the “I” was issued. The “I” must be made up by the midterm of the following semester or it will become an “F” grade. The incomplete must be completed with the instructor who originally issued the “I.” The “I” does not count in computation of grade point average.

You may petition to change your program (or major) by filing a form available in the Enrollment Services Office, or online at www.stchas.edu/home/forms-applications.html.

Independent study may be used to complete the requirements for regularly offered courses. If you wish to take a course on an independent study basis, you must get approval through the appropriate division dean. The course curriculum must be developed and pursued under the direction of a faculty member.

T

C (Average) Student has demonstrated average proficiency in mastering course objectives. (2 points)

Change of Program

Independent Study

I

P (Pass) Student has completed the course work satisfactorily. This mark is used for most developmental courses and other courses at the discretion of the college. (Does not count in computation of grade point average.) R (Re-enroll) The student has made satisfactory progress but should re-enroll until the course objectives are completed. This mark is used for developmental courses only. (Does not count in computation of grade point average.) V

(Audit) Student’s final registration in the course was on an audit basis (no credit). (Does not count in computation of grade point average.)

W (Withdrawal) A “W” is not a grade, but an indication of administrative action requested by the student. You must officially withdraw from a course before the end of the 10th week of classes. For courses shorter than the normal semester, the withdrawal period will be prorated. A “W” may not be changed to a grade. (Does not count in computation of grade point average.) Z

Administratively unable to give a grade at this time.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

Procedure for Addressing Student Concerns Students with concerns about course requirements, class procedures, teaching styles, or grades should whenever possible first approach the instructor for clarification/resolution. Concerns about final grades must be expressed by the end of the next regular semester. If, after contacting the instructor you still have concerns, you should address them to the appropriate program coordinator and/or department chair who will work with you and the instructor to resolve the matter. If the department is unable to remedy the situation, you should address your concerns to the division dean. Individual departments may establish their own internal procedures for handling student concerns. If the division is unable to remedy the situation, you may then appeal in writing to the Office of Academic and Student Affairs. Anonymous calls or unsigned letters will not be acknowledged. Only concerns expressed by the individual student involved will be dealt with. Employees of the college may not legally discuss matters pertaining to non-minor students with parents, spouses, friends or classmates without a signed release from the student.

Attendance – General Policy The college has no plan of recognized class ‘cuts’ or absences. You should attend all class meetings in which you are enrolled. Excessive absence may be sufficient cause to fail the course. For distance classes, “attendance” will be defined as active participation in the course as described in the individual course syllabus. The final decision as to what constitutes excessive absence from a class is left to the instructor and will be outlined in the course syllabus. Students should discuss any absences with their instructor. Students who are absent from classes while participating in college-sponsored events or activities will not be automatically penalized for the absence. It is the expectation that students will normally be excused from class except under extraordinary circumstances. Students must complete the following procedures to determine the outcome of their absence for each missed class: 1) Students should make every effort to schedule college-sponsored activities around classes. 2) Students are responsible for notifying their instructors in advance of the absence. When possible, contact your instructor at least two weeks before the event/activity. Face-toface interaction between student and instructor is

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

preferred. 3) In advance of the activity, students must provide their instructor(s) a completed Event Form for each missed class. Student Event Forms are available to student athletes in CC 104 and for members of clubs and organizations in CC 102. This form will help you discuss the potential effects of the absence with your instructor. 4) Students are expected to make up any classwork in a time frame to be determined by the instructor. When a test is scheduled for the day of the expected absence, students should discuss with their instructor how to make other arrangements to take the test. You should use the ACE Center for additional help and the Assessment Center for make-up tests. 5) If you fail to inform the faculty in advance of the expected absence, the absence may or may not be accommodated at the instructor’s discretion. 6) Absences for the student-related activity will be reflected in your attendance record.

ACADEMIC & GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES

Withdrawal From Courses All students who wish to drop a course or courses must obtain and complete a Registration Form from the Registrar’s Office. It is the student’s responsibility to return the completed Registration Form to the Registrar’s Office. You may also drop online through SCC Connection. Discontinuing a course will affect your transcript (permanent record) as follows: A student who withdraws officially from a course before the end of the 10th week of class meetings will receive a “W” for the course. If you simply stop attending class and do not officially withdraw from the course, you will receive an “F” grade for the course. Leaving the Registration Form with your instructor does not constitute an official withdrawal from the course. The form must be returned to the Registrar’s Office in accordance with withdrawal procedure and dates. A listing of important course withdrawal dates may be obtained in the Registrar’s Office or online at www.stchas.edu/calendars/index.shtml. These dates are published in the credit class schedules and on the college website. The approved withdrawal dates are prorated for courses fewer than 16 weeks in length and for interim and summer sessions. The Veterans Administration may interpret the withdrawal from courses differently, so veterans should check with the Financial Assistance Office.

6-9101


S

ACADEMIC & GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES

6-10

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Withdrawal From College

Cancellation of a Class

All students who wish to withdraw from the college should contact the Enrollment Services Office and follow the prescribed procedure for dropping classes. If you simply stop coming to classes and do not officially withdraw from the college, you will receive an “F� grade for each course in which you are still enrolled. Withdrawing from all courses in a semester will affect future financial aid eligibility.

The college may find it necessary to cancel a class due to insufficient enrollment or other extenuating circumstances. Whenever possible, the class will be cancelled before the first meeting, and the students will be notified. Students enrolled in cancelled classes will receive a full refund of tuition and course fees.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

CORPORATE & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Non-Credit Courses GED/Adult Education/ESL Personal Development Workforce Development Continuing Education Units

8-1


S

8-2

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Corporate & Community Development St. Charles Community College is committed to providing lifelong learning experiences to every member of the community. Through the Division of Corporate & Community Development, the college focuses upon meeting cultural, educational, and economic development needs. SCC works closely with business and industry, schools, groups, and agencies in partnerships to improve the overall quality of life throughout the region.

Continuing Education To meet community needs, the Division of Corporate & Community Development provides a variety of special courses, activities, programs, and assistance that encourages lifelong learning. Not everyone who seeks learning experiences at the college is looking for a degree. Many people take courses one at a time to update professional skills, to satisfy personal and family interests, or for the enjoyment of learning something new. College is not a full-time job for them. It is a part of the week they look forward to, a chance to study things they may have passed by earlier in life, or an opportunity to explore a new technology. For many students, the Continuing Education program offers an exciting mixture of courses on a non-credit basis, which means there is no pressure from grades and exams and no substantial commitment of time. Many of the classes are offered at off-campus sites, so driving time is at a minimum.

Diversity of Subjects Each semester and during the summer, non-credit continuing education courses are listed in the Corporate and Community Development Schedule of Non-Credit Classes. Workshops, seminars, short courses, and entertainment programs are featured. Some of the topics include: Arts and Crafts Business Career Development Children’s Programs Computers Dance and Exercise Entertainment Foods GED/ESL/Adult Literacy

Home Improvement Languages Paralegal Certificate Personal Development Recreation Activities Technology Trade/Industrial Classes

Classes vary from workshops completed in one evening to classes that last several weeks. Fees for non-credit activities are based on the direct cost of instruction and include some offerings that are free of charge. Local tax dollars are not used to subsidize non-credit courses and activities. Classes are offered at the college and at community and business locations throughout the area. Some classes are offered from the comfort of your own home through our instructor-led online classes available at www.ed2go.com/stchas. Schedules of non-credit classes are published three times a year and are available on our website: www.stchas.edu/coned.

College for All Kids Children from toddler age through the eighth grade will enjoy this fun-filled instructional program. Throughout the year, children can explore their environment, satisfy their unlimited curiosity and express themselves through music, arts, writing, and recreation. General categories include: Computers Science Crafts Photography Suzuki Violin

Foreign Language Expressive Arts General Recreation Activities

8-3


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

CORPORATE & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Young People’s Theatre The Young People’s Theatre (YPT) is a performing arts program by kids and their families for kids and their families produced by the SCC Corporate and Community Development Division. The Young People’s Theatre is an official associate chapter of the International Thespian Society, a worldwide organization of young actors dedicated to excellence and achievement in theater arts. Theater classes and performing groups present musical and dramatic productions throughout the area as a part of this community enrichment youth program. Workshops, classes, and clinics are available for both beginning and experienced performers. For more information about YPT, call 636-922-8233.

Lifelong Learners Continuing education provides opportunities for intellectual and cultural exploration for men and women who are of retirement age or who are looking ahead to that time in their lives. Special discounts may be given to seniors (age 60 or older) enrolled in certain classes.

Elderhostel St. Charles Community College is an official sponsoring institution for the acclaimed National Elderhostel program. Elderhostel is an independent, non-profit organization offering short-term academic experiences in higher learning. 8-4

The program provides accommodations from three to six nights in a commercial facility with daily classes and course-related field excursions throughout the week. The college hosts more than 20 themed Elderhostel programs per year in the St. Charles area and in Illinois, from Meet Me in St. Louis to biking the Katy Trail.

Civic and Cultural Events The college arranges theater and entertainment events, business and civic lectures, workshops, and conferences at minimum cost or no cost to residents. See the Corporate and Community Development Schedule of Non-Credit Classes for upcoming events.

Continuing Professional Education Professional seminars and specialized training programs are specifically designed to enhance or expand job-related skills in areas such as: Child Care Instruction AMA Certificate Program Food Service Course Not-for-Profit Professional Series Paralegal Studies Certificate Course Ed2Go Gaitlin Career Certificate Programs Computer Instruction


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Adult Education And Literacy (AEL) And GED Preparation

Contact the Division of Corporate & Community Development for a class schedule or go to www.stchas.edu/ael.

Adult Education and Literacy (AEL) is individualized, self-paced instruction in the basic skills of language arts (reading and writing), math, science, and social studies. AEL helps adults improve basic skills needed to enter new job training programs or to increase the chances for job advancement. The program also provides preparation for the General Educational Development (GED) Tests for high school equivalency, instruction for English Language Learners (ELL), and one-on-one adult literacy tutoring.

The college has been approved by the state of Missouri as a regional GED testing site. Testing is conducted once each month. To register for the test, visit the Admissions Office, Room 1113, Administration Building. For additional information, visit the Assessment Center located in Room 133 of the Student Center.

St. Charles Community College coordinates with school districts and various community agencies to provide instruction. Free classes are offered at the college as well as at various agencies and school districts in St. Charles, Warren, Lincoln, and Pike counties. Day and evening classes are available. The college also provides adult basic education and vocational training to offenders in the Northeast Correctional Center in Bowling Green. All AEL students are individually assessed, and individual learning plans are created. Students work at their own pace in small groups or individually with materials suited to their specific abilities. The AEL program invites successful students to participate in its annual Student Recognition Ceremony. Competitive scholarships are available for GED graduates who participate in the AEL program.

GED Testing

CORPORATE & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Literacy Tutoring Free literacy tutoring is sponsored through the Literacy Education Action Program. Trained volunteers work one-on-one with low-level readers. Adults 16 years of age or older not enrolled in secondary school may qualify for this service. To obtain help or to become a volunteer, contact the Academic and Career Enhancement (ACE ) Center.

English Language Learners (ELL) These free classes are for adults of all nationalities 16 years of age or older not enrolled in secondary school who seek to improve their listening, reading, writing, and speaking skills in English. Contact the Division of Corporate & Community Development for a class schedule or go to www.stchas.edu/ael.

8-5


S

CORPORATE & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Workforce Development

Training Topics

The mission of the Workforce Development Department is to deliver customized training to our current workforce, re-direct the ready workforce to gainful employment, and assist the development of the next generation of workers using programs and events to strengthen their understanding of the world of work.

Training can be tailored to meet employers’ needs – the training site, duration and focus of training, and type of credit earned by participants are all elements that can be customized. Following is a sampling of the kinds of training offered by the Business and Industry program:

Business and Industry Program: Developing the Current Workforce The Business and Industry program of St. Charles Community College has been a leading force in the St. Charles County business community since 1992. The Business and Industry Program works with large and small employers to identify job skills and training needs for thousands of workers and employers; targeting primarily St. Charles, Pike, Lincoln, Montgomery, and Callaway counties. Our training features:

• Project Management • Leadership, team-building, and supervisory skills including strategic planning, mentoring/coaching, business writing, performance management/documentation, communications, problem solving/ decision-making, and more. • Instructional design services including needs assessment and designing performancebased training programs. • Computer/technical skills such as Microsoft Office, desktop publishing skills, and A+ Computer Certification Training.

• Experienced facilitators in a wide range of disciplines.

• Technical writing including job aids, process documentation, and procedure manuals.

• On and off-site training options

• Quality improvement including ISO, Lean, and OSHA safety training.

• Flexible scheduling. • A focus on adult learning.

Curriculum Partnerships

• Cutting-edge technology and resources.

The Business and Industry Program partners with proven training companies to offer consistent, effective training and measurable results.

Liaison to State Training Funds Workforce Development of St. Charles Community College is recognized by the State of Missouri as a Local Education Agency (LEA) for the application and administration of state funds for company training programs, new jobs training, and similar grant funding programs. If your company meets state guidlines, you may be eligible to receive funding assistance to support employee training. Workforce Development can assist you in applying for state funds. For additional information, contact the Workforce Development Department at 636-922-8474, or email workforcedevelopment@stchas.edu.

8-6

M

• DDI (Development Dimensions International). • Command Spanish, Inc.®, America’s top provider of occupational Spanish-language programs. • AchieveGlobal, a worldwide leader in producing business results. For information, contact the Workforce Development Department at 636-922-8474, or e-mail workforcedevelopment@stchas.edu.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Missouri Dislocated Worker Program: Redirecting a Ready Workforce

School-Business Programs: Investing In the Future Workforce

When county residents face unemployment due to layoffs, the college’s Workforce Development Department can help through its Missouri Dislocated Worker Program. This federally funded program offers professional assistance to laid-off job seekers in St. Charles County. Services available include:

Today’s youth are our future leaders in business and community – that is why the SCC Workforce Development Department is committed to creating opportunities for exploration and learning. The St. Charles County Alliance for Business, Learning, and Education (ABLE) exists to empower students for future success in all aspects of life.

• Job search assistance including resume preparation, interview skills training, and self-marketing tips. Numerous workshops and networking opportunities are provided. • Career consultation including development of a plan of action to determine job search goals and direction. • Opportunities for job seekers who require advanced training or retraining to enter a different career.

CORPORATE & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

As the coordinator for St. Charles County ABLE, the Workforce Development Department at SCC works with educators and businesses that make up ABLE. ABLE promotes the development of students through various programs such as: CHOICES, career fairs, an annual robotics competition, a teacher practicum, leadership activities, job skills initiatives, and ethics seminars – all with the focus on preparing young people to be productive employees and responsible citizens. For more information, call 636-922-8474.

• Use of the Missouri Career Center’s equipment and resources: telephones, fax, computers, laser printers, employer directories, and Internet connections. • Job placement assistance offering current labor market information and listings from area employers. The Missouri Dislocated Worker Program is located off campus in the Missouri Career Center and is part of the St. Charles County Government Department of Workforce Development and the Missouri Department of Labor. For more information, call 636-278-1360.

8-7


S

CORPORATE & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

8-8

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

GENERAL COLLEGE INFORMATION History & Governance Buildings & Campus Resources SCC Foundation Partnerships & Memberships

9-1


S

9-2

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

General College Information Since its establishment in 1986, St. Charles Community College (SCC) has served more than 150,000 individual students in credit and non-credit classes – a large segment of the St. Charles County population.

Board of Trustees chose a 135-acre tract on Mid Rivers Mall Drive in Cottleville. The site had easy access to major interstate highways, and its central location would position the college to be close to home for thousands of area residents.

SCC is here to meet your educational needs by offering lifetime opportunities for personal growth and professional success. SCC will prepare you for successful transfer to a four-year university or to directly enter a competitive workforce. SCC also offers cultural, civic, and recreational experiences for you and your family. Your experiences at SCC could be life-changing!

A Campus Home

If you know what you want to study, St. Charles Community College is a good place to start. If you are uncertain about your goals, let us help you discover the many options open to you. Many students already have chosen this college as a place to study, to learn, and to search – a place to get a quality education at an affordable price ... a place to grow. In fact, one-fourth of all St. Charles County high school graduates each year attend SCC! At SCC, new opportunities are continually being developed to improve the quality of life for you and the community in which you live. We look forward to building brighter futures together!

History St. Charles County has long been one of Missouri’s fastest-growing areas. With that growth came the need for affordable, close-to-home, and locally governed public higher education. An election in April 1986 established Missouri’s 11th community college district, formed within the boundaries of five school districts in St. Charles County. Selected as the first president was Dr. Donald D. Shook, who had previously served as president of two other Missouri community colleges. The first SCC classes were held in the summer of 1987 with about 400 students. By fall, there were 1,547 students enrolled in credit classes, and many other non-credit, continuing education programs were taking shape. The college operated out of several temporary locations for five years while continuing to plan for a permanent campus. Enrollment grew rapidly as SCC developed educational programs and services in answer to community needs. In November 1988, college district voters approved a $24 million bond issue for construction of a permanent campus. Then, in February 1989, the

Ground breaking for Phase 1 construction took place in June 1990. Excitement and fanfare surrounded the move to the new four-building campus late in 1991, and a public dedication ceremony was held on Jan. 26, 1992. The spring semester began without a hitch in the college’s new campus home. Planning for future campus growth continued, preparing the college to keep up with rapidly increasing enrollment. By fall of 1992, the number of students in credit classes had climbed to 4,631 – a 19 percent increase from the previous year. At the same time, continuing education non-credit programs kept growing, serving thousands of people, including business and industry partnerships and community outreach services for persons of all ages. In an April 1993 election, voters approved building Phase 2 of the campus. The college broke ground in March 1994 for the $10 million, two-building construction project that included the Donald D. Shook Fine Arts Building, named after the first college president, and a Continuing Education and Academic Center, later renamed the Humanities Building. The Phase 2 buildings opened in 1995. Then, matching funds from a separate statewide bond issue allowed SCC to build and open a Child Development Center in spring of 1996.

New Century of Learning Upon Dr. Shook’s retirement in November of 1996, Dr. John M. McGuire became the new college president. Dr. McGuire previously had served as president of Owensboro Community College in Kentucky. As the college celebrated its 10-year anniversary in 1996, enrollment was again on the rise. So that the college would have the capability to serve future generations of area residents, the Board of Trustees looked ahead to building Phase 3 of the campus, and they revised the master plan for campus growth. In April 1998, voters approved a $13.75 million construction project, including a College Center, a Technology Building, an addition to the Child Development Center, and athletic fields and parking lots. Trustees purchased several adjacent

9-3


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

parcels of property in 1998 and 1999, adding 87 acres to bring the campus size up to 222 acres. They later added (in 2003) another contiguous parcel to increase the total campus to the current 235 acres.

GENERAL COLLEGE INFORMATION

The Next 10 Years Dedication ceremonies for Phase 3 of the campus took place on Jan 21, 2001. That year also marked the college’s 15-year anniversary and an increase of more than 600 students – nearly 11 percent – in the fall. In spring 2001, responding to the popular local vernacular for the college, trustees shortened the original name (St. Charles County Community College) to St. Charles Community College. The change placed the emphasis on “community.” Entering the new century, the college focused clearly on enhancing programs and facilities, using technology to advance its mission, and placing the highest priority on excellence in teaching and learning. A 2002 mission statement revision reflected the “life-changing opportunities for personal growth and professional success” that have come to be the hallmark of this vibrant young college. That same year, SCC received the maximum 10-year accreditation from the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

More Room to Grow By 2004, student credit hour enrollment at SCC was growing more than three times faster than the population of St. Charles County, and the college neared maximum classroom occupancy. SCC was serving nearly 10,000 individual credit students in the course of a year, including more than onefourth of all St. Charles County high school graduates. Trustees once again looked to the future. County residents recognized the need, and voters approved a $23 million bond issue in April 2004 to further expand the campus with additional buildings, parking, renovations, and roadways. Another $2 million was added to the project through the sale of revenue bonds to be funded through bookstore auxiliary services. Ground breaking for Phase 4 buildings was held in June 2005, and an accelerated construction timetable enabled the college to open three new buildings in time for fall 2006 classes.

9-4

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Celebrating 20 Years – and Beyond Academic year 2006-2007 was a time for growth, celebration, and remembrance. The college marked its 20-year anniversary and dedicated the three new Phase 4 buildings in a special ceremony on Oct. 1, 2006. During the ceremony, the new Social Sciences Building was named after Dr. Daniel J. Conoyer, one of the original 1986 members of the Board of Trustees and the longest-serving board member until his death in late 2007. Dr. Conoyer had been re-elected three times to six-year terms, served as board president three times, and was instrumental in hiring both of the college’s presidents and selecting the permanent campus site. Another former board member, the late Paul O. Schnare, was honored with his wife, Helen, when the college named the library after the Schnares in a Sept. 19, 2007, dedication ceremony in the Learning Resource Center. The Schnares had a major role in early citizen efforts to establish the college. Later, they became longtime library volunteers and student scholarship supporters, having established the college’s first scholarship endowment. Leading the way among area higher education institutions, SCC went tobacco-free on Jan. 1, 2007, prohibiting tobacco use both indoors and outdoors to promote a healthy and safe campus. In fall 2007, SCC marked its highest enrollment ever – 7,027 students in credit classes. By 2008, SCC was well into its third decade. The college had progressed significantly in terms of space, technology, communication, and service. Wireless Internet access was introduced campuswide, “smart” technology aided instruction in nearly every classroom, and additional online classes provided convenience and access for students. SCC also focused on increasing student support with additional counseling and advising staff, a computer technology “help desk,” and a restructured scholarship program to reach more people in need. The college reaffirmed its vision, values, and mission to keep the doors of opportunity open for future generations of students.

Award-Winning Campus St. Charles Community College has been honored with a series of local, regional, and national architectural and design awards reflecting the unique construction and beauty of its campus. The magazine Architectural Record published a six-page pictorial feature praising the light and open building spaces, landscaped courtyards, and compact site plan. Among other awards was the


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

American Institute of Architects’ selection of the SCC campus design for highest honors among 88 projects throughout the area. The college campus is being built in phases. The most recent, Phase 4, added 130,000 square feet in three buildings. With the addition of Phase 4, the campus includes approximately 550,000 gross square feet of space under roof in 12 buildings. All buildings offer wireless Internet access. The main cluster of buildings faces an outdoor plaza, located on the crest of the rolling hill site and surrounded with 2,547 parking spaces for student commuters. All buildings allow easy access for people with disabilities. Architects describe the building layout as creating a sequence of "sheltering, internal courtyards" somewhat like an “educational village.”

Administration Building This three-level building houses classrooms, science and nursing labs, offices, and faculty suites. On the ground floor most accessible to students are areas for registration, financial assistance, career services, and counseling. Also located in this building are the SCC Foundation, the Human Resource Department, and the college’s marketing and communications services.

Learning Resource Center The LRC is the two-story home of the Paul and Helen Schnare Library, with books, periodicals, electronic databases, and Internet access. The building also contains offices, interactive video classrooms, a computer lab and technology “help desk,” a student “information commons,” or lounge, and instructional media resources.

Student Center This two-level building contains the cafeteria and dining areas; the Assessment (testing) Center; accessibility services, offices, lounges, and meeting rooms; and the Workforce Development Department.

Donald D. Shook Fine Arts Building Named after the first SCC president, the FAB houses a 407-seat theater, art gallery, scene shop and other theatrical areas, music rooms, and offices.

Humanities Building

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Campus Services Building Campus Services houses the Purchasing Office, Department of Public Safety, warehouse, receiving and storage areas, mail room, copying, central heating and air conditioning, and other essential services.

Child Development Center The accredited and highly acclaimed CDC accommodates the children of students, employees, and residents of the community. It serves as a teaching lab for students in the childcare program and provides training for workers from other child care centers throughout the area.

GENERAL COLLEGE INFORMATION

Technology Building All classrooms in this two-story building incorporate the latest in computer hardware and software, and the building is wired with fiber optic cable to allow the full range of voice, data, and video in each room. The building also houses offices and student lounge areas.

College Center This two-level building is a multi-purpose activity area for student organizations, physical education classes, athletics, recreation, and for special events, meetings, and exhibits. A gymnasium and a unique lobby/rotunda allow the building to accommodate large college and community events.

Daniel J. Conoyer Social Sciences Building Named after the college’s longest-serving board member, this large two-story building has 25 classrooms, a 250-seat multipurpose auditorium, the community boardroom, the Academic and Career Enhancement (ACE) learning center and computer lab, a student lounge, and faculty and administrative offices.

Café-Bookstore Buy a book and sip a hot latte all in one location – how convenient! The Café-Bookstore offers one-stop shopping for textbooks, software, general school supplies, and SCC logo apparel adjacent to the food service grab-n-go café and checkout. Students can relax, study, eat, and visit with friends between classes in a friendly and comfortable setting. The Café-Bookstore also has an outdoor seating area overlooking a lake.

This two-story building houses the Humanities Department and serves as a general classroom building. It also contains offices and classrooms of the Division of Corporate & Community Development, including the Continuing Education Department. 9-5


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

Visual Arts Building

GENERAL COLLEGE INFORMATION

This one-story building is all about art and design. The VAB includes 10 art classrooms and studios for pottery, printmaking, photography, painting, drawing, sculpture, jewelry making, graphic design, and metalworking.

Athletic Fields A softball field, baseball field, soccer field, and multi-purpose outdoor areas are located just north of the main campus cluster.

Campus Master Plan The Master Plan for campus growth continues to be updated and new construction projects initiated based on enrollment demands. The Master Plan document looks into the future, projecting that the 235-acre campus will eventually be able to serve up to 12,000 students as new facilities are added.

A Safe And Healthy Campus Drug-Free St. Charles Community College provides a drug-free school and workplace and operates within the guidelines as set forth in the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 and the AntiDrug Abuse Act of 1988. SCC prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs on the college’s property and client sites or as a part of the college’s activities. Furthermore, student possession, use, or distribution of alcoholic beverages on campus and at college events is prohibited.

Tobacco-Free The use of tobacco products is prohibited anywhere on the college campus. This includes all buildings, common areas, building entrances, athletic fields, walking trails, and parking lots.

Weapon-Free Possession or use of firearms – whether concealed or in sight – or any explosives, dangerous chemicals, or other weapons are prohibited on college property and at college-sponsored or supervised functions.

9-6

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Community Use Of the Campus St. Charles Community College makes the campus as accessible as possible to district residents by offering the use of meeting rooms and teleconferencing services when available. SCC also presents many cultural, recreational, and educational events and activities – both indoors and outdoors – that are open for participation by the general public. To inquire about community use of SCC campus facilities, contact the Academic Affairs Office or visit the college website at www.stchas.edu/community/rental.shtml. To view upcoming events and activities on campus, go to the main event calendar website at www.stchas.edu/calendars.

Campus Closings Inclement Weather In the event of inclement weather, the college may adjust campus opening/closing times or close the campus entirely. For inclement weather notices, you may call the college at 636-922-8000, or go to the college website at www.stchas.edu. The college also will contact local media with inclement weather announcements as soon as possible but cannot guarantee what times they will appear on radio or television stations. The following media will be notified by 5 a.m. for day classes or by 4 p.m. for evening classes (if bad weather develops during the day): KMOX Radio (1120 AM); KWRE (730AM)-KFAV (99FM) Radio; KSDK-TV, Channel 5; KMOV-TV, Channel 4; and KTVI-TV, Channel 2. Do not call the stations for information, but listen/watch during the scheduled inclement weather announcement periods. In the case of evening classes held at middle schools and high schools in the area, the SCC classes will not meet if the schools themselves have announced they are closed. Because area weather conditions may vary, you should use discretion in deciding if travel is safe. Make-up work is the responsibility of the student.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Holidays, Etc.

Board of Trustees

The college will be closed on certain holidays and on several in-service days during the year. In some cases, the college will remain open on days when no classes are held. Please consult the current credit class schedule for a list of campus closing dates.

St. Charles Community College is governed by six trustees who are elected by citizens of the college district.

Other Locations

Responsibilities of the Board of Trustees include the selection of the president and the establishment of basic policy for the district. The board is charged with the duty of fostering and maintaining the overall welfare of the college as well as approving the annual budget and the expenditure of funds.

In cooperation with public schools and other agencies, businesses, and institutions in the area, a number of credit classes and continuing education programs are taught off campus within the local community. Consult the credit and non-credit class schedules for exact locations.

The District The St. Charles Community College District is one of 12 public community college districts in Missouri serving a total of more than 86,000 transfer and career students statewide. The St. Charles Community College District covers all of St. Charles County except for a portion in the southwest corner that is in the Washington School District. The SCC district comprises five county high school districts: Francis Howell, St. Charles, Wentzville, Fort Zumwalt, and Orchard Farm. The college district covers approximately 525 square miles and includes the following urban and rural municipalities:

The Board of Trustees meets monthly. Times, locations, and agendas of the meetings are announced. All meetings are open to the public.

The board functions as a legislative and policymaking body of the district, whose responsibilities include the oversight and control of the college and such other duties as are imposed by Missouri law. The current trustees are listed in Chapter 10.

SCC Foundation The St. Charles Community College Foundation is an independent, not-for-profit corporation formed to solicit, receive, and administer gifts, grants, bequests, and donations to support the educational purposes of the college. Private and corporate contributions, whether in-kind or cash, are critical to completing the college’s mission. The SCC Foundation is a 501(c)3 tax exempt organization. Persons or groups who wish to contribute to the Foundation should address inquiries to the SCC Foundation and Development Department.

Cottleville

O’Fallon

Dardenne Prairie

Orchard Farm

Defiance

Portage Des Sioux

Flint Hill

St. Charles

Foristell

St. Paul

Harvester

St. Peters

Kampville

Weldon Spring

Lake St. Louis

Wentzville

The Catalog

New Melle

West Alton

The catalog is published to inform you about SCC – our students, faculty, programs, and services. Usefulness has been the prime consideration for including material. We have tried to make it a simple, accurate, and practical guide to ensure your academic success at SCC.

Residents of other counties can attend the college for an additional fee.

Service Area In addition to serving the local college district, St. Charles Community College has a broader service area that includes four other counties: Callaway, Lincoln, Montgomery, and Pike. Although residents of these areas pay “out-ofdistrict” tuition rates, they benefit from many services offered by the college.

GENERAL COLLEGE INFORMATION

Student scholarships and SCC program grants are available through the Foundation. For more information, visit Room 1119 in the Administration Building or visit the Foundation website at www.stchas.edu/foundation.

If you plan to earn a degree at SCC, you will need to meet the requirements of the catalog in effect when you first enrolled or of any subsequent catalog. Students who discontinue their enrollment for two consecutive semesters (summer excluded) will be required to follow the catalog in effect at the time of their return. 9-7


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

At Your Service

GENERAL COLLEGE INFORMATION

After you have read the catalog, you may still have questions. To further assist you, our staff and faculty are available throughout the campus. We encourage you to seek advice and information from a wide variety of sources: Admissions Office, registrar, counselors in the Student Development Office, faculty, college administrators, library staff, financial assistance staff, Career Services Center, and more. You have the responsibility of finding answers to your questions. We will help you in every way possible, and we expect that you will take the initiative to be in control of your educational path. We hope you will make full use of the many resources available to you at SCC.

Partnerships As part of its mission to make educational opportunities available to all residents of the college district, SCC develops and maintains community, business, and institutional partnerships. By working with the state of Missouri, local governments, public and private colleges and universities, area business and industry, economic development associations, school districts, agencies, and civic organizations, the community college is better equipped to provide the programs and services that constituents need and want. Such partnerships and collaborative efforts will help provide a strong local workforce and make attending college more affordable and available to the average citizen. Initiatives include cooperating with high schools to provide students with careertechnical preparation, advanced placement, and dual enrollment. Transfer and articulation agreements with colleges and universities also are in place for the benefit of our students. For example, a transfer (or 2+2) agreement with the University of Missouri-St. Louis allows students to continue their progress toward a bachelor’s degree in several program areas by enrolling in junior- and senior-level UM courses that are taught right on the SCC campus. Agreements with other colleges and universities allow students to complete a bachelor’s degree online via the Internet after a prescribed sequence of courses at SCC.

9-8

In addition, the community college continues to develop partnerships with businesses, institutions, colleges, and agencies for training and retraining, job placement, community service, and economic development. The college is part of the awardwinning Dislocated Worker Program and Missouri Career Center one-stop shop – a job preparation partnership with state and local agencies. The college also teams up with the Economic

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

Development Center of St. Charles County and the Partners for Progress business leaders organization to create and carry out programs that train area workers and prepare local youths for success in college. SCC has expanded community education outreach efforts including literacy and adult basic education programs as well as special activities for youths and senior citizens. The college library is a member of MOBIUS, the statewide computerized catalog system that enables patrons to search the holdings of numerous other academic libraries throughout the state, resulting in access to 14 million volumes. Another unique partnership that is centered on educational access through state-of-the-art technology is the Gateway Consortium for distance learning. SCC and three area community colleges pool their faculty talent and technology expertise to offer more than 100 online and teleweb courses. This collaborative technology allows students to learn from home or office! New educational partnerships are welcomed and continue to form across the college’s service area.

Affiliates Institutional memberships are held in the following organizations: • American Association of Collegiate and Admissions Officers • American Association of Community Colleges • American Association of Community College Trustees • American Occupational Therapy Association • Association for Career and Technical Education • Missouri Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers • Missouri Community College Association • National Association of College and University Business Officers • National Junior College Athletic Association • National League of Nursing • North Central Association of Colleges and Schools – The Higher Learning Commission • And other national academic and professional development organizations.


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

PERSONNEL Board of Trustees Administration Professional/Technical Staff Faculty

10-1


S

10-2

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Board of Trustees PERSONNEL

William R. Pundmann St. Charles Term Expires: 2012 President

Ryan Robertson O’Fallon Term Expires: 2010 Vice-President

Robert R. Proost O’Fallon Term Expires: 2014 Treasurer

Rose Mack O’Fallon Term Expires: 2010 Secretary

Jean Poggemeier Ehlmann St. Charles Term Expires: 2012

Timothy A. Lohmar O’Fallon Term Expires: 2014

Administrative Officers John M. McGuire, President A.B., West Virginia University M.A., West Virginia University Ph.D., Florida State University

Todd Galbierz, Vice-President for Administrative Services B.S., University of Missouri M.B.A., Washington University

Michael L. Banks, Vice-President for Academic and Student Affairs

Barbara Keim, Vice-President for Technology, Research, and Planning

B.A., St. Louis University M.F.A., Southern Illinois University Ph.D., St. Louis University

B.A., University of North Carolina M.S., Rutgers University M.B.A., Bradley University Ph.D., University of Virginia

Donna M. Davis, Vice-President for Human Resources B.S., Culver-Stockton College M.S., Lindenwood University S.P.H.R.-certified, Society for Human Resource Management

Heather M. McDorman, Vice-President for Marketing and Communications B.A., Truman State University M.A., University of Missouri

10-3


St. Charles Community College

S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

Administrative And Professional/Technical Staff PERSONNEL

Fay Aubuchon, Training Specialist B.S., Maryville University Laura Austin, Academic Counselor B.A., St. Olaf College M.A., Truman State University Julie Barro, Career Consultant B.A., University of Missouri M.Ed., University of Missouri Jerome Bauer, Colleague Systems Administrator A.S., St. Mary’s College B.S., Maryville University Rachel Beardsley, Academic Advisor B.S., Liberty University M.S., Cameron University Elaine Benedict, Executive Assistant Paula Berry, Director of Child Development Center B.A., St. Mary’s Dominican College M.A., Tulane University

Theresa Carusa-Ortega, Lead Teacher B.A., California State University Long Beach M.A., California State University Long Beach Ingrid Casillo, Lead AEL Instructor B.A., University of Northern Iowa M.B.A., Lindenwood University Mary Jane Chadwick, Housekeeping Supervisor Barbara Chandler, Associate Dean of Academic and Career Enhancement Services B.A., Connecticut College for Women M.S.T., American University Kay Conroy, Assessment Specialist A.A., St. Charles Community College Jared Conner, Financial Assistance Counselor B.S., Southern Illinois University

Virginia Bjorness, Reference Librarian B.S., Dickinson State University M.L.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Sandra Copeland, Administrative Computing Systems Administrator B.A., Lindenwood University

Terri Borger, Payroll Supervisor

Sherry Cox, AEL Instructor B.S.E., Hannibal LaGrange

Jeanette Boria, Project Coordinator Business School Certificate, Katherine Gibbs School A.A., St. Charles Community College B.L.S., University of Missouri Pam Bova, Coordinator Counselor A.A., Mineral Area Community College B.A., Southeast Missouri State University M.A., Southeast Missouri State University Kenneth Bray, Maintenance Supervisor Trouble Shooting Instructor, Webster University HVAC Certificate, Vatterott College Christopher Breitmeyer, Dean, Math, Science & Health B.S., Illinois State University M.S., Arizona State University Kathy Brockgreitens, Dean of Enrollment Services B.S.B.A., Lindenwood University M.B.A., Lindenwood University Douglass Brown, Learning Specialist B.A., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri M.S., University of Missouri 10-4

Ashley Carpenter, Career Consultant B.S., University of Phoenix M.S., Lindenwood University

Andrea Crouch, Academic Counselor B.A., Western Kentucky University M.S., Webster University Patrick Darnell, AEL Instructor B.Ed., Northwest Missouri State University Laura Davidson, Associate Director of Student Development B.S.E., University of Kansas M.Ed., University of Kansas Tim Davison, Academic Network Administrator B.S., Southern Illinois University M.B.A., Southern Illinois University C.C.N.A., Cisco Certified Network Administrator Tammie De Los Santos, School/Business Programs Coordinator B.S., Southwest Missouri State University M.B.A., Lindenwood University Leatrice Dixon, Lead Teacher A.A.S., St. Louis Community College

E


2

0

1

0

-

2

Michael Dompierre, Assistant Vice-President for Academic and Student Affairs B.S., Northern Michigan University A.M., University of Michigan Ph.D., University of Michigan Kathy Drews, Assistant Director, Child Development Center B.A., George Mason University M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian Education Joy Dufrain, Project Coordinator A.A.S., St. Charles Community College Diane Eyssell, System AdministratorNetwork Computing B.S., University of Missouri Theresa Flett, Reference Librarian B.A., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri Martin George, Director of Food Services A.S., Johnson and Wales Karen George, Learning Specialist B.S., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri Paige George, Academic Counselor B.A., Lindenwood University M.A., Lindenwood University M.S., Lindenwood University Robert Gill, Instructional Media Manager B.A., Southern Illinois University Lori Gilley, AEL Instructor B.S., Northwestern Missouri State University Chris Gober, Director of Athletics and Head Baseball Coach A.A., Lincoln College B.A., Northwestern College Christine Goodman, Purchasing Specialist B.A., Univeristy of Missouri Adrienne Grant, Academic Advisor B.S., Southeast Missouri State University M.S., Lindenwood University Lauri Gray-Stoewsand, Dislocated Worker Program Manager B.A., Southern Illinois University M.Ed., University of Missouri Mary Jo Grimm, Student Outreach Coordinator B.S., Ball State University

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Personnel

Stacy Hansen, Lead Teacher B.A., Lindenwood University Pat Haynes, Director of the Bookstore A.A., St. Charles Community College Kimberly Heitmann, Learning Specialist B.S., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri

PERSONNEL

Richard Helldoerfer, Technical Writer Douglas Hobbs, Learning Specialist B.A., UC Santa Cruz Ph.D., Columbia University April Hoekenga, Coordinating Counselor A.S., Spoon River Community College B.S., Western Illinois University M.S., Western Illinois University Jay Hofmeister, Network Specialist Joseph Hogan, Business and Industry Projects Manager A.S., St. Louis Community College B.S., Tarkio College M.B.A., Fontbonne University Brenda Hollrah, College Center Coordinator B.S., Lindenwood University Guy Hunt, Programmer Analyst B.S.B.A., Western Illinois University Linda Jamerson-Baenziger, Program Specialist B.A., Maryville University M.B.A., Lindenwood University Floretha Johnson, Director of Administrative Computing B.S., Southern Illinois University Richard Johnson, Learning Specialist B.F.A., Washington University M.A., Washington University Ph.D., Washington University Sunny Kalimikonda, Systems and Security Architect M.S., Nagarjuna University Kristen Kalz, Career Consultant B.S., Southern Illinois University M.A., Southern Illinois University Margaret Kelley, Career Consultant B.A., Lindenwood University M.S., Lindenwood University Michelle Killeen, International Student Coordinator A.A., St. Charles Community College B.S.W., University of Missouri M.Ed., University of Missouri 10-5169


St. Charles County Community College

S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

Denise King, Dean of Arts & Humanities B.A., Emory University Ph.D., Stanford University

PERSONNEL

Ronald Kinney, Database Administrator B.A., Huntingdon University Barbara Klasek, Facilities Office Supervisor

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

Chris McCracken, Internet Services Administrator

Keith Kolander, Adaptive Technology Specialist A.A., St. Louis Community College B.A., University of Missouri

Janelle Meyers, Lead Teacher B.S., University of Missouri M.Ed., University of Missouri

Irina Krasnoperova, Career Consultant B.A., Lindenwood University

Kathy Mikulin, Computer/Network Analyst

Bradford Kretzer, Assistant Bookstore Manager A.A., St. Louis Community College B.A., St. Louis University

Kelly Mitchell, Cataloger B.A., Eastern Illinois University M.Ed., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri

Matthew Kroll, Employment/Benefits Coordinator B.A., University of Missouri

Valerie Miyasaki, Publications Specialist B.A., Brigham Young University

Thomas LaFata, Learning Specialist B.A., St. Louis University M.A., St. Louis University

Travis Molleck, Computer/Network Analyst B.A., University of Missouri

Jennifer Lansdowne, Associate Registrar B.A., Blackburn College M.A., Bradley University Brian Legate, Coordinating Counselor A.A., Lon Morris College B.S., Stephen F. Austin University M.S.W., Washington University Ying Li, Library Public Services Manager B.A., Hefei University M.L.S., Indiana University Jie Lin, Computer Specialist B.S., Northwest Polytechnical University Ernestine Love, Senior Programmer Analyst B.A., Berea College M.Ed., University of Missouri Phyllis Marchand, Human Resources Administrative Coordinator Michelle Martin, Career Consultant B.S., Missouri State University

E

Katherine Mawer, Lead Teacher B.A., Missouri State University

Kasey McKee, Annual Giving Manager B.A., Lindenwood University

Erin Lanham, Reference Librarian B.A., Drury College M.A., University of Missouri

G

Ryan Mathias, Computer Specialist A.A., St. Charles Community College

Al Koehler, Director of Facilities and Construction

David Land, AEL Instructor A.A., Hannibal LaGrange College B.S., Hannibal LaGrange College

10-6

O

Bernadette Moody, Director of Nursing Programs B.S., Fairfield University M.S., Seton Hall University Lisa Mouser, Manager, Academic Computing A.A., St. Louis Community College Microsoft Certified Professional Benjamin Munson, Associate Director of Marketing and Communications B.A., Brigham Young University Jennifer Muschany, Public Safety Supervisor James Nelson, Graphic Designer Gayle Palmer, Help Desk Manager A.A., St. Charles Community College Ronald Pennington, Director of Institutional Research B.A., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri Ph.D., St. Louis University Cynthia Perkins, AEL Instructor B.Ed., University of Missouri, Columbia Kirsten Perschbacher, Financial Assistance Counselor B.A., South Dakota State University Kelley Pfeiffer, Coordinating Counselor B.A., Central Michigan University


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Daniel Porter, Grounds Supervisor I.S.A., Certified Arborist A.S., St. Charles Community College/St. Louis C.C.

Susie Rubemeyer, Director of Financial Services B.S.Acc., University of Missouri C.P.A.

Tracy Powers, Science Lab Coordinator A.A., St. Charles Community College B.A., University of Missouri St. Louis

Patricia Rudd, Book Department Supervisor B.A., University of Missouri St. Louis

Donna Price, HR Analyst A.A., St. Louis Community College B.A., Lindenwood University Liz Quiggins, Lead Teacher, Child Development Center A.A., St. Louis Community College Raymond Randolph, Career Consultant B.A., Eastern Illinois University M.A., Eastern Illinois University Daryl L. Ray, AEL Instructor B.A., Missouri Valley College Beverly J. Riethmayer, Dean, Business and Social Sciences B.S., Abilene Christian University M.A., Texas A&M University Timothy Riley, Career Consultant, Missouri Dislocated Worker Program B.S., Culver-Stockton College M.B.A., Lindenwood University Trenda Roch von Rochsburg, Project Coordinator Donald Roettger, AEL Instructor B.S., Truman State University Diana Romans, Nursing Lab Coordinator Nursing Diploma, Barnes Hospital School of Nursing B.S.N., Indiana University Christine Romer, CPPB, Director of Purchasing A.A., St. Louis Community College B.S., St. Louis University Robert Ronkoski, Director of Public Safety A.A., St. Louis Community College B.A., Columbia College M.S., Lindenwood University Jeffrey Roop, Theater Manager B.A., Lynchburg College Amanda Rose, AEL Coordinator B.A., University of North Carolina Jean Rose, Library Technical Process Manager B.A., Rowan University M.A.L.S., University of Missouri

PERSONNEL

Stacy Runion, Lead Teacher A.A., Chesterfield Day Montessori Academy Cassandra Samson, Financial Assistance Counselor B.A. Bradley University Christine Scherer, Web Site Coordinator B.A., San Diego State University M.S., Fontbonne University Mary Lou Schlis, Project Coordinator Thorin Schmidt, Microcomputer Repair Instructor B.S., Lindenwood University Diana Schoo, C.P.M., CPPB, Purchasing Specialist Thomas Schrautemeier, Academic Counselor A.A., St. Louis Community College B.S., St. Louis University M.S., Southern Illinois University Peggy Schreiner, Public Relations Coordinator B.S., Missouri State University M.B.A., Missouri State University Diane Schremp, Bookstore Warehouse Supervisor Diane Schroeder, Associate Dean of Extended Learning B.A., University of Wisconsin M.A., University of Missouri M.Ed., University of Missouri Ed.D., University of Missouri Lisa Scott, Office Supervisor Gregory Seguin, Facilities Manager Peggy Sherwin, Academic Counselor B.A., St. Ambrose College M.S., Western Illinois University Linda Shipley, Scheduling Coordinator B.A., University of Missouri Tina Sieker, Office Supervisor A.A., St. Charles Community College B.S.B.A., Lindenwood University Amanda Sizemore, Director of Workforce Development B.S.B.A., University of Missouri Pamela Sloan, Career Consultant B.A., St. Louis University M.A., Missouri Baptist University 10-7171


St. Charles County Community College

S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

Jim Snyder, Network Specialist

PERSONNEL

James Sparks, Assistant Education Supervisor B.S., University of Missouri M.S., University of Missouri Trisha Spires-Barb, Career Consultant B.S., Culver-Stockton College

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

Kathy Stearns, Program Specialist A.A., University of Findlay

Karen Vossenkemper, Associate Director of Financial Assistance A.S., St. Mary’s College B.S., Lindenwood University

Yvette Sweeney, Dean of Student Development B.S., Lindenwood University M.Ed., University of Missouri Jeramy Thompson, Network Specialist A.S., Sanford Brown Dawn Tipton, Career Consultant B.A., University of Missouri M.S., Lindenwood University Martha Toebben, Coordinating Counselor B.A., Lindenwood University M.Ed., University of Missouri Stephanie Tolson, Dean of Learning Resource Center B.A., Park University M.L.S., Emporia State University Ed.D., St. Louis University Janis Turner, Lead Teacher A.S., City College of Chicago Carl Ulrich, Microcomputer Repair Instructor A.A.S., Linn State Technical College Chris Van Mierlo, Learning Specialist

E

Mary Van Noord, Nursing Lab Coordinator B.S.N., Missouri Baptist University M.S.N., Webster University Ph.D., Capella University Gail Voss, Lead AEL Instructor B.A., Concordia Teacher’s College

Victoria Swartzenberg, Career Consultant, Dislocated Worker Program B.S., Culver Stockton College M.A., Lindenwood University

G

B.S., Lindenwood University M.Mus., Southern Illinois University M.A., Bircham International University

Mary Stassi, Health Occupations Coordinator R.N., Gerontological Nursing, Lutheran Medical Center School of Nursing

Cynthia Strodtman, Learning Specialist/Tutor Program Coordinator B.S.Ed., Southwest Missouri State University M.S.Ed., University of Missouri

10-8

O

Karen Walters, Academic Advisor M.A., National Louis University B.S., Columbia College A.S., McHenry County College Amy White, Science Lab Technician B.S., Pennsylvania State University David Willmore, Learning Systems Administrator B.S., Fontbonne University Yvonne Wills, Dean of Corporate and Community Development A.S., Jackson State Community College B.S., Union University M.A., Webster University Gregory Wirth, Director of Network Computing B.A., University of Missouri Suzanne Wirth, Associate Director of Institutional Research A.A., St. Charles Community College B.A., Lindenwood University M.S., Lindenwood University Larry Wolgast, Education Supervisor-NECC B.S.E., Truman State University, M.A., Truman State University, Yemi Zelleke, Computer/Network Analyst B.S., Harris Stowe State College


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Faculty Hal Berry, Professor of History and Theater B.S., Dana College M.A., Central Missouri State University M.S., Lindenwood University M.A., Lindenwood University Charles Blumer, Professor of Accounting B.S., Morningside College M.B.A., Southern Illinois University CPA John Bookstaver, Professor of Science B.A., Cardinal Glennon College B.A., University of Missouri Ph.D., Washington University

Debra Crank-Lewis, Professor of History B.S., Truman State University M.S., University of Kansas Callie Daniels, Professor of Mathematics B.S., University of the Ozarks M.S., University of Missouri Virginia Daugherty, Professor of Nursing Nursing Diploma, DePaul Hospital School of Nursing B.S.N., St. Louis University M.S.N., University of Missouri Gene Ditch, Professor of Music B.M.E., Central Methodist College M.Ed., University of Missouri

Anna Boulware, Professor of Accounting B.S., University of Kansas B.S., University of Kansas M.B.A., University of Kansas CMA

Mary Downen, Assistant Professor of English A.A., East Central College B.A., Fontbonne College M.A., University of Missouri

Jonathan Bowman, Assistant Professor of Philosophy B.A., John Carroll University Ph.D., St. Louis University

Joetta Drake, Associate Professor of Nursing R.N., St. Luke’s School of Nursing B.S.N., Webster University M.S.N., Webster University

Cal Chandler, Professor of Foreign Language B.A., University of Missouri M.A., St. Louis University Ph.D., St. Louis University

Cheryl Eichenseer, Assistant Professor of Math B.S., Fontbonne University M.A., St. Louis University

Glen Chapuis, Associate Professor of Business B.S., University of Illinois M.A., Washington University in St. Louis M.B.A., University of Illinois A.C.Ed., University of Illinois Ph.D., University of Missouri Lawrence Checkett, Associate Professor of English B.S.Ed., University of Missouri M.A., Webster University Rich Christianson, Professor of Mathematics B.S., Illinois Institute of Technology M.S., University of Illinois Th.M., Grace Theological Seminary Pamela Cilek, Professor of Theater B.A., Western Illinois University M.F.A., Lindenwood University Linda Cole, Professor of Nursing B.S.N., Kent State University M.A., Ohio State University M.S.N., University of Missouri Andrea Compton, Assistant Professor of Business Administrative Systems B.A., Belmont University M.B.E., Middle Tennessee State University

PERSONNEL

Linda Estes, Professor of Child Care B.A., University of Louisville M.Ed., University of Missouri Ed.D., University of Missouri Gayle Feng-Checkett, Professor of English B.A., University of Redlands M.A., University of North Dakota Beth Finders, Professor of Psychology B.A., Southwest Missouri State University B.S., Southwest Missouri State University M.A., Forest Institute of Professional Psychology Zoe Fitzgerald, Professor of Life Science A.S., Southwestern College B.S., California State University Ph.D., Texas Woman's University Michael Fuszner, Professor of Computer Science B.S., University of Missouri M.S., Capella University Cisco Certified Academy Instructor Nancy Graviett, Professor of Business Administrative Systems B.S.B.A., University of Missouri M.Ed., University of Missouri 10-9173


St. Charles County Community College

S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

O

Jacqueline Gray, Professor of English B.A., Memphis State University M.A., University of Colorado

PERSONNEL

Nancy Greenwood, Professor of Computer Science B.S., Pittsburg State University M.S., Pittsburg State University Deronnda Griesenauer, Assistant Professor of Nursing A.D.N., St. Charles Community College B.S.N., Webster University M.S., Lindenwood University

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

William Kristen, Associate Professor of Sociology B.S., St. Louis University M.A., St. Louis University M.A., St. Louis University Michael Kuelker, Professor of English B.A., St. Louis University M.A., St. Louis University Jennifer LeGrand, Associate Professor of Math B.S., University of Texas M.S., Southern Illinois University

William Griffin, Associate Professor of Anthropology B.A., Brown University M.Phil., University of Cambridge

Kyle Linden, Assistant Professor of Math B.A., University of Missouri M.A., St. Louis University

Virginia Guneyli, Assistant Professor of English B.A., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Joyce Lindstrom, Professor of Mathematics B.A., Bradley University M.S.T., Illinois Wesleyan University Ed.D., University of Missouri

Monica Hall-Woods, Associate Professor of Biology B.S., Penn State University M.S., St. Louis University Ph.D., St. Louis University

Lydia Ann Long, Professor of English B.A., Washington University M.A., Washington University

Hilary Harris, Associate Professor of English B.A., University of Missouri M.A., University of Arkansas Ph.D., University of California

Wanda Long, Professor of Mathematics B.S., Michigan State University M.A.T., Michigan State University Ph.D., University of Missouri

Joseph Hartnett, Professor of Marketing B.A., St. Louis University M.A., New Mexico State University M.B.A., University of Missouri

John Marino, Associate Professor of English B.S., St. Louis University M.A., St. Louis University Ph.D., Purdue University

Sharon Heckel, Associate Professor of Computer Science B.S., Maryville University M.B.A., Lindenwood University

Jane Matheney-Rood, Associate Professor of Science B.S., Bradley University M.S., Northern Illinois University

Vicky Herbel, Assistant Professor of Sociology B.A., University of Colorado M.A., University of Colorado

Denise McCracken, Professor of Foreign Language B.A., University of Colorado Certificat, UniversitÊ d’Aix-Marseille M.A., Washington University

Joe Howe, Professor of Mathematics B.S., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri Rebecca Ingraham, Associate Professor of Reading B. Ed., Fairmont State University M.A., West Virginia University Karen Jones, Professor of English B.S.Ed., University of Missouri M.A., Southern Illinois University Amy Koehler, Associate Professor of Nursing B.S.N., Murray State University M.S.N., Southeast Missouri State University

10-10

M

Nancy McGough, Professor of Nursing B.S.N., Central Missouri State University M.Ed., University of Missouri M.S.N., University of Missouri Elizabeth Michael-Smith, Instructor of Chemisty B.S., Western Illinois University M.S., University of Iowa Marilyn Miller, Professor of Nursing B.S.N., Nursing, University of Missouri M.S.N., University of Missouri


2

0

1

0

-

2

0

1

1

C

A

T

A

L

O

G

Jordan Mogerman, Associate Professor of Art B.A., Lindenwood University M.F.A., University of Missouri

John Phillips, Associate Professor of Computer Science A.B., Indiana University M.S., Texas A&M University

Lee Ann Nelson, Assistant Professor of Communication B.S.Ed., University of Missouri M.A., Webster University

Rosemarie Priesmeyer, Professor of English B.A., Lindenwood University M.A., University of Missouri

Candace Neu, Professor of Health Information Technology B.A., University of Texas B.S.M.R.A., St. Louis University M.D.E., Athabasca University RHIA, CCS

Vaidehi Rajagopalan, Associate Professor of Psychology B.A., Mount Carmel College B.S., Bangalore University M.A., Queens College Ph.D., St. Louis University

Joshua Niemczyk, Associate Professor of Math B.S., Truman State University M.A., University of Missouri David Niermann, Associate Professor of Computer-Aided Drafting/Pre-Engineering B.S., University of Illinois M.S., Alfred University Thelma Norris, Professor of English B.S.Ed., University of Missouri M.L.A., Washington University Jane O’Donnell, Associate Professor of Computer Science B.A., University of Missouri M.S.Ed., University of Missouri Jennifer O’Malley, Assistant Professor of Science B.S., McKendree College M.S., Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville Darren Osburn, Associate Professor of Speech Communication B.A., Culver-Stockton College M.A., Southwest Missouri State University Alison Ouellette-Kirby, Associate Professor of Art B.F.A., University of Windsor M.F.A., University of Tennessee Kevin Patton, Professor of Life Science B.A., St. Louis University M.S., Southern Illinois University Ph.D., Union Institute and University Catherine Peacock, Associate Professor of English B.A., Bryn Mawr College M.A., Georgetown University Ron Pettus, Associate Professor of Political Science B.S., University of Missouri M.A., Washington University A.M., University of Missouri

PERSONNEL

Daniel Rezny, AssociateProfessor of History B.A., St. Louis University M.A., University of Missouri Heather Rodgers, Assistant Professor of English A.A., St. Charles Community College B.A., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri Paul Roesler, Professor of Political Science B.A., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri Isaac Ruedin, Associate Professor of Philosophy B.A., University of Illinois M.A., State University of New York Ph.D., State University of New York Kristen Rupert-Leach, Instructor of Speech B.S., Southern Illinois University M.A., Southern Illinois University Mary Ann Sadler, Professor of Biology B.A., Depauw University M.A., Washington University Kathleen Sanker, Associate Professor of Art B.F.A., University of Missouri M.F.A., Washington University Beth Schroeder, Assistant Professor of English B.S., Truman State University M.A., Truman State University Brian Smith, Professor of Art B.F.A., Boston University M.F.A., University of Chicago Russlyn St. John, Professor of Practical Nursing Nursing Diploma, Miami Valley Hospital School of Nursing B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia M.S.N., Southern Illinois University Andrew Stephan, Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.A., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri 10-11175


S

T

.

C

H

A

R

L

E

S

C

Lisa Stoner, Associate Professor of Psychology B.S., Northeast Missouri State University M.S., Western Illinois University

PERSONNEL

Barbara Sullivan, Associate Professor of Psychology B.A., Indiana University M.S., Purdue University M.S.W., Washington University

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

Bruce Welz, Associate Professor of Economics B.A., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri Lonna Wilke, Associate Professor of Theater B.A., Central Methodist College M.F.A., University of North Carolina

Travis Thompson, Instructor of History B.A., Arkansas State University M.A., Arkansas State University

Ellen Wilson, Professor of Geography B.B.A., University of Cincinnati M.A., University of Cincinnati

Marvin Tobias, Assistant Professor of Psychology B.S., Tuskegee University M.S., St. Louis University

Vicki Woodrum, Professor of Mathematics B.A., University of Kentucky M.S., Wright State University

Behrooz Vakil, Associate Professor of Mathematics B.S., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri

Francesca Woods, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy B.S., Washington University M.A., Webster University

Curtis VanGeison, Professor of Communication B.S., Illinois State University M.S., Illinois State University Ann Vernon, Professor of Life Science B.S., Lambuth College M.S., Memphis State University

E

John Walker, Associate Professor of Music B.M., Drake University M.M., Temple University D.M.A., University of Nebraska

Stacey Thater, Instructor of Physics A.S., East Central College B.S., Lindenwood University

David Van Mierlo, Professor of Criminal Justice B.A., University of Missouri M.A., University of Missouri M.B.A., Lindenwood University J.D., St. Louis University

10-12

O

Jane Zeiser, Associate Professor of Foreign Language B.A., Southwest Missouri University M.A., St. Louis University Litao Zhong, Assistant Professor of Accounting B.A., Southwest University of Finance and Economics M.B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College Ph.D., Southern Illinois University


4601 Mid Rivers Mall Drive • Cottleville, MO 63376-2865 636-922-8000 • www.stchas.edu

2010-11College Catalog v.1  

St. Charles Community College Catalog v.1, 2010-11

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you