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ST SPYRIDON COLLEGE Annual Report 2009

Educational & Financial Reporting

To The NSW Board of Studies

June 2010


My School was a source of strength and of self improvement these past 13 years and I will never forget it. It empowered me, nourished me, befriended me and gave me a second home. My School provided me with a voyage into an unparalleled domain of spiritual and cognitive illumination and became a beacon of communal altruism. My School gave me boundless chords of memories, which I hold dear to me for as long as I live. Christopher Stasos College Captain, College Dux 2009

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Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009


Mission Statement “We promote educational excellence within a caring environment�

At St. Spyridon College we aim to educate our students to take their place in a rapidly changing world with confidence and success.

We endeavour to develop the whole person- strong in mind, healthy in body, endowed with love, faith and compassion, able to make a conscious and positive contribution to the well being of our Australian community.

In this process we strive to provide them with the firm foundations of the Greek Orthodox Faith and Hellenic Ideals.

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THE SEVEN STRATEGIC GOALS 2007 – 2011 Goal One:

Our students will experience a dynamic, exciting learning culture that is firmly focused on the future.

Goal Two:

Our students’ social, physical and spiritual well being will play a major part in everything we do.

Goal Three:

We will initiate exemplary programs in Student Leadership, Community Action and Global Connections.

Goal Four:

We will actively foster students’ appreciation of the beautiful things in life; art, music, literature, drama.

Goal Five:

We will continue to support every initiative possible to further enrich our educators’ knowledge and practice of their profession and their continuing commitment to it.

Goal Six:

We will reach out to the community and ensure the financial future of our College is secure.

Goal Seven:

We will add the new buildings necessary to support our continuing pursuit of excellence across all fronts.

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Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009


Educational and Financial Reporting Policy Statement St Spyridon College will meet the educational and financial reporting requirements as laid out in the Registered and Accredited Individual non-Government Schools (NSW) manual. The College will maintain the relevant data and will comply with reporting requirements of the New South Wales Minister for Education, Science and Training. This reporting will include public disclosure on the school’s website of the educational and financial performance measures and policies of the school by the 30th June of the following year.

Procedures for Preparation of Annual Reports The Head of College with the Executive Team is responsible for co-ordinating the final preparation and distribution of the annual report to the Board of Studies and other stakeholders including parents and the community as required. The Parish President, with the Parish Executive Officer is responsible for the section on Financial Reporting. The Head of College will establish and chair the St. Spyridon College Educational and Financial Reporting Committee. Its Terms of Reference will include: •

Identification of appropriate staff members who will be responsible for the collection, analysis and storage of relevant data for each reporting area and for providing the relevant information to the coordinator for inclusion in the report

Determination of the specific content to be included in each section of the report and reviewing this each year to ensure ongoing compliance, relevance and usefulness

Preparation of the report in an appropriate form to send to the Board of Studies

Setting the annual schedule for: o Delivery of information for each reporting area to the Head of College o Preparation of the report and presentation to the College Board of Governors o

Preparation and Publication of the Report

o

Distribution of the report to the Board of Studies and other stakeholders.

Committee Membership: Head of College (Chair) Principal, Senior School Principal, Junior School Enrolments Officer Other Executive staff may be co-opted to support the work of the Committee.

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Requests for additional data from the NSW Minister for Education and Training The Head of College is responsible for coordinating the school’s response to any requests from the Minister for additional data.

The Head of College is responsible for ensuring it is provided to the

Board of Studies in an appropriate electronic form.

DEST Annual Financial Return The Parish Executive Officer is responsible for the collection of the relevant financial data and for ensuring it is provided to DEST in an appropriate form.

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Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009


Contents Educational and Financial Reporting SCHOOL POLICY ON EDUCATION AND FINANCIAL REPORTING Annual Report 2009 SECTION 1:

INTRODUCTION .....................................................................1 A message from the Chairman of the Board of Governors ....................2 A message from our Head of College.............................................3 About our College ...................................................................5

SECTION 2:

OUR STUDENTS .....................................................................9 Student Outcomes in Standardised National and Literacy Numeracy Testing 11 Student Performance in Statewide Tests And Examinations .................13 Senior Secondary Outcomes .......................................................14 Student Attendance ................................................................15 Student Retention of Year 10 to Year 12 ........................................15 Post School Destinations ...........................................................16

SECTION 3:

OUR EDUCATORS ...................................................................19 Professional Learning ...............................................................21 Teacher Standards .................................................................24 Workforce Composition ............................................................24

SECTION 4:

ENROLMENT POLICIES AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE STUDENT BODY .25 Enrolment Policies ..................................................................27 Characteristics of Student Body ..................................................28

SECTION 5:

SCHOOL POLICIES ..................................................................31

SECTION 6:

SCHOOL DETERMINED IMPROVEMENT TARGETS ..............................35 The Seven Strategic Goals .........................................................36 Targets 2009 .........................................................................37 Initiatives Promoting Respect & Responsibility.................................61

SECTION 7:

STUDENT, PARENT AND TEACHER VOICES ....................................64 Student Voices .......................................................................65 Teacher Voices ......................................................................67 Parent Voices ........................................................................68

SECTION 8:

SUMMARY FINANCIAL INFORMATION ...........................................69

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SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION A message from the Chairman of the Board of Governors A message from our Head of College About our College

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Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009


A message from the Chairman of the Board of Governors The 2009 Annual Report is an opportunity to reflect on the progress of our College. We do this by measuring progress against the Seven Strategic Goals of the 2007-2011 Plan and the Annual Targets approved for action by the Board of Governors. Clear direction, significant and sustained work, commitment to quality outcomes, has meant that we can say that we have honourably fulfilled our moral and professional responsibilities to our students and their families; and this gives us the inspiration and energy we need to do better in 2010. I wish to thank the President Dr Thomas Savoulis and Parish Committee and my Board of Governors, who as guardians of the school’s ethos and Mission, spend considerable energy to ensure that the resources needed for our students and teachers are planned for and well executed–including the buildings we need to best conduct the business of teaching and learning. The Board of Governors together with the Parish Committee convenes a number of Working Groups with representation from teachers and parents on key and emerging issues. In 2009, we highlight the work of the Digital Education Revolution ICT Reference Group, and the Master Plan Working Group, as a result of Building Education Revolution funding. I thank the Parish Executive Officer and College Bursar Mrs Christina Tsaconas, together with her staff, for all their hard work and dedication. The Year of 2009, brought unexpected and much welcomed opportunities to accelerate our building program. The Commonwealth Government’s Building Education Revolution meant that Goal 7 of the Strategic Plan- the construction of a purpose built facility for Sports and Performing Arts K-12, could be commenced. In addition, The Senior School quadrangle was transformed by the new Classical Greek colonnade and the construction of a garden. In 2010, the Junior School Campus, in the lead –up to the development of the Master Plan for the renewal of the Infants School site, will have a new facility built in Doran Street, to meet the growing numbers of students in Kindergarten. I congratulate the Head of College Mrs Stefanou-Haag, the Principal Senior School, Mrs Katsogiannis and the Principal Junior School, Mrs Hamer together with their teams, for the exacting standards they set for themselves and for our students. Mr James Phillips Chairman, Board of Governors

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A message from the Head of College In preparing this Message, I wish to acknowledge those who help make this unique institution a place of learning, light and beauty. At the same time we are fully aware, that the effectiveness and efficacy of an educational organisation is only appreciated with the passage of time; just as the tenacity and persistence of a parent, in providing opportunities, boundaries and advice to their child, may not bear fruits until many years later-sometimes, not until the child itself becomes a parent. We commend the whole of the HSC Class of 2009 for their results, and we look forward to following their future progress through life. In particular we congratulate Christopher Stasos College Captain and College Dux 2009 for his outstanding HSC and ATAR results. We wish him every success in his university studies and what will no doubt be a brilliant career. We congratulate Mark Xin, Prefect 2009 who together with Christopher was a Top All Rounder in the HSC. At St Spyridon College, we cultivate academic success, naturally. Which school does not? But our students are “not just taught how best to pass a test” to quote Alexander Vatiliotis. Above all, we have the ambition to contribute powerfully to the development of our students’ whole personalitymind, body and soul. Our ultimate goal is that the young people who enter our Church with pride and zeal-in other words with faith-will create a better world than the one that past generations have put into their hands. We say in our school literature that St Spyridon is about building young lives. Critical contributors to building young lives are the parents and families, who share our values and who work with us for the benefit of their children. The P&F Association of 2009 has been outstanding in raising significant funds for the College. $43,000 was raised last year, for interactive whiteboards and computers. The new interactive whiteboards-starboards in the Infants and Prometheans in the Primary have opened up a world of learning experiences that will assist in preparing our students for a technology driven future. Equally important, is the success of the P&F Committee in its ambassadorial role. In fact seventy of the ninety new families enrolling in 2010, stated “word of mouth” as the single greatest influence on their decision. We thank all parents who support the College by opening doors of opportunities for our students, as visiting speakers with Dr. Dokos; as technology experts–with Mr. Lynch giving us the chance to be Asia-Pacific Champions in the HP Toons competition; with Mr. Lambos coaching our girls’ Basketball; with the business supporters of sports; the people who volunteer for the canteen; and all those who give strength to the teachers’ voices in taking their children’s learning forward. In all schools, it is the teachers who have the central role in ensuring that students learn to know, to do, to be and to live together. St Spyridon teachers present a powerful force of knowledge, expertise, competence and commitment to their chosen career. St Spyridon College once again demonstrated the quality of its literacy and numeracy programs, achieving very good results and significantly above the national average in the NAPLAN tests. Most pleasing for us was that the value added programs we offer, meant that students as a whole made excellent progress in their personal learning journeys from Years 3 to 5 and Years 7 to 9. 3

Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009


At the heart of everything we do, is the Church-and the Blessings and constant vigilance of His Eminence Archbishop Stylianos. Today we salute the Very Reverend Father Steven who completes thirty-five years in the service of God and His people in the Parish of St Spyridon the Wonder-worker. Finally we commend the students of St Spyridon and tomorrow’s Australian Leaders. The Prefects and Peer Supporters; the Sports stars; the Year 6 students, who bring the Kindies to Church for Divine Liturgy, holding their little hands; the Library monitors and members of the Logic Club; the quiet achievers and the dramatic extraverts. Each student, who without any thought of reward or acknowledgement, from an innate goodwill, “Φιλότηµο”, extends friendship and kindness to others. Distinctive to a St Spyridon Student’s character, are the qualities of Integrity and Compassion. This is why in the holidays, fifty students board a bus for Cabramatta at a moment’s notice, to attend the funeral of a beautiful, brave boy, Gera-to be there for his memory and for his mother. This is why our students show such generosity whenever any human person is in trouble. This is why, without pressure from any of us, 500 or so students will line up for Holy Communion at every School Divine Liturgy. Christopher Stasos in his College Captain Address at the 2009 Scholarships and Leadership Assembly spoke about our Student Leadership program-its democratic and holistic focus on creating a culture of enthusiasm and opportunity. And this is true. As adults we do everything in our power to provide a culture of opportunity. Our Scholarships and Awards are exactly that-opportunities to work towards maximising students’ results. We thank everyone who contributed to these in 2009. Indeed we honour all those who in the past and present support the school’s good progress. In closing I wish to stress that it is the students who are our inspiration, our present joy and future hope. It is their enthusiasm and their strength of purpose that breathes life into all our good intentions. And for this, on behalf of all the Community, I congratulate and thank them. Mrs E. Stefanou-Haag Head of College

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About our College St Spyridon College is a co-educational K-12 day school, providing education to some 600 students on two campuses. The College operates within the policies and mandates of the Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) and the Board of Studies New South Wales (BOS NSW). It was established in 1983 by the St Spyridon Community and Parish of South East Sydney, under the auspices of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia. It had its first full complement, K-12, of students in 1993. St Spyridon is the first Greek Orthodox College to be established in New South Wales. St Spyridon students come from 20 different cultural backgrounds, over 40% of whom, live further than 10 kilometres away. International students add to the rich tapestry of backgrounds within our College, with most but not all students coming from the Asian continent. Our Mission is to educate students to take their place in a rapidly changing world with confidence and success, by developing the whole person-strong in mind, healthy in body, endowed with love, faith and compassion, able to make a conscious and positive contribution to the well being of the whole community. Academic performance is strong, as is evident from NAPLAN and HSC results. Over 90% of Year 12 students continue to Tertiary studies.

Education’s Higher Purpose The purpose of schooling is to prepare students to manage futures that, due to rapid technological and social advances, we can neither pre-empt nor predict. At St. Spyridon College, we do this by encouraging students to excel in all that they attempt. We provide an education that is academically rigorous and challenging. We believe that a strong sense of identity and self-worth are the basis for managing the challenges of life with confidence and success. Our pastoral care instils values that inspire our students to make a positive contribution to their school and the wider community. The most distinctive aspect of Hellenic thought is the desire to solve the mysteries of the universe through a logical and innovative search for knowledge. As a Greek Orthodox school, we believe that we have a responsibility to promote the concept of a Thinking School. We give our students every support to fulfil their potential in their Learning Journey K-12. Our programs explicitly address the four pillars of education as identified by the UNESCO International Report on Education for the 21st century, “Learning; the Treasure Within’: Learning to Know; Learning to Do; Learning to Live Together; and Learning to Be. It is these four pillars that in turn support what we believe is the essential platform for a fulfilling life and ultimate purpose of our endeavours here at St. Spyridon College – Learning to Love.

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Students need to have a sense of belonging in order to embark on an “inner voyage” where they develop faith, resilience, sense of purpose and responsibility. In partnership with parents, we endeavour to make their journey both challenging and joyous.

Affiliations and Memberships 1.

Independent Schools Council of Australia (ISCA)

The Independent Schools Council of Australia (ISCA) represents the interests of the independent school sector on a national basis such as in relation to Commonwealth funding and representation on national policy making bodies. Its eight member State and Territory Associations of Independent Schools represent a sector with 1,007 schools and 441,455 full-time equivalent (FTE) students, 13 percent of all school enrolments in Australia. Mrs Stefanou-Haag, Head of College, and Mrs Christina Tsaconas, Parish Executive Officer, are members of this prestigious National Council. 2.

The Association of Independent Schools of New South Wales

(AISNSW)

The AIS is the umbrella organisation which serves the interests of all independent schools in the State. It guards the rights of member schools to expound their particular philosophy and also protects the rights of parents to choose the kind of education they want for their children. The Association renders advice to member schools on all legal and administrative matters related to education, and ensures that our school’s voice is heard on significant issues affecting the education of our students.

3.

Association of Heads of Independent Schools in Australia

(AHISA)

Mrs. Stefanou-Haag, Head of College is a member of AHISA. This is the peak body of Independent Schools Heads in Australia. The N.S.W. Branch meets four times per year. There is no contact between students of AHISA Schools. The Association exists as a means by which Heads may meet for the exchange of information.

4.

Heads of Co-educational Independent Schools

(HICES)

Mrs. Stefanou-Haag, Head of College is a member of HICES. This body provides a medium for providing opportunities for school participation in leadership training and the organisation of such events as athletics, swimming, diving, cross-country, music and special ability events. Mrs. Hamer is a member of HICES Junior Schools. Mrs. Katsogiannis is a member of HICES Senior Schools. Mrs Stefanou is Treasurer of HICES and Member of the Conference 2010 subcommittee.

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5.

Independent Primary Schools Heads Association of Australia

(IPSHA)

Mrs. Hamer, Principal Junior School is a member of IPSHA. This is a forum which avails the Junior School Heads with opportunities to interact at the State and National levels. Benefits for our College include: access to travelling art displays, participation in music festivals, sharing in sporting and cultural activities, and development of professional fellowship. Mrs. Synesios is a member of the IPSHA Deputies Group.

6.

Independent Sporting Association (ISA)

The ISA is strictly a sporting body, made up of the following member schools: Full Member Schools: St. Pius X College

St. Paul’s Grammar

Chevalier College

St. Stanislaus College

Oxley College

Blue Mountains Grammar

SCECGS Redlands

St. Patrick’s College

St. Andrew’s Cathedral School

St. Spyridon College

Central Coast Grammar

St Augustines School

Associate Member Schools: All Saints Bathurst

Barker College

Kinross Wolaroi

Oakhill College

Scots Bathurst

Snowy Mountains Grammar

Weekly competitive games are played on a Saturday.

7.

All Suburbs Independent Schools Sports Association

(ASISSA)

ASSISA is strictly a sporting body that includes Athletics, Swimming and Cross Country Carnivals as well as competitive sport for the Year 6 students.

Member Schools include: Arkana College Emanuel School International Grammar School Macquarie Anglican Grammar School Moriah College Mt Sinai College Redeemer Baptist School St Andrew’s Cathedral School St Mark’s Coptic Orthodox College

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The Junior School The Junior School campus is located in Kingsford. It offers: •

Strong Literacy focus using Spalding Multi-Sensory Language Literacy Programme.

Excellent programmes that promote personal development; study skills; community service; and global connections.

Highly qualified caring teachers committed to excellence.

A rich Co-curricular Programme, offering a variety of competitive and House sports, creative and performing arts and thinking skills development.

Strong Enterprise Education Programme, with a focus on critical thinking, problem-solving interpersonal and team skills.

Prep Middle School programme for Years 5 and 6 preparing students for a successful transition to Senior School.

Qualified and specialist teachers in Gifted and Talented, Physical Education and Sports, Information Technology, Greek Language, Greek Dance, Music, Special Education and Student Welfare Officer.

The Senior School The Senior School is located in Maroubra. It offers: •

Exemplary Academic and Pastoral Care Programmes that promote academic achievement; personal development; student leadership; community service; and global connections.

Unique H.S.C. Academic Elevation programmes. Some of the many initiatives implemented in order to support students to maximize their HSC results include: HSC Winter Academic Elevation Courses; ACER, Dux and University Scholarships; Bursaries; Careers Advisory; and Preparing for Preliminary Courses.

Access to three different learning pathways – School to University; School to TAFE; and School to Work.

Saturday Sporting competition through membership of the Independent Sporting Association (ISA) leading to elite state and National representation.

Co-curricular Programmes, incorporating a variety of House sports, creative and performing arts and thinking skills development.

Specialist facilities including Information and Communication Technology classrooms, Visual and Creative Arts centres, Food Technology and Hospitality facilities.

Highly qualified caring teachers committed to excellence.

Small class sizes.

For further information you may access http://www.myschool.edu.au.

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SECTION 2: ABOUT OUR STUDENTS i.

Student Outcomes in Standardised National and Literacy Numeracy Testing

ii.

Student Performance in Statewide Tests and Examinations

iii. Senior Secondary Outcomes

9

iv.

Student Attendance

v.

Student Retention of Year 10 to Year 12

vi.

Post School Destinations

Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009


HSC 2009 Distinguished Achievers

Year 12 2009

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i.

Student Outcomes in Standardised National and Literacy Numeracy Testing NAPLAN Results 2009

Year 3

Year 5

Year 7

Year 9

Reading

Writing

Spelling

463

471

479

Grammar & Punctuation

493

Numeracy

432

SIM

SIM

SIM

SIM

SIM

428

426

418

432

408

ALL

ALL

ALL

ALL

ALL

411

414

405

420

394

513

521

523

525

497

SIM

SIM

SIM

SIM

SIM

508

497

497

513

499

ALL

ALL

ALL

ALL

ALL

494

485

487

500

487

564

555

588

589

571

SIM

SIM

SIM

SIM

SIM

554

546

549

555

557

ALL

ALL

ALL

ALL

ALL

541

532

540

539

544

598

590

621

615

622

SIM

SIM

SIM

SIM

SIM

595

584

588

590

604

ALL

ALL

ALL

ALL

ALL

580

569

576

574

589

(Source: http://www.myschool.edu.au)

KEY SIM ALL

St Spyridon average Statistically similar schools' average Australian schools' average

Proportion of students in Years 3 and 5 achieving at or above the National Minimum Standard 2009 NAPLAN Test

Literacy (Overall)

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Percentage of students at or above the National minimum standard Year 3 (43 students) Year 5 (40 students) School Statewide School Statewide 100%

98%

100%

96%

Reading

100%

97%

100%

94%

Writing

100%

97%

100%

95%

o

Spelling

100%

97%

98%

95%

o

Grammar & Punctuation

100%

94%

100%

93%

o o

Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009


Numeracy (Overall)

100%

95%

98%

97%

o

Number, P&A

100%

95%

96%

95%

o

Measurement, Data, Space &

100%

94%

100%

95%

Geometry

Year 3: We are very pleased that 100 % of Students in Year 3 achieved at or above the National minimum standard in Literacy. We are very pleased that 100% of Students in Year 3 achieved at or above the National minimum standard in Numeracy. Year 5 We are very pleased that 99% of Students in Year 5 achieved at or above the National minimum standard in Literacy and that as individuals students showed significant growth in their achievement. We are very pleased that 98% of Students in Year 5 achieved at or above the National minimum standard in Numeracy and that as individuals students showed significant growth in their achievement.

Proportion of students in Years 7 and 9 achieving at or above the National Minimum Standard 2009 NAPLAN Test

Percentage of students at or above the National minimum standard Year 7

Literacy (Overall)

Year 9 Statewide

School

Statewide

School

100%

95%

100%

93%

o

Reading

100%

95%

100%

93%

o

Writing

100%

93%

100%

89%

o

Spelling

100%

95%

98%

92%

o

Grammar & Punctuation

100%

93%

100%

90%

98%

96%

100%

97%

Numeracy (Overall) o

Number Patterns and Algebra

98%

94%

100%

96%

o

Measurement, Data, Space &

100%

97%

100%

96%

Geometry

Year 7: We are very pleased that 100% of Students in Year 7 achieved at or above the National minimum standard in Literacy. We are very pleased that 98% of Students in Year 7 achieved at or above the National minimum standard in Numeracy.

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Year 9 We are very pleased that 100% of Students in Year 9 achieved at or above the National minimum standard in Literacy and that as individuals students showed significant growth in their achievement. We are very pleased that 100% of Students in Year 9 achieved at or above the National minimum standard in Numeracy and that as individuals students showed significant growth in their achievement. Further comparative information on these tests can be found on http://www.myschool.edu.au.

ii.

Student Performance in Statewide Tests and Examinations HSC 2009

Total Number of Students

Performance Band achievement by number and % Band 3-6

Band 1-2

School

Statewide

School

Statewide

Ancient History

11

11 (100%)

(85.4%)

0

(14.6%)

Biology

7

6 (85.7%)

(90%)

1 (14.3%)

(10%)

Business Studies

25

24 (96%)

(89%)

1 (4%)

(11%)

Chemistry

2

2 (100%)

(90%)

0

(10%)

Economics

5

5 (100%)

(87.5%)

0

(12.5%)

English (Standard)

28

28 (100%)

(77%)

0

(23%)

English (Advanced)

14

14 (100%)

(98.9%)

0

(1.1%)

English as a Second Language

2

2 (100%)

(84.9%)

0

(15.1%)

Food Technology

9

9 (100%)

(91%)

0

(9%)

Geography

4

4 (100%)

(89.6%)

0

(10.4%)

Information Processes and Technology Legal Studies

10

10(100%)

(87.7%)

0

(12.3%)

12

12 (100%)

(86%)

0

(14%)

General Mathematics

19

16(84.2%)

(80.9%)

3(15.8%)

(19.1%)

Mathematics

12

12 (100%)

(89%)

0

(11%)

Modern History

6

5 (83.3%)

(93.3%)

1 (16.7%)

(6.7%)

Music

4

4 (100%)

(97.7%)

0

(2.3%)

Personal Dev. Health & P.E.

14

14 (100%)

(87%)

0

(13%)

Physics

5

5 (100%)

(87.9%)

0

(12.1%)

Visual Arts

13

13 (100%)

(98.5%)

0

(1.5%)

Modern Greek Continuers

14

14 (100%)

(94.8%)

0

(5.2%)

Serbian Continuers

1

1 (100%)

(97%)

0

(3%)

Hospitality Operations (VET)

11

10 (91%)

(84.4%)

1 (9%)

(15.6%)

Information Technology (VET)

4

4 (100%)

(77.5%)

0

(22.5%)

Please note: Band 6 is the highest band and Band 1 the lowest HSC

Total Number of Students

Performance Band achievement % Band 3 - 6 School Statewide

Band 1 - 2 School Statewide

2009

44

95%

87%

5%

13%

2008

61

96%

86%

4%

14%

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HSC 2009

Total Number of Students

Performance Band achievement by number and % Band E4-E3 School Statewide

Band E1-E2 School Statewide

English Extension 1

6

6 (100%)

(84%)

0

(16%)

Mathematics Extension 1

3

2 (66.7%)

(81.6%)

1(33.3%)

(18.4%)

History Extension 1

5

4 (80%)

(73.6%)

1 (20%)

(26.4%)

Modern Greek Extension 1

3

3 (100%)

(93.3%)

0

(6.7%)

Please note: E4 is the highest band and E1 the lowest

School Certificate 2009

Performance band achievement by % Bands 3 – 6 Bands 1 – 2

No. of Students

School

Statewide

School

Statewide

English – Literacy

54

100%

95.6%

0

4.4%

Science

54

96.3%

89.8%

3.7%

10.2%

Mathematics

54

90.8%

80.5%

9.2%

19.5%

Australian Geography. Civics and

54

92.6%

86.7%

7.4%

13.3%

Citizenship Australian History, Civics and

54

92.6%

85.7%

7.4%

14.3%

Citizenship Computing Skills: 100% of students Competent or Highly Competent

Please note: Band 6 is the highest band and Band 1 the lowest

iii.

Senior Secondary Outcomes

100% of students attained their HSC. Hospitality VET and Information Technology VET were offered at school. 14 out of 44 students (32%) studied these courses. In addition students were supported to undertake the following courses at TAFE: Hairdressing – 1 student; Property Services – 1 student. Two students studied Chinese background Speakers through the Saturday School of Community Languages and two students studied Japanese Beginners through the Open High School.

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iv.

Student Attendance

We are pleased to report that the daily attendance rate for students in 2009 was 95%. This was similar to the daily attendance rate in 2008.

v.

Year Level

Annual Attendance Rate %

Kindergarten Year 1

95

Year 2

96

Year 3

96

Year 4

96

Year 5

96

Year 6

97

Year 7

97

Year 8

94

Year 9

94

Year 10

93

Year 11

93

Year 12

93

94

Student Retention of Year 10 to Year 12

At St Spyridon College in 2009 there was a retention rate from Years 10 to 12 of 85%. This is similar to previous years.

vi.

Post School Destinations

In 2009, 44 students sat for the Higher School Certificate Examinations (HSC) across 29 courses. Eight accelerant students from Year 11 studied Modern Greek Continuers and or Modern Greek Extension 1. We congratulate our students on their achievements and wish them well in their tertiary studies and future life choices. Highlights include: 

Christopher Stasos, highest ATAR 98.9. AAA UNSW Scholarship winner.

Christopher Stasos and Mark Xin, Board of Studies Top Achievers (results 90% or above in a minimum of 10 Units).

15

10 Board of Studies Distinguished Achievers (results 90% or above in a subject).

95 % of students have now begun Tertiary studies.

64% of students now studying Undergraduate courses.

Out of 44 students 91 results 80% and above in a given course.

14% of students with an ATAR 90 or above.

Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009


Destinations of Year 12 Class of 2009 TAFE Courses 23%

Private Providers 9%

Undergraduate Degrees 63%

Other 5%

Undergraduate Degree Destinations of Year 12 Class of 2009 UNSW 25%

USYD 11%

ACPE 11% UWS 14% USYD - University of Sydney UNSW - University of NSW UWS - University of Western Sydney UTS - University of Technology Sydney ACU - Australian Catholic University ACPE - Australian College of Physical Education

ACU 7% UTS 14%

Other 18%

Destination by Course Type Education/Health/Science 17%

IT 7%

Creative Arts 15%

Law 5%

Arts/Policing 10%

Engineering/Aviation 7%

Business/ Economics 39%

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SECTION 3: OUR EDUCATORS i

Professional Learning

ii

Teaching Standards

iii

Workforce composition

17

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Senior School Staff

Junior School Staff

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i. Goal 5:

Professional Learning Support educators to enhance their professional knowledge practice and commitment. (Strategic Plan 2007-2011).

As is clearly evident from the Professional Learning matrices below, St Spyridon College values the professionalism of its teachers very highly and supports their ongoing professional development. In fact the enhancement of professional knowledge, practice and commitment is Goal 5 of the Seven Strategic Goals as set out by the Strategic Plan 2007-2011. Student free days are assigned for internal professional development and financial support is provided for teachers to access external conferences and forums provided by a range of providers. The teachers belong to an extensive range of Associations. The Libraries and Resources Centres at both campuses carry up to date professional publications. Priorities are determined by the strategic directions set by Seven Strategic Goals and the Annual targets. St Spyridon teachers embrace the opportunities presented to them and spend many hours and days of their own time on expanding their knowledge and professional skills. In turn, St Spyridon teachers provide educational leadership to others in New South Wales. Mr Arthur Kollias, Curriculum Leader Mathematics lectured at the UNSW GERRIC program. The first AHISA Directors of Studies Conference for 2009 was jointly hosted by The Scots College and St Spyridon College on Sunday 3 and Monday 4 May. Jan Hart (Scots) and Mrs Jennifer Michalski (St Spyridon) jointly organised the occasion. Heads of Department and others with an interest and involvement in Curriculum management were invited to attend, with the result that around one hundred delegates registered. Mark Treadwell well known international speaker and currently a Director of a New Zealand based high-tech company, Rob Randall, interim Manager of the interim National Curriculum Board, and Paul Hewitt, who Assistant Director Curriculum, under Carol Taylor, Director, Curriculum and Assessment spoke at the conference. Eight of our teachers once again took part in the marking of the HSC and School Certificate Examinations. In 2009, one of our Junior School New Scheme teachers was supported to meet the requirement of the New South Wales Institute of Teachers and were successful in gaining Accreditation. Mrs Michalski, as AIS Reference Group Member joined a group of executive teachers to work on a document for School Improvement. Dr Geoff Newcombe AIS Executive Director’s mandate to the Group was to look at and adapt the Scottish Education model of What Makes a Good School?

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All Teachers participated in professional development conducted by a range of providers including the Association of Independent Schools New South Wales (AISNSW), the Australian Heads of Independent Schools (AHISA), the Heads of Co Educational Schools (HICES), the Independent Primary Schools Association (IPSHA). The Head of College, Principals and managers participated in a range of leadership forums and seminars on new developments particularly in the context of accountability to Governments and statutory bodies.

Summary of Professional Learning Mandated Policies, Child Protection

No of staff participating All Staff K – 12

Implementing the Strategic Plan, Targets 2009

All Teachers K - 12

Goal 1 Action 4 – Metacognition and Literacy

All Teachers K - 12

Registration and Accreditation

All Teachers 7 - 12

Occupational Health and Safety

All Teachers K - 12

National Curriculum (ACARA)

All Teachers K - 12

CPR

Staff 7 - 12

First Aid

Staff K – 6

Executive Leadership

4

New Scheme Teachers

3

Mathematics – Number Sense, Developing Tasks K – 6, Creative Problem Solving, Numerical Literacy English, Literature and Literacy – making curriculum adjustments, bringing writing to life, quality literature, planning and teaching integrated units, Spalding 1 and 2, English Extension 2, knowing narrative, research on teaching reading

6 16

Special Education

6

Science and Technology

11

Music and Performing Arts

3

Visual and Creative Arts

3

HSC, SC, Marker, Judge, Examiner in Modern Greek, Serbian, PDHPE, IPT, English, Mathematics, Music

8

Orthodox Studies

2

HSIE

3

Languages

3

Internet safety

12

Pastoral Care and Student leadership

15

Sport

5

Careers

2

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PROFESSIONAL ORGANISATIONS TO WHICH TEACHERS BELONG AHISA Australian Head of Independent Schools in Australia ALIA Australian Library Information ASLA NSW Aust. School Libraries Assoc ALA American Library Association ASLA American School Library Association AIIP Association of Independent Information Professionals ASIST Association Science and Information Technology Australian College Educational Readership AHISA Directors of Studies ASCD Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development ACHPER (Aust. Council of Health, PE & Recreation) Art Gallery of NSW MANSW Mathematics Association of NSW Modern Greek Teachers Association CSTA Computing Studies Teachers’ Assoc. EBE Economics Business Education Assoc. English Teachers’ Association Food Facts Nutrition Australia Nutridate History Teachers’ Association HICES Heads of Independent Coeducational Schools HICES Junior School Heads of Independent Co-educational Schools ISA Independent Sports Association ISCA Independent Schools Council of Australia IPSHA Independent Primary Schools Heads of Australia IPSHA Deputies’ Umbrella Group IPSHA Curriculum Co-ordinators’ Umbrella Group IPSHA Umbrella Groups; Infants Co-ordinator, G&T, ICT, Learning Support Teachers, Librarians, Music Teachers, Art Teachers, PDHPE Teachers, New Scheme Teachers, Sports Convenors and IPSHA Early Childhood Education Teachers Umbrella Group LTA Legal Teacher Association SPELD Specific Learning Difficulties NSW Institute of Teachers Primary English Teacher’s Association Children’s Book Council ISTE International Society of Technology in Education

The average expenditure on professional learning in 2009 was $1240.00 per Teacher.

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ii.

Teaching Standards Category

Number of Teachers Junior Senior Total School School K – 12

Teachers who have teaching qualifications from a higher education institution within Australia or as recognised within the National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition (AEI-NOOSR)

23

31

54

0

2

2

1

0

1

guidelines.

Teachers who have qualifications as a graduate from a higher education institution within Australia or one recognised within the AEI-NOOSR guidelines but lack formal teacher education qualifications.

Teachers who do not have qualifications as described in (i) and/ or (ii) above but have relevant successful teaching experience or appropriate knowledge relevant to the teaching context.

iii.

Workforce Composition

In 2009 the average daily teacher attendance rate was 96%. The proportion of teacher retained from 2008 is approximately 90%. The school’s workforce presents a rich diversity of qualifications, experience and expertise. Educators are united in their professionalism and commitment to quality outcomes for students and the provision of a safe pleasant, family, teaching, learning and working environment. The high level of attendance and retention is one indication of this.

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SECTION 4: ENROLMENT POLICIES AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE STUDENT BODY

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Year 10 Preparing for the Preliminary Course

Mrs Hamer at the Junior School Christmas Assembly

Year 7 Easter Focus

Year 12 Doxology

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Enrolment Policies Enrolment Policy and Procedures All applications for enrolment are accompanied by: • Birth Certificate • Baptismal Certificate (where applicable) • Reference by priest (where applicable) • Report / Profile from School, Preschool or Child Care Centre (as applicable). All other things being equal, priority is given to siblings, children of Past Students, of clergy of canonical Orthodox Churches, of Parish Executive members, of staff, as well as benefactors’ children & grandchildren (identified by a confirmation letter from the Parish). The school complies with all Legislation that prohibits Discrimination including the Disability Discrimination Act.

1.

Kindergarten Entry

At the Kindergarten level, the cut-off date for the year of entry is the 31st May. Enrolments are processed in order of receipt, and maintaining a balance of boys and girls. For priority to be given at the Kindergarten level, applications must be received in the first year after birth. As part of the Early Intervention Programme, the Infants Co-ordinator holds a school entry assessment with the child prior to the year of entry. This is used to assist the College to best meet the learning, social and emotional needs of the child on entry. The assessment includes: • Oral communication skills • Auditory discrimination skills • Literacy (print concepts, letter identification, phonemic awareness) • Numeracy (one to one correspondence, shapes, counting) • Fine motor skills / physical development • Social interaction skills and emotional maturity • Information from Reports/Portfolio profiles from pre-entry institutions • Information from reports from other professionals eg. Psychologists/ therapists.

2.

Entry to Years 1 - 12

All applicants are required to complete entrance examinations in English and Mathematics. The Principal will make a decision on accepting an application using the following information. • The results of the entrance examinations • The most recent school report • Previous School References where the Principal deems this to be relevant • The interview

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3.

Progression to Upper School

During Year 10 and to progress to the next level of schooling for Years 11 and 12 students will need to formally submit an Expression of Interest in continuing their education at St Spyridon College. The application should be made after giving consideration to the commitment that this entails. All students who meet the following criteria will be invited to continue their Years 11 and 12 education at St. Spyridon College: • Apply diligence and sustained effort to their studies. • Complete set assignments in the set time, and to a standard – meets course requirements – reflects a student’s best effort • Attend all classes unless able to provide relevant documentation to explain absence. • Abide by the Student Principles and follow the school’s Code of Conduct. • Support activities and programs that enhance the school’s ethos and culture. Students who accept the invitation to continue their studies at the College will sign an Acceptance Agreement that is co-signed by parents.

4.

Acceptance Agreement

Placement offers are made to parents in writing. To accept a placement, parents must return a signed Acceptance Agreement, which outlines their commitment to paying all fees and charges, and their agreement to support the school’s policies, ethos and culture.

Characteristics of Student Body St Spyridon students come from 20 different cultural backgrounds, over 40% of whom, live further than 10 kilometres away from the school. International students add to the rich tapestry of backgrounds within our College, with most but not all students coming from the Asian continent. The most interesting fact about the characteristics of our student body is that 25% of our families are polyglot-in other words, they speak three languages at home-English and two others. Another 49% are bilingual-or use English and another language at home. This presents a rich linguistic environment for our school, and it is therefore not surprising that our students do well in languages, offered at school or supported by the school and offered through the Open College. Students who predominantly use a language other than English at home make up the minority, and include the International students. The range of languages spoken by St Spyridon families is: Afrikaan, Arabic, Assyrian, Chinese, Croatian, Fijia, French, German, Greek, Hindi, Indonesian, Italian, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish and Vietnamese. In terms of religious backgrounds, 89% are from Orthodox backgrounds-Greek, Russian, Serbian and Assyrian. 11% of our students are from a variety of faith backgrounds including Catholic, other Christian faiths, Muslim, Buddhist and Jewish.

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Leadership Assembly 2009 Student Body

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SECTION 5: SCHOOL POLICIES

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School Policies The following policies and procedures were in place (or developed) during 2009 to manage a Safe and Supportive Environment:

Policy

Changes in 2009

Access to Full Text

STUDENT WELFARE Child Protection Policy encompassing: • • • • • •

• • • • • •

Policy statement Protocols than enhance ethos and culture Professional conduct in relation to Child Protection Definitions and concepts Legislative requirements Child Protection Legislation Amendment Bill 2003 (Provided by the AIS) Child Protection Procedures Investigation process Reporting and investigating “reportable conduct” Procedural fairness Documentation Appendices

STUDENT WELFARE Security Policy encompassing: • Occupational Health and Safety Policy including: Rationale

• Professional Conduct Protocols • Changed section on Electronic Communications between Teachers and Students. • Revised Child Protection Policy statement in line with Board of Studies advice.

Full text in Teachers Policy and

• Updated Occupational Health & Safety Policy in line with BOS Guidelines.

Full text of all in Teachers

Procedure Handbook Part 1

Policy in Parent Handbook 2009, and Study Planner 2009.

Policy and Procedures Handbook Part 3

Code of Practice Policy Statement in Parent

Policy statement

Handbook 2009.

Management procedure for each of the 12 systems specified by the AIS guidelines.

• Students Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Policy.

• Draft Employees Acceptable use of Information & Communications Technology and Equipment policy.

Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009

Circulated to all staff and Board members for response.

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Policy

Changes in 2009

Access to Full Text Full Text in Newsletter Feb 2009

Disability

and Parent Handbook 2009 STUDENT WELFARE

Full text in Teachers Policy and

Supervision Policy encompassing:

Procedure Handbook Part 1

• • • • • • • • • •

Roles and responsibilities of Teacher Attendance Punctuality Staff absence Duty of care Duty of care and student attendance Duty of care and supervision Negligence Yard Duty Keys and security

• Summary of main points in Parent Handbook 2009, and Study Planner 2009

Codes of Conduct Policy

Full text in:

encompassing:

• Teacher Policy and Procedure Handbook Part 2 • Students’ Study Planner 2009 • School web page • Parent Handbook 2009

• Our principles as St Spyridon Education Professionals • Our principles as St Spyridon College students • Code of conduct for students • Statement on student harassment • Classroom behaviour management • Consideration for ethical behaviour management • Procedural fairness

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STUDENT WELFARE

New Senior School

Full text in:

Pastoral Care Policy encompassing:

Section of Managing a

• Attendance • Managing a positive learning environment • Rewarding the good • The pastoral care system • Availability of and access to special services such as counselling • Health care procedures • Home study policy • Progression through schooling • Leadership

Positive Learning

• Teacher Handbook Part 2 • Excerpts in: • Students’ Study Planner (2009) • Parent Information Handbook (2009)

Environment Handbook.

Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009


Policy

Communication Policy encompassing: • Formal and informal mechanisms that facilitate communication between the school and those with an interest in the students’ education and well-being. • Communication with parents section in Student Planner and Parent Handbook • Newsletter (fortnightly) • Flyers, Bulletins and notes to parents • Direct correspondence • Parent/Teacher interviews • Study Planner for two way notes • Parent/Teacher meeting

Changes in 2009 • New Intranet established for sharing curriculum development and policy documents at the Senior School.

Access to Full Text

Means of communication and reference to Communication in: • Teacher Policy and Procedure Handbook Part 2 • Parent Information Handbook (2009) • Students’ Study Planner (2009) • School’s Web page

Communication within the school: • Staffroom whiteboards • Study Planner – key dates and major events • Pigeon holes • Telephone messages • Email • Staff and team meetings

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SECTION 6: SCHOOL DETERMINED IMPROVEMENT TARGETS The Seven Strategic Goals Targets 2009 Initiatives Promoting Respect and Responsibility

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THE SEVEN STRATEGIC GOALS 2007 – 2011 Goal One:

Our students will experience a dynamic, exciting learning culture that is firmly focused on the future.

Goal Two:

Our students’ social, physical and spiritual well being will play a major part in everything we do.

Goal Three:

We will initiate exemplary programs in Student Leadership, Community Action and Global Connections.

Goal Four:

We will actively foster students’ appreciation of the beautiful things in life; art, music, literature, drama.

Goal Five:

We will continue to support every initiative possible to further enrich our educators’ knowledge and practice of their profession and their continuing commitment to it.

Goal Six:

We will reach out to the community and ensure the financial future of our College is secure.

Goal Seven:

We will add the new buildings necessary to support our continuing pursuit of excellence across all fronts.

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TARGETS 2009 1. All actions taken to ensure successful Registration and Accreditation Inspection of the Senior School by the Board of Studies in 2009. (Goals 1-7) 2. Review and implement the Senior School Stepping up Program as part of strengthening the learning culture.

(Goals 1 and 2)

3. Review and amend Handbooks and Policies in line with mandated responsibilities. (Goal 5) 4. Develop curriculum that enhances students’ literacy and Metacognitive skills. (Goal 1, Action 4) 5. Prepare document for publication on Junior School High Intellectual Potential Students (HIPS) Programs. (Goal 1 Action 4) and review Senior School initiatives for differentiated, distinction and accelerated classes.

(Goal 1)

6. Map 2007 – 2009 initiatives K – 12, which foster students’ appreciation for the “beautiful things in life”. (Goal 4) 7. Develop and implement ICT Plan for Junior School. (Goals 1, 5 and 6) 8. Develop and implement ICT intranet for Senior School. (Goals 1, 5 and 6) 9. Establish timeline and begin work on Building Program

(Goal 7)

10. Promote the good name of our College (Goal 6).

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TARGET 1:

All actions taken to ensure successful Registration and Accreditation

Inspection of the Senior School by the Board of Studies in 2009. (Goals 1-7) BOS Inspector’s Comments: St Spyridon College provides a stimulating and supportive learning environment for all students. The Head of College provides educational leadership supported by the Principal Senior School, and the Deans. The school has a comprehensive set of policies and procedures relating to student welfare that meet the requirements for registration. Its pastoral focus and care of each individual is evident in the level of independent learning throughout the schools educational program. The school provided detailed and clear educational overviews including teaching programs supported by a wide range of work samples. Inspectors discussed with the school strategies to strengthen assessment policies and procedures for both the School Certificate and the Higher School Certificate. We were pleased that St Spyridon College Senior School was recommended and granted registration and accreditation for the period 1/1/2010 to 31/12/2014.

Mrs A. Katsogiannis Principal Senior School

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TARGET 2:

Review and implement the Senior School Stepping up Program as part of

strengthening the learning culture.

(Goals 1 and 2)

The aim of the Senior School Stepping Up Program is to strengthen the learning culture across the four elements: study skills, personal development, community awareness and global connections. In reality this Stepping Up Program begins in Year 4. At the core of the Stepping Up Program is the development of student leadership for all. Student Leadership is developed through a coherent and tightly planned series of activities whose aim is to assist every student to develop pride, responsibility and skills to lead. A democratic view of leadership is fostered and opportunities structured so that each student feels recognised, valued and applauded for their specific strength. In that way each student develops a strong sense of belonging and positive self image. Formal leadership is provided via the SRC, Peer Support Leaders, and Prefect Body. The College Captain and Student Leadership Team (Vice Captain, Senior Prefect) hold a respected position in the school community and represent the College in State and National Forums. Leadership is not an option at St Spyridon College but rather an integral part of every student’s education. Students learn to exercise moral leadership as a group member in a variety of contexts: • • • • • • •

Collaborative learning in classrooms Cultural, sporting and co curricular activities Supporting peers Community action and Global connection activities Running group meetings and assemblies School and community service Camps which include leadership development activities, team building and initiative skills.

Stepping Up to Senior School Students in Years 4, 5 and 6 visit the Senior School and become familiar with the environment (physical) and feel safe and comfortable. Exposure to Senior School routines in and out of the classroom assists students in feeling like they belong. Student apprehension and feelings of being overwhelmed are reduced. They get to know teachers so they feel more confident when they begin in Year 7. They meet and interact with senior school students and build a sense of belonging and connectedness. This leads to reduction in stress and negative feelings related to beginning somewhere new, big, different with lots of unknowns. Positive mind set built over three years makes transition exciting; students are eager rather than fearful and perform better academically. From Year 6 to 7 All students and parents meet with Dean of Middle School. A Getting to Know You day is held for Year 6 students where Year 6 spend the day at the Senior School Campus. Transition activities led by Peer Support Leaders are held at the Junior School in Term 4. This builds relationships and knowledge of how to ready themselves for Senior School. Foundations are laid across Curriculum areas as students experience Taster lessons. Apprehension about lots of new subjects is reduced as they have an idea of what their subjects are about and what they will be doing in each of them. Peer Support Leaders attend camp with Year 7, and also assist them to find their way for the first few weeks.

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In Pastoral Care students are given detailed guides (oral and written) to assist them with adjusting to life at Senior School from both academic and social perspectives and how to set goals. Students know rules, expectations, where to go and what to do in a variety of situations thus further increasing their confidence and happiness as they get to know more about successfully functioning in their new environment. They learn about their Greek Orthodox Community and how to support it through participation in key events.

Ms G. Kokinelis Dean of Middle School Stepping Up Program

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TARGET 3:

Review and amend Handbooks and Policies in line with mandated

responsibilities. (Goal 5) The following handbooks were reviewed in 2009: Parent Handbook Middle School Handbook Upper School Handbook Assessment Handbooks Years 10, 11 and 12 Teacher Handbook 2 Teacher Handbook 3 Please see section 5 of this report for an overview of all Policy amendments and changes for the 2009 school year.

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TARGET 4: Develop Curriculum that enhances students’ literacy and Metacognitive skills (Goal 1 Action 4)

JUNIOR SCHOOL Junior School students’ Literacy and Metacognitive skills were significantly enhanced as a result of the use of the Spalding Method of instruction for English through its focus on systematic and explicit instruction. Grouping students loosely into three groups across the grade in Years 3 – 6, for literacy instruction with the support of the Primary Support teacher has enabled value to be added to each student’s results. This is clearly evident in the NAPLAN results, detailed in Section 2 of this Report. In addition the Kindergarten Performance Indicators in Primary Schools (PIPS) assessment in Reading, Mathematics and Phonics, shows that St Spyridon College students make significantly more progress than their age peers in New South Wales and Australia between February and the end of Kindergarten.

Averages: St Spyridon Cohort State Cohort National Cohort Individual Students

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Other external assessments and standardised tests confirm the effectiveness of our literacy and metacognitive key initiatives: -

ICAS English – 2 High Distinctions, 10 Distinctions, 38 Credits

-

ICAS Computer Skills – 4 High Distinctions, 13 Distinctions, 53 credits.

-

ICAS Science – 1 High Distinction, 12 Distinctions, 28 credits.

Students were provided with a variety of innovative literature enrichment activities, including: the Kindergarten Reading Eggs on-line reading program; Dorothy McKellar poetry competition; and the Year 6 oral history publication Year 6 of their grandparents’ migration stories “Coming to Australia”. St Spyridon celebrated National Literacy and Numeracy Week focus with book sharing sessions. Each teacher took a multi-age class with students from Years 3-6 and shared their favourite story or poem and have the students complete an activity relating to the literature read. Activities included drama, creating artwork, freeze frames, shared reading circles and puppet plays. Year 4 created sandwich board posters to advertise their favourite book during the Book Week Parade. Kindergarten to Year Two teachers took on a different class and ran drama and literature appreciation activities with the class. Much positive feedback was received about this and discussion has begun about expanding it to other key learning areas or for it to become a term based activity. The profile of Mathematics in the school was raised as was the engagement of students with the process of Mathematics through the following events: Celebration of Numeracy Week “Reach for the Stars”; inter class and inter grade competition; to celebrate the rare occurrence of the 09/09/09 date combination Year 6 students declared the day “nine times table day”. They tested and rewarded students from Grades 3-5 who were proficient with the nine times table. Four Year 6 Students attended the AIS Maths Challenge Camp in early March to challenge their mathematical thinking and reasoning. All students from K-6 participated in World Maths Day and united to set the new World Record of 452 682 682 correct answers. Our college contributed 207 345 correct answers. Very pleasing results were received in the Australian Mathematical Problem Solving Olympiad: Year 5: One Distinction, 13 Credits; Year 6: One Distinction, 10 Credits.

Junior School Sports Highlights • St. Spyridon College winners of Combined Greek Orthodox Schools’ Swimming Carnival. • Introduction of the “Footsteps Dance Program”. • Year Six student selected to the Football NSW Scholarship Development Program. • Year Five student selected to compete in PSSA Football championship. • Three Year 5 students selected to represent in ASISSA football squad. • Year Two student - Under 10’s Junior coloured belt – First Place – Gold at Taekwondo Australian ITF National Championship. • Swimming Carnival winning House – Olympians. Five new records; 8 Years 50m Freestyle, 8 Years 50m Backstroke – boys and girls, 8 Years 50m Breaststroke, 8 Years 50m Butterfly. • Athletics Carnival winning House – Nemeans. Two new records; Senior Boys 400m, 8 Years Girls Long Jump.

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SENIOR SCHOOL English Curriculum – differentiation and reading program All units are written with suggested modifications so that the work can be differentiated to suit both talented students and those with special needs. The English curriculum includes a reading program of one lesson a cycle devoted to silent wide reading in years 7 to 9. In these lessons either students are directed to read within a particular genre or there are follow up exercises.  We also encourage participation in the Premier’s Reading Challenge. Silent sustained writing is implemented throughout the Senior School as are rich tasks across subject specific genres. Grading of classes for literacy development Classes are graded according to student need and there are differentiated classes in English in Years 8, 9 and 10 with two roughly parallel classes and one smaller class in each year. History classes in Years 9 and 10 are arranged in the same way. Literacy support The school employs a special literacy support teacher two days a week. Where a student has been identified as in need of particular, special support, the teachers of that student modify classroom work and teaching methods for that student. If that student is in a mainstream Year 10 class, then the method only is modified.  Teachers, in consultation with the Dean of Middle school, identify students with literacy needs and/or problems with organisation of ideas/work/ homework/notes. These students attend afternoon classes which are tailored to specific needs   Mathematics Our Programs 7-10 are written for a differentiated curriculum. Additional content (non mandatory) is included (for sidewise extension). In 2009, we trialled a Literacy book, in some classes. Students did their ‘mathematical writing’ in this book, including reflective writing (to help develop metacognitive skills). All units are written with suggested modifications so that the work can be differentiated to suit both talented students and those with special needs. Acceleration is provided for talented students as in the case of Mark Xin who studied Mathematics Extension 1 (96%) and Mathematics Extension 2 (93%) whilst studying in Year 11. Extension work is given to students in the Middle School identified as having High Potential. This may include participation in the Maths Challenge and Enrichment Stages (of the Australian Mathematics Trust) or doing problems taken from there and from the Australian Mathematics Competition itself.

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Senior School Sports Highlights • ISA Champions Boys Football (Division 1) – 14’s and Open B’s came first • ISA Champions Netball – Junior C and Year 7 girls came first • FUTSAL – 14 yrs boys and Open girls indoor soccer team won the regional titles. The boys were runners up at the State level and progressed to the Nationals • St Spyridon College won the Division 2 Open Girls ISA Swimming Trophy. Martha Spilioti, Makrina Spilioti, Angelina Flokis and Lena Nesterenko were chosen to represent the ISA. • Martha Spilioti represented the ISA in the NSWCIS and at the All Schools championships. She came 2nd in 200m Butterfly and 6th in 100m Butterfly • ISA Representation – Cassie Georgiou U15’s Netball, George Georgamlis Open A’s Football, Amanda Horafios, Ivana Bojanovic and Tiffany Koutrouzas girls Football • Amanda Horafios Year 12 was chosen to represent the Australian Womens FUTSAL Team, team toured China in Nov/Dec • Cassandra Georgiou, Nicholaos Baratsas, Kayla Want, Phillip Fotiou, Martha Spilioti and Amanda Horafios chosen to represent the ISA at the NSWCIS Athletics • Forty-two students travelled to Adelaide to compete in the Greek Orthodox Colleges National Schools Event – the girls won the Netball, Basketball and Indoor Soccer Championships. The boys came second in the Soccer, third in Basketball and fourth in Indoor Soccer. • Four Basketball teams made the ISA semi finals. • Open Netball Team ( Division 2) made the ISA semi finals. • Intermediate Netball team made the ISA finals. • Athletics carnival champions Delphians. • Swimming carnival champions Delphians.

National Schools Event Adelaide

Leadership Assembly

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TARGET 5:

Prepare document for publication on Junior School High Intellectual Potential Students (HIPS) Programs and review Senior School initiatives for differentiated, distinction and accelerated classes.

(Goal 1)

St. Spyridon College is committed to the provision of educational programs for gifted students that empowers them to thrive as learners, for their personal edification and the benefits of their community. Student with high intellectual potential (HIPS) are an asset to any school and their needs must be met. They must be provided with material that challenges them so that their full potential may be realised. At the Junior School, a teacher support pack was drafted to assist teachers in identifying, planning and responding to the needs of gifted students. It was premised on extensive research both in Australia and overseas and Best Practice. It provided teachers with simple and clear information about:• What are gifts? What are talents? • What do gifted and talented students look like? • Cognitive and affective characteristics • The identification process • Curriculum Options • Sample Checklists and Nomination forms • Evaluation tool for programs • Resources • Reading List. The aim was to formalise what was being done for students with high intellectual potential and those with gifts and talents in the academic sphere so that teachers were better able to plan appropriately for them in the classroom. It was to highlight the importance of providing depth and differentiation. It was also designed as a simple pack that teachers can use with ease and which offers a step by step approach to modifying the curriculum. The inclusion of cognitive and affective characteristics proves that the gifted student is not always the self assured high achiever and that no two gifted students are the same. In 2010 we aim to work closely with the draft so that programming is more directed and reflective of the research provided and adopt this as a working policy document. We hope that these positive initiatives will increase the achievement outcomes of our students with high intellectual potential. At the Senior School differentiation is supported with a number of initiatives including: • Grouping of students according to potential. • Opportunities to compete in elite competitions. • Units written with suggested modifications so that the work can be differentiated to suit both talented students and those with special needs. • Accelerant classes in 2009 included: Modern Greek Continuers, Modern Greek Extension, Russian. • Accelerant students in 2009 included Economics and Legal Studies. • Teachers as mentors of students with gifts and talents. • Clubs for special talents eg Robotics. • Extension courses in Years 11 and 12. Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009

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TARGET 6:

Map 2007 – 2009 initiatives K – 12, which foster students’ appreciation for the “beautiful things in life”. (Goal 4)

A biannual calendar of events has been developed that may be varied due to major changes such as new buildings and other peak moments in the school’s history. On an annual basis the Junior School Performing Arts program features special assemblies on such themes as ANZAC Day, Easter and Harmony Day. A highlight for our Junior School calendar is the integrated work culminating in a spectacular open day. In 2009 “Australia” was the theme and included dance, song and presentations of Australian artists and genres of music from Waltzing Matilda to the “Land Down Under”. The music program was enhanced with the appointment of a music teacher, Mrs Helen Coyne who initiated the annual Musical Showcase – already popular with students and parents alike. Each class performed and the choir dazzled with closing renditions of pop and jazz. On a Bi-annual, basis the K – 12 Arts Exhibition together with the Appreciating Culture Lectures forms a high-end cultural event. Speakers to date have been: Appreciating Culture Lecture 1:

Professor Gavin Brown – “The Case for Universities in a Civilised Society”

Appreciating Culture Lecture 2:

His Eminence Archbishop Stylianos of Australia – “Priorities in True Culture”

Appreciating Culture Lecture 3:

The Honourable John Hatzistergos MP, Attorney General, Minister for Justice NSW “Federation and Culture – Reflections on the Australian Constitution”

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On an annual basis the Senior School presents a Greek Play whose director Mrs Mary Faletas never ceases to amaze in bringing to us both performing talents and exquisitely spoken Greek. In addition an English Play or a Christmas Pantomime is performed before students and parents. The Snapshots and HSC Music and Drama performances take place before a select audience. Evenings organised by Ms Savva have become much anticipated events for our whole community with very high standard of performances. Over the last 10 years St Spyridon College students have presented excellent productions including: 2001

“Dramatic Snap Shots”

Mr S Travers, Ms C Savva

2001

“Did We Leave Anybody Out?”

Mrs M Faletas

2002

“Dramatic Snap Shots 2”

Ms K Lucas, Ms C Savva

2002

“Iphigenia at Aulis”

Mrs M Faletas

2003

“The Crucible”

Ms K Lucas

2003

“Greece, a Land of Light and Sea”

Mrs M Faletas

2004

“Dramatic Snapshots 3” – co directed

Ms K Lucas, Ms C Savva Ms D Heretakis, Mrs M Faletas

2004

“The Olympic Games then and now”

Mrs M Faletas

2005

“The Shepherdess’ Lover”

Mrs M Faletas

2005

“An Idiot & a Half”

Mrs M Faletas

2005

“Musical Snapshots”

Mc C Savva

2005

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

Ms K Lucas

2006

“Spare the rod, spoil the child”

Mrs M Faletas

2006

“Romeo & Juliet”

Ms K Lucas

2006

“Musical Snapshots”

Ms C Savva

2007

“Small Pharisees”

Mrs M Faletas

2007

“Macbeth”

Ms K Lucas

2007

“Musical Snapshots”

Ms C Savva

2008

“In this Strange Land Refuge and Exile”

Mrs M Faletas

2009

“Musical Snapshots”

Ms C Savva

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Performing Arts Photo Gallery 2001 - 2009

2001 – Dramatic Snapshots

2001 – “Did We Leave Anybody Out?”

2002 – Dramatic Snapshots 2

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2002 – “Iphegenia at Aulis”

2003 – “The Crucible”

2003 – “Greece, a Land of Light and Sea”

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2004 – “The Olympic Games Then and Now”

2004 – “Dramatic Snapshots 3”

2005 – “The Shepherdess’ Lover”

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2005 – “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

2005 – “Musical Snapshots”

2006 – “Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child”

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2006 – Romeo & Juliet

2006 – “Musical Snapshots”

2007 – “Macbeth”

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2007 – “Musical Snapshots”

2007 – “Small Pharisees”

2008 – “In this Strange Land Refuge & Exile”

2009 – “Musical Snapshots” Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009

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TARGET 7:

Develop and implement ICT Plan for Junior School. (Goals 1, 5 and 6)

St Spyridon College Junior School’s ICT plan was developed by Mr. Arnott in 2009 and gradually implemented as per the school’s digital revolution plan 2008 - 2011. This four year plan will maximise student learning with up to date technologies by developing skills and competencies to allow them to act powerfully as learners within a future focused curriculum. Teachers will receive professional development to ensure innovative learning practices. Infrastructure will be developed for the establishment, monitoring and evaluation of technology systems. Leadership will be provided to ensure a coordinated plan for the provision of infrastructure, learning resources and teacher capability to address the educational challenges of the 21st century and satisfy the goals of the strategic plan 2007 – 2011.

In 2009 this included: Personalising and extending learning through: • making ICT decisions which support the implementation of a coherent curriculum framework that informs learning, teaching and assessment; • using ICT to differentiate the curriculum and enable student-centred learning environments; • purposefully integrating ICT with subject content in curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. Providing, accessing and managing teaching and learning resources through: • providing a system to select content and use digital resources to suit the individual needs of students; and • facilitating sharing of digital curriculum resources between teachers. Connecting learning beyond the school through: • supporting teachers, students and the local community in using safe internet behaviours; • using ICT to increase parent engagement and to provide relevant information and resources that enable families to contribute to their child’s learning; and • using a wide range of electronic systems for effective and appropriate communication. Supporting professional learning through: • placing a high priority on professional learning with and about ICT for staff and the wider community; and • ensuring that professional is timely, focussed, practical, ongoing and reflective of the ISTE National Educational Technology Standards.

Highlight of 2009: With the support of the P & F Committee, the Junior School now has an interactive whiteboard in each classroom. This has enriched learning and improved visual literacy. For example, students in Years 3 – 6 participated in an international cartoon competition run by HP and Cartoon Network. Students had to watch a segment from a popular cartoon and create an ending using a cartoon creating program. They did this by applying existing knowledge to think creatively, evaluate and select tools in order to produce an original plan and manage activities to develop a

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solution and complete a project. It was a task that challenged their creative and aesthetic abilities. As a result, St. Spyridon College Junior School were the Australian winners of the HP/ Tooncreators Competition. The prize was two HP Touchsmart computers which will further develop the technological skills of students.

HP Cartoon Network Competition

Mrs E. Marinos

Guest Speaker Dr Dokos using one of our Interactive Whiteboards

Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009

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TARGET 8:

Develop and implement ICT intranet for Senior School. (Goals 1, 5 and 6)

An ICT Intranet was set up for the Senior School teachers to assist in the management of all documentation required by the Board of Studies for Registration and Accreditation. It was a useful tool and the Board of Studies commended the school for its use and commented that it may be used as an example for other schools. Digital Education Revolution – National Secondary Schools Computer Funding A total of $154,500.00 was received over two years (2008 and 2009) as part of the Digital Education Revolution initiative enabling us to ensure an excellent student to computer ratio. A joint Parish and Board Working group was established to manage the implementation of the DER ICT Plan 2008 – 2012. Its membership includes teachers and parents. An exciting outcome has been the approval of the establishment of two new ICT centres; one for English, Literacy and LOTE and the other for Numeracy and Mathematics, for 2010.

Mrs D. Kefalouros

Miss E. Gambriell

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TARGET 9:

Establish timeline and begin work on Building Program

(Goal 7)

The Year of 2009 brought unexpected and much welcomed opportunities to accelerate our building program. The Commonwealth Government’s Building Education Revolution meant that Goal 7 of the Strategic Plan- the construction of a purpose built facility for Sports and Performing Arts K-12, could be commenced. In addition, The Senior School quadrangle was transformed by the new Classical Greek colonnade and the construction of a garden. A total of $2,700,000.00 was granted to the College for these two projects. The Junior School Campus, in the lead –up to the development of the Master Plan for the renewal of the Infants School site, will have a new facility built in Doran Street, to meet the growing numbers of students in Kindergarten.

The Beginning

The Hospitality

Parish Committee and Ladies Auxiliary

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TARGET 10:

Promote the good name of the College

(Goal 6)

The Joint Board and Parish Working Group in 2009, worked on a schedule of monthly marketing activities, such as print media, open days and other major events. The Stylus publication was considered by the working group as an asset in our promotion efforts as were the feature articles written by the College Captain and other student leaders, in such publications as Southern Courier and the St George Leader. It is our firm belief that the best way to promote the good name of the College, is through genuine engagement of students in their learning and the maximising of their career choices and life chances. This is the core work of our teachers with students. The fact that 98% of students enrol at the College as a result of word of mouth, is testimony that parents support their children’s school. It is also worth noting that 40% of our students live 10 or more kilometres away from the school. This is another indicator that parents support their school of choice. The role of the P & F Committee as ambassador is warmly acknowledged. The high calibre of the major performing arts and sporting events at both campuses served to develop students’ skills and capacities, as well as to promote the school’s reputation. Major events include:

K – 12 and VIP Visitors • The Hon. Kristina Keneally, Premier of NSW, attended the Junior School Awards Presentation Morning. • Speech and Prize Giving Afternoon keynote address by the Hon Peter Garrett AM MP, Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts • Scholarship and Student leadership Assembly Years 3 – 12 • 25th March celebrations at St Spyridon Church, Martin Place and Opera House • Laying of the Foundation stone for the Multipurpose Hall – Sports and Performing Arts Centre, officiated by His Eminence Archbishop Stylianos • Sports Presentation Evening, Keynote Speaker Ms Lyndall Jesse, CIS Director • K – 12 Doxology to farewell Year 12 officiated by His Eminence • Anzac Day commemorated at St Spyridon Church where student leaders laid a wreath.

P&F Events and initiatives • Palm Sunday Lunch. • Trivia Night • Taverna Night • Mother’s Day Brunch • Spring Fair

Junior School • Heads of Co Educational Schools sporting events – Cross Country, Athletics, Swimming • Combined Greek Orthodox Schools Swimming Carnival • Performances at community Nursing Homes • Grandparents Morning Tea • Musical Talent Showcase • Special Assemblies for Mother’s Day, Easter Focus and ANZAC Day 57

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• Open Days • Charity Appeals • Parent forums and Spalding Parent Course • All Year Six students attended the HICES Student Leadership Day at the Blue Mountains.

Senior School • Twilight Tours • Year 10 students chanted the Engomia on Good Friday at St Spyridon Church • Year 11 boys carried the Epitaphios at St Spyridon Church • National Schools Event in Adelaide • Snapshots performed at NIDA Parade Theatre • Parent Forums Year 10 to 11, Year 8 to 9, Year 11 to 12 • Visits by Year 4, Year 5, Year 6.

Student Leaders Elite Representation • Kosta Pappas, Vice Captain, attended the regional Final of the Lions Youth Club Youth of the Year Quest • Alex Stellatos, Year 8 participated in the Rostrum Public Speaking Competition • Senior Prefects attended a Leadership Conference at NSW Parliament House • Senior Leaders attended a combined Schools Anzac Day service which was held at the Anzac Memorial in Hyde Park • Aleksandra Djordjevic represented the school in the State Constitutional Convention at NSW Parliament House • Twenty Year 11 students attended the Young Leaders Day Conference.

Student Leaders at Attorney General’s Office

School Captain 2009 Christopher Stasos

Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009

Mark Xin & Tina Piperides SRC Leadership Talks

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Initiatives Promoting Respect & Responsibility (Goal 2) Spiritual Growth and Reflection At St Spyridon College the study of religion is not isolated within the confines of a lesson or classroom but permeates throughout all aspects of student and community life. The spiritual and cultural development of children is not an annex to their education, something that can be delivered from time to time, but an integral part of it. The development of the whole child requires that we are deliberate about the values and beliefs of their school environment. To this end, Saint Spyridon College provides for students, together with an integrated and structured curriculum many opportunities for spiritual growth and reflection. This is encapsulated in their experiences outside the classroom which include: Divine Liturgies – The Divine Liturgy is the very heart of the life of the Church. St Spyridon College provides students with the opportunity to partake of the Sacrament of Holy Communion through the celebration of the Divine Liturgy specifically for the College community. Students are actively involved in the celebration of the service as chanters, readers, altar servers, in the preparation of Prosphoro (Offertory) Bread and especially through the partaking of Holy Communion. The College timetables Food Technology lessons in such a way that this aim can be achieved, and the canteen assists with the preparation of a fasting menu for both staff and students. Prayer Room – Prayer is key element of the Life in Christ. The prayer room (Chapel) provides students with a spiritual refuge where students can retreat from ‘earthly cares’ and communicate with God. Students maintain the prayer room, lighting votive lamps, offering incense and lighting candles. The prayer room is also used as a sanctuary for the counselling of grieving, lost or troubled students by the Orthodox Studies staff. Easter Focus Week – As The Feast of the Resurrection is the centre of our faith, the Great Feast of Easter provides students with many opportunities for spiritual development. Introductory sermons and presentations by staff and students at special assemblies are given throughout Great Lent. Pamphlets for students and their parents are prepared and distributed, as are the choirs for Holy Week services. Year 7 students make Easter cards which are presented to the elderly at Saint Basils’ and Saint Sava Nursing Homes and they decorate of Resurrection Candles for members of their families. Students of the Junior School participate in the traditional customs such baking Easter sweets, making of palm crosses and colouring of red eggs. Charities – The Divine command to give is echoed in the charitable works of the students who are given the opportunity to be responsible for, and serve their fellow person in a spirit of Christian Fellowship and love. Students perpetuate the ‘Treasury of Love’ which is used to support families in need. Students supported the Greek Welfare Centre Annual Tin Can Appeal and many other charities such as the ‘Bushfire Victims’ Fund, Biggest Morning Tea and Jeans for Genes Day via the work of the SRC. Soup Kitchen – In the spirit of Christian service, students visit and help in the management of the Soup Kitchen which is run under the auspices of the Parish of Saints Constantine and Helen, Newtown. Church Choirs – Throughout the year, students prepare for and chant in a number of Ecclesiastical Choirs, namely the Lamentations Hymns of Great and Holy Friday, the Doxology Services and the Christmas Carols Choir which visits the nursing homes. Students of the College also sing traditional Christmas hymns to parishioners in their homes.

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Special Assemblies – Special Assemblies are organised throughout the year for special feasts and celebrations. Often an accompanying pamphlet is prepared for these events. Monastery and Nursing Home visits –Monasticism is at the heart of the expression of the Life in Christ. As part of the Preparing for the Preliminaries Course, students are given the opportunity to visit Holy Cross and Panagia Pantanassa Monasteries to experience the life of Orthodox Monasticism. Prior to such visits the College prepares students with a presentation on Monasteries. (Please see Section 7 of this Report).

School Blessing

Victorian Bushfire Appeal $12,000 raised

Olive Picking

St Simeon’s Nursing Home

Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009

Year 12 Doxology

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Dr Savoulis at the Preparing for the Preliminaries Course

National Schools Event & Bill Turner Cup

P & F Committee Taverna Night and Trivia Night

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SECTION 7: STUDENT VOICES PARENT VOICES TEACHER VOICES

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Student voices: Year 10 Preparing for the Preliminaries Course Evaluation The overwhelming response of the Year 10 class to the 12-day Preparing for the Preliminaries Course, was that they found it invaluable in their journey to Years 11 and 12. The highlight for the greatest majority of the students was the monastery visit, with commensurate calls to make this visit longer. The peace, serenity and hospitality of the monks and nuns left an indelible impression on our young people. Things to improve on in the future other than a longer time at the monasteries, was to shorten some of the talks, have more hands on activities, and to insert more breaks to assist attention and avoid fatigue. Some students enjoyed all areas covered. The best way to capture the students’ response to the course is to quote their own “voices”. As Head of College, I feel privileged to lead a school community which in partnership with parents, develops young people of character, conscience and compassion. What do you think were the benefits for the Year Group?

1.

Study Skills:

20 students

“The benefits for our Year group would be the study skills and the etiquette.” 2.

Stepping Up:

16 students

“I believe this course has been beneficial to the Year group as it encourages us as a year to step up and formally make our transition from Year 10 to Year 11. Some of the presentations have taught us life long skills, and this will additionally assist with the hard years of Years 11 and 12.” 3.

Global Understandings, Respect for Others/Cultural Knowledge:

12 students

“The benefit for the year group was that the Year got a better understanding of others, including disabled people, people suffering from poverty and the lives of priests and nuns. It helped us open our eyes to how fortunate we really are and the lives and hardships some face.” 4.

Etiquette:

7 students

“Better manners (a matter of style).”

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5.

Life Long Skills, CPR & First Aid:

6 students

“We were able to learn different methods of study which we were able to adopt for future reference.” 6.

Monastery Visit:

6 students

“We got the opportunity to see a more peaceful way of living, dedicated to God.”

What were the highlights of the Program for you? What did you find most useful and interesting? 1.

Monastery Visit

82%

2.

A Matter of Style Course

3.

CPR/First Aid Course

33%

4.

Wheel Chair Sports

29%

5.

Study Skills – Prue Salter

20%

6.

Visit to St Basil’s Homes

9%

7.

Other

6%

(Etiquette)

51%

a. Driver Education b. Introductory talk by Mr Mavrommatis

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Teacher Voices: I am sitting at my desk writing end of term reports and it occurs to me that in 2001 when I was doing much the same thing, I was wondering if I would make it to the end of the year. Obviously, I did make it to the end of that year and somehow, I am still here eight years later! So, in a time when long stays in one place have become uncommon in our profession, I have to ask myself “Why am I still here rather than somewhere else”? A simple question. A difficult answer. One very strong reason, perhaps the strongest reason, has to be the kids. When you hand out extra paper in the middle of a test and everyone says “thank you Dr. Hickie”; when the boys in your class are certain that you cannot handle the simplest operations of the computer system (because you, being of an older generation, naturally do not understand these things and every boy, being part of the smartest generation that ever was just naturally does), then you know that this is a special place and that these are special kids. It is great to feel that you are in a place where mutual respect, tolerance and humour are part of the fabric of your daily life. A second reason has to do with the people I work with. At St Spyridon, I have the extremely good fortune to work with an outstanding team, people who care, people who share a laugh and people who are devoted to doing the very best for every student in every class. This is an ideal of our profession, but an ideal that is rarely embodied in the way it is at St. Spyridon. Our philosophy is that students should always be encouraged to do more and to do more at a more sophisticated level. To this end, the team in English/History/Drama has worked with a constantly evolving curriculum, designing, trialing and sometimes discarding units of work so that what we teach is as interesting and rigorous as possible to these students at this time. This places enormous demands on teachers, well beyond what passes as acceptable and I will be eternally grateful for the willingness and support for each other that marks the work of these outstanding educators and wonderful people. Finally, to repeat a cliché, I do feel that I make a difference. St. Spyridon has given me the opportunity to put in place long term strategies that I hoped would make a difference to the learning outcomes for our students. I feel they have. But making a difference is not the work of one person or one idea or one moment in time. I believe that it is the way that the staff at St. Spyridon care for our students and see each one as an individual is what enables St. Spyridon College to make a difference in students’ lives. I am proud to be a part of that process. Dr Veronica Hickie Curriculum Leader English, History, Drama

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Parent Voice: I can proudly say that I have been a parent of St Spyridon College for seven years. During this time, all three of my children have commenced study here. I am extremely pleased in the way in which the College has met the individual learning needs of my children. They have all made impressive progress in all areas of their education. The warmth of our College environment is comforting for our students and their families. The classroom experiences of our students are both valuable and rewarding. The teachers are extremely patient and encouraging in their aim to develop the students mind, body and soul. During my time at the College, I have been involved in the P&F Association and committed as President for the last 18 months. This has given me the great pleasure of communicating and working together with the College and Parish executive as we strive to improve the teaching and learning resources of our College. Through my regular contact with the executive I have found them to be approachable, professional and friendly. This together with their regular feedback and constant support keep us motivated and interested to continue raising funds. We achieve this through regular fundraising events which also aim to promote our Greek cultural values and Greek Orthodox beliefs. In keeping with our tradition, our P &F committee, annually organize Palm Sunday Lunch, the selling of Paschal Candles, Greek Taverna Night, Mother’s Day Brunch and Spring Fair. Our college and Parish community look forward to supporting these events and activities. Enjoyment, laughter and learning are often experienced by P& F members while planning our menu for Palm Sunday, decorating Pachal Candles and choosing our live entertainment for Taverna night. Members break out in sing alongs with live guitar strumming while working a production line of endless gift wrapping for our various stalls. Success is always our outcome no matter what obstacles we face. Spring Fair being our all time favourite, was best remembered in 2009 as “Wet and Wild” due to heavy wet weather yet achieved excellent profit raising. The 2009 committee re-introduced Trivia Night to the community. It was well received thanks to the fun filled brain teasing, free jelly shots, endless prize giving and dancing the night away. In our efforts to achieve the goals of our association we have developed a strong hardworking and dynamic team. This team doesn’t hesitate to have a good laugh at regular meetings where even Mrs Stefanou responded with great humour during our 2010 AGM. Our committee is grateful to the families of our College community who show interest and support for all our events. This has enabled our College to gain some great teaching and learning resources which have included Promethean interactive white boards for all junior school classrooms and at present we are striving for our major contribution of funds towards upgraded IT facilities. I look forward to continuing my involvement in the growing and developing years of our College and anxiously await to share in its future achievements. Anna Stamoulis P & F President

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SECTION 8: SUMMARY FINANCIAL INFORMATION

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Commonwealth recurrent grants 31% Commonwealth & Other 5% Building Fund Contribution 3% Fees & Private Income 45% State recurrent grants 14% State-Interest subsidy 2%

Income 2009

14%

2% 31%

45%

Educational & Financial Reporting\BOS Annual Report 2009

5% 3%

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Salaries, Allowances, Related Expenditure 65% Subjects, Resources, Students始 Stationery 11% Administrative Expenses 11% Building and Operation Expenses 10% Loans Interest 3%

Expenditure 2009

10%

3%

11%

11%

65%

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BOS Annual Report 2009  

The St Spyridon BOS Annual Report of 2009

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