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CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015 Prepare | Inspire | Empower


Table of Contents School Leadership Team……………………………………………………………………………..

2

Board of Trustees……………………………………………………………………………………..

3

Message from the Head of Schools………………………………………………………………....

4

History/Philosophy/Mission……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

5

School Vision……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

6

Lower School……………………………………………………………………………………………………..………………………………

7

Upper School……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

20

Upper School 4 Year Plan………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

33

Advanced Placement Requirements………………………………………………………………………………………………….

36

College Entrance Preparation……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

40

High School Course Descriptions………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

43

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St. Andrew’s Episcopal Academy

Head of Schools Trina Angelone

Mandy Doss

Joseph Noel

Lower School

Upper School

Assistant Principal

Assistant Principal Office

St. Andrew's Episcopal Academy 210 S Indian River Drive Fort Pierce, FL 34950-4337 Phone 772-461-7689 Website: http://www.staacademy.org

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Board of Trustees

Father John Liebler

Gerda Fletcher

Chuck Armstrong

Michelle Lineal

Rector/Chair

Vice Chair

Treasurer

Secretary

Susan Carver

David Gates

Alan McGregor

Shawn Merschdorf

Trustee

Trustee

Trustee

Trustee

Ginny Mooney

William Stoddard

Horace Webb

Trustee

Trustee

Trustee

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Message from the Head of School Welcome to St. Andrew’s Episcopal Academy! We are excited you have chosen to provide your child with a world-class education in a faith-filled environment. Our highly qualified and experienced team is committed to meeting your child’s academic and personal needs as they grow through the years with us. It is our belief that every student should have a Personal Education Plan, one which enhances their strengths and supports their developing areas. Our programs are designed to provide a wide array of academic options which includes accelerated options for the gifted and talented, while providing support for those students who need specific additional help in one or more areas. This Curriculum Guide can be used to create the roadmap for your child’s journey from PreK-2 through graduation at 12th grade. There are many options, and each child will make choices based on their interests, college plans, and career goals. New electives can be added at any time based upon student interest, online options, college relationships, etc. It is a fluid and flexible document designed to maximize choices for every student. Our guide also contains information regarding the assessments students are expected to take at each grade level. While we do not want students to fear testing, it is important for us to have valid and reliable data when making decisions to benefit each student. As such, norm-referenced tests, individual screenings and other formal and informal assessments will be administered throughout the year. Parents and students will be kept informed of ongoing progress. Please feel free to contact our leadership team at any time if you have questions or would like to discuss the programs at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School. Thank you again for your support and commitment to providing the best possible educational opportunity for your child. God Bless,

Trina Caterina Angelone Head of Schools

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History St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church opened the school in the fall of 1970 as an expression of its mission to the community of Fort Pierce. We welcome children from all walks of life, regardless of race, sex, color, religion, national origin or ancestry.

Philosophy The Academy is dedicated to the philosophy of academic excellence and disciplined order in a Christian environment for children in PreK-2 through 12th grade. In addition to emphasizing basic skills, faculty and staff employ a variety of teaching methods to foster a lifelong love of learning. The faculty and staff of St. Andrew’s dedicate themselves to meeting the intellectual, spiritual, moral, social, emotional and physical needs of each child in partnership with Academy families.

Mission St. Andrew’s Episcopal Academy is committed to achieving the highest standards in education. Living the Episcopal School tradition, we emphasize a rigorous curriculum and develop students with a passion for lifelong learning and intellectual curiosity. Our students are immersed in an atmosphere of ethical behavior, social conscience, caring and integrity. We challenge the whole student – emotionally, intellectually, spiritually, socially and physically. Our graduates are prepared to lead lives that make a positive difference in their community and the world at large.

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School Vision To prepare all students for college and careers in a global economy, to

inspire each one to make a difference, and to empower them to become leaders dedicated to the betterment of mankind.

School Colors Blue and Green

School Mascot

Lion

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LOWER SCHOOL Early Childhood Education (PreK-2 through PreK-4) Primary Program (Kindergarten through 2nd grade) Elementary Program (3rd grade through 5th grade)

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION St. Andrew’s Academy Early Childhood Education (ECE) Program is comprised of grades PreKindergarten-2 (PreK-2), PreKindergarten-3 (PreK-3), and PreKindergarten-4 (PreK-4). The goal of our ECE program is to engage children joyfully, physically and intellectually in meaningful learning experiences that help each child develop a positive self-image and instill a passion for lifelong learning. Learning reflects hands-on experiences where the children have the opportunity to be engaged in activities that are relevant and meaningful to them. Our ECE program looks at the whole child. It addresses key goals in all areas of child development – social/emotional, physical, cognitive, and language. Program Standards Our ECE program strives to implement best practices in the classroom and follows the guidelines of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). NAEYC’s book Developmentally Appropriate Practices, 3rd edition identifies key components of quality early childhood programs and provides specific guidance for teachers. Developmentally appropriate practice means teaching in ways that meet children where they are and contribute to their optimal learning and development. A well-planned program will encourage children to learn about the world around them. Our programs' curricula integrate ideas and content across disciplines and respect the different ways children learn. The curriculum is taught thematically. Connecting content areas (language arts, math, social studies, science, the arts) using a theme-based approach allows children to make meaningful connections in their learning. Curriculum Our Early Childhood Academy Program uses The Creative Curriculum. Designed for children ages 2 to 5 years old, this meets all of the standards put forth for effective early childhood curricula by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the National Association of Early Childhood Specialists in State Departments of Education (NAECS/SDE). The Creative Curriculum is a comprehensive curriculum that guides teachers in designing a program in which children learn important skills and content, and develop social competence. The Creative Curriculum shows teachers how to set up a classroom and structure a day, what types of experiences to provide for children, how to work with children at different developmental levels, and how to involve families in the program. It shows teachers how to guide learning in all content areas including literacy, math, science, social studies, the arts, and technology, while also supporting children’s social/emotional development. The use of technology is integrated into every subject area. This infusion of online resources, apps, videos, games, tutorials, e-texts, and other digital curricular assets provides a wide range of supplemental engaging materials for each subject area.

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PreKindergarten-2 Two-year-olds are constantly in motion and use their natural curiosity for hands-on discovery. They need a rich learning environment that develops their cognitive skills and expands their vocabulary. By this stage in their development, routines and schedules become a big part of the child’s day which promotes stability and security. Learning Centers are introduced in the 2-year old classroom and include: circle time, dramatic play, art center, blocks, fine motor skills, music, and book/literacy area. Every child will participate in activities that are socially, physically, intellectually and psychologically age appropriate. Children learn by doing and through exploration and play. Our skilled teachers are adept at turning play time into learning activities. New items are periodically introduced to facilitate a better understanding of the classroom’s weekly focus. Extra-curricular activities include but are not limited to Christian Education, PE, Music, Art, Spanish, and Technology. Program Features Low student to teacher ratio Supportive, nurturing professional care in a Christian environment Monthly thematic activities purposely fashioned to engage and focus on learning concepts appropriate for this age group Regular communication between teachers and parents to stay informed about your child’s day Criteria to enter PreK-2 Program 1. Children must be 2 years old before September 1st of the year entering the program 2. All immunizations must be current

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PreKindergarten-3 Three-year-olds need integrated, hands-on learning experiences. Experimentation and exploration build higher-level thinking, language, math, social and motor skills. Children at this age love fun and challenging experiences. The PreK-3 teachers offer activities to creatively stimulate minds to the highest level possible by partnering with parents to provide a strong foundation in a loving, nurturing environment. Our PreK-3 days are busy with circle time, centers, outdoor play, etc. The classrooms are set up to allow for individual exploration and learning. Learning environments such as: Reading/Listening Corner, Science Centers, Dramatic/Home Center, Block, Sand Play, Small Manipulatives, and Art Area. New items are periodically introduced to further their understanding of the coordinated weekly/ monthly theme. Extra-curricular activities include but are not limited to Christian Education, PE, Music, Art, Spanish, and Technology. Program Features Low student to teacher ratio Care and education in a Christian environment Thematic elements to enhance and encourage hands-on learning Focus on channeling natural curiosity and developing academic skills Regular communication between teachers and parents to stay informed about your child’s day

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Criteria to enter PreK-3 Program 1. Preschoolers must be 3 years old before September 1st of the year entering the program 2. All immunizations must be current 3. Children must be completely, 100%, potty trained

PreKindergarten-4 and VPK, Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Four-year-olds need to investigate new interests and experiences. At this age, children build a foundation for lifelong learning through play, exploration, trial and error, and gain independence and self-confidence with their growing abilities, while achieving readiness skills needed for kindergarten. Our goal is to partner with parents to provide a strong foundation to preschoolers in a loving, nurturing environment that is filled with discovery and learning. Phonics, reading readiness, math and language etc. are vital elements of the day’s agenda. Our skilled teachers outline key activities to maximize areas of interests in order to enhance the learning capabilities of each child. One of the objectives is to fine-tune skills needed to adapt to the Kindergarten setting. Some of which are: self-control, listening, following instructions and cooperation, etc. Learning environments such as Math & Manipulatives, Reading/Listening Corner, Science Centers, Dramatic, Blocks, and Art Areas give each child a wide range of opportunities to choose from. A more academic focus with just the right balance of play, offers children first-rate preparations for Kindergarten. Extracurricular activities include but are not limited to Christian Education, PE, Music, Art, Spanish, and Technology. SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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Program Features Low student to teacher ratio A unique network of support, meeting the distinctive needs of each child in a Christian environment Thematic elements to enhance and maximize learning experiences Focus on developing and fine-tuning readiness skills for Kindergarten Regular communication between teachers and parents to stay informed about your child’s day Criteria to enter PreK-4 Program 1. Preschoolers must be 4 years old before September 1st of the year entering the program 2. All immunizations must be current

PRIMARY & ELEMENTARY Students at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Academy enter the primary grades for Kindergarten – 2nd and elementary grades during 3rd – 5th grade. Their development as lifelong learners begins with a solid foundation in reading, writing, math, science and social studies, presented within a stimulating and enriching classroom environment. Small classes enable teachers to reach out and get to know their students, developing the vital personal relationships that support their academic and social development. The Primary classrooms are designed so that the students have a homeroom teacher who is directly responsible for instruction in all of the major disciplines, while elective teachers provide instruction in the “specials”, areas such as art, music and physical education. The Elementary classrooms are structured so that the team of teachers covers the major disciplines, while each teacher teaches to their individual strengths. Not only does this allow the team to make better use of resources, it also prepares the students for transitioning into middle school where they will be expected to rotate through different classes each day. SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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Curriculum A broad and balanced curriculum is offered to educate students who will become open-minded, thoughtful, lifelong learners and who will develop the critical and creative thinking skills necessary to achieve success in an ever changing world. Our goal is to provide students with exceptional opportunities for academic development, intellectual growth, artistic and physical self-fulfillment, and moral awareness.

Our primary and elementary grades use My Math and National Geographic Reach for Reading. The curriculum has been carefully designed to offer a progression of skill development, incorporating a range of teaching strategies and methods. Each quarter, students are assessed on a variety of skills that reflect the student's progress, noting areas of strength and weakness. In addition to parent-teacher conferences, teachers are readily available to meet with parents and students to provide updates on a student's progress. The use of technology is integrated into every subject area. This infusion of online resources, apps, videos, games, tutorials, e-texts, and other digital curricular assets provides a wide range of supplemental engaging materials for each subject area.

Voluntary Prekindergarten (VPK) Assessment The Florida Center for Reading Research has developed the Florida Voluntary Prekindergarten (VPK) Assessment, in collaboration with the Department of Education. The purpose of this assessment is to provide teachers with valid and reliable feedback regarding children's progress in attaining the skills in the Florida Early Learning and Developmental Standards for Four-Year-Olds, so that teachers may use this information to guide instructional decisions in the VPK classroom. The VPK Assessment includes progress monitoring measures in the areas of Print Knowledge, Phonological Awareness, Mathematics, and Oral Language/Vocabulary that are aligned with the Standards for 4 Year-Olds

Florida Kindergarten Readiness Screener (FLKRS) Grade/Students-All new students in Kindergarten Date-Administered within the first 30 days of each school year Description-The FLKRS is made up of two separate measures: the Early Childhood Observation System -(ECHOS) and the first measure of the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading – Kindergarten (FAIR-K). The ECHOS measures benchmarks in seven domains. It provides a simple, uniform method for observing and measuring the progress of young readers. FAIR- measures the growth and development of early literacy skills. All new kindergarten students are assessed for school readiness with these instruments.

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Results-School Report of Student Results and School Summary Results are provided online by the contractor in December/January. The Voluntary Prekindergarten (VPK) Provider Readiness Rates are determined by FLKRS.

Assessment Plan: Grades 1 through 8 A new school-wide assessment plan will go in to effect for the 2014-2015 school year

Iowa Tests of Basic Skills is administered to students in all grades. The ITBS is nationally normed and administered throughout the country. It includes separate assessments in the areas of reading, language, mathematics, social studies, science, and sources of information. The test also provides an overall measure of achievement referred to as the composite score. A norm-referenced test means a student's performance is compared with that of a group of similar students who have taken the same test across the nation. Student scores are reported in relation to the scores of this "norm" group. A score in the 87th percentile, for example, means the test taker scored better than 87 out of every 100 students in the norm group. Statistically, the majority of students nationwide will be in the 50thpercentile range.

SSAT- Secondary School Admissions Test The Secondary School Admissions Test is used for admissions at private middle schools and high schools around the country and is used by St. Andrew’s Episcopal Academy for placement of incoming Upper School students effective 2014-2015. The test contains multiple-choice sections in Quantitative (two sections for Upper and Middle Levels; one section for Elementary Level), Verbal Reasoning and Reading Comprehension. There is also an essay, which is not scored, but is sent to the schools to which you apply. The Upper Level test is for applicants in 8th grade and above. The Middle Level test is for applicants in 5th, 6th and 7th grade. The Elementary Level test is for applicants in 3rd and 4th grade.

Primary Courses Kindergarten Language Arts Kindergarten Language Arts emphasizes instruction in the areas of letter names, phonics, highfrequency words, oral vocabulary, vocabulary strategies, reading and listening comprehension, listening and speaking, grammar, and writing. The National Geographic Reach for Reading program provides ample practice and application of these skills using a variety of resources and activities. Reading selections include genres such as realistic fiction, poetry and lullabies, fantasy, fairy tales, fables, as well as, concept books and informational text. SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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Kindergarten Mathematics My Math for Kindergarten provides the opportunity for lifelong learning skills for students by developing information and communication skills, higher-order thinking skills, problem solving skills, independent learning as well as providing real-world connections to mathematics. Critical areas of study found in this course cover Numbers and Operations as well as Measurement and Data, by representing, relating, and operating on whole numbers, initially with sets of objects. This course also includes a critical area of study in Geometry and Positions by describing shapes and space. Kindergarten starts the students on the right track to achieving the common core standards. Kindergarten Science Kindergarten Science promotes active learning through a blend of print, inquiry, and digital experiences. In this course, students will explore how we use our senses; the tools and skills scientists use; what are living things, like plants and animals; how they grow and change and what their habitats are like. The students will investigate day and night and the differences in the day and night sky. They will learn about weather and our seasons. Earth’s resources will be discussed and how we can conserve the natural resources. Students will learn how matter changes; answer the questions, what is sound, what is light, and what heat is; and investigate motion and which objects magnets attract. Kindergarten Social Studies Children who come to kindergarten may already have some space, time, and causal knowledge about their own world. During their school experience, they will expand these understandings, moving outward to learn about other people, places, and times, fording links with people from the past, both ordinary and extraordinary, is part of this exploratory process. Grade 1 Language Arts Grade 1 Language Arts emphasizes instruction in the areas of phonics, high-frequency words, reading comprehension, spelling, vocabulary strategies, grammar, and writing. The National Geographic Reach for Reading program provides ample practice and application of these skills using a variety of resources and activities. Reading selections include genres such as poetry, realistic fiction, fantasy, fables, fairy tales, readers’ theater, as well as, informational text and biographies. Grade 1 Mathematics My Math for First Grade provides the opportunity for lifelong learning skills for students by developing information and communication skills, higher-order thinking skills, problem solving skills, independent learning as well as providing real-world connections to mathematics. Critical areas of study found in this course cover:

Operations with Algebraic Thinking to develop an understanding of Addition and

Subtraction within 20; Number and Operations in Base Ten to develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value; Measurement and Data to develop an understanding of linear measurement and measuring lengths as iterating length units; Geometry, reasoning about attributes of,

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and composing and decomposing geometric shapes. My Math for First Grade starts the students on the right track to achieving the common core standards. Grade 1 Science Grade 1 Science promotes active learning through a blend of print, inquiry, and digital experiences. In this course, the students will explore how scientists work; the technology that is all around us; animals, plants, and the environments in which they live; Earth’s resources; weather and seasons, objects in the sky; solids, liquids, and gases; and forces and energy. Grade 1 Social Studies Grade 1 Social Studies starts first grade students on the right track in achieving the common core standards. First grade students explore the concepts of geographical location, physical characteristics of geography, and the effects of geography on the people who live in varied areas. Through comparisons of everyday life in different times and places, students learn that certain aspects of people, places and things stay the same over time, while others change. Grade 2 Language Arts Grade 2 Language Arts emphasizes instruction in the areas of reading comprehension, phonics, spelling vocabulary strategies, grammar, and writing.

The National Geographic Reach for Reading program

provides ample practice and application of these skills using a variety of resources and activities. Reading selections include genres such as realistic fiction, humorous fiction, plays, fables, folktales, poetry, as well as, informational text and biographies. Grade 2 Mathematics My Math for Second Grade provides the opportunity for lifelong learning skills for students by developing information and communication skills, higher-order thinking skills, problem-solving skills, independent learning as well as providing real-world connections to mathematics. Critical areas of study found in this course cover:

Number Sense and Place Value to extend understanding of base-ten notation;

Building fluency with Addition and Subtraction; Measurement and Data, using standard units of measure. My Math for Second Grade keeps students on the right track to achieving the common core standards. Grade 2 Science Grade 2 Science promotes active learning through a blend of print, inquiry, and digital experiences. In this course, the students will learn that scientists ask questions about the world around them and find answers through many methods of investigation; will learn how technology affects our everyday life and can affect the environment around us. Students will study the many kinds of animals, the environments in which they live, and their needs to live and grow. They will learn how fossils help us in identifying animals that lived long ago. The students will study plants and their parts. They will investigate the Earth’s resources like rock, plants, and water and the changes that can occur to the Earth’s surface. SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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Students will measure and track weather and study the changes that occur day to day and from season to season. Students will learn about our solar system. The properties of matter are explored. They will investigate heat, light, and sound as forms of energy, and magnets. Grade 2 Social Studies Grade 2 Social Studies explores the people who lived in a different time or place. This year the student will be learning about how families have changed over time and meet special people who we remember for the important work they have done. Students will see where people live and how they use the land around them.

Elementary Courses Grade 3 Language Arts Grade 3 Language Arts emphasizes instruction in the areas of reading comprehension, phonics, spelling, vocabulary strategies, grammar, and writing.

The National Geographic Reach for Reading program

provides ample practice and application of these skills using a variety of resources and activities. Reading selections include genres such as humorous fiction, realistic fiction, fantasy, legends, historical fiction, readers’ theater as well as biographies and informational text

throughout this course,

connections are made to the disciplines of science, social studies, and poetry. Grade 3 Mathematics My Math for Third Grade provides the opportunity for lifelong learning skills for students by developing information and communication skills, higher-order thinking skills, problem-solving skills, independent learning as well as providing real-world connections to mathematics. Critical areas of study found in this course cover: Whole Number Operations, including multiplication and division within 100; Fractions, highlighting unit fractions; Measurement, developing understanding of the structure of rectangular arrays and of area; Geometry, describing and analyzing two-dimensional shapes. My Math for Third Grade keeps students on the right track to achieving the common core standards. Grade 3 Science Grade 3 Science promotes active learning through a blend of print, inquiry, and digital experiences. In this course, the students will explore how scientists raise questions about Earth and the universe and seek answers by careful investigation; how technology is all around us and how the design process is used to develop new types of technology to meet people’s needs. Students will learn about the cycle of growth and adaptations for survival. They will study how all living, once-living, and nonliving things interact in an ecosystem; how living things use Earth’s resources to meet their needs. They will explore the importance of water and the sun as an energy source for the water cycle and weather. They will discover that matter has properties that can be observed, described, and measured.

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Grade 3 Social Studies Grade 3 Social Studies explore different communities. Students will find out about what it was like to live in a different time and meet people from communities in other states and countries. Students will visit many places to find out how people in different communities live. Grade 4 Language Arts Grade 4 Language Arts emphasizes instruction in the areas of reading comprehension, decoding, spelling, vocabulary strategies, grammar, and writing.

The National Geographic Reach for Reading

program provides ample practice and application of these skills using a variety of resources and activities. Reading selections include genres such as humorous fiction, realistic fiction, historical fiction, science fiction, as well as narrative nonfiction, biographies, informational text, and persuasive text. Throughout this course, connections are made to the disciplines of science, social studies, and poetry. Grade 4 Mathematics My Math for Fourth Grade provides the opportunity for lifelong learning skills for students by developing information and communication skills, higher-order thinking skills, problem-solving skills, independent learning as well as providing real-world connections to mathematics. Critical areas of study found in this course cover: Place Value and Operations with Whole Numbers to develop understanding and fluency with multi-digit multiplication, and developing understanding of dividing to find quotients involving multi-digit dividends; Fractions and Decimals to develop an understanding of fraction and decimal equivalence, addition and subtraction of fractions with like denominators; and multiplication of fractions by whole numbers; Geometry, Measurement, and Data, to include a growing understanding that geometric figures can be analyzed and classified based on their properties, such as having parallel sides, perpendicular sides, particular angle measures, and symmetry. Grade 4 Science Grade 4 Science promotes active learning through a blend of print, inquiry, and digital experiences. In this course, the students will explore how scientists answer questions about the world around us by carrying out careful investigations; and how engineers use a process to design products and processes that solve human problems.

Students will learn how living things adapt for survival in their

environment; and how both living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem impact one another. Students will study weather and how it is influenced by the movement of the water cycle. Students will explore objects in space including Earth and its moon. They will investigate the properties of matter and the physical and chemical changes it can undergo. Students will learn about energy, electricity, and motion. Grade 4 Social Studies Students will study the geography of the United States. Geography is the study of the Earth’s surface and the ways people use it. Students will learn about history, economics, government, and culture and how areas change over time. Students will find out how people change the places they live and how they are changed by these places. SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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Grade 5 Language Arts Grade 5 Language Arts emphasizes instruction in the areas of reading comprehension, decoding, spelling, vocabulary strategies, grammar, and writing.

The National Geographic Reach for Reading

program provides ample practice and application of these skills using a variety of resources and activities. Reading selections include genres such as humorous fiction, realistic fiction, historical fiction, science fiction, as well as narrative nonfiction, biographies, informational text, and persuasive text. Throughout this course, connections are made to the disciplines of science, social studies, and poetry. Grade 5 Mathematics This course develops the students’ higher-order thinking and provides explicit in-depth instruction in fundamental mathematical concepts, such as place value and the interrelatedness of operations, and in skills such as algorithms and data analysis. Attention is also focused on helping students become fluent in math vocabulary, and throughout the program students are encouraged to reflect on mathematical processes and patterns.

This course uses varied approaches to problem-solving strategies to help

students build a true concept of what mathematics is and what it means to “do” math. This course is aligned with Grade 5 Common Core Standards. Grade 5 Science Grade 5 Science promotes active learning through a blend of print, inquiry, and digital experiences. In this course, the students will explore how scientists work, the engineering process, cells to body systems, how living things grow and reproduce, ecosystems, energy, natural resources, changes to Earth’s surface, the rock cycle, fossils, Earth’s oceans, the solar system and the universe, matter, light and sound, and forces and motion. Grade 5 Social Studies Students will learn how the United States of America came to be and how its past affects them today. Students will discover what it was like to live during the time when important events in our nation took place and learn about people who took part in those events and about the place where each event happened. Enrichment Courses include but are not limited to: Christian Education, PE, Music, Art, Spanish, and Technology. .

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UPPER SCHOOL Middle School (6th – 8th Grade) High School (9th – 12th Grade)

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MIDDLE SCHOOL 6th – 8th Grade

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Middle School Middle school is designed to allow advanced level students to accelerate at a pace which prepares them academically for taking Honors, Advanced Placement, Dual Enrollment or other college preparatory work upon entering high school. Some middle school students will receive high school credits in advance of entering the high school program. It is also a time when students who need additional academic preparation prior to taking high school courses will receive intensive reading and math support. Each student will have an individual academic plan designed to optimize his or her opportunities for success at the upper school level. The use of technology is integrated into every subject area. This infusion of online resources, apps, videos, games, tutorials, e-texts, and other digital curricular assets provides a wide range of supplemental engaging materials for each subject area, in addition to expanding curricular choices through the use of online classes.

Assessment Plan: Grades 1 through 8 A new school-wide assessment plan will go in to effect for the 2014-2015 school year

SSAT- Secondary School Admissions Test The Secondary School Admissions Test is used for admissions at private middle schools and high schools around the country and is used by St. Andrew’s Episcopal Academy for placement of incoming Upper School students effective 2014-2015. The test contains multiple-choice sections in Quantitative (two sections for Upper and Middle Levels; one section for Elementary Level), Verbal Reasoning and Reading Comprehension. There is also an essay, which is not scored, but is sent to the schools to which you apply. The Upper Level test is for applicants in 8th grade and above. The Middle Level test is for applicants in 5th, 6th and 7th grade. The Elementary Level test is for applicants in 3rd and 4th grade.

Iowa Tests of Basic Skills is administered to students in all grades. The ITBS is nationally normed and administered throughout the country. It includes separate assessments in the areas of reading, language, mathematics, social studies, science, and sources of information. The test also provides an overall measure of achievement referred to as the composite score. A norm-referenced test means a student's performance is compared with that of a group of similar students who have taken the same test across the nation. Student scores are reported in relation to the scores of this "norm" group. A score in the 87th percentile, for example, means the test taker scored better than 87 out of every 100 students in the norm group. Statistically, the majority of students nationwide will be in the 50thpercentile range.

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Middle School Courses Grade 6 Language Arts The purpose of this course is to provide integrated educational experiences in the language arts strands of reading, writing, listening, viewing, speaking, language, and literature. The content should include, but not be limited to the following: using the reading process to construct meaning from a wide range of literary, informational, and technical texts; using the writing process to communicate information and ideas; using listening, viewing, and speaking strategies; understanding the power of language and using language in authentic contexts; and understanding the common features of a variety of literary forms. Grade 6 Literature Sixth grade Literature focuses on world literature, reading skills, poetry, composition, grammar concepts, vocabulary study, and research skills. This course emphasizes the practice of comprehensive study of reading skills, vocabulary, grammar for writing, and writing. Students use writing, vocabulary, and research skills in their study of other disciplines such as science, math and social studies; these skills are reinforced through this literature course. Grade 6 Mathematics The sixth grade Math curriculum is designed for students to master whole number concepts, operations, and problem solving. Throughout the course students will master the four arithmetic operations with whole numbers, positive fractions, positive decimals, and positive and negative integers.

Students

conceptually understand and work with ratios and proportions as well as percentages. Students will then apply their knowledge to statistics and probability.

Students should develop a working

understanding of the concepts of mean, median, and mode of data sets and how to calculate the range. They will apply their knowledge to analyze data and sampling processes for possible bias and misleading conclusions. They use addition and multiplication of fractions routinely to calculate the probabilities for compound events. Geometry, measurement, an introduction to equations is covered, as well as an introduction to algebra, including solving 1-step linear equations. Grade 6 Science This course enables students to develop an understanding of the natural and man-made environment and the environmental problems the world faces. Students explore ecological concepts through an inquiry approach. Embedded standards for Inquiry and Technology & Engineering are taught in the context of the content standards for Individuals, Populations, Communities, Ecosystems, Biomes, Humans and Sustainability. Grade 6 Pre-Advanced Placement World History Throughout our planet only one species of human can be found, but a cornucopia of cultures & ideas has always existed within our one race.

World History is a course that explores the various beliefs,

technologies, ideas, and accomplishments achieved by people all over the globe and across time. During SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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this course students will learn the fundamental struggles experienced by early cultural groups in order to appreciate the accomplishments of the past to which we stand on today. Students will learn the concept of progression and culture transmission & how people, technology, ideas, and beliefs have migrated from specific regions to encompass the globe. Grade 7 Pre-Advanced Placement Language Arts Seventh grade literature focuses on World Literature, reading skills, poetry, composition, grammar concepts, vocabulary study, and research skills. This course emphasizes the practice of comprehensive study of reading skills, vocabulary, grammar for writing, and writing. Students use writing, vocabulary, and research skills in their study of other disciplines such as science, math and social studies; these skills are reinforced through this literature course. Grade 7 Literature Seventh grade literature focuses on World Literature, reading skills, poetry, composition, grammar concepts, vocabulary study, and research skills. This course emphasizes the practice of comprehensive study of reading skills, vocabulary, grammar for writing, and writing. Students use writing, vocabulary, and research skills in their study of other disciplines such as science, math and social studies; these skills are reinforced through this literature course. Grade 7 Pre-Advanced Placement Mathematics The 7th grade Math course is designed to build on the foundations from the 6th Grade course as well as introducing the students to some foundational concepts of Pre-Algebra. The curriculum spans a wide range of proficiencies which include measurement, geometry, formulas, percentages, probability, integers, number theory, and percents. Review of basic operations with decimals and fractions is incorporated throughout the year and problem solving is emphasized. This course prepares the students for 8th grade algebra study. Grade 7 Pre-Advanced Placement Science This course explores the origins and the connections between the physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the earth system. Students explore the physical aspects of earth processes and cycles through open-ended field and laboratory investigations. Understanding the importance of these processes and how they influence humankind enables students to make sound decisions about both their community and the earth’s global environment. Embedded standards for Inquiry and Technology & Engineering are taught in the context of the content standards for Maps, Matter and Minerals, Rocks and the Rock Cycle, Geologic History, Plate Tectonics, and Landforms. Grade 7 Pre-Advanced Placement World Cultures/Geography Geography is course designed to not only transmit basic knowledge of the physical world in which we live, but to understand how the physical world has affected the various peoples found throughout our planet. Within this class students will learn key issues to human development such as, the importance of SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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river & water systems, geographical barriers, & climate as it has applied to human/cultural development. Students should gain an appreciation and understanding for the adaptability and creativity that cultures throughout history have displayed in exploring our world. Grade 8 Pre-Advanced Placement Language Arts The purpose of this course is to provide integrated educational experiences in the language arts strands of reading, writing, listening, viewing, speaking, language, and literature. The content should include, but not be limited to the following: using the reading process to construct meaning from a wide range of literary, informational, and technical texts; using the writing process to communicate information and ideas; using listening, viewing, and speaking strategies; understanding the power of language and using language in authentic contexts; and understanding the common features of a variety of literary forms. Grade 8 Pre-Advanced Placement Literature Eighth grade literature focuses on World Literature, reading skills, poetry, composition, grammar concepts, vocabulary study, and research skills. This course emphasizes the practice of comprehensive study of reading skills, vocabulary, grammar for writing, and writing. Students use writing, vocabulary, and research skills in their study of other disciplines such as science, math and social studies; these skills are reinforced through this literature course. Grade 8 Pre-Advanced Placement Mathematics Grade 8 Mathematics is the last in a 3 class series preparing students for entry into High School Algebra. This course continues the study of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percents helping students make the transition from arithmetic to algebra. Students are introduced to integers, solving equations, and the basics of algebra early in the course. Problem solving, applications, and communication are integrated throughout the course. Students in grade eight mathematics will continue to extend and build upon their foundation of basic understandings of numbers, operation, and quantitative reasoning; patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking; geometry and spatial reasoning; measurement, probability and statistics, and problem-solving. Grade 8 Pre-Advanced Placement Science This course examines the interactions between matter and energy. Students explore physics concepts through an inquiry-based approach. Embedded standards for Inquiry, Technology & Engineering, and Mathematics are taught in the context of the content standards for Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Waves and Optic, Electricity and Magnetism, and Nuclear Science. Grade 8 Pre-Advanced Placement World Languages Spanish This beginning level course introduces students to the target language and its culture. Students will learn beginning skills in listening and speaking and an introduction to basic skills in reading and writing. Also, culture, connections, comparisons, and communities are included in this one-year course. SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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Latin Students learn basic language structures and essential elements of Latin pronunciation in order to be able to read simple passages in Latin. The relationship of English to Latin is emphasized in vocabulary building, word derivation, and meanings of prefixes and suffixes. Language structures and syntax are developed through the study of literary passages. The geography, history, government and the culture of the Roman Empire are studied. For middle school students, this credit becomes a part of the high school transcript, is included in the determination of the high school grade point average (GPA), and counts toward fulfilling the world languages requirements of the high school Advanced Studies diploma. It also counts toward the total number of credits required for graduation. Italian Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and their immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. This communication is evidenced in all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing - with emphasis on the ability to communicate orally and in writing. Students begin to explore and study the POS themes of Personal and Family Life, School Life, Social Life, and Community Life. For middle school students, this credit becomes a part of the high school transcript, is included in the determination of the high school grade point average (GPA), and counts toward fulfilling the world languages requirements of the high school Advanced Studies diploma. It also counts toward the total number of credits required for graduation. German Students continue to develop the ability to communicate about themselves and their immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. This communication is evidenced in all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing - with emphasis on the ability to communicate orally and in writing. Students continue to explore and study the POS themes of Personal and Family Life, School Life, Social Life, and Community Life. Credit becomes a part of the high school transcript, is included in the determination of the high school grade point average (GPA), and counts towards fulfilling the world languages requirement of the high school Advanced Studies diploma. It also counts towards the number of credits required for high school graduation. Chinese Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and their immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. This communication is evidenced in all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing - with emphasis on the ability to communicate orally and in writing. Students begin to explore and study the themes of Personal and Family Life, School Life, Social Life, and Community Life. For middle school students, this credit becomes a part of the high school transcript, is included in the determination of the high school grade point average (GPA), and counts toward fulfilling the world languages requirement of the high school Advanced Studies diploma. It also counts toward the total number of credits required for graduation.

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French Students continue to develop the ability to communicate about themselves and their immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. This communication is evidenced in all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing - with emphasis on the ability to communicate orally and in writing. Students continue to explore and study the POS themes of Personal and Family Life, School Life, Social Life, and Community Life. Credit becomes a part of the high school transcript, is included in the determination of the high school grade point average (GPA), and counts towards fulfilling the world languages requirements of the high school Advanced Studies diploma. It also counts towards the number of credits required for high school graduation. Grade 8 Pre-Advanced Placement U.S. History American History is a course that introduces students to the role the United States has played throughout our modern and post-modern world. Within this course students will learn to take the basic knowledge acquired in earlier social studies classes and apply them to a narrow historical subject area in order to appreciate & understand the complexity of being a part of our modern and varied society. Ethnic diversity, economic issues, political developments, cultural tensions, diplomatic interactions, religion, war, and social change are some of the main themes that will be covered and analyzed within this course.

Middle School Electives Grade 6-8 Art History Art History will teach students about the complex world of art & creation through examining artistic techniques, individual artists, artistic movements, and different cultures. Students will view and analyze the various mediums used in creating art. Students will learn how art formed in its infancy to how it developed into complex techniques. Through reading, research, slides, and videos, students will view important works of art from around the world and throughout time. Students will develop the ability to understand artistic terminology, an appreciation for making and displaying art, an understanding of the purpose & function of art, an ability to analyze artwork & art forms, and the ability to examine a variety of art while being able to explain and articulate the skill and value of the field of art. Grade 6-8 Creative Photography I Creative Photography I course focuses on the basics of photography with an emphasis on digital photography, including building an understanding of aperture, shutter speed, lighting, and composition. Students will be introduced to the history of photography and basic camera functions using a point-and-shoot camera. Students will build a portfolio of images in the vPortfolio. Students will need a camera. Cell phone cameras for the introductory course will work well if they can upload their images to the course.

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Grade 6-8 Digital Arts Digital Arts courses focus on digital photography, editing, video, and web design. Grade 6-8 Keyboarding Keyboarding and Computers teaches students basic parts of the computer and common computer terms. Students will learn to use correct posture and learn to key by “touch.� Keying by touch means they are feeling the keyboard rather than watching their fingers as they key. They learn to use correct techniques and correct spacing as they key the alphabetic keys. Student will be able to show improvement in accuracy and speed. Grade 6-8 Strings Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced level orchestra students will continue to develop skills on violin, viola, cello, and double bass. A variety of musical styles will be studied through the playing of string orchestra literature. Students must meet both the school day and after school participation requirements to receive credit for this course. Grade 6-8 Physical Education and Health Physical Education covers health and safety understanding the human body, growth and development, self-esteem, decision making skills, personal health and hygiene, disease prevention and prevention of child abuse.

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HIGH SCHOOL 9th – 12th Grade

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Preparing for College (What You Need to Do and When You Need to Do It!)

Grade 9 th

Take schoolwork seriously because 9 grade counts toward Bright Futures Scholarships. Take college prep courses. Begin and continue building your personal resume. Include any school, religious organization or community activities you join as well as any awards or honor’s you receive. Complete your 4 Year Plan with your Guidance Counselor. Begin looking at colleges in general, vocational tech schools, or the military according to your long range goals. Plan to take computer and/or technology classes early in high school. With today’s technology focus, these skills are extremely important for all students! Get involved in quality activities. Start a file on colleges and college materials. Visit www.facts.org . Set up your ePEP online. Also, create a profile to review your academic standing for Bright Futures Scholarships.

Grade 10 Take the PSAT which is given once a year in October. The PSAT gives you good practice for standardized testing for college entrance. Learn ways to improve your scores. Attend the local College and Career Night. Numerous colleges, universities, and businesses allow you to browse and ask questions as well as collect brochures and materials about their organizations. Meet with your guidance counselor to review your 4 Year Plan and make any adjustments to your courses for the future. Discuss careers you are interested in. Discuss your eligibility for honors, dual enrollment, or AP level classes based on your success last year and this year. Go online to www.facts.org and take Choices Explorer. Discuss your results with your guidance counselor. Review your profile for Bright Futures. Begin planning for college visits with your family. A good time for a visit is during summer vacations. See the campus in person and visit with college students as well as admission representatives. Consult SAT preparation software, books or tutorial classes to become comfortable with the types of questions on the test and how to work with time limits. Continue to add materials to your college file.

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Grade 11 Take the PSAT. This year it will count for qualifying for the National Merit Scholarship. Check off the box that allows your profile to be sent to interested colleges. Attend the local College and Career Night, this time armed with specific questions about degree programs, admissions procedures, financial aid, and campus life. Add material to your college file. Plan when you want to take both the SAT and ACT. Depending on your test taking strengths/weaknesses, you may want to take them in the fall as well as again in the spring. Colleges will always take your best subset on each test to use for admission purposes. Plan to take the SAT-II Subject Test(s) after completing specific advanced course work (if needed for college.) Continue updating your resume. Add in other clubs, leadership positions, and activities you are involved with. If interested in athletic scholarships, contact the athletic department at the college of your choice. Go to the library and start researching scholarship and financial aid directories in preparation for next year. You may also go online and research scholarships at www.fastweb.com and www.collegeboard.com for scholarship and financial aid information. Spend spring break visiting college campuses. Check on schools of various sizes and locations, both in and out of state. Take pictures while you are there. Get a head start on writing your college essays. They often take a lot more time than students think, so don’t wait until the hectic senior year. Finalize them in senior year. Review your profile on www.facts.org for eligibility of Bright Futures Scholarships.

Grade 12 Prepare college application packages. Review deadlines and requirements. Line up letters of recommendations early. Give teachers, employers, or other adults at least two weeks to complete the recommendation forms. Include a stamped, addressed envelope with each letter request. Meet with your Guidance Counselor for your schedule and senior credit check interview. Complete college applications online or turn completed paper applications in to your Counselor. Try to have them all finished by the end of October, especially for schools that admit on rolling decisions. Let your counselor know when you hear anything back from your colleges on admission. Take or retake the SAT and ACT if needed for admission scores or scholarship cut off scores. In October, pick up your local scholarship book from your counselor. Attend the training session on how to complete applications appropriately. Watch the deadline! Visit college campuses for final decisions. Attend classes if possible and see the dorms. Talk to students attending the colleges you visit.

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st

Apply for Bright Futures Scholarships after December 1 through www.facts.org or www.FloridaStudentFinancialAid.org In December, pick up the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) form from the Guidance Office. Have your parents begin filling it out. Tax forms need to be filled out early st

this year. File the FAFSA as soon after January 1 as possible. You may also go online to complete the application at www.fafsa.ed.gov Have parents attend the spring Financial Aid Workshop at your high school for help in filing for financial aid. Take SAT II Subject Tests if needed for your colleges. Provide guidance counselor with requests for mid-year senior grades, if required by a college or university. Wait for college admission decision and financial aid award letters! Make your final college decision based on the college best suited for your personal academic goals and financial needs. Send housing application deposit for selected college. Notify all colleges immediately when you make a decision. This frees up places for other students. Stay in touch with your Guidance Counselor! Attend Scholarship Night if you are receiving a local scholarship. Send thank you notes or letters to anyone assisting you during the admissions process.

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Major Areas of Interest 4 Year Plan

•

Major area of interest: Four (4) credits selected by the student in an area of interest. For example, courses may be in: a career and technical program, fine and performing arts, or an academic content area. *Students may revise major areas of interest each year as part of the annual course registration process and should update their personal education plans to reflect such revisions.

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St. Andrew's Episcopal Academy High School Course Selection Preparation Student Name: __________________________Academy/MAI Language Arts Select (X)

Mathematics COURSE

COURSE #

Q

Credit

Science Select (X)

COURSE

COURSE #

Q

Credit

COURSE

COURSE #

Q

Credit

COURSE #

Q

Credit

COURSE #

Q

Credit

Social Studies COURSE

COURSE #

Q

Credit

Intensive Select (X)

Select (X)

Select (X)

World Language COURSE

COURSE #

Q

Credit

PE

Select (X)

COURSE

Major Area of Interest (MAI)

Select (X)

COURSE

COURSE #

Q

Credit

COURSE

COURSE #

Q

Credit

Select (X)

COURSE

Electives Select (X)

Counselor Signature:

Date:

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CURRICULAR EMPHASIS

FOUR-YEAR EDUCATIONAL PLAN WITH MAJOR S.T.E.A.M. AREAS OF INTEREST

4 Year College____ Last Name _____________________ First Name_____________________ Student ID#___________________

2 Year College____ Career/Technical__

MAJOR INTEREST_____________________________ MAJOR INTEREST____________________________

Military

MINOR INTEREST_____________________________ MINOR INTEREST ____________________________

World of Work ____

Credits

Required in Subject Area

9TH GRADE

4

English

English I

English II

English III

English IV

4

Mathematics

Math

Math

Math

Math

3

Science

Science

Science

Science

3

Social Studies

World History

American History

Economics (1/2) Government (1/2)

1

Physical Education/HOPE

1

Fine Arts Major Area of Interest Course 1

Major Area of Interest Course 2

Major Area of Interest Course 3

Major Area of Interest Course 4

PSAT

PSAT, SAT, ACT

PSAT, SAT, ACT,

PSAT, SAT, ACT,

8

Electives (College Bound: 2 Credits of same world language required, additional Theology courses recommended beyond the required electives for graduation)

SS

10TH GRADE

SS

11TH GRADE

SS

12TH GRADE

____

SS

Total 24

Testing _______GPA Requirements Met _______Testing _______Sports ______Extracurricular Activities _______College Time Line

It is the student’s responsibility to make sure that all graduation requirements are met, including earning 24 credits, passing the appropriate tests, earning a minimum GPA of 2.0, and other requirements as identified on Personal Academic Plan

Bright Futures Scholarship________

Students applying to the Florida University system are strongly advised to take at least 18 credits in the following areas: English, Math, Science, Social Studies. If applying outside the State of Florida system, please make sure to verify admissions requirements on a regular basis. Student Signature:__________________________________ Date:____________

Parent Signature :______________________________________ Date :________________

Counselor Signature:________________________________ Date:_____________

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT AP速 REQUIREMENTS

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT College and High School Credit

UNIVERSITY BOUND STUDENTS A.P. Advanced Placement is a college preparatory curriculum for the motivated high academic achiever. It is intended to prepare students to be successful upon entry into a four-year university. The opportunity to pursue a challenging, in-depth study of English, math, science, social studies, and fine arts may be provided based on course availability. A qualifying score on the final comprehensive exam will award college credit that is recognized at universities across the country. Due to the demanding nature of these courses, it is imperative that a high-level academic environment exist and that the student is dedicated to learning is highly, motivated, and is willing to put forth the effort for courses of this intensity.

Weighted Grade Point Average 9th –12th grade AP classes earn an extra .04 weight factor when averaging grade point averages. Class rank is determined by a weighted grade point average.

Eligibility: Successful completion of grade 9 and/or 10 Honors or Pre-AP classes in core subjects Grade point average - 3.0 Above average test scores Teacher recommendation

Available AP Courses: Human Geography (grade 9) World History (grade 10) US History (grade 11) English Language Composition (grade 11) English Literature (grade 12) Microeconomics/Macroeconomics (grade 12) American Government (grade 12) Spanish Language (grade 9-12) Spanish Literature (grade10-12) Physics (grade 11-12) Psychology (grade 10-12)

College Board Official Websites https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/home Students: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/index.html?studentarents http://www.collegeboard.com/parents/

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Indian River State College (IRSC) HIGH SCHOOL / COLLEGE DUAL ENROLLMENT Dual enrollment courses are advanced courses for which students can receive high school and college credit if the student earns a grade of “C” or better. A three-credit college course is equivalent to .5 high school credit, except for English courses, which are equivalent to 1.0 high school credit. Please note that some universities do not regard a “C” in dual enrollment as academic success. A list of college courses eligible for dual enrollment is available in the Guidance Department. Dual Enrollment courses are available through a partnership with Indian River Community College. When required to attend the college campus, students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the IRSC campus. Eligibility criteria: 1. 16 years of age 2. Academic courses: (earn .04 weight factor when averaged in cumulative grade point average) a. Grade point average of 3.0 b. Test scores: i. SAT – 440+ verbal & 440+ math ii. ACT – Reading 18+, English 17+, Math 19+ iii. P.E.R.T. — Postsecondary Education Readiness Test iv. College Placement Test (CPT) - Elementary Algebra 72+ Reading Comprehension 83+ Sentence Skills 83+ 3. Counselor recommendation NOTE: Students must be aware that dual enrollment course work is college level work and the student is expected to be motivated, self-directed, and adept at time management.

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Registration Procedures: 1. Student meets with high school counselor to verify eligibility for enrollment in a dual enrollment course. 2. Student completes a dual enrollment application for admission and has it signed by his/her parent and the high school principal/designee. 3. The application should be returned to IRSC and an appointment should be made to take the College Placement Test. A copy of the P.E.R.T. — Postsecondary Education Readiness Test scores must be submitted to the Guidance Counselor for verification of eligibility. 4. Student and counselor select appropriate course(s) for enrollment.

NOTE: Students who withdraw from dual enrollment classes after the drop and add period will have an “F” posted on the high school academic transcript.

ONLINE COURSES FOR MIDDLE & HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT Middle and senior high school students are eligible to enroll in VSOE, the Virtual School of Excellence or other approved accredited Virtual School programs when taking a virtual course to enhance, accelerate or remediate in order to fulfill the needs of their Personal Academic Plan. Each student is required to participate in a minimum of 1.0 full credit online as a graduation requirement. The courses offered are teacher-facilitated by certified and highly qualified teachers. Courses are based upon the same criteria as those taught in the traditional school program and, therefore, generate the same credit for students. Students may obtain more information about any of these opportunities for acceleration from the guidance counselor. Additional information about the Virtual School program can be found at myvsoe.com

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Preparation for National College Entrance Examinations

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PSAT/MSQT-The Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test This 2 1/2 hour test offered once a year in October only. Scores range from 20-80 in each of three sections: critical reading and verbal reasoning, writing, and math problem-solving skills. Scores can be used to estimate potential SAT scores by adding a zero to each score, as in a PSAT math score of 56 could be estimated as a possible 560 on the SAT. All juniors intending to enroll in a four-year college or university should take this test. The test offers college-bound juniors a shorter, sample version of the SAT for practice. This test will highlight academic strengths and weaknesses early enough to allow the student to take extra test preparation in time for college applications during the senior year. This test is the qualifying test for the National Merit Scholarship Program and must be taken in the junior year by students hoping for this academic honor. SAT I - (Reasoning Test)-The Scholastic Assessment Test This 3 hour test measures verbal and mathematics reasoning ability and is offered seven times a year. Scores range from 200 to 800 in each of the three test areas, and the scores are added for a total score ranging from 600 to 2400. The score from one test date may be mixed with the score from another area taken on another date to count the student’s highest total critical reading, mathematics and writing score. Taken during the Junior Year or, at the very latest, in the beginning of the senior year, all students considering attending a four-year college or university should take this test (or the ACT) at least once. Students who plan to attend highly competitive schools should begin taking the SAT early in the junior year to ensure time to achieve the score they need for college admission. th

Highly academic sophomores may wish to take the test once during the 10 Grade year for additional practice. Students should be enrolled in Algebra 2 before taking the SAT. SAT I (or ACT) scores are required for admission to all state universities in Florida and for most of the nation’s other colleges and universities. Admission to highly selective colleges and universities is determined in part by a student’s score on this test. This test (or the ACT) is used to determine NCAA eligibility. This test may be used to determine eligibility for dual enrollment courses in conjunction with IRSC. Students can use the SAT to satisfy the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship requirements. SAT II - (Subject Tests)-The Scholastic Assessment Tests Part 2 These tests measure student achievement in specific academic areas, such as American History, Biology, Spanish, etc. Each test is one hour long. The tests are offered six times a year. Scores range from 200 to 800. Students may take up to three separate tests at one sitting. Academic students who intend to apply to highly selective colleges and universities should take these tests in the Junior or Senior year. The SAT II’s in specific subject areas are required for admission to the most highly selective colleges and

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universities. Students should check with the admissions offices of these schools for specific test requirements. Many colleges use these tests for placement purposes. ACT The ACT assessment consists of tests in four areas: English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science Reasoning. Scores in each area range from 1-36. A composite score is also given. All students considering attending a four-year college or university should take this test (or the SAT) at least once during the Junior year or, at the very least in the beginning of the Senior year. Students who plan to attend highly competitive schools should begin taking the ACT early in the junior year to ensure time to achieve the score they need for college admission. Highly academic sophomores may wish to take the test once during th

the 10 Grade for additional practice. ACT (or SAT) scores are required for admission to all state universities in Florida and for most of the nation’s other colleges and universities. Admission to highly selective colleges and universities is determined in part by a student’s score on this test. This test (or the SAT) is one of the criteria for earning a Florida Bright Futures Scholarship. This test (or the SAT) is used to determine NCAA eligibility. The ACT is one criteria used to determine eligibility for dual enrollment courses in conjunction with IRSC.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

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Christian Education Theology Curriculum All Students shall take two 1 Semester courses of Theology each year. Student performance may be evaluated by tests, theses, and/or projects, with a strong preference for projects that apply learning in real-world situations. Sacred Scripture is a pre-requisite for subsequent courses, and must be taken by all students entering after 9th grade. Following completion of Sacred Scripture in the first year after matriculation, students will progress to the class of his/her grade level. For example, a student entering SAEA in the 11th grade will take Sacred Scripture in that year, and in his or her Senior Year, would take the senior level courses.

9th Grade: Sacred Scripture The Hebrew Bible (1 Semester) Christian New Testament (1 Semester) 10th Grade: Wisdom for Living Healthy Relationships and Interpersonal Communication (1 Semester) Discerning Gifts and Talents (1 Semester) 11th Grade: Foundations of Western Civilization Christian Philosophy (1 Semester) Christian Ethics (1 Semester) 12th Grade: Worldviews Christian History and Worldviews (1 Semester) World Religions and Worldviews (1 Semester)

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Course Title: Sacred Scripture: The Hebrew Bible Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content Students will become familiar with and learn to critique the most important texts of Judaism and subsequently, of Christianity, as well as the major events in the history of the Hebrew people. Students use literary and historical analysis in order to understand and better appreciate Hebrew Scriptures. The Bible’s influence and impact on history, literature, and the arts is also examined. The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) constitutes the earliest written evidence of values that Western civilization holds dear: history and time as linear, stewardship of the earth, liberation from oppression, morality and law as rooted in God’s will, social justice, and the dignity of the individual. Special emphasis will be placed on applying the Biblical truths to the student's life. Course Title: Sacred Scripture: Christian New Testament Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content Students will become familiar with and learn to critique the most important texts of Christianity. The Bible’s influence and impact on history, literature, and the arts is also examined. This review of the New Testament includes a survey of the teachings life and personality of Jesus, the revelation of God, including his radical ideas of the primacy of holiness, justice, and sacrificial love, which changed the world. Special emphasis will be placed on applying the Biblical truths to the student's life. Additionally, a select group of students is encouraged to share their work with the student body at a spring chapel service. Course Title: Wisdom for Living: Healthy Relationships and Interpersonal Communication Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content What gives life meaning and purpose? How can individuals achieve their highest potential? How can we develop healthy relationships? This class will explore how religious beliefs and practices throughout human history have been a means towards “ultimate transformation.” The “grist for the mill” will be relationship challenges that high school and college students encounter. Healthy sexual ethics will be included. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of spiritual and moral lifestyle issues while also examining and applying principles found in the sacred texts of various religions related to these issues. Students will develop communication skills such as active listening, assertiveness, forgiveness, and peacemaking. Course Title: Wisdom for Living: Discerning Gifts and Talents Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content This course will focus on the challenge of discovery of the unique gifts, skills and talents with which God has endowed each student. Students will participate in various vocational assessments that will assist them in focusing their vocational and avocational choices. Students will also spend time looking at spiritual autobiographies. By reading and exploring the religious experiences of others, students will develop an empathetic appreciation of the unique spiritual and vocational “pathways” of each individual. Ideally, this empathy and understanding will lead to a deepening of the students’ own religious selfunderstanding and awareness.

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Course Title: Spiritual Foundations of Western Civilization: Christian Philosophy Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The course examines the influence of the philosophical tradition on Christian thinking and of Christian philosophy on the traditions of western philosophical thought. Students will be exposed to the great thinkers and debates of western culture and become familiar with philosophical methodology and terminology. Students will read Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, C.S. Lewis and other Christian philosophers. Course Title: Spiritual Foundations of Western Civilization: Christian Ethics Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content What does it mean to be a good person, or to live a good life? How should an individual or a society decide what is right and wrong; which actions are obligatory, optional, or prohibited? Are there universal and eternal moral truths, or is everyone’s opinion on moral questions equally valid? These are some of the questions that humans have asked throughout all times and places, and that philosophers and theologians alike have struggled to answer. This course is a study of ethics with an emphasis on relating universal principles and students’ values to moral issues. Contemporary fiction and film are studied. Students learn methods of ethical reasoning. The goal of the course is to help students become aware of their own values and decision-making processes, especially in conflicted or ambiguous situations, and to encourage students to reflect on traditional religious and universal values. Course Title: Christian History and Worldviews Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content This course will survey the development of Christianity through the ancient, medieval, reformation, and modern periods with special attention on God’s work through certain people and events in different times and cultures. The distinctly Christian worldview and how it gave rise to science and industry will be explored. Course Title: World Religions and Worldviews Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content This course reviews the various major world religions, including many of the major denominations of Christianity. Religions include Indigenous (“pagan”) Religions, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity. The course uses standards for comparing world religions to Christianity.

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Language Arts Language is an essential part of social development. If students are to be educated and productive citizens in society, they must develop fundamental and advanced language skills that will enable them to communicate their ideas effectively. Four years of English are required for graduation. Students will be placed in the appropriate English course on the basis of scores on standardized tests, past performance in classes, and teacher recommendations. There are a variety of elective classes available to students who are interested in additional language development. Course Title: Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content: The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the semantic, structural, and rhetorical resources of the English language as they relate to the principles of effective writing. The course is also provides a variety of writing opportunities calling for the use of different styles and tones. Course Title: Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content: The purpose of this course is to study and practice writing and to study literature. Students will learn to use the modes of discourse and recognize the assumptions underlying various rhetorical strategies. Students will also acquire an understanding of the resources of the language and of the writer’s craft. They will develop critical standards for the appreciation of any literary work and increase their sensitivity to literature as shared experience. Course Title: English I Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to provide integrated educational experiences in the language arts strands of reading, writing, listening, viewing, speaking, language, and literature. Course Title: English Honors I Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to provide integrated educational experiences in the language arts strands of reading, writing, listening, viewing, speaking, language, and literature. Course Title: English II Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to enable students to further develop fundamental reading and writing skills and strategies to ensure successful literacy experiences.

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Course Title: English Honors II Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to provide integrated educational experiences in the language arts strands of reading, writing, listening, viewing, speaking, language, and literature. Course Title: English III Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to provide integrated educational experiences in the language arts strands of reading, writing, listening, viewing, speaking, language, and literature. Will meet graduation requirements for English. Course Title: English Honors III Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to provide integrated educational experiences in the language arts strands of reading, writing, listening, viewing, speaking, language, and literature. Will meet graduation requirements for English. Course Title: English IV Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to provide integrated educational experiences in the language arts strands of reading, writing, listening, viewing, speaking, language, and literature. Will meet graduation requirements for English. Course Title: English Honors IV Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to provide integrated educational experiences in the language arts strands of reading, writing, listening, viewing, speaking, language, and literature. Will meet graduation requirements for English.

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Mathematics Mathematics courses provide students with the basic concepts and relationships fundamental to living in a highly technical society. Understanding the nature of mathematics encourages critical thinking, precise expression and analytical approaches to problem solving. Three years of mathematics are required for graduation; however, students are encouraged to take a fourth year of mathematics in twelfth grade. Placement in a particular mathematics course is determined on the basis of scores on standardized tests, past performance in courses and teacher recommendations. Students are encouraged to grow in mathematical awareness and competency consistent with their individual potential. Some classes require a scientific or graphic calculator. Course Title: AP Calculus AB Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. AP Calculus AB is a college-level course which differs from a high school calculus course in terms of depth of coverage and time commitments for study. The content is organized to emphasize major topics which include the following: (1) functions, graphs, and limits; (2) derivatives, and (3) integrals. These topics are detailed in the AP Calculus AB course description, which is available at AP Central. Course Title: AP Calculus BC Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. AP Calculus BC is a college-level course that differs from a high school calculus course in terms of depth of coverage and time commitments for study. The content is organized to emphasize major topics, which include the following: (1) functions, graphs, and limits, (2) derivatives, (3) integrals, and (4) polynomial approximations and series. These topics are detailed in the AP Calculus BC course description, which is available at AP Central (http://apcentral.collegeboard.com). AP Calculus BC is an extension of AP Calculus AB, and provides the equivalent of a second course in a college calculus sequence. Course Title: AP Statistics Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. AP Statistics is a college-level course which differs from a high school statistics course in terms of depth of coverage and time commitments for study. The content is organized to emphasize major topics which include the following: (1) data investigation, (2) designing and conducting studies, (3) anticipating patterns using probability and simulations, and (4) statistical inference. These topics are detailed in the AP Statistics course description, which is available at AP Central (http://apcentral.collegeboard.com).

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Course Title: AP Computer Science A Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The course description for the advanced placement courses published by College Board is to be used for the course. Computer Science A emphasizes programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester college course in Computer Science. It also includes the study of data structures and abstraction. A large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs or parts of programs that correctly solve a given problem. The course also emphasizes the design issues that make programs understandable, adaptable, and, when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the development of useful computer programs and program modules is used as a context for introducing other important concepts in computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, and the study of standard algorithms and typical applications. In addition, an understanding of the basic hardware and software components of computer systems and the responsible use of these systems are integral parts of the course. Students are expected to take the AP exam. Course Title: Algebra I Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to develop the algebraic concepts and processes that can be used to solve a variety of real-world and mathematical problems. Course Title: Algebra I Honors Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to develop the algebraic concepts and processes that can be used to solve a variety of real-world and mathematical problems. Course Title: Algebra II Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to continue the study of algebra and to provide the foundation for applying algebraic skills to other mathematical and scientific fields. Course Title: Algebra II Honors Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to continue the study of algebra and to provide the foundation for applying algebraic skills to other mathematical and scientific fields. Course Title: Pre-Calculus Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop concepts and skills in advanced algebra, analytic geometry, and trigonometry. Course Title: Geometry Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to develop the geometric relationships and deductive strategies that can be used to solve a variety of real world and mathematical problems. Course Title: Geometry Honors Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to develop the geometric relationships and deductive strategies that can be used to solve a variety of real world and mathematical problems.

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Science Students are required to complete 3 years of science for graduation. After completion of requirements, students are encouraged to take physics and at least one A.P. class to better prepare them for college. Through the electives, the department offers a broader study of the human body in Anatomy and Physiology, the relationship of living things to each other in Environmental Science and the study of plants/animals in the ocean in Marine Science. All science courses are designed to promote a sense of inquiry through laboratory experiences and to develop critical thinking skills. Course Title: AP Biology Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The AP Biology course is designed to enable you to develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. The result will be readiness for the study of advanced topics in subsequent college courses — a goal of every AP course. This AP Biology course is equivalent to a two-semester college introductory biology course and has been endorsed enthusiastically by higher education officials. Course Title: AP Chemistry Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This course is an authorized APŽ college equivalency chemistry course designed to be the equivalent of a general chemistry course taken during the first year of college. AP Chemistry provides an orderly development of the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry. Topics of study include: the structure of matter, states of matter, reactions (acid-base, precipitation, oxidation-reduction, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, and descriptive chemistry. Laboratory work is an important component of this course. Technology including graphing calculators, probe ware, graphing and data analysis software and chemistry apparatus is used throughout this course. This course is represented as a second year chemistry course in high school and is set up to be similar to a college level, yearlong introductory level general chemistry course. The course requires a working knowledge of chemistry and second-year algebra. The pace and depth of the material covered in AP Chemistry exceeds the standard high school chemistry course. The college-level textbook, laboratory work, and time and effort required of students illustrate this higher level of learning. Students are expected to take the AP Chemistry Exam at the end of this course. Course Title: AP Environmental Science Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college course in environmental science. Environmental science is an interdisciplinary course that embraces a wide variety of topics structured around unifying themes in science. These themes in AP Environmental Science are detailed in the AP Environmental Science course description, which is available on AP Central (http://apcentral.collegeboard.com).

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Course Title: AP Physics B Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content AP Physics B is an accelerated course in college level, non-calculus based physics. This course is intended to prepare students to take and succeed at the Physics B Advanced Placement examination, published by the College Entrance Examination Board. Completion of this course (accompanied by a high AP exam score) may enable students to receive credit for or exemption from an introductory non-calculus-based Physics course at some colleges and universities. Course Title: AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The Physics C course is a college-level course which differs from a high school Physics course in terms of depth of coverage, the type of laboratory work and time commitments for study. The subject matter of the Physics C course is principally mechanics, and electricity and magnetism, with approximately equal emphasis on these two areas. The sequence is more intensive and analytic than that in the B course. Strong emphasis is placed on solving a variety of challenging problems requiring algebra and trigonometry, and concepts of calculus. Topics in Physics C are detailed in the Physics C course description, which is available on AP Central (http://apcentral.collegeboard.com). Course Title: AP Physics C: Mechanics Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content Topics will include but not be limited to: (a) mechanics-kinetics, Newton’s Laws of Motion, work, energy, power, systems of particles, statics, rotational motion, and oscillations gravitation, Laboratory activities that include the use of the scientific method, measurement, laboratory apparatus, and safety are an integral part of this course. Course Title: AP Physics 1 Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content Students explore principles of Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. The course is based on six Big Ideas, which encompass core scientific principles, theories, and processes that cut across traditional boundaries and provide a broad way of thinking about the physical world. Course Title: AP Physics 2 Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content Students explore principles of fluids, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, optics, and topics in modern physics. The course is based on seven Big Ideas, which encompass core scientific principles, theories, and processes that cut across traditional boundaries and provide a broad way of thinking about the physical world. Course Title: Biology I Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to provide exploratory experiences and laboratory and real-life applications in the biological sciences. Course Title: Biology I Honors Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to provide exploratory experiences and laboratory and real-life applications in the biological sciences.

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Course Title: Earth/Space Science Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to develop and apply concepts basic to the Earth, its materials, processes, history, and environment in space. Course Title: Integrated Science I Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This purpose of this course is to provide opportunities to investigate the theories and ideas associated with the biological, earth, and physical sciences in a way that is relevant and usable. Students construct science knowledge by formulating questions, making predictions, planning experiments, making observations, classifying, interpreting and analyzing data, drawing conclusions, and communicating. Course Title: Integrated Science I Honors Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This purpose of this course is to provide opportunities to investigate the theories and ideas associated with the biological, earth, and physical sciences in a way that is relevant and usable. Students construct science knowledge by formulating questions, making predictions, planning experiments, making observations, classifying, interpreting and analyzing data, drawing conclusions, and communicating. Course Title: Integrated Science III Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This purpose of this course is to provide opportunities to investigate the theories and ideas associated with the biological, earth, and physical sciences in a way that is relevant and usable. Students construct science knowledge by formulating questions, making predictions, planning experiments, making observations, classifying, interpreting and analyzing data, drawing conclusions, and communicating. Course Title: Marine Science II Honors Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to continue an in-depth study of the marine environment. Course Title: Physical Science Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities to study the concepts of matter, energy, and forces, and their applications through exploratory investigations and activities. Course Title: Chemistry I Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to study the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter and their applications. Course Title: Chemistry I Honors Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to study the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter, and their applications. Course Title: Physics I Honors Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities to study the concepts, theories, and laws governing the interaction of matter, energy, and forces, and their applications through exploratory investigations and activities.

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Social Studies Social Studies courses help prepare students to be knowledgeable, responsible, and active citizens of the community, nation and the world. Students are required to successfully complete three credits in Social Studies for graduation. Ninth grade students are required to take World History. American History is taken in the eleventh grade. American Government and Economics are two semester courses which are required for twelfth grade students. All three courses fulfill the requirements for the Florida Academic Scholars Certificate and for admission to the Florida state university system. Elective courses are available for those students who wish to specialize in a particular field or area of study. Course Title: Advanced Placement US History Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content Students understand the development of the United States within the context of history by examining connections to the past to prepare for the future as participating members of a democratic society. Students use knowledge pertaining to history, geography, economics, political processes, religion, ethics, diverse cultures and humanities to solve problems in academic, civic, social and employment settings. Will meet graduation requirement for United States History. Course Title: Advanced Placement Microeconomics Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content In order for students to acquire the knowledge and decision-making tools necessary for understanding how society must organize its limited resources to satisfy its unlimited wants, students learn factors that influence the economic system. Will meet graduation requirement for Economics. Course Title: Advanced Placement Macroeconomics Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content Students understand the choices they must make as producers, consumers, investors, and tax payers. The study of economics provides students with the knowledge and decision-making tools necessary for understanding how a society must organize its limited resources to satisfy its unlimited wants. Will meet graduation requirement for Economics. Course Title: Advanced Placement Human Geography Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop higher levels of concepts and skills related to Human Geography. Course Title: Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content Students acquire a critical perspective of politics and government in the United States. They learn general concepts used to interpret American politics and analyze specific case studies. Students also become familiar with the various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute the American political perspective. Will meet graduation requirement for American Government.

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Course Title: Advanced Placement World History Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content Students understand the development of Europe within the context of history by examining connections to the past in order to prepare for the future as participating members of a global community. Students use knowledge pertaining to history, geography, economics, political processes, religion, ethics, diverse cultures and humanities to solve problems in academic, civic, social and employment settings. Will meet graduation requirement for World History Course Title: AP Comparative Government and Politics Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The AP course in Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes. Comparison assists both in identifying problems and in analyzing policymaking. For example, we only know that a country has a high population growth rate or serious corruption when we compare it to other countries. Careful comparison of political systems produces useful knowledge about the institutions and policies countries have employed to address problems, or, indeed, what they have done to make things worse. We can compare the effectiveness of policy approaches to poverty or overpopulation by examining how different countries solve similar problems. Furthermore, by comparing the political institutions and practices of wealthy and poor countries, we can begin to understand the political consequences of economic well-being. Finally, comparison assists explanation. Why are some countries stable democracies and not others? Why do many democracies have prime ministers instead of presidents? In addition to covering the major concepts that are used to organize and interpret what we know about political phenomena and relationships, the course should cover specific countries and their governments. Six countries form the core of the AP Comparative Government and Politics course: China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia.1 By using these six countries, the course can move the discussion of concepts from abstract definition to concrete example, noting that not all concepts will be equally useful in all country settings. Course Title: AP European History Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of AP European History are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) an ability to express historical understanding in writing.

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Course Title: AP Psychology Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content AP Psychology is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. This course is targeted to students who wish to complete studies in secondary school equivalent to an introductory college course in psychology; the learning experience emphasizes development of an understanding of psychology as the science and critical evaluation of "common sense" knowledge about how people function. Instructional activities include direct instruction, demonstrations, class discussions, peer collaborations, simulations and hands-on experiments. The course study includes a balance between classic and current research. Students are expected to take the AP exam at the end of this course. Course Title: American History Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand the development of the United States within the context of history with a major focus on the postReconstruction period. Students will use knowledge pertaining to history, geography, economics, political processes, religion, ethics, diverse cultures, and humanities to solve problems in academic, civic, social, and employment settings. Will meet graduation requirement for American History. Course Title: American History Honors Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand the development of the United States within the context of history with a major focus on the postReconstruction period. Students will use knowledge pertaining to history, geography, economics, political processes, religion, ethics, diverse cultures, and humanities to solve problems in academic, civic, social, and employment settings. Will meet graduation requirement for American History. Course Title: Economics Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and decision-making tools necessary for understanding how society organizes its limited resources to satisfy its wants. Students will gain understanding of choices they must make as producers, consumers, investors, and taxpayers. Will meet graduation requirement for Economics. Course Title: Economics Honors Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and decision-making tools necessary for understanding how society organizes its limited resources to satisfy its wants. Students will gain understanding of choices they must make as producers, consumers, investors, and taxpayers. Will meet graduation requirement for Economics

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Course Title: World Cultural Geography Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content Students develop multicultural understanding and use geographical concepts and skills to acquire information and systematically apply decision making processes to real-life situations. They will acquire an understanding of interrelation-ships between people and their environment. Course Title: Voluntary School/Com Service Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content Students are engaged in activities that help them develop an appreciation for the concept of service to the school or community. In this issues approach, students are expected to examine topics, make informed judgments and apply problem-solving skills within a context of how they might best serve a local school or community. Teachers are challenged to encourage students to plan for the future and to act in the present. Course Title: American Government Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to gain an understanding of American government and political behavior that is essential for effective citizenship and active involvement in a democratic American society. Will meet graduation requirement for American Government. Course Title: American Government Honors Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to gain an understanding of American government and political behavior that is essential for effective citizenship and active involvement in a democratic American society. Will meet graduation requirement for American Government. Course Title: World History Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand their connections to the development of civilizations by examining the past to prepare for their future as participating members of a global community. Students will use knowledge pertaining to history, geography, economics, political processes, religion, ethics, diverse cultures, and humanities to solve problems in academic, civic, social, and employment settings. Course Title: World History Honors Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand their connections to the development of civilizations by examining the past to prepare for their future as participating members of a global community. Students will use knowledge pertaining to history, geography, economics, political processes, religion, ethics, diverse cultures, and humanities to solve problems in academic, civic, social, and employment settings. Course Title: Leadership Skills Development Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to teach leadership skills, parliamentary procedure, problem solving, decision making, communication skills, group dynamics, time and stress management, public speaking, human relations, public relations, team building, and other group processes.

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World Languages It is imperative to master more than one language. Major universities and colleges require foreign language for admission. In order to receive a scholarship to a university in the state of Florida system or receive a Bright Futures scholarship, a student must complete two (2) years of foreign language as part of his/her curriculum. Today’s workforce demands and rewards multilingualism more than ever before. Foreign language students score higher in reading achievement, vocabulary, cognitive learning and total reading ability. Courses in foreign language as follows:

Course Title: French I Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to begin to acquire proficiency in French through a linguistic, communicative, and cultural approach to language learning. Emphasis is placed on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and on acquisition of the fundamentals of applied grammar. Cross cultural understanding is fostered and real-life applications are emphasized throughout the course. Will meet the graduation requirement for foreign language. Course Title: French II Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to enhance proficiency in French through a linguistic, communicative, and cultural approach to language learning. There is continued emphasis on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and on acquisition of the fundamentals of applied grammar. Cross-cultural understanding is fostered and real-life applications are emphasized throughout the course. Will meet the graduation requirement for foreign language. Course Title: Spanish I Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to begin to acquire proficiency in Spanish through a linguistic, communicative, and cultural approach to language learning. Emphasis is placed on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and on acquisition of the fundamentals of applied grammar. Cross cultural understanding is fostered and real-life applications are emphasized throughout the course. Will meet the graduation requirement for foreign language.

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Course Title: Spanish II Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to enhance proficiency in Spanish through a linguistic, communicative, and cultural approach to language learning. There is continued emphasis on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and on acquisition of the fundamentals of applied grammar. Cross cultural understanding is fostered and real-life applications are emphasized throughout the course. Course Title: Advanced Placement - Spanish Literature Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content AP Spanish Literature is equivalent to fifth and sixth semester college work (3rd year college). This course exposes students to diverse Spanish etched literature and prepares students to reflect on the varied voices, cultures, traditions, mores, social-political conditions, attainment and decline of power and nobility, and religion inherent in Hispanic life as represented in its literary world. The course uses authentic resources along with required authentic Hispanic literature. Course Title: Advanced Placement-Spanish Language Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content AP Spanish Language is equivalent to fifth and sixth semester college work (3rd year college) such as found in university level Spanish Composition and Conversation courses. The 5 domains of learning (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities) involve the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and developing cultural awareness appropriate to this level of coursework. The academic rigor for this course is high. Authentic materials are used in addition to the required text. Course Title: Advanced Placement Chinese Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The AP Chinese Language and Culture course is designed to be comparable to fourth semester (or the equivalent) college/university courses in Mandarin Chinese, or the point at which students would typically complete about 250 hours of collegelevel instruction. The course prepares you to demonstrate your level of Chinese proficiency across the three communicative modes (Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational) and the five goal areas (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities) as outlined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. The course aims to provide you with many opportunities to further develop your proficiency across the full range of language skills while learning about Chinese culture and society. Course Title: Advanced Placement French Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The AP French Literature course is designed to introduce students who have advanced language skills to the formal study of a representative body of literary texts in French. Gain proficiency in the fundamental language skills that enable them to Read and understand prose and verse of moderate difficulty and mature content; Formulate and express critical opinions and judgments in correct oral and written French; Develop the ability to read and analyze critically and to discuss perceptively representative works of French literature. The program is not to be construed as a formal survey of literary history but rather as an introduction to representative works of prose, poetry, and drama from different periods. Students should, however, be aware of the cultural context of the works read. They should also acquire the basic concepts and terminology of textual analysis.

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Course Title: Advanced Placement German Language and Culture Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content AP German Language is equivalent to a 3rd year college German language course. The 5 domains of learning (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities) involve the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and developing cultural awareness. The analysis and examination of authentic literary texts is part of this course. Authentic materials and resources are used along with the required text. Course Title: Advanced Placement Latin Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This AP Latin course is designed to give students the experiences needed to be successful on the College Board AP Latin exam. The course’s goals are to develop the students’ abilities to translate the required passages from Caesar’s De Bello Gallico and Vergil’s Aeneid into English as literally as possible, to help them understand the context of the written passages (including the political, historical, literary, and cultural background of each author and text), and to help them understand the reasons behind the particular style of writing and the rhetorical devices employed. The course should also help students to be successful in analyzing Latin passages to understand how and why the author uses the language in a particular way and the effects he is hoping to produce. Students will learn to analyze the text and draw their own logical conclusions. This course should give students tools to read Latin prose and poetry aloud and with accurate comprehension and appreciation. For the Vergil text, students will learn dactylic hexameter and how it is used to enhance the text and create effect, and students will scan and read the poetry at least once a week. Course Title: Advanced Placement Italian Language and Culture Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The AP Italian Language and Culture course is designed to promote proficiency in Italian and to enable you to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts. This course focuses on communication. Students will demonstrate their skills and abilities in the Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational modes of communication. The course encourages cultural awareness: Students will develop an understanding and appreciation of various aspects of the cultures of the Italian-speaking world including cultural products such as television and film, books, newspapers, music, laws, and institutions; Cultural practices such as customs, traditions, and patterns of interactions and cultural perspectives such as values, attitudes, and beliefs

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Music & Performing Arts All students are required to take 0.5 credits (one semester) of fine arts to meet the state requirements for graduation. Introductory courses are available as well as advanced courses for students who wish to specialize in a specific medium of expression. Most fine arts courses are one full credit. The following courses are available: Course Title: Advanced Placement Music Theory Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to develop the student’s ability to recognize and understand the basic materials and processes in any music that is heard or read in score. Course Title: String Ensemble Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The string ensemble course is designed to acquaint students with beginning to advanced instrumental music skills which include, but are not limited to, the following content: beginning to intermediate level sight-reading skills; discrimination of pitch; absolute essentials for playing in tune; inter-mediate rhythm concepts and patterns; technique for achieving the essentials of unit, balance, and contract in performing instrumental music; study of all major and minor scales; performance of a variety of good musical repertoire; and listening skills development. Course Title: Jazz Ensemble Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop basic skills in jazz performance through knowledge of styles and performance techniques of varied jazz and contemporary literature. Will meet graduation requirement for Performing Fine Arts. Course Title: Vocal Ensemble Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop proficient performance techniques in a small ensemble setting through the study of varied high school choral literature. Emphasis will be placed on vocal independence, expressiveness, and stylistic authenticity. Will meet graduation requirement for Performing Fine Arts. Course Title: Vocal Ensemble IV Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop advanced performance techniques in a small ensemble setting through the study of varied high school choral literature. Emphasis will be placed on vocal independence, expressiveness, and stylistic authenticity. Will meet graduation requirement for Performing Fine Arts

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Health & Personal Fitness The physical education curriculum is designed to develop an appreciation for and understanding of specific forms of physical activity. Most of the instructional time in the physical education courses is devoted to skill development. Participatory activities, demonstrations, and lectures are all a part of the physical education curriculum. All students are required to complete one semester each of personal fitness and life management skills for graduation. Individual and Dual Sports exposes students to lifetime activities such as tennis, golf, bowling and badminton. The Physical Education / Athletic Coaching Matrix are emphasized. Understanding the principles for fitness and the rules and strategies to developing a sound body and mind are fundamental to this discipline Course Title: Health I - Life Management Skills Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to develop and enhance critical life management skills necessary to make sound decisions and take positive actions for healthy and effective living. Will meet graduation requirement for Life Management Skills. Course Title: Personal Fitness Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to (a) acquire knowledge of physical fitness concepts (b) understand the influence of lifestyle on health and fitness, and (c) begin to develop an optimal level of fitness. Will meet graduation requirements for Physical Education Course Title: Individual and Dual Sports I Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop knowledge and skills in specified individual and dual sports and to maintain or improve health-related fitness. Will meet graduation requirements for Physical Education. Course Title: Team Sports I Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to acquire basic knowledge of team sports play, develop skills in specified team sports, and maintain or improve health-related fitness. Will meet graduation requirements for Physical Education. SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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Course Title: Team Sports II Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop knowledge of team sports play, develop skills in specified team sports, and maintain or improve healthrelated fitness. Will meet graduation requirements for Physical Education. Course Title: HOPE - Physical Education Variation Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content. The purpose of this course is to develop and enhance healthy behaviors that influence lifestyle choices and student health and fitness. Will meet graduation requirement for Physical Education with the integration of health topics.

Art Course Title: AP Art Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the appreciation of works of art, the intelligent examination of works of art, and to the major forms of artistic expression in Western art from 1400 to the present. The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: survey of Western art from 1400 to the present, other artistic traditions that have influenced Western art during the period of study (e.g. Far Eastern, African, pre-Columbian), problems and topics in the study of art, the relationship of form and meaning in art, the relationship of art to its historical context. Course Title: Advanced Placement Studio Art Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This Advanced Placement course is intended to address a very broad interpretation of two-dimensional (2-D) design issues. This type of design involves purposeful decision making about how to use the elements and principles of art in an integrative way. It is for the advanced student who wished to seek AP credit through submitting a Portfolio of work for consideration by the College Board. The content should include, but not be limited to the following: advanced study of the elements of design (line, shape, illusion of space, illusion of motion, pattern, texture, value, and color), advanced study of the principles of design including unity/variety, balance, emphasis, rhythm, and proportion/scale development of proficiency in a variety of 2-D forms including but not limited to graphic design, typography, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, illustration, painting, and printmaking, advanced study of approaches to representation, abstraction, and expression development of rationale and criteria for inclusion of works of art in an Advanced Placement Portfolio. Course Title: Art/2-D and 3-D Comprehensive Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to communicate ideas and concepts through advanced two- and three-dimensional design and composition, and develop appreciation of exemplars in varied cultures and historical periods. Will meet graduation requirement for Performing Fine Arts.

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Course Title: Computer Graphics Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop basic knowledge of computer graphic systems and to produce computer-generated images by applying the elements of art and principles of design. Will meet graduation requirement for Performing Fine Arts.

Culinary Arts Course Title: Culinary Operations I Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This course was developed as part of a three-credit core. Students will develop competence in understanding the history of the food service industry and identifying careers in that industry; following directions and applying math skills; using communication skills; demonstration of basic food handling techniques; basic safety procedures; demonstration of basic employability skills (punctuality, appearance, etiquette); identification of the elements of a successful food service operation; identification and use of commercial tools and equipment; basic concepts of food science; following standard recipes; basic nutrition information (nutrients, labels); identification of front and back-of-the-house duties; and participation in introductory food preparation labs. Course Title: Culinary Operations II Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This course was developed as part of a three-credit core. Students will develop competence in understanding duties and responsibilities in the hospitality industry and ways to achieve job advancement; understanding technical materials; working in a culturally diverse workplace; critical thinking and problem solving; knowledge of federal, state and local sanitation/safety codes; time management; inventory control; advanced principles of food science (fermentation, leavening agents, emulsion, acids/bases, starches); following and modifying recipes; using nutrition skills to evaluate menus; performing front-of-the-house duties (greeting and escorting guests, transporting and serving meals, carrying trays); performing back-of-the-house duties (receiving and storing food supplies); and participation in food preparation labs appropriate for this skill level. Course Title: Culinary Operations III Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This course was developed as part of a three-credit core. Students will develop competence in entrepreneurship; career trends in the food service industry; professional associations in the industry; computer literacy; leadership; community service; practicing profitable procedures; obtaining the Safe Staff food handler certification; practicing environmentally sound procedures; additional principles of food science (function of sugar, types of cooking methods, the chemistry of protein, categories and functions of lipids); following and modifying recipes; restaurant industry trends; merchandising techniques; SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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participation in food preparation labs appropriate for this skill level; and food presentation and display techniques. Course Title: Culinary Operations IV Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This course was developed for students to develop competence in career advancement opportunities; food identification, selection and purchasing; advanced cooking and baking skills; communication skills; math skills; scientific principles of cooking and baking and quality standards of food preparation and presentation.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS & MARKETING

BUSINESS AND MARKETING Course Title: Entrepreneurship Certification College Credit: 12.0 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this program is to teach students the fundamentals of starting and operating a business venture while presenting entrepreneurship as a viable career option. Coursework covers opportunity recognition, business planning, cash flow and financial management, market research, e-commerce and how to understand and work with an accounting system. Entrepreneurship education is a necessity in Florida as it prepares Florida for the new global economy by increasing the capacity for the creation of new firms, one of the key features to an adaptive economy. Course Title: International Marketing SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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Major Concepts/Content. This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in the Marketing, Sales & Service career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competencybased applied learning that contributes to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, technical skills, and occupation-specific skills, and knowledge of all aspects of the Marketing, Sales & Service career cluster. Course Title: E-Commerce Marketing Credit: 3 Major Concepts/Content. This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in the Marketing, Sales & Service career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competencybased applied learning. The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment or advanced training in the E-Commerce Marketing Industry. The content includes, but is not limited to, employability skills; selling techniques; public relations and publicity; event planning and execution; and licensing, sponsorship, and endorsements. Course Title: Customer Service Technology - ATD College Credit: 18 Major Concepts/Content ATD (Applied Technology Diploma) The purpose of this program is to prepare students for entry-level employment in customer service occupations such as customer services representative (SOC 43-4051), customer services advisor, public relations specialists (information and advice), customer conveniences consultant (service desk, telephones, waiting rooms, etc), and all other service sales occupations. The program is designed to prepare students for employment in the specialists positions involving customer service activities in all industry areas of marketing and in all institutions of marketing (retail, wholesale, services) or to provide supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in these occupations. The content includes selling, sales promotion and research of offerings and Activities considered "value added" or "product support" services. (Note: The "value added" or product support" approach to the instruction of customer services is used to distinguish the content from "service marketing" whereby the nature of products are intangible as contrasted with tangible goods or merchandise.) Course Title: Marketing Management Credit: 1 Major Concepts/Content This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in the Marketing, Sales and Service career cluster. The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment in organizations and businesses for or not for profit as marketing, advertising, and public relations managers, or to provide supplemental training for persons previously or current employed in these activities. The content includes management of sales, merchandise, transportation, storage, promotion, operations, finance, personnel, market research, and components of marketing strategy.

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TECHNOLOGY Course Title: Applied Cybersecurity Credit: 5 Major Concepts/Content This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and cybersecurity-related careers in the Information Technology career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competency-based applied learning that contributes to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, technical skills, and occupation-specific skills, and knowledge of all aspects of cybersecurity. The content includes but is not limited to foundational knowledge and skills in computer and network security, security vulnerabilities, attack mechanisms and techniques, intrusion detection and prevention, cryptographic systems, system hardening, risk identification, incidence response, penetration testing, key management, access control, and recovery. Specialized courses focus on database security, planning and analysis, software, and web security. Course Title: Database and Programming Essentials Credit: 4 Major Concepts/Content This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and entry-level database and internet/web related careers in the Information Technology career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competency-based applied learning that contributes to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, and technical skills related to database and Internet technologies skills using the latest industry tools. This curriculum is project-based and modeled after the Oracle Academy. Course Title: Digital Design Credit: 8 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment in digital publishing positions, such as Information Technology Assistants, Production Assistants, Digital Assistant Designers, Graphic Designers, and Multi-Media Designers. This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in the Arts, A/V Technology and Communication career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competency-based applied SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015 Page | 67


learning that contributes to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problemsolving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, technical skills, and occupationspecific skills, and knowledge of all aspects of the Arts, A/V Technology and Communication career cluster. The content includes but is not limited to enhanced practical experiences in computer generated art and text, graphic design, graphic production, electronic design skills, preparation of electronic layouts and illustrations, and electronic scanning; and development of specialized skills in multimedia presentations. Course Title: Game/Simulation/Animation Programming Credit: 4.0 Major Concepts/Content This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers such as a Game/Simulation Designer, Game Programmer, and Game Software Developer in the Information Technology career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competency-based applied learning that contributes to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills. The content includes but is not limited to practical experiences in game/simulation conceptualization, design, storyboarding, development methodologies, essential programming techniques, and implementation issues. Specialized programming skills involving advanced mathematical calculations and physics are also integrated into the curriculum. Course Title: Web Design I Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This course is designed to provide a basic overview of the Internet, Intranet. The content includes operating systems; basic HTML commands; navigation of the Internet, Intranet, and Web; and Web page design. After successful completion of Web Design 1 and 2, students will have met Occupational Completion Point Course Title: Web Design II Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This course provides advanced concepts for Internet, Intranet, and Web design. The content includes Internet/Intranet tools, Web site promotion, advanced HTML commands, advanced page design, and multimedia applications. After successful completion of Web Design 1 and 2, students will have met Occupational Completion Point. Course Title: PC Support I Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content This course continues the development of basic entry-level skills for PC support services. The content includes software applications and operating systems, electronic communication via the Internet, and an introduction to computer networking. After successful completion of PC Support 1 and 2, students will have met Occupational Completion Point. Course Title: GIS Introduction to GIS Credit: Multiple Major Concepts/Content: This program is designed to prepare students for employment as a GIS Technology Assistant or a GIS Technician. Students are introduced to the concepts of Geospatial/Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) Technology — an organized collection of computer hardware, specialized software, and geographic data designed to efficiently capture, store, update, manipulate, analyze, and display all forms of SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015

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geographically referenced (spatial) information. Students will research and learn detailed information about global and local matters related to political, environmental, commercial, and other areas, through the use of specialized geospatial tools and products.

PRE-LAW ACADEMY

Course Title: Law Studies Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content Major concepts/concerns: Students learn that the American legal system is the foundation of American society. In order to function effectively, students examine those laws which have an impact on citizen’s lives and are provided with an introduction to fundamental civil and criminal justice procedures. Course Title: Legal Systems and Concepts Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content Students learn that the American legal system is the foundation of American society. They examine the American legal system and the nature of specific rights granted under the United States Constitution. Course Title: Court Procedures Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content Students develop their ability to function effectively in society by understanding the judicial systems of the United States and Florida. Course Title: Court Procedures Intern Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content Students develop an understanding of the legal system and court procedures and are provided an opportunity to participate in the judicial process. Course Title: Forensic Science Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content Forensic Science is a one-semester introductory class for students who have completed or are currently taking Chemistry and Biology. This course uses an SAEA CURRICULUM GUIDE 2014-2015 Page | 69


interdisciplinary approach, focusing on practical real-life connections. Forensic Science is designed around authentic performance assessments, with students working in teams to solve crimes using scientific knowledge and reasoning. It involves all areas of science, including biology, anatomy, and chemistry, physics, and earth science, with an emphasis on reasoning and critical thinking. In addition, students incorporate the use of technology, communication skills, language arts, art, mathematics, Social Studies and criminology. Tests/quizzes, homework, laboratory work and projects assess the progress of students in this class. Course Title: Speech Honors Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to provide instruction in the fundamentals of formal and informal oral communication. The content includes, but is not limited to, the forms of oral communication, techniques of group discussion, techniques of effective listening, analysis of audience, and techniques of public speaking. Course Title: Debate Honors Credit: 0.5 Major Concepts/Content The purpose of this course is to provide instruction in the fundamentals of argumentation and problem solving. The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: logical thinking, organization of facts, speaking skills, research skills related to debate topics, and participation in frequent debate situations. Course Title: Journalism Honors (Yearbook) Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The content of this course includes, but is not limited to, the following: training necessary for successful news gathering for journalistic media, practice in gathering information, practice in writing news, sports, feature articles, and editorials, and exploration of career opportunities in journalistic fields through various media. Practice in the preparation of materials for publication in journalistic media should occur within a workshop setting. The required selling of ads is part of the business aspect of the curriculum. Course Title: Journalism Honors (Newspaper) Credit: 1.0 Major Concepts/Content The content of this course includes, but is not limited to, the following: training necessary for successful news gathering for journalistic media, practice in gathering information, practice in writing news, sports, feature articles, and editorials, and exploration of career opportunities in journalistic fields through various media. Practice in the preparation of materials for publication in journalistic media should occur within a workshop setting. The required selling of ads is part of the business aspect of the curriculum.

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NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY St. Andrew's Episcopal Academy adheres to a policy of non- discrimination in educational programs/activities and employment and strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all as required by: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, or natural origin. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - as amended – prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. Title IX of the Educational Amendment of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex. Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) – as amended prohibits discrimination on the basis of age with respect to individuals who are at least 40. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 - prohibits discrimination against the handicapped. Florida Education Equity Act - prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, sex, national origin, marital status, or handicap against a student or employee. Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) - prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in employment, public service, public accommodations, and telecommunications. Veterans are provided re-employment rights in accordance with P.L. 93-508 Federal) and Section 295.07, Florida Statues, which also stipulates categorical preferences for employment.

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St. Andrew's Episcopal Academy Curriculum Guide 2014-2015  
St. Andrew's Episcopal Academy Curriculum Guide 2014-2015  
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