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Freshman forward Miles Bridges (22) dunks the ball during the game against Mississippi Valley State on Nov. 18, 2016 at Breslin Center. PHOTO: NIC ANTAYA

GROWING PAINS Amid progress with young team, Spartans find ways to trip themselves

NEWS

S P OT L I G H T

F E AT U R E S

ASMSU FALL REPORT RELEASED

“Nick Ward is a great post player, he can basically get a shot whenever he wants down there.”

MICRODOSING AT MSU

ASMSU only spent 1.2 percent of its general fund in the fall

Cassius Winston, Freshman guard

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M ON DAY, JA N UA RY 9, 2 017

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Some students use small amounts of psychedelic drugs to stay focused during the day PAGE 11


News

Rachel Fradette Campus editor campus@statenews.com

ASMSU releases fall report on bills, spending BY MADISON F. O’CONNOR MOCONNOR@STATENEWS.COM

As the fall session for the Associated Students of Michigan State University, or ASMSU, came to a close. The ASMSU Office of the President published a final semester report. The ASMSU 2016 Fall Report provides an overview of what the organization accomplished last semester and details where ASMSU hopes to go in the spring. Here are some of the key points from the report. THE GENERAL FUND

The report includes an overview of ASMSU’s general fund and where the money went. The starting general fund balance was $142,908.28. Through passing bills, ASMSU can allocate money to specific initiatives, but if this money is not used, it will roll back into the general fund. Out of the $92,500 allocated, which is 65 percent of the general fund, only $1,750 has been spent, which is 1.2 percent of the general fund. This does not mean the $92,500 allocated won’t be spent on the initiatives, it simply means this allocated money has yet to be spent. ASMSU SERVICES

ASMSU continued its services last fall and will continue in the spring. The organization has provided 1,180 iClickers to students this semester and purchased 100 more. Graphing calculators were also purchased, and all 40 purchased during the summer were rented in the fall. ASMSU gave $27,650 in loans to stu-

dents and printed 2,290 pages through their Print/Copy Service. In addition, 9,500 blue books were given out this semester, 3,300 cases were served through the Student Legal Services and 50 cases were consulted through the Student Rights Advocates. Of these cases, 27 went to hearing. As for Red Cedar Log yearbooks, 3,300 were distributed out of the 7,000 printed. SAFE RIDE

To develop a program that facilitates safe transportation for

$92,500 allocated, which is 65% of the general fund, only $1,750 has been spent, which is 1.2% of the general fund. Out of the

students at night, ASMSU is working on a Safe Ride program. The organization has been working with MSU Risk Management and the vice president for finance and treasurer of MSU. So far, three options for the program have been proposed. The first would involve outsourcing the entire program to a third party vendor. The second involves partnering with a rental car company where the drivers would either be paid ASMSU employees or volunteers. The final option involves partnering with a local

cab company and Residential and Hospitality Services. ASMSU hopes to develop the program this year since 2017 presents the only opportunity in the next three years to pass a tax if needed. TEXTBOOK EXCHANGE

ASMSU implemented a textbook exchange as a new service last fall. ASMSU will work with MSU Libraries to collect textbook donations and lend them to other students. The collection box is in the Student Engagement Office and the service is currently underway. BUS RAPID TRANSIT

In response to a proposed new bus system that would run from the Capitol to Meridian Township, the Capital Area Transportation Authority, or CATA, has proposed four alternative plans that would serve a similar purpose. ASMSU has been working with CATA to make recommendations on the project while still taking a neutral stance on the plans. INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION

ASMSU worked on interviews to fill seats on the General Assembly, especially for Colleges of Engineering, Business, Nursing, Education and Communication Arts and Sciences. STUDENT ALLOCATIONS

Registered Student Organizations, or RSOs, are funded through the General RSO Fund and the Start-Up Fund. This semester, 40 RSOs were funded, which impacts the 2,500 plus students involved with these organizations. READ MORE AT STATENEWS.COM

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THE STATE N EWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2 01 7


Contents

Cameron Macko Managing editor cmacko@statenews.com

ONLINE

Fatal crash on I-96 near Hagadorn

Column: Loss to Penn State hard on MSU

Pizza restaurant comes to E.L.

Icy road conditions caused a fatality during the weekend

Men’s basketball fails to make progress during loss to Penn State

LOTSA Stone Fired Pizza to open location near campus

BY T H E N U M B E R S

40 Number of reported crimes at MSU during winter break See page 8

“I thought we had really good chances in the first period, and I thought we had some good opportunities in the second period.”

Tom Anastos, Head MSU hockey coach after MSU swept by the Wisconsin Badgers PAGE 10

Main Conrad’s closes amid leasing issues BY RILEY MURDOCK RMURDOCK@STATENEWS.COM

The main location of Conrad’s Grill on the corner of Grand River Avenue and Abbot Road, a longtime oasis of late-night culinary salvation for many an MSU student, has closed indefinitely. Conrad’s owner Joe Conrad said the restaurant is closing because of a leasing conflict with the company’s landlord, Ballein Management. “We’ve been in a dispute with the landlords for about four months,” Conrad said. “We were under the impression we were operating under a five-year lease extension, and they said that we were on a 30 day month-to-month lease.” Conrad said the company fought Ballein in court over the dispute, but abruptly lost a ruling a few days before Christmas. “Their original offer to us was to move into one of their new spaces, somewhere in the time frame of 12 to 18 months,” Conrad said. “However, they have no plans with the city yet, and they basically offered us a space to move into that doesn’t exist at all … that’s why it was very

hard for us to accept that offer.” The location has been in operation since 2009 and its closing took many by surprise because of the restaurant’s popularity. Chemistry senior Kurt Hamel posted a picture of a statement taped to Conrad’s’ door on Facebook, which stated that for events beyond their control they are “being forced to vacate the premises.” “It’s just kind of sad, it was where you’d always go at the end of your night because it’d still be open almost at 2 a.m., when you’re a freshman going out to parties or after a bar night here in East Lansing,” Hamel said. Conrad said while the other two Conrad’s locations on Grand River Avenue and in Frandor Shopping Center are still going strong, not all Conrad’s employees will be able to keep their jobs. “Nobody has been terminated as of yet, we’re going to work as much as we can to keep everybody happy, but unfortunately going from three stores to two, there’s going to have to be some cuts,” Conrad said.

East Lansing residents Ashlynn Zwickle, 5, and sister Maeve, 2, make each other laugh while winding down after creating craft projects during Family Day on Jan. 7 at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum. Their mother, Sarah, said she values creative development of her daughters through engaging their imaginations beyond mundane daily activities. “Give them a chance to do whatever they want – be creative, no rules,” she said. Family Day is a free event held at the museum the first Saturday of every month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. PHOTO: CHLOE GRIGBSY

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THE STATE N EWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2 01 7


Features

McKenna Ross Features editor features@statenews.com

Students use psychedelic drugs to focus better, clear their minds BRYCE AIRGOOD BAIRGOOD@STATENEWS.COM

Usually when she’s studying, MSU junior Shelby, whose full name is not mentioned for privacy reasons, will figure out exactly what she wants to accomplish and will leave her phone somewhere far away from her so she can focus. Other times, when she’s really got to buckle down and focus, she employs a study method called microdosing. According to Collective Evolution, microdosing is a trend that is becoming more popular in places like Silicon Valley. Microdosing means to, “take small amounts of psychedelics during the day in order to enhance focus, creativity, patience, and connection to others,” according to the website.

“It increases your curiosity and makes you focus because you’re actually curious about what you’re trying to do.” Shelby, MSU junior

Shelby said she started using this method when she heard about it from her brother and a friend. When it was brought up a year later, she thought she’d try and see if it worked for her. “It doesn’t give you any visuals, or you don’t hear anything,” Shelby said. “It just makes you, I don’t want to say ‘think creatively,’ but it increases your curiosity and makes you focus because you’re actually curious about what you’re trying to do.” Shelby said she takes about 1/10 of the recreational amount of mushrooms when she’s microdosing and it takes about an hour for it to take effect. She will take the mushroom dose, grind it up until small, and steep it with tea. She said she usually makes it in a mint tea to help combat the nauseous feeling that sometimes comes with microdosing. Once that feeling wears off, she said she is able to look at her homework in a different way and is curious about what she’s working on. “Have you ever read a really

good book and then you just don’t want to stop because you get really into it?” she said. “It’s like that but for a four or five hour period where you just actually, genuinely care about what you’re doing and you’re focused, not because you feel alert but because you’re interested.” Shelby said she microdoses around two or three times a year. The most recent time she used it was when she had to complete a semester-long project without the help of a partner a couple weeks before it was due. She steeped her tea, started drinking and settled in to work, she said. Another student who microdoses at MSU is junior Natalie, whose name has been changed for privacy reasons as well. She takes mushrooms by steeping them in tea. However, Natalie said she hasn’t microdosed for studying and isn’t sure she would. “It would be interesting, but I’m not sure if I could focus, but maybe I would focus extra hard,” she said. Instead, Natalie likes to use psychedelics when she’s going to an event like a music festival. “I do it before I go out to shows because I really love to dance when I’m listening to music, and I think it’s just awesome to see people perform live when you’re feeling so happy and friendly and you feel like a part of the community,” she said. Natalie described the mushrooms as coming in all shapes and sizes, which she thought was beautiful. The top part of the mushroom is called the cap and the bottom part

is the stem, she said. According to How Stuff Works, most “magic mushrooms” are on the smaller side with a three inch stalk and one inch cap. Some different types, according to the website, are Psilocybe cubensis, or golden cap, with a reddish brown cap and yellow or whitish stem; Psilocybe semilanceata, or liberty cap, which are yellow or brown with a pointed cap; and Psilocybe baeocystis, or blue bell, which has a dark brown cap and brownish or yellowish stem when fresh. Natalie said in the fall, she has microdosed around two times, and she usually does it when her friends are doing it as well, as everyone likes to share. When she makes her mushroom tea, she likes to make a lot and put it in a thermos to drink throughout the day and to share with others. She said sometimes her friends will bake a pizza with the mushrooms on them, as the mushrooms don’t taste very good and have a “dirty” flavor. Like Shelby, Natalie said taking psychedelics has changed the way she thinks about some things. One time she had an epiphany during one of her microdosing sessions and made a career change because of it, she said. “Lots of people have sudden realizations about their future, about their decisions when they take psychedelics and I’ve had that happen before, (it was) like, ‘Oh wow like this is something that I really love, this is probably what I want to do for the rest of my life,’” she said. However, taking psychedelic

mushrooms isn’t for everyone, Shelby said. Like other forms of stimulants or depressants that affect the way people think, psychedelics can have different effects for different people. Shelby said one of her friends had a hereditary condition that was triggered by the use of

psychedelics and caused her to have a panic attack. Besides microdosing, there are other methods that students use to help them study. Shelby said some of her friends use “helpers” such as “acid” and others will chug a beer before getting to work. For Shelby though, microdos-

ing is a way for her to either study things she might not have been interested in before or she might have been looking at from the wrong perspective. “Like I said, it’s good for raising your curiosity and then approaching things differently and seeing it in a different light,” she said.

MSU junior Shelby poses for a photo with her psychedelic mushroom tea on Dec. 8, 2016 at her house in East Lansing. Shelby uses small doses of psychedelic mushrooms and steeps them in her tea to drink. STATE NEWS FILE PHOTO.

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Spotlight

Cameron Macko Managing editor cmacko@statenews.com

New faces shine and Spartans see slow start as Big Ten play begins CCLARK@STATENEWS.COM

As students felt relief, remorse and regret filling in scantron bubbles and submitting final essays, MSU men’s basketball (11-6 overall, 3-1 Big Ten) turned over the midterm leaf in its regular season. With an average 4-4 record on the season on Nov. 29, the Spartans had proved victorious against lesser competition but failed to defeat any of the four ranked opponents they played. While in Durham, N.C. to face off with then-No. 5 Duke University, the Spartans suffered a 78-69 loss, which dwarfed in comparison to another loss — a foot injury to the freshman forward Miles Bridges. At that time, Bridges led the team with 16.6 points per game and rebounds with 8.8 per game. His production on the court included a 21-point game in the season opener against then-No. 10 Arizona and three additional games with 20-plus scoring. His ability to corral rebounds appeared corner-

stone to the damaged front court, with offseason injuries to graduate transfer forward Ben Carter and senior forward Gavin Schilling. Against thenNo. 2 Kentucky, Bridges reigned in 12 rebounds. His season-high of 15 rebounds came three games later against St. John’s in the Bahamas. Ward holds down the fort After an 80-76 win against Oral Roberts University the Spartans’ first game without Bridges freshman guard Cassius Winston said there was an empty feeling without him on the court. “He’s a big part of what we are doing, there are a lot of plays that run through him early to get us going inside,” Winston said. “He’s got a lot of energy and a leader of this team and being without him was kind of different out there. At the end of the day we have to fight through adversity. He’s going to be back and better than ever so right now we just have to hold it down.“ Without Bridges, the heavily damaged front court for the Spartans gave way to a rising gem,

freshman forward Nick Ward. Out of the four highly-acclaimed freshmen this season, head coach Tom Izzo said Ward had the most progress to be made. Without the Carter and Schilling injuries, Izzo said Ward might not have seen much of the court this season. Against Oral Roberts, Ward dazzled on offense, scoring 24 points and grabbing 10 rebounds for his first career double-double. “Nick Ward is a great post player, he can basically get a shot whenever he wants down there,” Winston said after Oral Roberts. “There is not a lot of people who can guard him down there.” In game two of the Spartans’ five-game homestand, Ward contributed 13 points and eight rebounds in a 20-point blowout against the Youngstown State Penguins, 77-57. Limited because of foul trouble in a 71-63 win against Tennessee Tech, Ward finished shooting a perfect 4-4 from the field. His ability to consistently knock down shots has given him a field goal percentage of 60.7 percent, second best in the Big Ten. Hiccup against Northeastern In three separate sports — men’s ice hockey, women’s basketball and men’s basketball — MSU squared off against Northeastern University on Dec. 18. The MSU men’s ice hockey team suffered an early 6-2 loss and the women’s basketball team rolled 78-44 behind a 19-point, 10-rebound performance from senior guard Tori Jankoska. While the series was locked 1-1, the MSU men’s basketball team took cover as the Huskies rained a barrage of 3-point baskets. Northeastern’s Alex Murphy, T.J. Williams and Devon Begley carved through the Spartans, combining for a total of 51 points. Together, the trio shot 17-19 from the free-throw line for 89.5 percent. “I can take nothing out of this game personally,” Izzo said following Northeastern. “We didn’t play well enough to win. Things I’ve been preaching all year. Winning and losing. Some of the games that we’ve lost, it’s come down to the small things. I have not been satisfied with the play of a couple guys. I have not been satisfied with the upperclassmen. I have not been satisfied with the toughness that they play with. What I take out of it, we need to get much tougher. We need to play

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Hot start in the Big Ten After a sluggish start at the Barn against Minnesota, the Spartans took a 13-point deficit into halftime. However, the Spartans collected themselves to eat away piece by piece at the Golden Gopher lead. From 13 points to six points, MSU was starting to get in a rhythm, however they couldn’t get over

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much harder.” The Spartans lost 81-73 and MSU lost the threegame series, 1-2. Ward, after showing progress throughout the season, received the honor of starting the game for the first time in his career against Oakland University. Ward finished over defenders, around defenders and added more from the free-throw line. Out of his 25 minutes played, Ward tallied a careerhigh 25 points, adding in nine rebounds as well. MSU defeated the Golden Grizzlies, 77-65.

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Freshman guard Miles Bridges (22) and head coach Tom Izzo talk with one another during the first half of the men’s basketball game against Rutgers on Jan. 4 at Breslin Center. PHOTO: NIC

MSU HORSEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

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SATURDAY RIDING CLINICS • CLASSROOM SESSIONS • TACKSALE SUNDAY STOCK SEAT TEAM HORSE SHOW


Spotlight the hunch to give themselves a lead. It took senior leadership from guard Alvin Ellis III to pull the Spartans to a tie down the stretch. Ellis used his strength to finish layups in traffic, and when the Spartans began to slow down on offense, Ellis converted a 3-point field goal to bring back the momentum and energy. In the waning seconds, Ellis’ free throws tied the game for MSU, forcing overtime. In OT, junior guard Lourawls “Tum Tum” Nairn Jr. stepped up and knocked down a three. The teams traded free throws, but Minnesota held a one-point lead. Again, Ellis was at the line hoping to put the Spartans ahead of the Golden Gophers. Confidently, Ellis made both free throws, giving MSU a 75-74 lead, the eventual winning score. The intensity of conference play is much higher than a regular non-conference game, Nairn said. “You just have a different feel when it’s conference play, it’s almost like a new season,” Nairn said. Game two of Big Ten play, the Spartans held host to Northwestern University. The Wildcats came into East Lansing looking for a statement win to improve their chances of making the March Madness tournament at the end of the season — a tournament MSU has made 18 straight times, but Northwestern never has. The Spartans jumped on Northwestern early with a layup by Ward, assisted by sophomore guard Matt McQuaid. From there on out, Ellis and Winston controlled the pace of play, never allowing the Wildcats to gain a lead. The Spartans improved to 2-0 in the Big Ten with a 61-52 victory. After missing seven straight games, Bridges suited up and came off the bench at home against Rutgers. His injury time spanned 36 days, but at last, MSU had its star back. Out of the first media timeout, Bridges walked

FIRST 10 GAMES

72.3 PPG 68.2 PPG +4.1 PTS 47.3% 37.1% 62.3% +4.8

onto the court with a loud ovation. The first play, a backdoor screen for Bridges, saw him fly high for a McQuaid lob and down hard with a two-handed dunk. Bridges ended the game with six points and six rebounds in a win against Rutgers, 93-65, the Spartans’ third straight Big Ten win and seventh win in the last eight games. The look ahead Though the Spartans were 3-0 in the Big Ten, Nairn said the team hasn’t done anything yet. MSU headed to the Palestra in Philadelphia to face off against Penn State. The Nittany Lions used their athletic ability to find space behind Spartan defenders, leading to easy dunk after easy dunk. Anytime the Spartans tried something new, Penn State was on top of it and continued to hammer the Spartans. The Nittany Lions got their second conference win and the Spartans received their first Big Ten loss. After the 72-63 loss, Izzo said the performance was humiliating. Bridges started the game, however he failed to show any increase of health. He struggled to get involved on offense and defensively he was not a major factor. Bridges would finish the game with four points, six rebounds and four fouls. Though deflated, assistant coach Dwayne Stephens said in the Big Ten not only does the intensity pick up, but each opponent knows you better. The Spartans will have a rematch against Minnesota on Jan. 11 in East Lansing. The game is set to tip-off at 7 p.m. and be televised on Big Ten Network. “We’re just worried about getting better each day, and if we continue to get better each day I feel good about where we’re going to be,” Stephens said.

WHAT YOU MISSED SCORING OFFENSE SCORING DEFENSE SCORING MARGIN FIELD GOAL % 3PT FIELD GOAL % FREE THROW % REBOUND MARGIN

Freshman guard Miles Bridges (22) brings the ball down the court during the second half of the men’s basketball game against Rutgers on Jan. 4 at Breslin Center. The Spartans defeated the Scarlet Knights, 93-65. PHOTO: NIC ANTAYA

LAST 7 GAMES

73.3 PPG 67.4 PPG +5.9 PTS 47.2% 40.5% 62.4% +2.6

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TOGETHER martinlutherchapel.org

Resources in the Neighborhoods MSU Neighborhood Engagement Centers offer a wide variety of resources to help you with everything from math to staying healthy!

Resources Include: Neighborhood Academic Advising

Chemistry Help Room Writing Center (WC) Health Clinics Yoga, Zumba, Cardio Kickboxing, and other fitness classes

Sunday Supper 5:30pm Wednesday ON FIRE 7:00pm Student-led Bible Class 8:05pm

Lutheran Student Center 444 Abbot Road East Lansing (517)332-0778 mlc@martinlutherchapel.org

ITS Computer Help Desk MSU Libraries Help

Math Learning Center (MLC) Sunday Worship 10:30am & 7:00pm Bible Class 9:30am

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Bus rides from campus available

Visit neighborhoods.msu.edu for the complete resource schedule in your neighborhood! MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2 01 7

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Crossword

L.A. Times Daily Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

News

Stephen Olschanski City editor city@statenews.com

Crime during break includes fraud, larceny 4

GRAPH: CLAIRE BARKHOLZ

1 Brings peace to 2 Native Alaskan 3 Having a been-there-done-that attitude 4 War-torn country since 2011 5 Goodyear offering 6 “Relax, soldier” 7 Pre-euro Metz money 8 Up to, in ads 9 Got a look at 10 Use as a reference 11 Workplace standards org. 12 Israel’s Golda 13 Puts money (on) 19 To-do list entry 21 Envelope fastener 24 Looked at closely 25 Birth certificate datum

Get the solutions at statenews.com/puzzles

Level: 1

2

3

4

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www. sudoku.org.uk SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S PUZZLE Get the solutions at statenews.com/ puzzles

MWEIDMAYER@STATENEWS.COM

During winter break, from Dec. 19 through Jan. 8, the MSU Police Department made multiple arrests, including nonaggravated assault, and is continuing to investigate various cases of fraud and larceny among other crimes, according to the Clery Crime and Fire Log. “Just because the students and the faculty and staff may be on break, we still have follow-up to do and so that there are some cases that we continued to investigate and we will continue that,” MSU police Capt. Doug Monette said. Among the numerous arrests, two were for nonaggravated assault on Jan. 5 and Jan. 6. One case of assault and battery is currently active. Many of the reported crimes are typical of crimes that occur during the school year, such as marijuana possession and larceny. “The important things during break (are) that

1

1

1 indecent exposure

assault

nonaggravated

1

property

possessing stolen

fraud impersonation

larceny

liquor violation

BY MARIE WEIDMAYER

we maintain the safety and security of the campus,” Monette said. “We continue patrol, we do foot beat, we check the security of some of the different buildings and the residence halls.” According to the Clery Crime and Fire Log, which was last updated Jan. 8, there were four incidents of violation of a controlled substance, all for marijuana. From the incidents, three resulted in arrests, on Dec. 23, 2016, Jan. 4. and Jan. 8. One case that is currently active was reported on Jan. 6. One arrest was made on Dec. 21, 2016 for larceny. While there were two other incidents of larceny, one case is active and one case is inactive, according to the log. Fraud was also a reoccurring reported crime with three cases of impersonation fraud and one case of fraud. According to Legal Dictionary, impersonation is “the crime of pretending to be another individual in order to deceive others and gain some advantage.” READ MORE AT STATENEWS.COM

ST. JOHN CATHOLIC CHURCH & STUDENT CENTER WELCOME BACK!

JOIN US FOR:

Undergraduate Men’s & Women’s Groups begin again Monday, 1/9/17

Upperclassmen Discernment Retreat 1/21/17 – 1/22/17

Sunday 8:00am, 10:00am, Noon, 5:00pm & 7:00pm

MASSES

DOWN

28 “We Try Harder” car rental chain 29 Air conditioner setting 30 Suffer from overexertion 31 Goes below the horizon 32 Senior NCO 33 “Oops!” 34 Place for an earring 35 Grand-scale poem 36 Pres. between FDR and DDE 39 Sandy shade 40 Flushed, as cheeks 41 Down the road 46 Magician’s syllables 47 Pays tribute to 48 “My schedule is wide open” 50 Works with flour 51 Cup for café or thé 52 Blowing one’s top 53 Lead or zinc 54 Blissful regions 55 Cain’s victim 56 Commando garb 57 Stumble 58 Kiddie lit monster 61 Mischief-maker 62 Modernist’s prefix

(marijuana)

60 Take into account 63 Fill fully 64 Qatari ruler 65 British unit of length 66 Hall of Famer Musial 67 Relaxed gait 68 Old West search party 69 Narrow-bodied swimmers

violation of a

1 Rides for hire 5 Rapids transports 10 Toothed tonsorial tool 14 Treaty partner 15 Open courtyards 16 “So that’s what you mean” 17 Shakespearean king 18 “Just handle the problem!” 20 Jam session jammer 22 Signs of sadness 23 Upstage one’s co-stars 26 Tavern brew 27 Some motorcycles and pianos 32 Lawn-wrecking pests 36 Sewn edge 37 __ president 38 Big sale, where you can find the starts of 18-, 23-, 49- and 60-Across 42 Mongolian desert 43 No-frills sleeper 44 Fire pit particles 45 ‘70s-’80s band with a steering wheel on their debut album cover 47 Google success 49 Employ stalling tactics 55 Pro on camera 59 Like some rays outside the visible spectrum

1 controlled substance

ACROSS

fraud

1

3

probation violation

3

trespassing

3

concealed weapons

3

SOURCE: MSU POLICE CLERY CRIME AND FIRE LOG

Undergraduate Retreat 2/17/17 – 2/19/17 in Dewitt, MI

Mon, Wed, & Fri: 12:15pm Tue & Thu:

9:15pm

St. John Catholic Church & Student Center 1/9/17

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Sports

Souichi Terada Sports editor sports@statenews.com

Gaines gains confidence on court after earning conference honors BY DENISE SPANN DSPANN@STATENEWS.COM

On a chilly Saturday evening, the MSU women’s basketball team downed the University of Nebraska at the Breslin Center, 93-73. With the season in full motion, the starting lineup is beginning to form with two freshmen sliding into the lineup. One of those is redshirt-freshman forward Victoria ‘Coco’ Gaines, who has been showing she’s an asset when on the court. Gaines scored six points against Nebraska, which includes her 3-pointer that was the first of eight during the game. She totaled five rebounds, one assist and a steal in the match. Gaines said becoming a consistent starter hasn’t phased her. The rookie said she tries not to think about starting because it can make her more nervous, but becoming more confident, improving every game and giving her all on the court is what she focuses on. “I’m trying to get where I was in high school, like a more of a stretch forward that can shoot the ball outside, like at the three, and drive,” Gaines said. “Just basically having my defender move more since they’re bigger. I just think since I got my confidence back for college games it’s finally coming back to me, like I can do this stuff.” Recently, the forward was named Big Ten Freshman of the Week after her performance against

Illinois. Gaines had her first career double-double with 13 points and 10 rebounds, a career-high in both categories. At the beginning of the season, Gaines’ future on the court was up in the air after the early success of sophomore forward Hana Vesela. However, after sophomore forward Jenna Allen chipped her tooth, Gaines was able to step on the court and showcase some of her talents. Head coach Suzy Merchant said it’s good seeing Gaines play at the level they know she can, adding she likes what she sees on the court. “We really like what she brings defensively and rebounding wise, she can cover a guard and handle the perimeter type post player, she can defend on the block, she’s a good rebounder,” Merchant said. “She’s probably our best position help guy, she’s taken more charges than anybody. She’s long, she’s lanky. I think she’s getting more confidence as she’s continuing to play.” During her first year at MSU, Gaines had to redshirt because she wasn’t healthy enough to play at the college level yet. After Gaines tore her ACL going into her senior year of high school, Merchant and the rest of the staff thought it would be best to wait until she could play at 100 percent. Wanting to play the best she could at the faster college level, Gaines used the redshirt to get stronger for the game she loves. “We redshirted her last year, just to try and get

her knees healthy, she’s had two ACLs in high school,” Merchant said. “She was a little bit rusty, you know, now that she’s played more she’s getting more confident.” Moving forward to the rest of Big Ten play, Gaines said she is looking forward to beating

highly- ranked teams and getting better as a team. The Spartans will face off against the Ohio State University Buckeyes the next time they step onto the court. The match is scheduled for 8 p.m. on Jan. 10 at the Breslin and will be televised on Big Ten Network.

Seeking Student Board Member • to fulfill term until Sept. 2018 • The State News is now accepting applications for the Board of Directors. The board establishes the policies and budget of The State News and annually selects the editor-in-chief and advertising manager. Members attend monthly meetings during the academic year and serve two-year terms. The twelve member board represents members of the MSU community and newspaper profession and consists of three professional journalists, three MSU faculty/staff members and six registered students. “Being a part of The State News board serves as an opportunity to continue the voice and empowerment of the student experience at Michigan State University. As an aspiring community leader, this experience has been beneficial for my career development by giving me insight on strategic approaches to reaching a broader community.” Kevin Jackson State News Board of Directors

Redshirt-freshman Victoria Gaines (15) passes the ball to a teammate as she is defended by Nebraska center Allie Havers (22) during the game against Nebraska on Jan. 7 at the Breslin Center. The Spartans defeated the Cornhuskers, 93-73. PHOTO: SUNDEEP DHANJAL

TO READ MORE ABOUT MSU WOMEN’S BASKETBALL GO TO STATENEWS.COM

Students who are registered as a full time student and paid The State News subscription fee for the current semester may receive a refund of that fee if they do not wish to support the student newspaper. Refunds will be paid during the first 10 days of classes at 435 E. Grand River. Proof of payment of the fee and a photo ID must be presented. Office hours are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

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Sports

Souichi Terada Sports editor sports@statenews.com

MSU swept by Badgers in conference play BY COLTON WOOD CWOOD@STATENEWS.COM

The MSU hockey team (4-13-1, 0-4-0 Big Ten) looked like it generated some momentum after a string of victories earlier this season, most notably against thenNo. 5 North Dakota on Nov. 25-26. Now, the Spartans have found themselves on the heels of a seven-game losing streak after being swept by the Wisconsin Badgers (10-7-1, 3-1 Big Ten) on the road at the Kohl Center. It was the first time the Badgers were in action since a series against the University of Michigan Wolverines from Dec. 9-10. The weekend didn’t start off well for the Spartans, as they dropped the first game against the Badgers, 5-1. The Badgers got off to a hot start, besting junior goaltender Ed Minney twice at the beginning, putting the Spartans in an early 2-0 deficit. MSU retaliated, however, as senior forward Villiam Haag netted the only score for MSU. Haag received a pass from freshman forward Patrick Khodorenko with 7:21 on the clock in the the first period. Haag’s ensuing wrist shot from the slot found the back of the net after sailing past Wisconsin goaltender Jack Berry to cut the Spartans’ deficit to one. The Badgers continued to pile on, however, eventually taking the game, 5-1. A Wisconsin shorthanded goal

in the second period halted any momentum the Spartans had. MSU ended the match outshot by the Badgers, 36-26. Minney recorded 31 saves in the loss. Badger defenseman Jake Linhart recorded a goal and an assist apiece as the home team took game one over MSU. On Saturday, it was a similar story as the Spartans were defeated by the Badgers by the same score, 5-1. Junior defenseman Carson Gatt was the only Spartan to find the back of the net. After sophomore forward Mason Appleton and fifth-year senior defenseman Rhett Holland fed Gatt, his wrist shot on a Spartan power play managed to get by Wisconsin goaltender Matt Jurusik at 3:41 into the first frame to tie the game at 1-1. At one point, the Spartans momentarily had the lead, 2-1, after freshman forward Taro Hirose seemingly scored. Unfortunately for the Spartans, the goal was wiped off the scoreboard after it was deemed the puck did not completely cross the line. After the review, the Badgers went on to score four unanswered goals and swept the weekend series. “I thought we had really good chances in the first period, and I thought we had some good opportunities in the second period,” head coach Tom Anastos said on Saturday’s loss. READ MORE AT STATENEWS.COM

Then-freshman forward Mason Appleton (27) and Wisconsin forward Matthew Freytag (15) skate to take possession of the puck during the hockey game against Wisconsin on Dec. 11, 2015 at Munn Ice Arena. The Spartans defeated the Badgers, 4-3. PHOTO: SUNDEEP DHANJAL

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Employment

Employment

LAW OFFICE internship. Course credit avail. Unpaid. Crockett Law Offices. crockettslaw@yahoo.com. 349-9090

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Apts. For Rent ABOVE TACO BELL, only 2 apts left~ including Huge 2 bedrm/2 story loft! Furnished, parking & right downtown~ lic for 2. LEASING SPECIALS thru end of Jan~ Contact cronmgt.com or 351-1177 for more info or tour.

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RECYCLE this newspaper, please.

Rachel Fradette Campus editor campus@statenews.com

3 former Spartans named to Forbes ‘30 Under 30’ list BY MADISON F. O’CONNOR MOCONNOR@STATENEWS.COM

MSU alumni Tyler Oakley, Draymond Green and Travis Thompson all made Forbes’ annual “30 Under 30” list. In Forbes’ seventh year of the list, 30 influential millennials were chosen across 20 industries, including Education, Music and Venture Capital among others, to make the total number of those honored 600. The number appears high, but according to Forbes.com, each category had under a four percent acceptance rate this year. Oakley was honored in the Hollywood and Entertainment category, Green in the Sports category and Thompson in the Energy category. Oakley, 27, is a digital star and humorist who uses YouTube as a platform for activism dedicated to LGBT rights, LGBT youth and other social issues. He got his start as a YouTuber while attending MSU, where he graduated from in 2011. With more than 8 million subscribers, Oakley uses his chan-

nel as a way to reflect on contemporary society and culture through collaborating with celebrities, interacting with his viewers and, of course, for humor. Green, 26, is a forward for the Golden State Warriors. He is an NBA All-Star, two-time All-Defensive team honoree and an Olympic gold medal winner. He played on MSU’s basketball team from 2008 to his graduation in 2012. He helped the team win the Big Ten Tournament championship in 2012 and made two Final Four appearances, among other accomplishments. In 2015, Green donated $3.1 million to MSU, the largest donation from an active athlete in MSU history. Thompson, 29, is currently a research fellow at University of Michigan. He received his doctorate from MSU in 2014. Thompson is now working with University of Michigan to develop a better battery. His goal is to replace lithium ion technology with a garnet-based electrolyte. This would eliminate the chance of catching fire and maximize energy density, according to his profile on the Forbes website, creating a solid-state ceramic battery.

tyler oakley digital star, humorist and new york times best-selling author

age:

27

hometown: jackson, mich. graduated in 2011 with a bachelor’s degree in communication

draymond green basketball player for the golden state warriors

age:

26

hometown: saginaw, mich. graduated in the year

2012, named 2012 national player of

travis thompson mechanical engineer and research fellow at university of michigan

age:

29

hometown: ann arbor, mich. received his doctorate in materials science from msu in december 2014 MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2 01 7

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