2020 Annual Report

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Annual Report For the year ended 31 December 2020


TABLE OF CONTENTS Board Chair Report .................................

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Board Committees ..................................

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Rector’s Report .......................................

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Staffing ....................................................

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2020 Highlights .......................................

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Whole School Achievement Outcomes ...

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Student Roll ............................................

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2020 Student Leavers ..............................

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Review of NCEA and Scholarship 2020 ...

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Public Benefit Report ..............................

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Financials ................................................

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Foundation Report ..................................

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BOARD CHAIR REPORT For the year ended 31 December 2020

The Board of Governors is pleased to report a continuation of strong financial, operational, and student performance outcomes achieved in 2020, despite the unprecedented challenges faced. 2020 was an exceptional year around the globe and in New Zealand due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. This unravelled from February/March and created considerable angst and uncertainty for everyone. New Zealand had a complete lockdown from Monday 23 March to Wednesday 13 May, which meant our teachers provided students with online learning and all but essential service personnel worked from home. Although we were all affected, some of our community were severely financially impacted through no fault of their own. The Board provided all students with a $750 fees rebate, which resulted in the College forgiving a net $1 million in fees for the year. Our community generously donated $200,000 to the Community Support Programme to support families through 2020 and ensure all students were able to remain at St Andrew’s College for at least the rest of the year. The restrictions the pandemic imposed on College activity, and measures put in place to reduce costs, meant the College not only absorbed the $1 million fees rebate but ended up with a surplus that was $478,000 better than budget. The College made a net operating surplus of $778,000 for 2020, half of which came from the generous donations to the Ben Gough Family Theatre, and the balance from the College roll being greater than budgeted throughout the 2020 year. This financial performance includes a $4.35 million depreciation charge resulting in a cash surplus of $5.12 million, slightly down on the $5.39 million achieved in 2019. Capital expenditure was $6 million, with $4.3 million spent on the new Fitness Centre and the final strengthening of Gym 1 (total final project cost will be $5.3 million). There was also nearly $1 million spent on the detailed design of the Ben Gough Family Theatre project. Capital expenditure was funded from cash flow

and College debt fell by $50,000 to $7.3 million at the end of 2020. Debt is less than four percent of total assets and the equity ratio remains similar to last year at 94 percent. The financial statements have been audited by BDO, endorsed by the Board’s Finance and Audit Committee, and subsequently approved by the full Board on Thursday 27 May 2021. The Board appreciates the efforts of the College’s Financial Controller, Richard Boon, and his team in ensuring quality financial management and reporting. This is fundamental to good governance and management of the College and has again been commended by the Auditor, BDO. While demand for student places at the College remains strong, it is not taken for granted. There is an unrelenting focus on continuous improvement, on evolving the St Andrew’s College experience and together building better people, for life. This commitment is reflected in the College’s strategic direction, Framing Our Future 2019–2023, which reflects the outcomes of a 12-month conversation with our community and stakeholders. Its purpose is to define where we are heading and what is most important in moving along that path and, in so doing, be a touchstone for all planning and decision making. The ongoing development of the campus remains a priority to provide facilities and resources befitting of a leading New Zealand independent school. The redevelopment of the Ben Gough Family Theatre into a modern, fit-for-purpose performance venue with teaching spaces for Drama and Dance is the next major project to be undertaken. Construction will commence in December 2021 and is due for completion by the end of Term 1 2023. It has been another year of strong performance and progress made possible by the collective capability, contributions, and efforts of so many people. The Board is grateful for each and every person who plays their part in making a real difference to the lives of students, and the prosperity and reputation of the College. This is my final report as Chair due to retirement from the Board after 12 years of service. It has been a privilege to serve St Andrew’s College and I will be forever grateful for the opportunity. Ngā mihi nui

Bryan Pearson Board Chair St Andrew’s Presbyterian College Board of Governors Inc.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

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Boa rd C om m it te e s

THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS

BOARD COMMITTEES

BOARD MEMBERS

FINANCE and AUDIT (FAC)

Old Collegians’ nominee Bryan Pearson Chair

Governor, Business Advisor and Investor

Board appointed Rob Hall Co-Deputy Chair Richard Holyoake

CEO Business Director

Chair Members

Rob Woodgate Christine Leighton Felicity Odlin Bryan Pearson

Board Rector Board Board Chair

REMUNERATION and NOMINATIONS (RNC) Parent nominees Malcolm Johns Co-Deputy Chair Felicity Odlin Rob Woodgate

CEO Company Accountant CFO

Alpine Presbytery nominee Rev. Sandra Wright-Taylor

Presbyterian Minister

Rector Christine Leighton Staff nominee Nick Letham

Rector

Chair Members

Rob Hall Richard Holyoake

Board Board

CAPITAL WORKS (CWC) Chair TBA Members Richard Holyoake Malcolm Johns Christine Leighton Bryan Pearson

Board Board Board Rector Board Chair

Law Partner

COLLEGE DISCIPLINARY (CDC)

Rector Board Chair

Plus two other Board Members appointed by the Board at the time.

BOARD SECRETARY David Evans

Christine Leighton Bryan Pearson

College General Manager

HEALTH and SAFETY (HSC) Chair Member

Richard Holyoake Sandra Wright-Taylor

Board Board

OTHER

YOUR LEGACY, OUR FUTURE CAMPAIGN Chair

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Bryan Pearson

Board Chair


RECTOR’S REPORT For the year ended 31 December 2020

2020 will be remembered as a year that challenged the world with the unexpected COVID-19 global pandemic. The seven week lockdown in New Zealand had minimal disruption compared to other countries, however the uncertainty, economically and emotionally, had a significant impact on all. The lockdown period of March–May provided challenges to schools to deliver online learning to students, and St Andrew’s College excelled in this regard. Teachers at all year levels made every effort to ensure that student learning was not compromised and used technology to best effect in delivering online lessons via Microsoft Teams and regular timetabled classes. Students were also supported through an active online pastoral care network and virtual co-curricular activities while they were physically disconnected from their usual routines. Despite this disruption, St Andrew’s College had an excellent year with student achievement matching, and in many cases, exceeding the norm. The Board of Governors focused on providing support for St Andrew’s College families, particularly those most affected by the economic repercussions of the pandemic. Through the College Development Office, a Community Support Programme was launched which enabled several students to remain at the College through challenging circumstances. 2020 was another outstanding year for St Andrew’s College students. As always, the co-curricular activities kept students very busy and there were many top individuals and collective successes, which are captured in the ‘Top Student Successes’ on the inside back cover of this report.

SCHOOL ROLL By the end of the school year, the average roll for 2020 was 1082 in the Secondary School and 457 in the Preparatory School, with a total average of 1539 students. The beginning of 2020 saw 13 new teaching staff join the College (nine in the Secondary School and four in the Preparatory School).

ACADEMIC / NCEA NCEA results released mid-January demonstrate both students’ and teachers’ commitment to achieving personal excellence. Many students achieved outstanding success with 279 Excellence endorsements across Levels 1, 2 and 3. Of our Year 13 students, 88.2% gained University Entrance. In the end-of-year Scholarship examinations, there were 53 Scholarship awards with four at an Outstanding level. Samuel Croot and Imogen McNeill each achieved five Scholarships placing them in the top 58 students in the country as an ‘Outstanding Scholar’.

NCEA Results Level 1 – 99.6%

Level 2 – 100%

Level 3 – 98%

Merit Endorsements Level 1 – 87

Level 2 – 78

Level 3 – 61

Excellence Endorsements Level 1 – 103

Level 2 – 101

Level 3 – 75

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

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Rector ’s Report

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Other academic awards included;– Entrance Scholarships to Universities – 70 awarded; 11 ICAS Top Medal Winner – Years 3, 10 and 11 English, Years 10 and 11 Mathematics, Years 7, 9, 10 and 11 Science, Years 8 and 10 Digital Technologies; Canterbury Pasifika Academic Awards – Supreme Academic Award; Young Enterprise Scheme – second place in national Gallagher Award for Smart Technology and Canterbury Regional Excellence Award for Enterprising Technology; New Zealand International Biology Olympiad Bronze Award; Creative Writing – three finalists National Schools’ Poetry Awards; Chemistry Olympiad Awards – two gold certificates, four silver certificates, and four bronze certificates. The College received information of 169 St Andrew’s College Old Collegians who graduated from Auckland, Canterbury, Lincoln, Victoria, Otago, and Massey universities in 2020.

STAFF AWARDS In 2020, five St Andrew’s College staff were recognised and celebrated; Marily Scanlon Prize for Teaching Excellence – Wilj Dekkers and Jo Bigford-Fleming; Brockenhurst Research Scholarship by the Christchurch England Sister Cities Committee and the Christchurch RSA – Jo Bailey, writer and editor of Regulus and Collegian; Lifetime Achievement Award by Sport Canterbury – Mike Johnston 1st XI cricket coach and College Custodian; Microsoft Innovative Educator Experts (MIE) for 2020–2021 – Digital Technology Teacher, Justine Lee, and Preparatory School Teacher, Jo Cordner; Study – Rev. Paul Morrow graduated from Otago University with a Bachelor of Theology, majoring in Biblical Studies; VEX Robotics Teacher of the Year Award – Head of Innovation and Information Services, Wilj Dekkers.

SPORTS The most resounding success was the 1st XV rugby team winning the UC Cup (for the first time ever in the UC competition) and the netball Senior A winning the Christchurch Supernet competition. Many students excelled in their chosen sport, with 15 students gaining their New Zealand representative badge. There were many other achievements of top three placings in South Island and national competitions including beach volleyball, mixed team adventure racing, Girls’ football, golf, Preparatory Boys’ and Girls’ tennis, Girls’ volleyball, mixed team duathlon, ice hockey, equestrian, mixed team skiing, swimming, rowing, Preparatory School Girls’ 1st XI hockey, orienteering, multi-sport, rowing, athletics, and adventure racing. Senior Girls’ badminton, Division 1 Girls’ basketball, Girls’ futsal, mixed tennis, and Boys’ basketball received placing in the top three of Canterbury competitions or South Island regional competitions.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

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Rector ’s Report

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CULTURAL Chamber Music Group ‘Les Apaches’ including siblings Samuel (Year 12) and Christine (Year 10) Jeon, made the finals (top six) of the New Zealand Chamber Music Competition. Grace Lawrence (Year 11) was accepted as second violin in the NZSO National Youth Orchestra. Estee Wilke (Year 11) was accepted to the New Zealand Secondary Students Choir. ‘Casper and the Frowny Face Club’ were named winners of Rockquest Canterbury Final, making the National Finals (top 20 bands in New Zealand). The Jazz Orchestra, Big Band, and Soul Band all achieved gold awards at the Ara JazzQuest. The Southern Jam Youth Jazz Festival competed online with Flynn Megaw (Year 12) on trombone awarded Most Outstanding Performer and Best Improvisation, and Club 347 | Jazz Combo awarded Best Rhythm Section and Most Outstanding Combo. Sage Klein and Renee Vaudrey (both Year 13) had their songs selected for the Play It Strange Lion Foundation Songwriting Competition Top 50. Year 13 students, Jeremiah AndersonGardner and Genevieve Henstock, short films, Escape and Cardrona Valley respectively, selected as finalists in the 2020 School Shorts Screen Competition. Escape won two awards for Best Actor; Jeremy Kent, and Best Cinematography; Jeremiah Anderson-Gardner. Andrew Garbett and Imogen McNeill (both Year 13), placed in the top five speakers for the 2020 Canterbury Schools’ Debating Competition, and the Junior debating team of Finlay Fairweather-Logie, Lachlan Odlin and Luke Wylie (all Year 10) won the Junior Cup in the 2020 Canterbury Schools’ Debating Competition.

(Middle School production) delighted audiences with strong acting, musical, and dance talent. Coppélia (Ballet production) was a visual delight with over 100 students on stage during this much loved performance.

CALENDAR EVENTS Many other memorable events throughout the year included special Secondary School Assemblies; Leadership, Academic, Prefect, Boarders, International, Cultural and Boys’ and Girls’ Assemblies. Special events included the Year 8 breakfasts, The Duke of Edinburgh International Award – Gold ceremony. Other regular events were Athletics and Swimming Sports, Highland Games, Cross Country, Oarsome O’Fare, Cultural Showcase, Dance Revue, Year 11 Semi-formal, Senior College Formal, Old Collegians’ Annual Dinner, StAC Attack (after 10 years it was back in the Christchurch Town Hall), Old Collegians golf tournament, special end-of-year dinners, and Combined Boarders’ Chapel. Five Old Collegian reunions held throughout the year, ensured that our community was connected and there was much to celebrate. We did have a few events cancelled due to COVID-19 and there was a limit on gathering numbers – Founders’ Day, ANZAC Day Service, Grandparents’ Day, Senior College production, and 60 Years On Reunion.

PRIZEGIVING CEREMONY St Andrew’s College 104th Prizegiving was a wonderful celebration of a year of outstanding achievement with over 330 students involved with the entertainment for this premier event.

National Pipe Band Championships results: • A Band – second place Juvenile and second place Grade 2; • B Band – fourth place Juvenile and ninth place Grade 4A. At the start of the holidays, two of our Senior and one of our Junior Highland dancers achieved their dreams of being named overall National Champions – an outstanding achievement with extremely strong competition against dancers from throughout the country. • U18 New Zealand Highland Dancer of the Year: Evelyn Clarke (Year 13); • U16 New Zealand Highland Dancer of the Year: Milly Christie (Year 11);

The event began with the Kapa Haka waiata and haka, followed by the Pipe Band display – also featuring Highland dancers and an impressive solo from Pipe Major Campbell Wilson. Entertainment included the Ballet Academy excerpt from Coppélia, orchestra, choirs, jazz band, and a special finale of The Skye Boat Song featuring Staccoro with orchestra, bagpipes, and soloist Archie Milligan (Year 13). 2020 Heads of College valedictory speeches were impressively delivered by Head Prefects, Hugh Montgomery and Emily Tyrrell, and the College Dux was Samuel Croot, who went on to gain an impressive five Scholarships in the New Zealand Scholarship examinations.

• U14 New Zealand Highland Dancer of the Year: Charlize Blakely (Year 8). Gold Duke of Edinburgh – 12 students (Year 13) were presented with their Gold Duke of Edinburgh Awards, and eight students were New Zealand representatives in cultural events. Productions – three outstanding productions were staged throughout 2020. Cry Baby (Senior College production), was delayed due to the COVID-19 lockdown and eventually performed in August to an audience maximum of 50 per night. Despite this, the show was, once again, a showcase of incredible St Andrew’s talent. You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown

SPECIAL CHARACTER AND COMMUNITY SERVICE In 2020, the St Andrew’s College students and extended community enjoyed many College Sunday and special services in the Centennial Chapel. All students in the Secondary School participated in community service activities as did the younger students, particularly in the 40 Hour Famine. Many different charities and local organisations were the beneficiaries of St Andrew’s College students’ energies and fundraising efforts with a total of $21,408.60 gifted to various charities.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

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Rector ’s Report

ANNUAL PLAN REVIEW

The 18 Whole School Goals identified in October 2019 have been well met in 2020 (these goals resulted from the publication of our 2019–2023 Strategic Framework). Thanks to the planning, focus, and attention of staff responsible; significant progress has been made in all areas.

DIMENSION 1:

Values and Culture • Well-being: An integrated approach to well-being included representation from the Well-being Committee, senior leadership and HoDs. Students and staff wellbeing were a focus during the lockdown, with proactive work from the pastoral care and guidance network. Dr Sven Hansen continued to work with staff on developing resilience, and inquiry into individual character strengths was further developed. Curriculum areas (Preparatory and Secondary) incorporated well-being initiatives in their classrooms including Year 9 Health, English, Drama, Humanities, ‘Bounce Back!’, Mindful Movers, and Te Waka. Student surveys on well-being were conducted and data analysed, and Deans developed resources to explore year group themes. Student-led activities included a student committee, St Andrew’s hosting a Secondary School conference, Well‑being Student Assembly, student character awards, and HeadsUp communication which began during the lockdown. Several well-being blog posts were shared with the community. • Co-curricular sport: The many layers of sport (curriculum and co-curricular) came together to share a common vision and purpose. Sports codes worked towards a consistent approach and to manage disruption to sports programmes due to the lockdown and Alert Levels. Cross code approaches improved communication and consistency, which helped students meet expectations. Preparation was completed for the opening of the new ‘StACFit’ Fitness Centre for the start of 2021. • Health and Safety: Focus on co-curricular/Outdoor Education/EOTC. ‘Volunteer’ register updated each term, Code of Conduct signed, and Police vetting checks completed. Student and staff accidents reported and reviewed. All EOTC trips have completed safety documentation, and a new Health and Safety action plan template was developed for implementation in 2021.

DIMENSION 2:

Teaching and Learning • NCEA changes: Staff engaged actively with the change process, submitted feedback, and held effective planning days. Developed understanding of proposed new literacy and numeracy requirements. Year 9 and 10 units of work will be rewritten to ensure alignment with changes by 2023. • Visible Learning: A focus for all staff to ‘know your learner’. Student profiles made more user-friendly for teachers. A requirement that Key Competencies are an explicit focus in all subject areas – to be visible in all curriculum planning. • Career education: 185 Year 13 interviews were completed. Targetted information sessions were held, a new website was completed, and fortnightly careers newsletter online for Year 11–13 students, as well as Year 12 and 13 parents. A ‘future pathways’ option was introduced to Senior College options. Plans for career information to be made through Health and Te Waka programmes.

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DIMENSION 3:

Leadership and Governance • ERO review: This was delayed due to COVID-19. Rescheduled for week of 15 February 2021. • School records: Retention, retrieval, and disposal were reviewed – a new policy drafted, and recommended actions recorded. • Staff leadership development: 11 teachers completed the second year of the StAC Leadership Programme which was very successful. Development of HoDs with focus on driving key College initiatives. • Human Resources: ‘Ask Your Team’ staff survey was completed by staff (77 percent) in October. Follow up will result in action during 2021. Desired outcome: increase in staff engagement and shared ownership of initiatives and school goals. • Data for decision making: Good progress was made in a number of areas including comparison of target and pre-dated grades, NCEA results summary, ability to track progress by learner category, gender, ethnicity, boarder, and St Andrew’s Preparatory. Further development for identifying students at risk.

DIMENSION 4:

Resources and Environment • Development: Generous support to the Community Support Programme in response to COVID-19. $200,000 was raised and used to assist St Andrew’s College families affected financially by the pandemic. Two further initiatives were the Community Business Directory and sponsorship recognition. Major gifts secured in support of the Ben Gough Family Theatre, hardship scholarship, and 10 new Strowan donors. • Alumni: A number of successful reunions despite COVID-19 disruption – 259 attendees to reunions held. Year 13 leavers gifted a weathervane as their leavers’ gift. • StACFit Fitness Centre: Completed December 2020. Excellent outcome – to be in use beginning of 2021. Staffing, management plan, Health and Safety plan, and user rules established. • Ben Gough Family Theatre: Construction delayed due to COVID-19. To begin December 2021 (proceed to tender mid-2021).

The above summary of 2020 reports only the specific goals and initiatives for the current year. These must be considered alongside the business as usual which includes curriculum delivery, teaching and learning, and the multitude of co-curricular opportunities at St Andrew’s. The College has strong leadership in areas of innovative practice. Progress is dependent upon leaders’ ability to develop a vision, plan steps, and delivery through the implementation. The progress made throughout 2020 recognises the strong leadership of multiple leaders throughout the College.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

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Rector ’s Report

DEVELOPMENT OFFICE AND REUNIONS By refocusing our fundraising strategy during the time in lockdown, our families who were experiencing severe financial hardship received assistance in difficult times. Significant new donors included four new Strowan members ($10k), four new Highland members ($25k), and two new Thompson Founders’ Club ($100k). There were five College organised reunions hosted throughout the year, with over 309 attendees. The 60 Years On Reunion falling during the COVID-19 restrictions was rescheduled to 2021. During the lockdown, the Rector and Board approved a support package for families experiencing severe financial hardship called the ‘Community Support Programme’. The College gifted back $750 per child as a rebate, suggesting those who could re-direct this back to the Support Programme. In this way, $200,000 was raised to assist 18 families in financial hardship. Other major gifts included $150,000 from Gina Satterthwaite through the Fife Foundation, the John Sinclair Scholarship – a generous gift of $100,000 from the Sinclair family in honour of their father John R Sinclair who was Deputy Rector (1983–1996) and Administration Manager (1997–2000) at St Andrew’s College. The scholarship is to be awarded to a student to attend Years 11–13, who might not otherwise be able to attend or remain at the College. St Andrew’s Sponsorship Programme – recorded those families/business who support a sporting code and a theatre ticket levy on the Middle School production and Ballet production – raised a total of $12,365. St Andrew’s College Charity Golf Tournament – in support of Chalky Carr Trust – raised $27,000 for the Trust. Despite a challenging year the Development Office raised a total of $687,547.

CONCLUSION 2020 has once again shown a remarkable ability of young people to show resilience in adversity, concern, and compassion for others, and strive to achieve their personal best. The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the cancellation of many student events and competitions. However, students, staff and families displayed great character strength in the way they made the most of difficult circumstances. Our whole school focus on well-being has positively affected students and staff, and our student leaders have demonstrated humour, creativity, humility and gratitude. It is a privilege to lead the St Andrew’s College staff and community who are all committed to achieving and supporting the best outcomes for all students. I am grateful particularly for the ongoing support of Board Chair Bryan Pearson and the Board of Governors, the College Executive team, and all others who bring their best selves to our College every day to enable us to collectively serve our St Andrew’s College families.

Christine Leighton Rector

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Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

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S ta f f i ng

STAFFING NEW STAFF 2020 Teaching Staff Mark Lane Mia Silverman Leisha Connolly Richard Webster Dan Hill Andrew Kerrison Nicole Kilbride Heidi Koning (OC 2010) Dayna Stirling Michelle Tewkesbury Marlene Van der Bent Monique O’Sullivan Fiona Patterson David Ermerins Liam Smith Isaac Leota Lori Haisty

Director of Sport and Co-Curricular Activities Head of Media Studies Social Sciences Careers Counsellor English Teacher Design and Visual Communication Teacher English Teacher Health, Physical Education Teacher Teacher in Charge of Health Science Teacher Year 1 Teacher Year 2 Teacher Year 5 Teacher Year 7 Teacher Agriculture Teacher Preparatory School Relief Teacher Long Term Relief Teacher Preparatory School

Support Staff Joe Piggott Katie Hayes Honor Clement Matt Cossey Trent Harris Genevieve Austin Caleb Aperahama Roisin Donohoe-Phillips

Sports Administrator Preparatory School Office Assistant Youth Worker Youth Worker Fitness Centre Gym Instructor Kitchen Assistant Grounds and Maintenance Marketing Assistant

ON MATERNITY LEAVE Teaching Staff Anna Hood Natasha Cloughley Nortje Susan Poulter Bid Constanti Emma Yeoman

Science Teacher Teacher in Charge of Agriculture Social Studies, History and Geography Teacher Preparatory School Teacher Preparatory School Teacher

STAFF ROLE CHANGES Bronwyn Radcliffe

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Head of Modern Languages and filling in as Year 13 Dean for Term 4


RESIGNATIONS DURING 2020 Teaching Staff Jo Morrow Steve Macintosh Natasha Derry Joe Gallagher Emily-Jane Ullrich Iona Bonney Dave Clark Leisha Connolly Steve Macintosh Louise Simpson Carly Miller Liz de Lautour

Head of Thompson House Mathematics Teacher Year 13 Dean Mathematics Teaching Support Teacher Aide Visual Arts Teacher Science Teacher Social Studies Teacher Mathematics Teacher Long Term Relief Teacher Secondary School Long Term Relief Teacher Preparatory School Long Term Relief Teacher Secondary School

Support Staff Ronelle van Dongen James Laughlin Anj Hawkins Brian Langridge Sam Jamieson Camila Reyes Cherie Methven Owen Sharland Bex Connell Premi Gill Jacqui Anderson Michelle Bell

Netball and High Performance Athlete Support Pipe Band Tutor Marketing Communication Co-ordinator Cleaner Farm Manager Marketing Communication Co-ordinator Basketball and Rowing Co-ordinator Grounds Person Preparatory School Office Assistant Preparatory School Receptionist Records Officer Kitchen Assistant

2020 PRESIDENT ROLES Old Collegians Association President Jonathan Wells (Retired September 2020) Meg Black (Elected September 2020) Parent Teacher Association President Stephen Higgs Ladies Circle President Elizabeth Peacock

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

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H i g hl i g ht s

COVID-19

HIGHLIGHTS

$155k

Scholarship Fund donations received by the Foundation

$550k

Capital development, investments, and other donations received by the College

$406k

Scholarship grants to the College from the Foundation

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Per MOE 1 July 2020 roll

2020

FEES REBATE

full roll

444 Preparatory School 1090 Secondary School

1534 STUDENTS

$1million (Net of GST)

$38million INJECTED INTO THE LOCAL ECONOMY BY THE COLLEGE (includes GST)

18.7%

Paid to St Andrew’s by our Parent / Caregiver community (includes GST)

$34.7m $778k NET SURPLUS INCLUDING DONATIONS

8.5%

-3%

VOLATILITY OF ANNUAL RETURNS ON FOUNDATION FUND OVER THE PAST THREE YEARS

CASH SURPLUS

$5.1m

(i.e. before depreciation charge) including donations


Whole School Achievement Target Outcomes for 2020 DIMENSION

TARGET

Preparatory School

Secondary School

Teaching and Learning

OUTCOME

That 75 Level 1 candidates gain Level 1 certificates with Excellence endorsement.

Achieved – 103

That 60 Level 2 candidates gain Level 2 certificate with Excellence endorsement.

Achieved – 95

That 60 Level 3 candidates gain Level 3 certificate with Excellence endorsement.

Achieved – 73

That 170 Level 1 candidates will gain Level 1 certificates with Merit or Excellence endorsement.

Achieved – 188

That 160 Level 2 candidates will gain Level 2 certificates with Merit or Excellence endorsement.

Achieved – 165

That 120 Level 3 candidates will gain Level 3 certificates with Merit or Excellence endorsement.

Achieved – 124

That percentage of Year 11 students gaining NCEA Level 1 be > 98%.

Achieved – 99.6%

That percentage of Year 12 students gaining NCEA Level 2 be > 98%.

Achieved – 100%

That percentage of Year 13 students gaining NCEA Level 3 be > 96%.

Achieved – 98%

That percentage of Year 13 students gaining UE be > 85%

Achieved – 88.1%

That Scholarships gained > 45.

Achieved – 53

‘Shows Excellence’ and ‘Demonstrates Consistency’ are the predominant ratings for 95% of students in Key Competency reporting.

Achieved – 95.1%

All teachers will use evidence-based methods to show/ identify individual learning advancement.

Achieved – Confirmed through individual appraisal discussions and observations.

In Years 1–8, 95% of students are ‘at’ or ‘above’ National Curriculum expectation for Reading, Writing and Mathematics.

Not achieved – Reading 91.3% Not achieved – Writing 90.5% Achieved – Mathematics 97.5%

Individual written formative comment is evident in all classrooms.

Achieved – in books and on walls and included as part of the Performance Review process.

All teachers will demonstrate quality visible learning practices as outlined in the 2020 Appraisal document .

Achieved – Team leaders have assessed this part of this year’s review. Evidence of the process is recorded in Appraisal Connector.

All Year 4–8 classroom teachers will be placed above the national norm for their year level in the end-of-year ‘Me and My School’ survey.

Achieved – 17 classes Not achieved – three classes slightly below

All staff will show evidence of using ‘Student Voice’ to reflect on teaching practice, delivery of learning programmes, and learning environment.

Achieved – All staff collected student voice in Terms 2 and 3 and had follow up reflective discussions with team leaders

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Whole School A chieve m ent Ou tco me s

Whole School Achievement Target Outcomes for 2020 DIMENSION Values and Culture

TARGET

OUTCOME

That student participation in sport and cultural activities for the College be > 90%.

Achieved – 94%

That the Pipe Band be successful in Grade 2 at New Zealand Championships.

Achieved – runner-up

That other top teams in target sports reach the goals set by their coaches and management: Athletics

Have 30 athletes qualify to represent the College at the South Island Athletics Championships.

South Island Championships cancelled due to COVID-19.

Basketball

Senior A Boys’ place in the top four at the South Island Secondary Schools tournament.

Achieved – Boys placed second

Senior A Girls’ place in the top four of the South Island Secondary School girl’s competition.

Achieved – Girls won their competition

1st XI to place in the Top three in the Premier one-day and two-day competition.

Achieved – First XI runners-up in both the one-day and two-day competitions

To qualify for the New Zealand Schools’ Cup regional final.

Not achieved

Year 9A team place in the top three in the Year 9 one-day competition.

Achieved

Development – providing more resource coaching for talented young players from Year 9.

Achieved – we have a Girl’s 1st XI cricket team for the first time.

To be recognised as having a leading co-educational football programme within the country.

Achieved

Girls’ 1st XI achieve top four in the local competition.

Achieved

Boys’ 1st XI achieve top six in the local competition.

Achieved

To grow participation levels in football through the Preparatory and Secondary School.

Achieved

Boys’ 1st XI hockey to be in the top two in Canterbury Hockey Association competition.

Not achieved

Boys’ 1st XI hockey to be in the top two at the National Secondary Schools’ Tournament.

Nationals cancelled due to COVID-19

Girls’ 1st XI hockey to be in the top eight at the National Secondary Schools’ Tournament.

Nationals cancelled due to COVID-19

To place in the top four in the Premier SuperNet competition.

Achieved – Won competition

To place in the top four at the South Island Secondary Schools’ Netball Tournament.

Achieved – Won competition

NZSS Maadi Cup – achieve nine A finals, two podiums.

Maadi Cup was cancelled due to COVID-19

Build depth in rowing; aiming for 30 learn-to-row students.

Achieved

Rugby

Make the top six in The UC Cup.

Achieved – 1st XV won the UC Cup for the first time.

Tennis

Win the South Island Championship in Timaru.

South Islands’ cancelled due to COVID-19

Make the semi-final of the National Secondary Schools’ Mixed Competition.

Nationals cancelled due to COVID-19

Maintain playing numbers and the number of teams in sport.

Achieved

Increase the number of junior students receiving specialist coaching through the season.

Achieved

Senior A Girls to place in top two of SISS competition.

Achieved – Won competition

Cricket

Football

Hockey

Netball

Rowing

Volleyball

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Whole School Achievement Target Outcomes for 2020 DIMENSION Resources and Environment

TARGET

OUTCOME

That the Secondary School roll average be > 1063 for 2020.

Achieved – 1087.4

That the Preparatory School roll average be > 446 for 2020.

Achieved – 446.6

That international enrolments for 2021 > 20 Secondary and four Preparatory, total 24.

Not achieved – (Border closure) 14 Secondary and one Preparatory

That the budgeted Operating Surplus (excluding capital donations) of $4,777,293 be achieved.

Achieved – Surplus $4,869,583

That all key budget holders operate below, or not more than $2000 above, budgeted Cost Centre net expenditure.

Not achieved – three cost centres > $2000 but with valid reasons.

That all key budget holders fully disperse Student Costs to within $2000 of Student Cost account (unless costs are for the following year).

Not achieved - two sports > $2000 without prepayments for 2021.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

17


S tud ent Roll

ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE STUDENT ROLL

Student roll numbers as at 1 July 2020, MOE Returns.

For the year ended 31 December 2020

Student Numbers

Total Boys Secondary Boys

1600 1400

Preparatory Boys

1200 Total Girls

1000

Secondary Girls Preparatory Girls

800 600

Total Students

400

Secondary Total Preparatory Total

PREPARATORY

200

BOYS GIRLS

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

255 153

255 165

248 182

240 196

222 216

220 213

225 216

2020

234 210

53% 47%

TOTAL

SECONDARY

408 420 430 436 438 433 441 444 BOYS 619 639 645 650 658 664 663 681 62% GIRLS 321 303 317 341 356 367 386 409 38% TOTAL

WHOLE COLLEGE

940 942 962 991 1014 1031 1049 1090 BOYS 874 894 893 890 880 884 888 915 60% GIRLS 474 468 499 537 572 580 602 619 40% TOTAL

18

ST AN DREW’S C OL L E G E

1348

1362

1392

1427

1452

1464

1490

1534


14

Student Staff Ratio

12 10 8 6 Pre-school

4

Preparatory School

2

Secondary School Total College

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

PRE-SCHOOL RATIO

10.2

9.1

8.5

8.9

8.3

8.0

8.1

7.9

PREPARATORY RATIO

11.6

11.8

12.1

12.7

11.8

11.2

11.2

11.2

SECONDARY RATIO

9.0

8.5

8.6

8.7

9.5

9.6

9.7

9.9

TOTAL COLLEGE RATIO

7.4

6.8

7.0

7.2

7.6

7.5

7.3

7.5

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

OTHER STAFF

4.0 35.1 104.2 44.2

4.4 35.5 111.4 53.8

4.7 35.4 111.6 51.8

4.4 34.2 114.5 50.8

5.2 37.0 107.0 48.2

5.5 38.7 107.4 48.9

5.7 39.4 108.7 55.9

5.7 39.6 109.8 54.7

TOTAL STAFF (FTE’S)

187.5

205.1

203.5

203.9

197.4

200.5

209.7

209.8

250

Staff FTE

200

150

100

Pre-school Staff Preparatory School Staff Secondary School Staff

50

Other Staff Total Staff

PRE-SCHOOL STAFF PREPARATORY STAFF SECONDARY STAFF

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

19


S tud ent Leavers

2020 STUDENT LEAVERS

201 Year 13 and 24 Year 12 students moved on from secondary education in 2020.

153 Year 13 students went on to university

Lincoln University (29) Massey University (10) University of Auckland (2) University of Canterbury (72) University of Otago (22) Victoria University of Wellington (7) Ara Institute of Canterbury (11)

48 Year 13 students made other choices

Army (2) Employment (7) Gap Year (4) Apprenticeship (15) Polytechnic (4) PTE (4) Other (5) Undecided / unknown (7)

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REVIEW OF NCEA AND SCHOLARSHIP 2020

Our 2020 NCEA results included a total of 279 Excellence endorsements and 226 Merit endorsements, as well as 53 New Zealand Scholarships, four of which were Outstanding Scholarships. At Level 1; students gained 103 Excellence endorsements, at Level 2; 101 Excellence endorsements, and at Level 3; 75 Excellence endorsements. High academic achievement is celebrated at the College with students striving to achieve NCEA Excellence endorsements, Merit endorsements, and College premier academic awards. A good number of students are also recognised for their performance in national and international competitions. Staff are working intensively towards the achievement of our target of all students completing each year of study having achieved the relevant NCEA Level certificate. The College has very effective processes for monitoring and tracking student progress and achievement such as individual student monitoring and extensive tracking of student achievement throughout all year groups.

Level 1

NCEA Pass Rates

100% LEVEL 1

100% LEVEL 2

98%

In 2020, the College’s Level 1 pass rate was 100%, the same as the 2019 figure and 27.7% better than the national decile 10 band. 38.9% of students gained a Merit endorsement (0.6% lower than decile 10 schools), and 45.2% gained Excellence (8.8% higher than decile 10 schools). The Excellence endorsement outcome was short of the very challenging target established at the beginning of the year of 75.

Level 2 At Level 2, the pass rate was 100%, up 0.5% on the 2019 figure and 18.3% better than the national decile 10 band. 33% of students gained a Merit endorsement (1.2% lower than decile 10 schools), and 39.3% gained Excellence (8.5% higher than decile 10 schools). The Excellence endorsement outcome was 41 higher than the target established at the beginning of the year of 60.

LEVEL 3

Level 3 At Level 3, the pass rate was 98%, up 0.1% on the 2019 figure and 18.9% better than the national decile 10 band. 28% of these students gained a Merit endorsement (5.5% lower than decile 10 schools), and 34.5% gained an Excellence endorsement (8.4% higher than decile 10 schools). The Excellence endorsement outcome was 15 higher than the target of 60.

This view includes only those students who entered sufficient credits to gain the qualification.

University Entrance 89.1% of our Year 13 students gained University Entrance compared with 74.1% in the decile 10 band.

Scholarships Our students achieved an outstanding 53 Scholarship passes in this premier assessment, including four Outstanding Awards in English, Health and Physical Education, History, and Digital Technology.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

21


Aca d em ic Result s

NCEA Level 1 % Achieved and ratio of Endorsements

% Achieved

22

ST AN DREW’S C OL L E G E

2019

2020

95.5 83.8 83.2

99.0 82.3 82.0

99.1 81.5 79.1

99.5 79.4 78.9

99.6 75.5 77.2

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

% Endorsed % Endorsed % Endorsed

85.5 81.5 74.2 75.2 84.1 68.4 68.1 70.1 69.0 68.1 57.0 56.7 58.9 56.8 57.3

StAC % Excellence Decile 8–10 % Excellence Canterbury % Excellence

43.8 47.0 31.9 32.7 45.2 28.9 28.6 29.6 28.3 30.2 22.0 22.3 21.6 21.1 22.6

2016 StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

Achieved Achieved Achieved

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

% Endorsed % Endorsed % Endorsed

NCEA Level 3

University Entrance

2018

Achieved Achieved Achieved

StAC % Excellence Decile 8–10 % Excellence Canterbury % Excellence

% Achieved and ratio of Endorsements

2017

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

NCEA Level 2 % Achieved and ratio of Endorsements

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

98.1 97.4 98.1 99.1 100.0 85.5 85.2 84.7 84.8 86.0 84.8 83.8 82.5 83.0 84.6 68.6 71.9 74.5 66.0 72.3 54.9 54.3 56.7 56.7 56.8 44.6 42.8 45.4 44.9 43.1 32.4 31.2 39.7 31.6 39.3 23.8 23.9 24.4 24.0 25.7 18.5 17.6 18.9 17.6 18.6

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

Achieved Achieved Achieved

96.0 95.0 96.6 96.7 98.0 76.5 77.3 77.4 77.8 81.0 71.0 72.1 72.2 71.7 73.9

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

% Endorsed % Endorsed % Endorsed

63.4 60.5 69.6 67.8 63.4 53.0 53.3 53.1 51.7 55.3 44.8 43.2 43.2 43.4 43.4

StAC % Excellence Decile 8–10 % Excellence Canterbury % Excellence

26.3 24.2 30.4 38.5 34.5 19.1 20.5 19.2 19.5 23.1 15.1 16.0 16.0 16.0 16.8

2016 StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

Achieved Achieved Achieved

2017

2018

2019

2020

89.7 87.0 91.0 89.4 88.2 67.0 67.0 66.2 66.2 70.0 57.8 56.4 56.0 54.2 58.2


100

100

90

90

80

80

70

70

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

10

0

0 2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2016

NCEA LEVEL 1

100

90

90

80

80

70

70

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

10

0

0 2017

2018

2019

2020

2016

NCEA LEVEL 3

StAC

2018

2019

2020

NCEA LEVEL 2

100

2016

2017

2017

2018

2019

2020

UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE

Achieved

StAC

% Endorsed

StAC

% Excellence

StAC

% UE

Decile 8–10

Achieved

Decile 8–10

% Endorsed

Decile 8–10 % Excellence

Decile 8–10 % UE

Canterbury Achieved

Canterbury

% Endorsed

Canterbury % Excellence

Canterbury % UE

The Achieved percentages are those of the students participating in the NCEA or University Entrance programme. The percentages of Endorsed and Excellence are the ratios of those students who achieved the NCEA level. Endorsed means Excellence and Merit endorsements together. This is the standard format provided by NZQA and used by schools generally when reporting the results.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

23


Pub l i c Be nefit Re port

PUBLIC BENEFIT REPORT For the year ended 31 December 2020

The purpose of this Public Benefit Report is to show how St Andrew’s College engages with the wider community and encourages access to its education to the fullest extent of its resources. This report, read in conjunction with the Annual Report, adds information about activities of a non-financial nature. The College is a registered charity (CC22462) and the charitable objectives relevant to this report include: • to provide a school or schools with facilities and atmosphere to promote sound learning and foster the development of life and character on the basis of the Presbyterian tradition; • to accept contributions, collections, donations, legacies, devises, gifts, grants, and subsidies. The beneficiaries of the College’s constitution include students, parents, staff, Old Collegians, and such other charitable purpose as the Presbytery of Christchurch shall direct. St Andrew’s College is also supported through financial grants from the St Andrew’s College Foundation from time to time. The College is committed to providing access to its educational programme and encourages applications from all sectors of the community. A range of scholarships and bursaries are available from the College, including academic, music, sporting, and cultural, and boarding scholarships. St Andrew’s College accepts Aspire Scholarship students (three in 2020) and contributes towards their tuition and/or boarding fees. The George Feilding Hight Scholarship, Endeavour Scholarships, and other bursaries are also available for students who, in the opinion of the Rector of St Andrew’s College, would be precluded from attending the College because of financial constraints.

STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE The College is committed to a sustainable future and has invested in both short and long-term planning. The 2019–2023 strategic direction document, Framing Our Future 2019–2023, highlights our six strategic priorities; as High Performance, Opportunity, Partnership and Social Responsibility, Celebration and Community, Well-being, and Place and Space. These strategic priorities will guide the College to the end of 2023. Our strategic focus drives the College to provide all students with the opportunity to complete their schooling having experienced personal success and excited to take the next steps in their learning pathway, to be confident, self-aware, compassionate, and caring, and to be connected and committed to global responsibility and a better future for all. Our founding values secure our future by inspiring trust and confidence through living out our values and demonstrating our commitment to continuous improvement. In 2019, two new values were added to our founding values of Truth, Excellence and Faith – Creativity and Inclusivity. Our vision for every student is to be at the leading edge of high performance education practice, in a community which values caring for others, tradition and creativity, in order to provide young people with the roots and wings to flourish in an ever-changing world.

24

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COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAMMES AND STUDENTS HELPING OTHERS The College is committed to creating purposeful local and global partnerships that allow unique opportunities for learning and foster civic engagement and social responsibility. Every year, St Andrew’s strives to develop long-term global, national and local partnerships which provide academic and service opportunities, provide co‑operative learning opportunities, and involve international, deeper relationships with community service and non-profit organisations. The College has comprehensive programmes in place to support these objectives. Part of the Senior College philosophy is ‘developing social responsibility’. Every student in the Senior College completes 30 hours of community service to receive their Senior College diploma. In 2020, Senior College students performed approximately 5620 hours of community service. Community Service Leaders ran student themed days raising a total of $10,666.90 to support the World Vision 40 Hour Famine, sports equipment for Allenvale School, Christchurch City Mission, and Maia Health. Preparatory School students also held themed days to raise $2461.20 for St John Ambulance and Melanoma New Zealand. Offerings from College Sunday chapel services raised $4940.60 to support the Big Brother Big Sister Mentoring Trust, St John Ambulance, Christchurch City Mission, and the Salvation Army. At Christmas, staff and students from across all year levels donated gifts to the Christchurch City Mission.

Castle Hill Outdoor Centre Despite the disruption of COVID-19, students who attended the camps in Years 9–10 in 2020 continued to work on a number of conservation projects throughout the Craigieburn Basin. During Terms 1 and 3, students maintained, cleared, and rebaited approximately 60 stoat traps around the Alistair Sidey Mountain Lodge. Year 9 students also spent time each week on camp manually removing wilding pines on Flock Hill Station. The College supports the Waimakariri Recreational and Environmental Trust with meeting venues and staff volunteer time. This organisation developed the wasp control programme in the whole Craigieburn Basin. The wasp control programme, now in its eighth year, is showing amazing results benefiting many others such as other schools, mountain bikers, and trampers who use the area. The College now works in with the DOC supported Wasp‑Busters, who have taken over overall control of the programme, and the Castle Hill Village Residents’ Association. The Castle Hill Outdoor Education Centre will continue to have a focus on environment work once the centre reopens in the near future. In the meantime, the College is supporting and co-operating with the Department of Conservation and the Castle Hill Village Residents’ Association.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

25


Pub l i c Be nefit Re port

Allenvale School The Prefect Team ran an activity day at Allenvale School as part of a community service legacy project. The students raised money through a themed day, bought sports gear to leave with Allenvale, and ran a full day of activities for their students. The Year 10 students also donated Christmas themed items to Allenvale Schools’ annual Christmas Raffle.

Box-a-Thon for Youth Mental Health Edwin Short (Year 10) organised and competed in a Box-a-Thon event which raised $6000 for the 298 Youth Health Centre. Sadly, Edwin lost a good friend to suicide shortly after the lockdown, which prompted him to organise the fundraising event ‘Let it Out for Youth Mental Health BOX-A-THON’. Over two days, 170 people were involved in 16 sessions at the event.

Cans for Humanity House Leaders introduced a new initiative in 2020 to promote a ‘Cans for Humanity’ drive. Each House encouraged members to bring along non-perishable items to donate to families in need. The collection was delivered to the Christchurch City Mission by a winning House representative from MacGibbon and the second-placed House, Rutherford.

Clothing Swap Members of the Sustainability Council and the Year 10 ACEE Class held a clothing swap, where donated items were distributed to Nurse Maude, KidsCan Charitable Trust, the Christchurch Public Hospital, and two Christchurch Schools.

Colour Your Day Students in the Secondary School held a themed day to support the Colour Your Day cause. The inaugural nationwide event was organised to provide New Zealanders with an opportunity to support the families of those affected by the 15 March terrorist attack by wearing colour, and also to support St John. The College collected $1623.80 which was given to the wonderful people at St John for equipment and training.

Fundraising Sophie Goode (Year 12) sold school hair scrunchies in the College Shop, Thistles, for a few months and at the end of 2020 had raised just over $700 for the Ben Gough Family Theatre. The fundraiser was so successful that Sophie has extended it to 2021.

Learning Support Canterbury The Community Service Team ran a collection of new or used stationery items for Learning Support Canterbury, a charity which helps children in schools around Christchurch with their education.

Latimer Square Community Service For the past nine years, students in Years 10–11 have provided Sunday lunch during term time for those less fortunate. Working with Latimer Square’s St Paul’s Trinity Pacific Presbyterian Church, students prepare meals at home to serve in Latimer Square. Students are encouraged to make genuine conversation with those they serve to help them see the world from another perspective. This year the Year 11 students had to stop the initiative when the country went into the COVID-19 lockdown and due to ongoing restrictions, did not resume the initiative.

26

ST AN DREW’S C OL L E G E


KidsCan To support those in low decile areas, a collection of female sanitary items was carried out in March for the KidsCan charity.

Plate Up for a Purpose Pipe Band Community Service Pipe Band Director, Richard Hawke, and pipers, Oskar Trafford (Year 10), Lachlan Johns, Jakarta Klebert and Ryan Stewart (all Year 11), performed brilliantly for the Plate Up for a Purpose event, which was fundraising for back-to-school costs for KidsCan.

Project Face Shield During the lockdown, William Couper (Year 9) printed 3D face shields with Project Face Shield New Zealand, a group consisting mainly of university students, engineers, and designers. They printed, assembled, and distributed thousands of face shields to healthcare workers including midwives, vets, dentists, nurses, rest home workers, COVID-19 testing stations, and other organisations around the country.

SPCA The Community Service Team set up a programme at the College for students to make toys for dogs and other animals at the SPCA.

St John A total of $4150.30 was raised from two themed days, as well as offerings from the Preparatory School Chapel Service, for St John.

Tree Planting St Andrew’s College students were amongst a large group of Christchurch school students, teaching staff, and parents who planted trees in the Christchurch Red Zone as part of a mitigation strategy to help secure New Zealand’s carbon-neutral future. The Year 3 inquiry for Term 3 was investigating change in our local environment, with a particular focus on the geographical, historical, and environmental change of the Port Hills. The social action for this inquiry took the children to Mary Duncan Park, on the east side of the Port Hills, where they enjoyed the experience of planting native trees.

Transition Class Year 13 Legacy Project To complete their Legacy Project to develop a strategy to enhance the biodiversity of St Andrew’s College, the Year 13 Transition class planted seven kahikatea and three tree ferns at the south end of Strowan Stream. The trees feature the students’ names on a name tag at the base of the trunk.

Volunteer Collectors Year 13 students Brendan Harris, Thomas Pike, Olivia Clark, James Sharpe, Tom Simpson, Henry Ullrich and Genevieve Henstock volunteered to collect for Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s at Fendalton New World, with over $1000 being raised for these causes.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

27


Pub l i c Be nefit Re port

World Vision Several Community Service Leaders attended the World Vision Leadership Conference, with the theme ‘Kotahitanga: Unity in the face of division in the world’. One of the key issues looked at was the human cost of the climate crisis and the shared understanding that global issues require co-operation from a global community. The students heard from some fantastic guest speakers at their lessons on leadership, and they reinforced the idea that change starts with ‘me’, and it starts now. Abby Jones (Year 12) was selected as a World Vision Scholarship Leadership winner. She attended a leadership conference in Auckland in January 2021. Community Service Co-leaders, Lucy Cammock-Elliott and Kelly Ting (both Year 13) were the driving force behind ‘Scream for Malawi’ and raised over $14,000 for the 40 Hour Famine fundraising campaign. Lucy was subsequently awarded World Vision’s National Award for Most Creative Fundraising.

EYES ON THE WORLD – CREATING GLOBAL CONNECTIONS The College has a strong Student Exchange programme which provides students with opportunities to explore different cultures and languages. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic affecting the globe at different levels and the restriction of foreign travellers entering into New Zealand, all Exchanges ceased for 2020. St Andrew’s has welcomed students from around the globe as part of the exchange programme. In 2019 we welcomed students to the College from Australia, Scotland and South Africa, and St Andrew’s College students went on exchange to Australia, South Africa and Scotland. In 2020, we ran a pen pal exchange with Presbyterian Ladies College, Sydney, which was a success. All girls involved enjoyed the experience of meeting another person from across the Tasman Sea with the future hope of meeting in person once borders opened. In keeping with the College’s ethos of developing a culture of philanthropy, students are offered the opportunity to take part in service trips, but due to the COVID-19 restrictions, students were unable to take part in the normal overseas Community Service trips this year. In 2020, our Japanese Year 10 class were in involved in an online exchange meeting with a class from Kakoyama Women’s Sugiyama Elementary School, Aichi Prefecture, Nagoya, Japan. Unfortunately due to the ongoing pandemic, no overseas language trips, global education tours, or the Robert Burns Scottish Scholars trip were able to take place. Over the past 11 years, the College has worked with St Vincent de Paul to donate spare computers, projectors, and screens to places such as Fiji, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

28

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STUDENTS REACHING THEIR POTENTIAL The College is committed to be known as a place which offers unique and innovative learning opportunities for staff, parents, and students. This includes providing opportunities for students with special educational needs. The team in the Learning Support Department assist students to reach their academic potential by supporting them with any learning difficulties they face. They work closely with parents, Deans, and subject teachers to identify and assess students with learning difficulties and provide the appropriate support. Students can be referred to outside agencies for specialist educational diagnosis in order to identify the most appropriate learning support. Features of the support programme include small group support, touch typing and spelling support, organisation and co-ordination of reader-writers and special assessment conditions, and a structured literacy programme in the options timetable for Years 9–10. The College works closely with parents and caregivers to ensure that the student can reach their potential. A number of teaching staff also provide support in this area to non‑St Andrew’s families who may have a need or require help or information, including getting literacy help for their child, high needs funding applications, and psychologists’ assessments. This includes reading the information and reports, then explaining what it means to parents and what should happen next. Non‑St Andrew’s students have been able to join the Morningside programme, with staff providing support to parents.

SHARING OF FACILITIES St Andrew’s College has a large campus with excellent sporting and educational facilities. Groups from the wider Canterbury community also make use of the facilities. The College continues to provide use of the Centennial Chapel to the Village Presbyterian Church for their Sunday services. In 2020, the sharing of our campus facilities was significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic due to the lockdowns and travel restrictions. Subsequently, all bookings from local, national and Australian groups and conferences were cancelled. However, once gatherings were again permitted, local sporting and cultural groups resumed their use of our facilities.

In 2020, the following community groups and organisations made use of the school buildings and amenities:

Sporting Groups: Mounfort Park U18 Water Polo team, Canterbury Basketball, Mainland Eagles Basketball, Canterbury Wildcats Basketball, and Wellington Lions Rugby.

Cultural Groups: The Jubilate Singers, the Highland Piping Society, Christchurch Civic Music Council, the Christchurch Liedertafel Male Voice Choir, Toi Toi Opera Company, the Christchurch School of Music, Helen O’Grady Drama Academy, and The Entertainment Company.

Other: Bishopdale-Burnside Rotary’s Artarama.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

29


Pub l i c Be nefit Re port

STAFF SHARING KNOWLEDGE As well as providing the highest education within the College, St Andrew’s staff continue to engage in the wider educational community and regularly share their expertise beyond the school. A number of teaching staff were markers for NCEA in various subjects and contributed as speakers to conferences. Staff continue to contribute voluntarily to the wider teaching community through leadership roles in their regional or national subject associations: Christine Leighton

Independent Schools of New Zealand

Deputy Chair

Duncan Ferguson

Music Education New Zealand Aotearoa (MENZA)

Deputy Chair of the Board

Natasha Cloughley Nortje

Agribusiness Hub

Christchurch Lead

Jonathan Hoh

CETA – Commerce and Economics Teachers’ Association

Committee member of Christchurch branch

Kristian Giles

Canterbury Mathematical Association

Secretary

Jacq Gilbert

NZATE (New Zealand Association for the Teaching of English)

President (Communications Committee Chair, Assistant Editor English in Aotearoa)

Ian Morrison

Canterbury Tourism Teachers’ Association

Deputy Chair

James Jenkinson

Canterbury English Teachers’ Association

Committee/Council member

Andy Kerrison

KiwiBots (Vex Robotics)

Regional Co-ordinator

Donna Jones

Canterbury English Teachers’ Association

Committee member

Laurence Wiseman

ANZDA – Association of New Zealand Drama Adjudicators

Vice-President

Three staff were due to present at conferences in Australia, however, these were cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions on travel: Kerry Larby

Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia Conference, Australia

Presenter

Duncan Ferguson

DAYTiME (A Day of Technology in Music Education) Conference, Perth

Presenter

Ginnie Thorner

Drama Australia Conference, Brisbane

Workshop Presenter

The College welcomes trainee teachers and hosts them for a six or seven-week teaching placement, which forms an integral part of their teacher training programme. Eight teacher trainees from the Graduate School of Education and the University of Canterbury, and one teacher on a Teacher Refresher Course, were hosted in a range of subjects in 2020. Staff act as Associate Teachers and support trainees’ teaching practice experience in classrooms throughout the course of the teaching placement. Teachers observe, both informally and formally, trainee teachers, and provide detailed and constructive written feedback throughout the placement. Trainee teachers are as fully integrated as possible into the College ‘teaching staff’ and are also provided with opportunities to participate in co-curricular involvement (e.g. coaching) where these opportunities arise. Staff sit on committees such as NZATE and CETE, and share their expert knowledge and contribute to the local and national education landscape. Many staff are volunteers in their local communities and staff are also involved with coaching sports or cultural groups outside of school hours. Staff give generously to causes championed by the student community. In 2020, in keeping with tradition, staff ended the year by generously donating presents to the Christchurch City Mission, which were put around the Christmas tree in the Centennial Chapel alongside those donated by students until the week before Christmas, when they were collected by the Christchurch City Mission for distribution.

SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT The College’s Pastoral Care objective is to offer a programme which celebrates the unique talents and personality of individuals and develops resilience and emotional intelligence in all students. The Pastoral Care programme is based on the College’s guiding values of Truth, Excellence, Faith, Creativity and Inclusivity. Our aim is to ensure every student feels comfortable, confident, and connected to the College, so that their time here is as rewarding as possible. The St Andrew’s College Māori and Pasifika group is a group formed to learn and practice traditional song and dance of the Māori and Pacific Island cultures, while celebrating these cultures as well through weekly sessions throughout the term. The group has been involved in several performances throughout the year, including College-wide assemblies and concerts. The group also took the stage for the first time ever at the Canterbury Polyfest and will take part in the 2021 Tūhono Kapa Haka Festival.

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The Preparatory School Kapa Haka programme continued to develop during 2020. Both the Years 4–6 and Years 7–8 Kapa Haka took part in celebrating this popular Māori art form at their respective Tūhono Festival competitions. The Years 7–8 Kapa Haka numbers increased, along with the students’ commitment and dedication to practices. They have become a polished performance group and played key roles in many College events and ceremonies including Prizegiving and the annual Mihi Whakatau. The Pipe Band performed at the 2020 Hororata Highland Games – an annual festival celebrating Scottish heritage which more than 10,000 people attend. Due to the COVID-19 restrictions this year, the band did not perform at the normal local concerts or at ANZAC Services at local RSA clubs.

COMMUNICATION WITH OUR LOCAL COMMUNITY The College’s website has readily accessible information which informs any member of the public about the activities undertaken at the school. The Annual Report is available online, as is the annual Philanthropy Report, which reports on the philanthropic and volunteering efforts of staff, students, and parents in the St Andrew’s community. The College’s magazine, Regulus, is also available online, which covers latest news from the College with regards to campus development, alumni news, and student successes. Any matters important to the local community are communicated on the website and via social media and, when relevant, neighbours will receive communications from the College.

EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMY The College is one of the larger employers in Canterbury, employing approximately 300 staff. The College generally supports the local economy by purchasing the majority of its goods and services in the Canterbury region.

GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE The College’s governance structure is outlined on page 2 of this report and is also detailed on the website. Both management and the Board of Governors have access to extensive professional development opportunities, including the annual Independent Schools New Zealand Conference. The local community has the opportunity to attend the Board Annual General Meeting if they wish. From time to time, community consultation meetings will be held where any member of the public can attend.

To read more about what is happening at the College or to read the Philanthropy Report, please visit the College website at stac.school.nz.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

31


F i na nci als

College Income and Expenses

ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE FINANCIALS

2020

For the year ended 31 December 2020

Income

St Andrew’s College includes our Secondary and Preparatory Schools, our boarding facilities, and our Pre-school.

INCOME

The 2020 result was a $778k surplus, half of which came from very generous donations to the Ben Gough Family Theatre, and the balance from the College roll being greater than budgeted as well as being maintained throughout the 2020 year. The funds that were available to help pay for our building programme came from the $4.35m of depreciation (non-cash expense), $350k of Capital Development donations, and using debt to help fund this programme. The College continues to rely on a cash surplus and donations to future proof the campus.

Grants

2.76

2.76

7.6%

7.6%

2020 was an exceptional year globally, due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. This unravelled from February/ March and created a huge amount of uncertainty for everyone. New Zealand had a complete lock-down from 23 March to 13 May, which meant our teachers provided our students with online learning, and all but essential service personnel were told to stay (and work) at home. Although we were all affected in some way, members of our community were severely impacted financially through no fault of their own. Our Board of Governors decided to provide all students with a $750 fees rebate, which meant the College forgave a net $1m in fees. The community generously donated a total of $200k towards a 2020 Community Fund that enabled all families to get through 2020 with their children able to remain at St Andrew’s for at least the rest of the year. The restrictions imposed due to the pandemic and measures put in place to reduce costs, meant that the College not only absorbed the $1m fees rebate, but ended up with a surplus $478k more than budgeted, an incredible result for all concerned. The complete Tier 1 Financial Report can be found on the Charities Services website: www.charities.govt.nz, registered charity number CC22462 for the St Andrew’s College and Group, and CC25213 for the Tier 2 St Andrew’s College Foundation report. These reports have been prepared in line with the External Reporting Board (XRB) standards as required by Charities Services. They were audited by BDO, independent accountants, and both received clean reports.

2020 $m

Fees 30.65

Donations

0.94

1.40

2.6%

3.9%

Other

1.75

1.91

4.8%

5.3%

TOTAL 36.10

35.77

EXPENSES

2019 $m

2020 $m

Employee Benefits 21.60

20.27

59.8% 56.1%

Depreciation

4.35

4.35

12.0% 12.0%

Property and ICT

2.21

2.35

6.1%

6.5%

Other

7.17

7.76

19.9% 21.5%

TOTAL

35.33

34.72

NET SURPLUS

0.77

1.05

2.1%

2.9%

HOW EACH $1.00 OF INCOME IS SPENT

$0.02 Surplus $0.06 Property and ICT $0.12 Depreciation

$0.60 Staff cost ST AN DREW’S C OL L E G E

29.70

84.9% 82.3%

$0.20 Other costs

32

2019 $m


College Assets and Equity ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE

$5.13m

CASH SURPLUS

i.e. the net surplus before deducting the non-cash cost of depreciation.

$000’s

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE FIXED ASSETS (NBV) FA NET OF REVALUATIONS DEBT (INTEREST BEARING) EQUITY EQUITY NET OF REVALUATIONS CASH SURPLUSES

Capital Expenditure

$000’s

2016

2017

2018

12,930

9,893

5,242

3,717

6,029

167,917

168,889

168,257

182,297

72,979

78,990

79,962

79,330

81,144

0

7,131

8,297

7,380

7,300

$000’s

159,390 159,453 159,394 160,439 173,443 70,463

70,526

70,467

71,512

72,290

4,705

3,944

4,211

5,394

5,126

Cash Surpluses

$000’s

14,000

14,000

12,000

12,000

12,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

6,000

6,000

6,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2020 saw further development of two connected projects – the first being the relocation of the Fitness Centre to above Gym1 (along with some betterment to this gymnasium and further strengthening of the Gym1 building), and upgrading the changing room facilities. The Fitness Centre project was physically completed by January 2021, and this wonderful facility has been well used by many students and staff since.

2020

161,906

14,000

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

2019

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Debt (Interest Bearing)

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

The second project is the redevelopment of the Theatre into a modern, fit-for-purpose performance venue with teaching spaces for Drama and Dance. Moving the Fitness Centre now allows the Ben Gough Family Theatre project to happen. This project has been further refined during 2020 and 2021, with detailed designs and cost estimates developed. The physical works will commence in December 2021 and physical completion will be by the end of Term 1 2023. A Project Governance Group has been set up to monitor the project as it develops.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

33


F i na nci als

Fixed Assets (NBV)

$000’s

185,000

Equity

$000’s

Net Book Value

200,000 180,000

180,000

160,000

175,000

140,000 120,000

170,000

100,000 165,000

80,000 60,000

160,000

40,000

155,000

20,000

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Fixed Assets (NBV)

$000’s

2017

2018

2020

2019

2020

Net of Revaluations

90,000 80,000

80,000

70,000

78,000

60,000

76,000

50,000

74,000

40,000 30,000

72,000

20,000

70,000

10,000

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2016

2017

2018

The College is run by the Rector and the Executive Team, and is closely governed by the Board of Governors, while the Foundation is run and governed by the Board of Trustees. The College is an Incorporated Society with the ‘business’ owned by the Board of Governors on behalf of past, present, and future students, parents, and the St Andrew’s College community (i.e. there are no ‘owners’ as such). It is also a ‘Not-for-Profit’ (and Not-for-Loss either) organisation with the operating costs incurred each year mostly paid for by the fees collected from families of current students. The assets of the College (i.e. largely the land and buildings) have been funded mostly by past and current students / families, as well as from generous donations received from the community. These are maintained to a high standard and are continually being kept ‘fit for purpose’ for current and future students.

34

2019

Equity

$000’s

Net of Revaluations

82,000

2016

ST AN DREW’S C OL L E G E


BURNETT VALLEY FARM

St Andrew’s College leased the Burnett Valley Farm from the Burnett Valley Trust (BVT). The College is the sole beneficiary of this trust. The farm is situated near Cave in South Canterbury. The College relinquished this lease in April 2020, by which time the livestock on hand at the previous year end had been sold down. Through agreement with BVT, the College retains ownership of all 194.5 hectares of forestry assets on the farm, including ownership of any carbon credits associated with these assets. At year‑end, the College was entitled to 12,352 credits. The College will continue to maintain the forestry blocks and will, from time to time, receive revenue from the harvesting of these blocks as they become of harvestable age/condition. Forest Management Ltd is employed to manage the forestry assets on behalf of the College. BVT is receiving substantial revenue from leasing the arable hectares to a third party at commercial rates. The BVT will use this revenue to maintain the farm assets owned by the trust, and any surplus revenues will, from time to time, be made available to the College in line with the trust deeds. In the official Charities Services financial report the College figures include the Farm Operation, however they are reported separately in this report.

FARM OPERATION

$’s

2020

2019

2018

Equity @ 1st January

690,856

601,669

311,263

Gross Profit from Livestock Forestry and ETS valuation increase Other Income

-24,821 517,932 17,516

655,411 314,981 40,450

876,686 83,187 65,210

Total Farm Income

510,627

Salaries Cultivation and Fertilizer Other Direct Expenses Depreciation Other Indirect Expenses

109,324 24,330 59,633 22,517 38,991

162,893 200,780 312,578 49,760 195,644

143,214 198,847 166,713 44,255 181,648

Total Farm Expenses

254,795

921,655

734,677

NET PROFIT / (LOSS)

255,832

89,187

290,406

Equity @ 31 December

946,688

690,856

601,669

1,010,842

1,025,083

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2020

35


F i na nci als

ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE FOUNDATION For the year ended 31 December 2020

Our Foundation receives and invests donations to enable it to support the College. This support includes helping to fund scholarships. The Foundation is governed by the Board of Trustees who employ Forsyth Barr to manage the investment fund. Funding for both the George Feilding Hight Scholarship’s and Foundation Scholarship’s comes from the Foundation’s Scholarship Grants.

Investment Advice

2020 FOUNDATION BOARD OF TRUSTEES CHAIR:

MEMBERS:

Rodger Finlay David Boyd Matthew Lancaster Richard Smith

FOUNDATION

2020

2019

2018

12,512,800

10,550,322

10,847,903

319,920 -64,356 887,519 -69,630

414,252 449,109 1,210,607 -65,192

395,094 24,319 -742,686 -62,543

Net Investment Income

1,073,453

2,008,776

-385,816

New Donations received Scholarship Grants

154,674 -406,400

340,665 -386,963

451,715 -363,480

13,334,527

12,512,800

10,550,322

8.51%

18.69%

-3.03%

Equity @ 1st January Interest and Dividends Realised Gains Unrealised Gains (1) Investment costs

Equity @ 31 December

Fund Portfolio Net Return

$’s

(1) ‘Unrealised Gains’ is the increase in value of the investments held (i.e. from the stock market valuations). These gains are not locked in until an investment is sold, so all or part of the gains could be lost in future movements of stock valuations, and/or more gains could be achieved. 2019 was an unusually good year for this investment gain, while the last quarter of 2018 saw a substantial down-turn resulting in an overall negative return. The COVID-19 pandemic had a large impact on world economies and stock markets which were at record highs in February 2020. The March 2020 quarterly valuation showed a 12.7% drop from the December values, however, strong recoveries as the year progressed saw the Fund returning a positive 8.51% return for the 2020 year.

36

ST AN DREW’S C OL L E G E


TOP STUDENT

SUCCESSES

ACADEMIC 11 ICAS NEW ZEALAND GOLD MEDALS: Top Mark in New Zealand – Years 3, 10 and 11 English, Years 10 and 11 Mathematics, Years 7, 9, 10 and 11 Science, Years 8 and 10 Digital Technologies

Congratulations to our students for their outstanding successes across sports, cultural and academic areas.

2020

SPORT CRICKET: Winner Gillette Cup – 1st XI (Dec 2019)

RUGBY: Winner UC Cup – 1st XV

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS:

NETBALL:

70 awarded

Winner Supernet – Senior A

CANTERBURY PASIFIKA ACADEMIC AWARDS:

BEACH VOLLEYBALL:

Supreme Academic Award

Runners-up NZSS Beach Volleyball

YOUNG ENTERPRISE SCHEME:

BADMINTON:

Second place in national Gallagher Award for Smart Technology

Winner Canterbury Interschool Senior Girls

Canterbury regional Excellence Award for Enterprising Technology

ICE HOCKEY:

BIOLOGY:

BASKETBALL:

Winner Christchurch High Schools Winner Division 1 Girls’ Whelan Trophy (Canterbury Schools)

New Zealand International Biology Olympiad Bronze Award

CREATIVE WRITING:

ADVENTURE RACING:

Three finalists National Schools’ Poetry Awards

Winner SISS Mixed Team

CHEMISTRY OLYMPIAD AWARDS:

FOOTBALL:

Two Gold Certificates, Four Silver Certificates, Four Bronze Certificates

Runner-up Girls’ Premier (Canterbury Schools)

HOCKEY:

CULTURE

Runner-up Girls’ Division 1 (Prep) Winner CPPSA Winter Tournament (Prep)

CHAMBER MUSIC:

FUTSAL:

Top 6 NZCT Chamber Music Contest

Winners Girls’ Canterbury Regionals

ORCHESTRA:

GOLF:

National Youth Orchestra Musician

Winner Best Team Gross and Individual Canterbury SS Championship Canterbury Women’s Golfer of the Year

CHORAL: NZSS Choir Member

ROCK BAND:

TENNIS:

Winners Rockquest Canterbury Final and Top 20 NZ Band Winner ZM Best Song and Musicianship Awards

Winners CPSSA Tournament (Prep Boys and Girls)

JAZZ BANDS:

VOLLEYBALL:

Gold Award Ara Jazzquest Jazz Orchestra, Big Band, Soul Band, Combo and Best Trombone Four Winners Southern Jam Online

Winner SISS Girls Division 1

DUATHLON: Winners Mixed Team Canterbury Schools

SONGWRITING: Finalist Play It Strange 2020 Peace Song Two Top 50 Play It Strange Lion Foundation

EQUESTRIAN:

FILM:

SKIING

Canterbury Schools’ Dressage – Two Firsts

Two finalists School Shorts

Winner Mixed Team SISS Ski

DEBATING:

SWIMMING: NZSS Championships 20 podium finishes

Top Speaker Canterbury Schools Winner Aotearoa Online Schools Winner Junior Cup Canterbury Schools

ROWING: SISS Championships 9 podium finishes

THEATRE FEST NATIONALS:

NEW ZEALAND REPRESENTATIVES:

Scratch Team Winners (two members) Canterbury Schools

15 Recipients

PIPE BAND: Winner MacGregor Memorial Piobaireachd New Zealand Young Piper of the Year National Drumming and Piping titles

BALLET: Five NZAMD Ballet Scholarship Nominees NZSOD Associate Dancer

College Productions

Outstanding Cultural Celebrations

HIGHLAND DANCE:

Coppélia (Ballet Academy)

Music Festival

StAC Attack (Pipe Band)

Tūhono Kapa Haka Festival

Cry-Baby (Senior)

Dance Revue

You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown (Middle)

Film Fest

NZ Highland Dancer of the Year – U18, U16 and U14

DUKE OF EDINBURGH HILLARY AWARD: 12 Year 13 Gold Awards

NEW ZEALAND REPRESENTATIVES: 8 Recipients


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