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Sunshine State TESOL 35th Annual Conference

Orlando, FL May 16-18, 2013


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CONVENTION SERVICES

OSCEOLA

CITRUS CROWN BALLROOM

SEMINOLE A

SEMINOLE B

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PHONES M

INDIAN RIVER (office) CAPE CANAVERAL (breakout #1) VOLUSIA (breakout #2)

PALM BEACH (breakout #3)

BROWARD (breakout #4) DADE (breakout #5) FLORIDA KEYS (breakout #6 )

1 Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

SPACE COAST ROOMS GOLD COAST ROOMS

DUVAL

ST. JOHNS

SARASOTA HILLSBOROUGH

PINELLAS

BUSINESS CENTER

SUN AND SURF ROOMS


TABLE OF CONTENTS

WELCOME

Welcome .......................................................................3 Greetings From The SSTESOL President ..............................6 Sunshine State Tesol of Florida .........................................7 GREETINGS,

In Sincere Appreciation ...................................................9 Featured Speakers ........................................................ 11

As Mayor of the City of Orlando, it is my pleasure to welcome you to the “City Beautiful� and to the Sunshine State Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (SSTESOL) 2013 Conference. I hope that your conference is a successful one, as attendees explore the theme “Expanding Traditions: Merging Methodology and Technology.�

Conference Snapshot (Three-Day View) ............................ 12

Orlando is a City on the rise.

Awards ....................................................................... 10

Thursday - Conference At A Glance .................................. 13

I encourage those of you visiting Orlando to experience all of the things that make Orlando one of the fastest growing, most business-friendly and quality of life-centered cities in our nation.

Friday - Conference At A Glance ...................................... 14 Saturday - Conference At A Glance .................................. 15 Thursday Session Descriptions ........................................ 16 Friday Session Descriptions............................................ 22 Saturday Session Descriptions ........................................ 30 List Of Exhibitors.......................................................... 34 Alphabetical List Of Presenters....................................... 36 Feedback Survey........................................................... 42 Notes.......................................................................... 44

8QGHUQHDWKDVN\OLQHWKDWKDVGRXEOHGLQMXVWWKHODVWÀYH\HDUVRXUG\QDPLFEXVWOLQJ 'RZQWRZQLVDOLYHZLWKÀQHGLQLQJH[FLWLQJQLJKWOLIHIDEXORXVVKRSSLQJ\HDUURXQGRXWGRRUDFWLYLWLHVDUWVDQGFXOWXUH professional sports and abundant parks. Our vibrant and diverse culture is evidenced by the many distinctive neighborhoods that dot our City. I invite you to walk our red brick, tree lined streets, visit our beautiful historic districts or our Downtown Arts District and take in Orlando’s crown jewel, Lake Eola Park. Again, welcome to Orlando! We are happy to have you here and hope you enjoy taking part in the wonderful experiences that can only be found here. Best wishes for a productive conference and continued success. I hope you enjoy your time here and I hope you visit Orlando again soon. Sincerely,

Buddy Dyer Mayor

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Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

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WELCOME

WELCOME

Dear Friends, As Mayor of Orange County, I offer my warm welcome to the Sunshine State Teachers ofEnglish to Speakers of Other Languages (SSTESOL) for their 2013 conference! We are honored that you chose to host your event at the Double Tree Universal Studios in Orlando. Moreover, I would like to commend SSTESOL on striving to give educators access to professional development, resources, and interaction, as well as provide leadership and advocacy in language policy issues. I am continuously amazed by the youth of today and believe that they are the leaders of our future. However, it is because of our educators that young people not only strive to succeed, but also set out to accomplish goals that will better themselves and their community. Thank you for your continued dedication and commitment to teachers and students in the state of Florida. Additionally, Orange County has much to offer to help make your event memorable. Most VLJQLÀFDQWZHKRVWPRUHWKDQPLOOLRQYLVLWRUVD\HDU$VLGHIURPRXUEHDXWLIXO)ORULGDZHDWKHU we are home to more than 90 attractions and exciting theme parks, a world-class convention center, an award winning international airport, more than 150 world-renowned golf courses, a wide variety RIVSRUWVHYHQWVÀQHPXVHXPVJUHDWVKRSSLQJFXOWXUDODFWLYLWLHVDQGPDQ\QDWXUDOZRQGHUVZKLFK makes our region unique. Additionally, our region is also home to top rated higher education institutions, the 2nd largest convention center in the nation and a burgeoning community of biotech, life sciences and research facilities, which have been recognized around the world for its forward thinking success. We are truly proud of being a major international destination. Orlando, the largest city in Orange County, has been cited as one of America’s ten best cities in which to live and work. We are extremely proud of that distinction and honored that you chose Orlando to host SSTESOL’s 2013 conference!

May 16, 2013 As Superintendent of the Osceola School District, I am extremely proud to welcome you to the heart of Central Florida for the 2013 Sunshine State Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages conference. No matter where you’ve traveled from in our great state to be with us throughout the conference, be assured that we are all here for the same reason: to create English language learners who are prepared for success in the 21st Century. Your conference theme, “Expanding Traditions: Merging Methodology and Technology� goes hand in hand with our district goal of the use of technology to increase student achievement, communication, assessment, and overall productivity.

Students in Osceola County proudly represent 107 different countries and speak over 97 languages, with Spanish, Arabic, Creole, Haitian-Creole, Portuguese, French, Urdu, Tagalog, Russian, and Chinese/Zhongwen rounding out the top ten. Our district-wide Hispanic student population average is 56%, with 26% being English Language Learners (ELLs). We value the unique perspective that our multilingual learners bring to the classroom, and work hard to ensure that they demonstrate the highest academic achievement possible. I also encourage you to make the most out of this wonderful conference and your time in Central Florida. Learn from each other and share the knowledge that you have. That is how we will continue to grow and expand our FROOHFWLYHNQRZOHGJHIRUWKHEHQHĂ€WRIVWXGHQWVLQWKLVJUHDWVWDWHDQGQDWLRQ Best wishes for an outstanding conference!

Sincerely, Melba Luciano Superintendent

Teresa Jacobs

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Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

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WELCOME

GREETINGS FROM THE SSTESOL PRESIDENT

As Superintendent of Seminole County Public Schools, I welcome you to the annual Sunshine State Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages Conference. The Sunshine State TESOL conference is an opportunity for you to learn from experts, network with practitioners and enjoy the company of other hard working educators.

May 16, 2013 Welcome to Orange County! It is an honor for Central Florida to be the site selected for the 2013 Conference for Sunshine State Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages. Your conference’s theme, “Expanding Traditions: Merging Methodology and Technology� is very timely and noteworthy. The conference’s many expert speakers will provide valuable professional development for our state’s TESOL professionals. For those of you that are visitors to our area, I hope you get to experience the real Central Florida. We are proud of our increasingly diverse community. Our students now represent 212 different countries and speak more than 160 different languages and dialects. I know this conference is an important opportunity to highlight our public elementary and secondary school, as well as our higher education partners - Valencia College and the University of Central Florida. I wish you a successful and productive 2013 SSTESOL Conference. Sincerely,

Barbara M. Jenkins, Ed.D. Superintendent

It is very important that as a state and as a nation, we UHFRJQL]HDQGVXSSRUWWKHEHQHÀWVRIVWXGHQWVVSHDNLQJD second language and embrace our English Language Learners as key contributors to the learning experiences of all of our students. As we prepare our students for a global economy, it is necessary to support how our ELL students are assimilated into our schools and communities. As we all know, the strength of our country comes from embracing our diversity and collectively working together for our future. Seminole County Public Schools is a diverse, multi-national district. Our students represent 139 different countries and 109 different languages. Other than English, the top ten languages spoken by our students are Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, Ukrainian, Tamil (language spoken in South India & East Sri Lanka), Russian, Gujarati (west coast of India) and French. During the last ten years, Seminole County Public Schools’ Hispanic population has increased to 22 % of the student population and currently we have approximately 2,450 English Language Learners. Seminole County Public Schools’ English Language Learners are on a path of continuous OHDUQLQJJDLQVLPSURYHPHQW2XUGLVWULFWKDVLPSOHPHQWHGVFLHQWLÀFUHVHDUFKEDVHGSURJUDPV and trained our ESOL teachers to work to ensure every student has an opportunity for academic success. In addition, starting in 2013-14, SCPS will offer a Dual Language program at three elementary schools. All of these efforts are supported by a committed School Board, and a strong parent and community network dedicated to our students. Seminole County Public Schools takes pride in the academic and social success of our English Language Learners, is committed to on-going training and support for our ESOL teachers, and embraces the innovation and diversity that our English Language Learners bring to the school district.

:DOW*ULIĂ€Q

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Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

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GREETINGS FROM THE SSTESOL PRESIDENT

SUNSHINE STATE TESOL OF FLORIDA CONFERENCE TEAM MEMBERS

SSTESOL HISTORY

May 16, 2013 Welcome to Orlando, and the 35th annual SSTESOL Conference, Expanding Traditions: Merging Methodology and Technology! We are glad you are here and look forward to this time together. 7KHFRQIHUHQFHWHDPKDVZRUNHGKDUGWRSODQDQGGHOLYHUDZRUOGFODVVHYHQWÀOOHGZLWK many opportunities for exciting and rewarding professional growth. If you are new to the TESOL FRPPXQLW\ZHH[WHQGDZDUPZHOFRPHLI\RXDUHDYHWHUDQ667(62/SDUWLFLSDQWZHOFRPHEDFN Whether your focus is K-12, higher education, EFL, adult ESOL, or teacher preparation, we think you ZLOOÀQGVRPHWKLQJRILQWHUHVWWR\RXRYHUWKHQH[WIHZGD\V In accordance with our theme, this year’s conference will provide a forum for sharing innovative ideas and strategies for integrating technology for meaningful classroom use. The promise of technology lies in its ability to support student learning and creativity and enrich learning environments. I hope that in attending this SSTESOL conference, you are able to increase your knowledge, gain new skills, gather ideas, and broaden your perspectives. :KLOH\RX¡UHKHUHSOHDVHWDNHWKHWLPHWRYLVLW\RXUORFDODIÀOLDWHERRWK3OHDVHDOVRYLVLWRXUSXEOLVKHUVDQGYHQGRUV7KHUH\RXZLOO ÀQGDQDUUD\RIPDWHULDOVWRKRQH\RXUVNLOOVRUHQKDQFH\RXUFRXUVHRIIHULQJV2XUH[KLELWRUVDUHWKHEDFNERQHRIRXUFRQIHUHQFHDQG have graciously sponsored several of our expert plenary speakers. Finally, after all is said and done, enjoy Orlando. We chose this venue largely because of the family-friendly atmosphere. After a full day of academic sessions and multiple workshops, take some time to relax and explore the city. Take advantage of the cultural and linguistic diversity that makes this area a prime destination. Thank you for coming, and I hope you have a fantastic conference experience. Please feel free to stop and introduce yourself and share your feedback. The conference team strives to make this event exceed your expectations every year. Collegially, Kisha C. Bryan SSTESOL President

When organized in 1975 the genesis of SSTESOL originally was a four state group: Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Florida TESOL. In 1980, this group adopted the name Gulf TESOL and had about 300 members. At the same time another group with membership focused in Southeast Florida retained the name Florida TESOL and hosted the 1987 TESOL International Convention in Miami Beach. In 1990, Broward separated from Florida TESOL in the southeast, formed the Broward TESOL Council, and joined Gulf TESOL as its ÀUVWFKDSWHU7KHQH[WWZRFKDSWHUVWRMRLQZHUH1RUWKHDVW)ORULGD TESOL and Treasure Coast TESOL. By 1995, there were about 450 members in Gulf TESOL. A controversial and unifying issue for TESOL folks in the state in the 1990’s was the implementation of the Florida Consent Decree. In 1995, the membership voted to become Sunshine State TESOL, a Florida organization. In 1997, SSTESOL hosted the TESOL International Convention in Orlando, giving the organization pubOLFLW\DQGDÀQDQFLDOERRVW7KDW\HDU667(62/RIÀFLDOO\GHÀQHG board member roles and responsibilities. At the same time, the once separate Florida TESOL organization moved to dissolution and 0LDPL'DGH7(62/ZDVHVWDEOLVKHGDVDFKDSWHUDIÀOLDWHWKXV SSTESOL came to represent the entire state of Florida. In October 2000, SSTESOL hosted the Southeast Regional TESOL Conference in Miami.

James May

Lindi Kourtellis

Conference Chair

Program Chair

Kisha C. Bryan

Stephen Johnson

SSTESOL President

Treasurer

Also at this time, the board began work on the development of a strategic forward plan. Organizational development, professional GHYHORSPHQWDQGDGYRFDF\ZHUHLGHQWLĂ€HGDVWKUHHNH\SODQQLQJ areas. Annually, short and long term goals are created and reviewed by the board in these categories. Currently, SSTESOL has eight active chapters, and membership has generally stayed close to 750-800. In 2006, SSTESOL again hosted the TESOL International Convention in Tampa Bay, and in 2010, the Southeast Regional TESOL Conference in Miam

Ekaterina Goussakova

Teresa Lucas

Exhibitor Liaison

Exhibitor Liaison

STATE CHAPTERS

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Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Bay Area Regional TESOL (BARTESOL): Don Modesto

Miami-Dade TESOL: Elvia Hernandez

Broward ESOL Council (BEC): Monica Nelsas

Northeast Florida TESOL (NEFTESOL): Betsy Sotillo-Gaura

Central Florida TESOL (CFTESOL): Gerry Stewart

Palm Beach TESOL: Jean Bayol

Emerald Coast TESOL: Laureen Fregeau

Suncoast TESOL: TBA

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

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SUNSHINE STATE TESOL OF FLORIDA 2012 - 2013 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

SSTESOL PAST PRESIDENTS

President Kisha Bryan, Florida State College at Jacksonville

Immediate Past President Patricia Grant, Duval County Public Schools

First Vice President James May, Valencia College

Second Vice President Lindi Kourtellis, Valencia College

Secretary Betty Green, Daytona State College

Treasurer Stephen Johnson, Miami Dade College

Members-at-Large Teresa Lucas (2010-2013), Florida International University Arlene Costello (2010-2013), Escambia County Public Schools Ester de Jong (2011-2014), University of Florida Li-Lee Tunceren (2012-2015), St. Petersburg College Melanie Gonzalez (2012-2015), University of Central Florida Christine Dahnke (2012-2015), Duval County Public Schools

Alternate Members-at-Large Katya Goussakova (2012-2013), Seminole State College

([2IĂ€FLR%RDUG0HPEHU Receiving Secretary Cynthia Schuemann, Miami Dade College

The Messenger Editor Betty Green, Daytona State College

SSTESOL Journal Editors Ester de Jong, University of Florida Maria Coady, University of Florida Candace Harper, University of Florida

Webmaster James May, Valencia College

Social Media Liaison Lindi Kourtellis, Valencia College

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IN SINCERE APPRECIATION

1975-1976 Carol Cargill 1976-1977 Mary Jane Schenk 1977-1978 Jane Harder 1978-1979 John Rogers 1979-1980 Sheila Acevedo 1980-1981 Judy Judd Price 1981-1982 Pat Byrd 1982-1983 Bob King 1983-1984 Susan McFalls 1984-1985 Jerry Messee 1985-1986 Bill Powell 1986-1987 Edwina Hoffman 1987-1988 Luz Paredes Lono 1988-1989 Randall Alford 1989-1990 Consuelo Stebbins 1990-1991 Yvonne Cadiz 1991-1992 Linda Evans 1992-1993 Sandra Fradd 1993-1994 Nancy Lucas 1994-1995 Allene Grognet 1995-1996 Judy Strother 1996-1997 Pat Ellis 1997-1998 Judy Jameson 1998-1999 Michael Kraft 1999-2000 Marilyn Santos 2000-2001 Sandra Hancock 2001-2002 Katherine Dunlop 2002-2003 Betty Green 2003-2004 Cheryl Benz/Betty Green 2004-2005 Suze Lindor 2005-2006 Jose Carmona 2006-2007 Carmen Morales-Jones 2007-2008 Roger Thompson 2008-2009 Ann Jackman 2009-2010 Cynthia Schuemann 2010-2011 Nora Dawkins 2011-2012 Patricia Grant

SPECIAL THANK YOU Arnhilda Badia, President of the JosĂŠ MartĂ­ Foundation Chane Eplin, SALA Bureau Chief at the Florida Department of Education

CENTRAL FLORIDA TESOL — HOST CHAPTER Gerry Stewart, Center for Multilingual Multicultural Studies Juliette Gjini, Seminole County Public Schools

Mayor Teresa Jacobs, Orange County

Rachel Wilkinson, Center for Multilingual Multicultural Studies

Mayor Buddy Dyer, City of Orlando 6XSHULQWHQGHQW:DOW*ULIĂ€Q6HPLQROH&RXQW\ Superintendent Melba Luciano, Osceola County

DOUBLETREE ORLANDO

Superintendent Barbara M. Jenkins, Orange County

Jill Jackson, DoubleTree Orlando Jessie Austudillo, DoubleTree Orlando

2013 CONFERENCE TEAM

Jay Varner, DoubleTree Orlando

James May, Valencia College Lindi Kourtellis, Valencia College

SPECIAL THANKS TO THESE VOLUNTEERS

Kisha Bryan, Florida State College at Jacksonville

Lindsay Vecchio - University of Florida

Katya Goussakova, Seminole State College

He Stephanie Huang - University of Florida

Teresa Lucas, Florida International University

Ahyea Alice Jo - University of Florida

Stephen Johnson, Miami Dade College

Seongah Byeon - University of Florida

SSTESOL Patricia Grant, Duval County Public Schools

SPECIAL THANKS TO THESE SPONSORS/SUPPORTERS

Ester de Jong, University of Florida

Jeff Janelle, jeffjanelle.com

Li-Lee Tunceren, St. Petersburg College

More than Just Ink

Melanie Gonzalez, University of Central Florida

Carolina TESOL

Arlene Costello, Escambia County Public Schools

Glenda Norvell, New Readers Press

Cynthia Schuemann, Miami Dade College

Robyn Smith, New Readers Press

Betty Green, Daytona State College

Keith Folse, University of Central Florida

Christine Dahnke, Duval County Public Schools

TESOL International

Proposal Reviewers Adult ESL: Melanie Gonzalez, Katya Goussakova, Stephen Johnson Advocacy: Arlene Costello Dual language/Bilingual Education: Ester deJong, Seongah Byeon EFL: Lindi Kourtellis K-12: Patricia Grant Teacher Education: Kisha Bryan, Ester deJong, Lindsay Vecchio, He Stephanie Huang, Ahyea Alice Jo Technology: James May, Li-Lee Tunceren

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

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AWARDS

FEATURED SPEAKERS

2013 PRESIDENT’S AWARD Dr. Maria I. Pouncey

DR. JANET ZADINA Dr. Maria I. Pouncey is the project director for the Migrant Education Program with the Panhandle Area Educational Consortium. For more than 21 years, she has worked with migrant and farmworker families, English language learners and community organizations that serve them. Passionate about education, she has consistently collaborated with various inter and intrastate migrant programs, school districts, and interested agencies and communities – providing training and guidance relevant to the Title 1, Part C Migrant Education Program and English learner services and accommodations. Further supporting migrant and farmworker families, she has organized a Migrant Seasonal Farmworker Program that offers additional resources to migrant families and stipends to support participation in educational programs that help further their educational and employment goals. Dr. Pouncey has collaborated with the local community college and university to provide ESOL professional development for teachers of students from migrant families. For the ODVWÀYHVXPPHUVVKHKDVSURYLGHGRSSRUWXQLWLHVIRUSUHVHUYLFH(62/WHDFKHUVWRZRUN with these students in a summer camp setting. Dr. Pouncey supports life-long learning, encourages migrant and seasonal farmworker English language learner families to participate in their children’s education, and regularly educates parents on the rights of English language learners. She is a staunch advocate for those families who live at the margins of society and the teachers who have the knowledge and passion to educate them.

2013 OUTSTANDING EDUCATOR AWARD RECIPIENT

Thursday, May 16th – 2:00pm to 3:15pm in Orange Dr. Janet Zadina is an Educational Neuroscientist who sees brain research through the eyes of a teacher and teaching through the eyes of a researcher. After twenty years’ teaching experience at both high VFKRRODQGFROOHJHOHYHOVVKHEHFDPHDFRJQLWLYHQHXURVFLHQWLVW6KHEULGJHVWKHÀHOGVRIHGXFDWLRQ and neuroscience through her work as a researcher, teacher, author, and international speaker.

DR. TIM COLLINS Friday, May 17th – 12:00pm to 1:30pm in Orange Dr. Tim Collins, Ph.D., is associate professor, ESL and bilingual education, at National Louis University in Chicago, one of the oldest and most renowned colleges of education in the U.S. The author of over 25 textbooks and media publications, Dr. Collins is the founder or co-founder of two technology in education companies, and an early mover in both epublishing and mobile learning with cell phones. He has taught in Spain, Morocco, Taiwan, and the United States.

Dr. Myra Medina Dr. Myra Medina is a professor at Miami Dade College in the department of ESL and Foreign Languages at the North Campus. Her primary responsibilities are to teach English for Academic Purposes and Spanish. Because English and Spanish are her areas of expertise, she has published in both languages. Her publications in Spanish include SHGDJRJLFDOPDWHULDOVOLWHUDU\UHYLHZVDQGDVKRUWVWRU\DQGLQ(QJOLVKVKHKDVFRDXthored ESL textbooks among other publications. She is a member of the editorial board of Baquiana, a literary publication in Spanish. Some of the recognitions Dr. Medina has received are an Endowed Teaching Chair from Miami-Dade College, the NISOD award for Teaching Excellence from the University of Texas at Austin, the Modern Languages Alumni Honor Roll Award from Rhode Island College, the Academic Excellence Award from CrĂ­tica Literaria Dominicana, and Distinguished Professor Promotion. In 2011, she received a grant through the Fulbright Specialist Program to train faculty at the Universidad APEC in the Dominican Republic in the areas of theories of language acquisition and second language methodology. She has recently been selected to serve as a peer reviewer in the Fulbright Specialist Program in the discipline category of Applied Linguistics/TEFL.

12

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

DR. THOMAS COBB Saturday, May 18th – 9:00am to 10:00am in Orange Dr. Tom Cobb has taught and coordinated ESL reading programs and trained ESL teachers in many parts of the world (Saudi Arabia, Oman, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Japan, England, and Canada). He currently teaches teachers and does research and development in applied linguistics at the University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. His development work is mainly involved with building and maintaining his Lextutor website, which is devoted to supplying ESL and French teachers and learners worldwide with tools for “data driven� language learning.

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

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THURSDAY, MAY 16TH

7:00am – 8:15am

Registration

14

$IĂ€OLDWH%UHDNIDVW (Invitation Only)

Publisher / Vendor Set-Up

8:30am – 5:00pm

8:00am – 5:00pm

Publisher Exhibits (closed for lunch 12:00pm – 1:00pm)

8:30am – 5:00pm 9:00am – 11:45am

Publisher Exhibits (closed for lunch 12:00pm – 12:45pm) 45-Minute and 90-Minute Concurrent Sessions

9:00am – 11:45am

45-Minute and 90-Minute Concurrent Sessions 3ODWHG/XQFK$ZDUGV 5DIĂ H 'U7LP Collins)

12:00pm – 12:45pm 1:45pm – 6:30pm

Networking – Lunch on Your Own 45-Minute and 90-Minute Concurrent Sessions

1:00pm – 1:45pm 4:45pm – 5:30pm

45-Minute Concurrent Sessions SSTESOL Annual Business Meeting

8:00am – 2:00pm Plenary Speaker (Dr. Tom Cobb)

Registration

10:15am – 1:00pm

7:45am – 8:45am 45-Minute and 90-Minute Concurrent Sessions

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Departure

1:00pm

Plenary Speaker (Dr. Janet Zadina) 6:00-­7:30

4:30-­5:15

3:30-­4:15

2:00  -­  3:15

1:00  -­  1:45

12:00  -­  12:45

Levy “Migrant Laptops: Credit Recovery for the Children of Farmworkers�

Belvis “Persuasive Writing Instruction in a Critical Literacy Framework for Middle School ELLs�

LĂłpez Estrada “Eliciting Students’ Extended Use of Spanish During Whole Group Instruction in a First Grade Two-Way Immersion Classroomâ€?

NETWORKING  -­  LUNCH  ON  YOUR  OWN

Al Khaiyali “Engaging EFL Learners to Develop Comprehension Strategies Using Picture Books�

Trotta “Using Television and Movies to Develop Classroom Activities�

Perez-Prado “Using Social Networking & Dramatization in TESOL Teacher Education�

Porter “The Use of iBooks and iTunes U in the Classroom�

Kellerman “Utilizing PowerPoint Technology to Successfully Teach ELL Students Oral Presentation Skills�

RECEPTION Â (COURTYARD)

Verde “Using an Academic Vocabulary Tracking Chart in the K-12 Classroom�

Karlsson “Quantitative and qualitative aspects of L1 (Swedish) and L2 (English) idiom comprehension�

Lucas “Habits of Mind for ESL Educators�

PLENARY  SPEAKER  –  DR.  JANET  ZADINA   “USING  BRAIN  RESEARCH  TO  ENHANCE  AND  ENERGIZE  LANGUAGE  INSTRUCTION:   THE  MULTIPLE  PATHWAYS  MODEL�   ORANGE

Tran, Nichols & Folse “Three Components of Successful Conversation Classes�

Benitez-Rosa & Acevedo “Know Your Literacy Shifts!â€? Deacon & Nakamura “Teaching Japanese Learners of (QJOLVK3UHSRVLWLRQV'LIĂ€FXOW versus Easy Differencesâ€?

O’Donnell & Gilbert “Understanding Student Anxiety in the Classroom�

Williams & Habib “Training ESOL Teachers through On-line Instruction�

Eplin “Update on Florida’s English Language Learners (ELLs) for the 2013 Sunshine State TESOL Conference�

Dwyer & Platt “Lessons from Angola, Rwanda, and Bangladesh: Bringing them back to Florida�

DADE

Program at a Glance

Vecchio “The Educational Experiences of Haitian Adolescents with Limited Formal Schooling�

11:00  -­  11:45

9:00am – 10:00am

Publisher / Vendor Set-Up

Abobaker “The Effect of English Captioning While Listening on Second Language Learners Comprehension�

FRIDAY, MAY 17TH

10:00  -­  10:45

2:00pm – 3:15pm

SATURDAY, MAY 18TH Torrey “Linking Social Studies Curriculum to USCIS Naturalization Requirements�

6:00pm BROWARD

Publisher Exhibits (closed after 12:00pm)

Kellerman & Schroeder “Using Video Clips from Popular TV Shows to Teach Effective Recognition and Utilization of Tones to ESL Students�

12:00pm – 1:30pm 8:30am – 1:00pm

Lopez Estrada, Rodriguez & Bonet “21st Century Classrooms: Exploring Perspectives, Negotiating ComputerMediated Landscapes, and Integrating Technology in the ESOL Classroom�

Registration

8:00am – 10:00am

Green “Save�

Welcome Reception Registration

9:00-­9:45

3:00pm – 6:00pm

6:00PM – 7:30PM

Chou “Strategies Using Word to Word Dictionaries as Accommodation for FCAT�

Board Orientation and Registration Training 45-Minute and 90-Minute Concurrent Sessions

Deacon “Building Graphemic Awareness: Arabic Orthographic Errors in English�

1:00pm – 3:00pm 3:30pm – 5:15pm

PALM Â BEACH

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15TH

CAPE

Bryan, Grant & Green ´+RZWR6WDUWDQ$IÀOLDWH Chapter�

Zadina “Using Brain Research to Orchestrate Language Learning: The Multiple Pathways Model�

May “Flipping Your Classroom: Curating Engaging LevelAppropriate Content for Students�

Navarre & Deuel “Taking Tradition to TimeSaving Technology�

Erben “A Pedagogic ESOL Essential: Web 2.0 Tools�

May “The Power of Backchanneling: Free Tools to Enhance Classroom Communication�

FLORIDA Â KEYS

Thursday,  Friday,  &  Saturday:  May  16-­18,  2013   DoubleTree  by  Hilton  Hotel  at  the  Entrance  to  Universal  Orlando   Orlando,  Florida

CANAVERAL

Expanding Traditions: Merging Methodology & Technology 35th Annual Conference – Sunshine State TESOL

VOLUSIA

TIME

CONFERENCE SNAPSHOT (THREE-DAY VIEW) THURSDAY - CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE


Le “Pathways: Academic Literacy through National Geographic Content” Reilly & Folse “I Am Boring: A Corpus Study of -ing and -ed Participial Adjectives”

Graney “The Flipped Class: Year Two”

10:00 -­  10:45

11:00 -­  11:45

Torrey “E-learning or Traditional Format for ESOL Teacher Preparation Courses”

Fisher “Interactive Notebooks and Foldables for ELLs”

Hammond Carrasquel “Assessing ESL Speaking Skills (With and Without Technology)”

12:15 -­  1:00

11:15 -­  12:00

10:15 -­  11:00

9:00-­10:00

Haring, Valdeos, Hancock & Wedding “Cruisin’ in My Wagon: Engaging ELLs in Language Learning and Culture Study through Doo Wop & Swing Songs”

Templeman, Harvey, Estes & Naghitorabi “The Culture of You: Students and Social Media”

Torrey “Help! I Don’t Speak Their Language”

Ells”

Technology Resources For

“A Journey Into Instructional

Masi & Paneque

Smith “Navigating Zamblish and Minibuses: Lessons Learned in Lusaka”

d

le cel

DADE

Liontas “Straight from the Horse’s Mouth: How to Teach Idioms and Not Lose Your Marbles”

Can

Ballard, Galeano & Torres “Integration of Technology in ESOL ÀHOGH[SHULHQFHµ

Anton “The Contemporary Music Approach to Teaching ESL”

PALM BEACH

Jones & DeLorenzo “ESL Students in the Writing Center: Inquiry and Action”

Shaqareq & McMurria “Linking Minds to Technology”

BROWARD

Seren “Interactive Read Aloud”

Vargas & Shelly “Supplementing Academic ESL Curricula with Authentic Materials”

DADE

Manner, Foronda, Powell & Flores “Professional Development in ESL: a Virtual Model”

Tunceren & Benson “Advancing Critical Literacies in Online EAP Courses”

Rodriguez Spence “The Term Paper and Technology: Avoiding the Pitfalls”

FLORIDA KEYS

Smith “A Treasure Hunt Approach: Using eLibraryUSA to Teach Literature Reviews and Increase Digital Literacy”

Bittenbender Royal, McGreger, Murphy, Victor & Kilkowska “Developing a Service Learning Course for IEP Students”

Jalilzadeh & Dastgoshadeh “Reconceptualization of Validity: Post Methods Perspective”

Torrey “Implementing CCSS for TESOL/BE courses in Teacher Education Programs”

DeLorenzo “Parental Beliefs and Attitudes on Enrollment in a Dual Language Program at a Central Florida Elementary School” Jiang & Perkins “A Study of the Peters Effectiveness of Recasts: “A Team-based The Case of ELT in Learning Approach in the ESP classroom” Jiangsu Union Technical Institute” McPeek “The Effect of Native Writing Systems on the Interlanguage English Pronunciation of EFL and ESL Learners”

Anton “Know Your True Value As a Teacher” Hussein “Integrating Technology into genre based writing classes”

Reilly ´%HQHÀFLDO)XQFWLRQV of Poetry in Second Language Learning” Bittenbender Royal “Avoiding Heterosexism: The New Normal”

Trujillo “Balancing Common Core, Technology, and Cooperative Learning for ESOL Students”

Destrades-Mendoza & Johnstone “Using iPads to Enhance Intensive Academic English Instruction”

Elturki & Abobaker “Using Technology to Support ESL Teaching and Learning”

Graney “Making an ebook: %HQHÀWWLQJIURP0\ Mistakes”

Collins “Building Your Own Interactive Textbook”

Lopez-Lopez & Hussein “Integrating Technology in the Classroom”

Cobb “Building Your own Web Content for Learners in 10 Minutes”

FLORIDA KEYS

Contreras & Espinal “Please TURN ON your Cell Phones”

Liontas “Contextualizing Oracy and Literacy Instruction in the Content Areas”

Quijano “How to Better Assist our Spanish ELLs”

Lapp, Weber, Ariza & Zelden “Common Core Standards for ELLS in Middle School”

PLENARY SPEAKER    -­  DR.  TOM  COBB “10  USES  OF  A  MILLION  WORD  CORPUS  IN  ESL” ORANGE

VOLUSIA

Goodman & Davis “AEROBIC & Visual PRONUNCIATION”

SSTESOL Annual, Business, Meeting

Devanny & Walton “Conversation Essentials”

deJong Getting Published: The SSTESOL Journal

Proietti, Folse & Denisenko “Five Practical ways to Teach Present Perfect”

Arsolino & Esparza “TFAs and ELLs: Lessons Taught and Lessons Learned”

Brinks Lockwood & Sippell “Trying to Flip the ESL Classroom: Applying Academic Strategies in Textbooks to Authentic Materials”

Hewett “The English Language Fellow Program”

Jones, Proietti & Keeler “Perceptions of Native and Non-Native Teachers in Asia”

Manner, Delgado, Hardy & Piro “Implementation of Instructional Strategies in ESL through Collaboration and Technology”

Destrades-Mendoza & Johnstone “Methodology and Implementation of Mobile and Blended Learning in an Intensive ESL Program”

Clarcq “Embedded Reading: Scaffolding Text for Student Success”

CANAVERAL

CAPE

Maldonado, Pappa & Rojas “Challenges Faced by Hispanic ELLs and Ways to Overcome Them”

TIME

5:45 -­  6:30

4:45 -­  5:30

3:45 -­  4:30

2:45 -­  3:30

1:45 -­  2:30

12:00 -­  1:30

BROWARD

PLENARY SPEAKER  –  DR.  TIM  COLLINS   “WHAT’S  WRONG  RIGHT  WITH  EBOOKS?  WHAT’S  THE  IDEAL  EBOOK  FOR  LANGUAGE  LEARNING?”   PLATED  LUNCH,  AWARDS,  &  RAFFLE   ORANGE

d lle e c Can

Goodman & Davis “Your Present Perfect Life!”

9:00-­9:45

PALM BEACH

AFFILIATE BREAKFAST  BY  INVITATION  ONLY  (ORANGE)

VOLUSIA

Gjini & Crum “Inclusion Through Team Teaching

CAPE CANAVERAL

Foster & Horwitz “Learning from the Test: Going Beyond Class Averages”

8:00 -­  8:45

TIME

FRIDAY - CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE SATURDAY - CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013 17


THURSDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

THURSDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS Thursday, 9:00am – 10:30am Broward

9:00 a.m. Thursday, 9:00am – 9:45am Cape Canaveral

Utilizing Audacity Software and TOEFL Speaking Tasks to Improve ELLs Pronunciation and Intonation Patterns 0DQ\(//VKDYHGLIĂ€FXOWLHVOHDUQLQJWKHFRUUHFW(QJOLVKSURQXQciation and intonation patterns of the language. How can we as instructors help them improve their pronunciation and intonation? This challenging task can be met by utilizing the computer recording technology, Audacity. Combining recording technology with speaking tasks while providing feedback will facilitate improvement. Deborah Kellerman, University of Florida

Thursday, 9:00am – 9:45am Volusia

Building Graphemic Awareness: Arabic Orthographic Errors in English ,QWZRLQGHSHQGHQWVWXGLHV 'HDFRQ'XQODS LWZDVVWDWLVWLcally shown that Arabic students make more errors than students of other L1 backgrounds (including languages without Romanized alphabets). Reasons and solutions for this will be discussed in order to correct common deviant patterns via new grapheme to phoneme awareness. Robert Deacon, University of Florida Thursday, 9:00am – 9:45am Palm Beach

Strategies Using Word to Word Dictionaries as Accommodation for FCAT Most schools have dictionaries in the classroom. In Florida, LEP students can use word to word bilingual dictionaries as accommodation at FCAT. This session explores several effective strategies on students using dictionaries to acquire academic vocabulary and as ELL accommodation at FCAT.

Linking Social Studies Curriculum to USCIS Naturalization Requirements Current and proposed Immigration Reform provides a ‘path to FLWL]HQVKLS¡UHTXLULQJ(QJOLVKODQJXDJHSURĂ€FLHQF\DQGNQRZOHGJH of U.S. civics topics. How can we prepare students and connect to Florida’s curriculum standards? What resources are available? How can immigrants be helped by schools or volunteer and advocacy organizations? Evelyn Torrey, Florida Atlantic University Thursday, 9:00am – 10:30am Dade

Lessons from Angola, Rwanda, and Bangladesh: Bringing Them Back to Florida In this interactive workshop, participants engage in stories from three developing countries, acknowledging pedagogical shifts in expertise from the foreigner to the local. Participants then connect these stories to Floridian contexts by examining their students’ communities and materials developed from their students’ lives, and planning lessons emerging from such orientation. Eric Dwyer, Florida International University Elizabeth Platt, Florida State University Thursday, 9:00am – 9:45am Florida Keys

The Power of Backchanneling: Free Tools to Enhance Classroom Communication Would you like to read your students’ minds? Know what they know and what they don’t? Know what your students are thinking while they are thinking it? This session will demonstrate free and easy to use techniques for both live-time and asynchronous backchanneled communication. All skill levels welcome. BYOD!

Thursday, 10:00am – 10:45am Palm Beach

10:00 a.m. Thursday, 10:00am – 10:45am Cape Canaveral

The Educational Experiences of Haitian Adolescents with Limited Formal Schooling

21st Century Classrooms: Exploring Perspectives, Negotiating Computer-Mediated Landscapes, and Integrating Technology in the ESOL Classroom

Many Florida ELLs are Haitian-born and some have had limited forPDOVFKRROLQJ'XULQJWKHLUĂ€UVW\HDULQD)ORULGDKLJKVFKRROZKDW are the experiences of Haitian students with limited formal schooling? Findings from interviews with Haitian students, high school ESOL teachers, and mainstream classroom teachers will be presented.

Global trends highlight the importance of technology use to allow students to demonstrate learning process, thus facilitating language learning in meaningful contexts (Eaton, 2010). The authors will illuminate current conversations concerning technology integration LQHGXFDWLRQH[SORUHEHQHĂ€WVDQGFKDOOHQJHVRIWHFKQRORJ\XVHIRU ESOL teaching, and share recommendations.

Lindsay Vecchio, University of Florida

Patricia LĂłpez Estrada, Technological Institute of Costa Rica Prisca Rodriguez, University of Florida Maria C. Bonet, Prince Georges Community College

Thursday, 10:00am – 10:45am Volusia

Using Video Clips from Popular TV Shows to Teach Effective Recognition and Utilization of Tones to ESL Students Many ESL students frequently have problems recognizing and identifying different tones like sarcasm in conversations or lectures when used by native speakers. Consequently, they then have problems producing those tones in their own speech. This lesson plan teaches DFFXUDWHUHFRJQLWLRQLGHQWLĂ€FDWLRQDQGUHSOLFDWLRQRIWRQHXVLQJ video clips from popular TV shows and traditional group role playing activities. Deborah Kellerman, University of Florida Jennifer Schroeder, University of Florida

Thursday, 10:00am – 10:45am Florida Keys

A Pedagogic ESOL Essential: Web 2.0 Tools This presentation explores how web 2.0 technology can be employed in ESOL classrooms. Teachers will have a roadmap based on simple and manageable steps to implement over 200 web 2.0 tools throughRXWWKHVFKRRO\HDULOOXVWUDWLQJKRZWHDFKHUVFDQPDNHXVHRIZHE tools to manage, prepare, present, facilitate, extend, apply, generate and create ESOL instruction in meaningful ways. Tony Erben, University of Tampa

11:00 a.m. Thursday, 11:00am – 11:45am Cape Canaveral

The Effect of English Captioning While Listening on Second Language Learners Comprehension This research paper aims to investigate a combination of scaffolding strategies such as reading captions while listening (bimodal texts) and topic and technology familiarity on ESL listening comprehension. Reima Abobaker, Washington State University

James May, Valencia College

Arthur Chou, Academic Learning Company

K-12 Programs

18

EFL

Technology

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Teacher Education

Dual language/ Bilingual Education

Community College EA P/Adult/ IE P Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

Special Topics

Advocacy

19


THURSDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

This presentation will provide an update on Florida’s ELL data, including CELLA data, FCAT data, AMAO data, and graduation data. Also, information will be provided on ELLs and the Common Core, PARCC accommodations for ELLs, the ELPA21 consortium, and any other timely ELL updates.

Using Social Networking & Dramatization in TESOL Teacher Education

Three Components of Successful Conversation Classes

Using Television and Movies to Develop Classroom Activities

This workshop will involve participants in a teacher training activity that incorporates social networking and dramatization to promote engaged interaction among English Language Learners and their peers. Instagram and facebook will be used to demonstrate the potential of social networking as a springboard for interactive classrooms.

In this session, the presenters will describe three components of a successful conversation course, including the structure of the class, topics for conversation, and management of conversations. Activities to encourage conversation and cultural issues that arise will also be discussed. Handouts will be provided.

Learn how to create activities inspired by movies and television. Examples from grammar and vocabulary exercises to intercultural communication role-plays will be demonstrated.

Aixa Perez-Prado, Florida International University

Rose Tran, University of Central Florida William Nichols, University of Central Florida Keith Folse, University of Central Florida

Chane Eplin, Florida Department of Education Thursday, 11:00am – 11:45am Florida Keys Thursday, 11:00am – 11:45am Palm Beach

Engaging EFL Learners to Develop Comprehension Strategies Using Picture Books Picture books were used as supplementary materials to teach some basic comprehension strategies in the seventh and eighth EFL classrooms overseas. Results of qualitative data analysis showed some JHQHUDOÀQGLQJVLQWHUPVRIVWXGHQWV·RYHUDOOHQJDJHPHQWDQGWKHLU comprehension learning process.

Save time, document actions, eliminate time-consuming paper and pencil tasks, and easily retrieve ELL student data. Document ELL VWXGHQWSURJUHVVWRZDUGSURÀFLHQF\DQGSURGXFHDFWLRQDEOHGDWDZLWK the push of a button. Eliminate lost documents. SuccessEd’s Steve Navarre and Mellony Deuel present the company’s cloud-based, digital ELL solution. Steve Navarre, SuccessEd, LLC Mellony Deuel, SuccessEd, LLC

1:00 p.m.

Thursday, 11:00am – 11:45am Broward

This credit-recovery program for a highly mobile population describes how school districts can support CLD students to meet graduation requirements both state and federal. Michele Lopez-Stafford Levy, Broward College Ft. Lauderdale

20

EFL

Persuasive text composition is an academic language skill that students must develop to succeed in school. This session reports on a research project in which middle school ELLs produced various persuasive texts within a critical literacy framework, following the self-regulated strategy development model (Harris & Graham, 1996). Renee Belvis, Pinellas County Public Schools

Training ESOL Teachers through On-line Instruction This presentation will explain how on-line instructional delivery systems can facilitate ESOL teacher education. After providing an overview of previous research about on-line instruction in teacher education, the presenters will offer strategies that can be used to engage students, provide content material, and assess their understanding of ESOL methodology Gwendolyn M.Williams, University of West Florida Amany Habib, University of West Florida

K-12 Programs

Persuasive Writing Instruction in a Critical Literacy Framework for Middle School ELLs

Thursday, 1:00pm – 1:45pm Cape Canaveral

Technology

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Teacher Education

Thursday, 1:00pm – 1:45pm Broward

Eliciting Students’ Extended Use of Spanish during Whole Group Instruction in a First Grade Two-Way Immersion Classroom The qualitative study describes how a bilingual teacher elicited students’ extended use of Spanish during whole group instruction in a WZRZD\LPPHUVLRQÀUVWJUDGHFODVVURRP,WDOVRDGGUHVVHVVWUDWHJLF instructional patterns used by a bilingual teacher and her beliefs as guiding points in her teaching practices. Patricia López Estrada, Technological Institute of Costa Rica

Dual language/ Bilingual Education

James Trotta, Florida State University

Thursday, 1:00pm – 1:45pm Florida Keys

Thursday, 1:00pm – 1:45pm Palm Beach

Taking Tradition to Time-Saving Technology

Al Tiyb Al Khaiyali, Washington State University

Migrant Laptops: Credit Recovery for the Children of Farmworkers

Thursday, 1:00pm – 1:45pm Dade

Thursday, 1:00pm – 1:45pm Volusia

Thursday, 11:00am – 11:45am Dade

Thursday, 11:00am – 11:45am Volusia

Update on Florida’s English Language Learners (ELLs) for the 2013 Sunshine State TESOL Conference

THURSDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

Flipping Your Classroom: Curating Engaging Level-Appropriate Content for Students Learn best practices and strategies for curating free, engaging content for your language classroom and beyond. Experience how TED, TEDed, YouTube and a variety of other sources can be combined with resources from Lextutor.ca to make free, engaging, level-appropriate content for your students. All skill levels welcome. BYOD! James May, Valencia College

2:00 p.m. Keynote Speaker Dr. Janet Zadina “Using Brain Research to Enhance and Energize Language Instruction: The Multiple Pathways Model” Orange Ballroom Come see with your own eyes how learning changes the brain! Go beyond visual, auditory, and kinesthetic pathways and utilize multiple pathways in your lessons. This Multiple Pathways Model will provide you with an understanding of the many pathways by which the brain can learn and how second language impacts the learning pathways. In this exciting presentation, loaded with images and scattered with interactive experiences, attendees will learn about these lesser known pathways and acquire strategies that can be added to curriculum design to reach diverse and struggling language learners. Come prepared to laugh, learn, experience, and engage.

Community College EA P/Adult/ IE P Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

Special Topics

Advocacy

21


THURSDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

THURSDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

Thursday, 3:30pm – 4:15pm Broward

3:30 p.m. Thursday, 3:30pm – 4:15pm Cape Canaveral

Understanding Student Anxiety in the Classroom 7KLVSURJUDPSUHVHQWVÀQGLQJVUHJDUGLQJVWXGHQWDQ[LHW\LQOHDUQing EFL and strategies on how to reduce the amount of anxiety that students have. Martin O’Donnell, University of Central Florida Kris Gilbert, University of Central Florida

Thursday, 4:30pm – 5:15pm Cape Canaveral

Utilizing PowerPoint Technology to Successfully Teach ELL Students Oral Presentation Skills This lesson focuses on teaching students successful oral presentation skills through learning how to create a basic PowerPoint for successfully presenting information in a college classroom. After instructional period and viewing a model presentation, students work in a computer lab in cooperative learning groups of two to create a PowerPoint presentation. Deborah Kellermann, University of Florida

Thursday, 3:30pm – 5:00pm Dade

Thursday, 3:30pm – 5:00pm Volusia

Teaching Japanese Learners of English 3UHSRVLWLRQV'LIĂ€FXOWYHUVXV(DV\'LIIHUHQFHV After analyzing Japanese and English spatial and temporal grammatical markers, this study examined the difference between easily negotiated language differences and troublesome ones. It is the belief of the researchers that an understanding of this will lead to better methods for teaching Japanese ESL learners. Activity ideas will be discussed.

Join us as we use the Six Key Principles for ELL Instruction, as our guide to designing scaffolded instruction to meet the needs of ELLs RIDOOODQJXDJHSURĂ€FLHQF\OHYHOV&RPHJUDSSOHZLWKXVDQGVHHKRZ reaching the Common Core State Standards can be a lot of fun! Deborah Benitez-Rosa, ESOL Department Broward County Public Schools Miriam Acevedo, ESOL Department Broward County Public Schools

Teresa Lucas, Florida International University

Thursday, 3:30pm – 4:15pm Florida Keys Thursday, 3:30pm – 4:15pm Palm Beach

Quantitative and Qualitative Aspects of L1 (Swedish) and L2 (English) Idiom Comprehension The study addresses three main research questions: 1) How well do students master idioms in their L2 as compared to in their L1? 2) How do a) degrees of transparency, b) idiom frequency and c) the choice of source domain affect students’ comprehension? 3) To what extent is context used when interpreting idioms?

Education and technology are becoming inseparable, and as educators we should know what our options are in order to maximize our students’ motivation and interest levels. The use of iBooks and iTunes U can help bridge the gap between technology and accessibility in the classroom. Mitchell Porter, Full Sail University

Thursday, 4:30pm – 5:15pm Florida Keys

+RZWR6WDUWDQ$IÀOLDWH&KDSWHU Thursday, 4:30pm – 5:15pm Palm Beach

Future teachers must cultivate “Habits of Mindâ€?, as well as knowledge and skills, to reach their full potential as educators and contributing members of society. Come see how activities promoting language acquisition also have the potential to encourage development of such characteristics as persisting, listening with understanding, and thinkLQJĂ H[LEO\

The Use of iBooks and iTunes U in the Classroom

Robert Deacon, University of Florida Yukari Nakamura, University of Florida

Habits of Mind for ESL Educators

Know Your Literacy Shifts!

Thursday, 4:30pm – 5:15pm Broward

4:30 p.m.

Using an Academic Vocabulary Tracking Chart in the K-12 Classroom A concern of teachers is helping English Language Learners acquire the academic vocabulary they need to succeed academically. This interactive session will provide forum for discussion of ideas and provide suggestions for hands on activities that can help students develop vocabulary necessary for academic success.

:RQGHULQJZKHUHWKHORFDO667(62/DIĂ€OLDWHFKDSWHUWKDWVHUYHV your area is? Have you considered creating a network of language professionals in your local school district and surrounding counties? ,I\RXDUHLQWHUHVWHGLQVWDUWLQJDORFDODIĂ€OLDWHFKDSWHUWKLVLVDVHVVLRQWKDW\RXPXVWDWWHQG667(62/ERDUGPHPEHUVDQGORFDODIĂ€Oiate representatives outline the steps to starting a chapter and discuss the opportunities and challenges of creating networks of advocacy and support for ELLs and language teachers. 667(62/%RDUG0HPEHUVDQG/RFDO$IĂ€OLDWH/HDGHUV

Jesus Verde, Velazquez Press

Using Brain Research to Orchestrate Language Learning: The Multiple Pathways Model Continue exploring multiple pathways in more depth after the keynote. Learn strategies for stimulating these pathways in your classroom activities and assignments. Learn how to avoid “drill and kill� and get more learning in less time. Discover what part of the brain you are responsible for helping to develop! Janet Zadina, Tulane University School of Medicine

Monica Karlsson, Halmstad University, Sweden

K-12 Programs

22

EFL

Technology

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Teacher Education

Dual language/ Bilingual Education

Community College EA P/Adult/ IE P Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

Special Topics

Advocacy

23


FRIDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

FRIDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS Friday, 9:00am – 9:45am Broward

9:00 a.m. Friday, 9:00am – 9:45am Cape Canaveral

Learning from the Test: Going beyond Class Averages ESL teachers encourage students to learn from returned tests, but teachers can also learn from the results of the test. The presenters will discuss techniques for collecting data as tests are graded, and participants will receive some hands-on practice at analysis.

Jenica Smith, University of Alabama, English Language Institute Friday, 9:00am – 9:45am Dade

Dayna Foster, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio Jeannette Horwitz, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio

Friday, 9:00am – 9:45am Volusia

Inclusion through Team Teaching What does an inclusion model look like? The presenters will share with the audience how they worked together to make the inclusion model successful in a regular classroom setting with an ELL population of students. The presenters will share ideas and activities to show how ELLs and regular students work collaboratively to develop reading and writing skills.

d

e l l ce

Florida State University’s ESOL preparation courses have incorpoUDWHGWKUHHQHZWHFKQRORJ\WRROVWRLPSURYHSUHVHUYLFH(62/ÀHOG experiences. These tools include IPAD minis, LiveScribe Smartpens, and the TeachLive Virtual Classroom. The presentation will include a demonstration of each tool and explanations of how program pre-service teachers are using each one.

Can

Laura Ballard, Florida State University Rebecca Galeano, Florida State University Kelly Torres, Florida State University

Friday, 9:00am – 9:45am Florida Keys

Friday, 9:00am – 9:45am Palm Beach

The Culture of You: Students and Social Media

The Term Paper and Technology: Avoiding the Pitfalls

In order to prepare university-level international students for the increasing use of social media in education, the presenters created a 5-week integrated EAP skills content unit that focuses on how students can utilize social media to their advantage in an educational context. Materials will be provided.

7HFKQRORJ\RIIHUVLQÀQLWHUHVRXUFHVHDVLO\DFFHVVLEOHIRUVWXGHQW research. However, how can teachers ensure they are used appropriDWHO\"7KLVSUHVHQWDWLRQSURSRVHVDÀYHSRLQWPHWKRGWKDWPDNHVVWXdents accountable, engaged, and information literate. By addressing issues as they arise, major problems like plagiarism can be averted.

Maureen Templeman, University of South Florida Jane Harvey, University of South Florida Kristin Estes, University of South Florida Christy Naghitorabi, University of South Florida

Silvia Rodriguez Spence, Southern New Hampshire University

24

EFL

d e l l

Your Present Perfect Life!

e c n Ca

Teaching the Present Perfect Tense doesn’t have to be a dull or boring grammar class. There are a variety of fun activities you can use in your classes to make the Present Perfect tense lively, interesting, motivating, and memorable for our students. Come, and let’s celebrate your Present Perfect Life! Mary Goodman, Everest University Caitlin Davis, American Heritage School

Integration of Technology in ESOL Field Experience

Xhuljeta Gjini, Seminole County Public Schools Nicole Crum, Seminole County Public Schools

K-12 Programs

Friday, 10:00am – 10:45am Cape Canaveral

Navigating Zamblish and Minibuses: Lessons Learned in Lusaka 7KHSUHVHQWHUUHÁHFWVRQD\HDUDVDQ(QJOLVK/DQJXDJH)HOORZLQ 2011. Teacher training, Zambian-English dialect, and adapting to life and teaching in Zambia are presented as they apply to that country as ZHOODVWRWKH()/(6/ÀHOGVPRUHEURDGO\

Friday, 10:00am – 10:45am Volusia

10:00 a.m.

Pathways: Academic Literacy through National Geographic Content English language instruction needed in today’s increasingly connected world must instruct learners to synthesize information, form opinions, and personalize information. National Geographic Learning’s Pathways program helps learners acquire the academic reading, writing, and critical thinking skills required for academic success and to connect to the world in which they live. Cindy Le, National Geographic Learning

Friday, 10:00am – 10:45am Broward

Friday, 10:00am – 11:30am Palm Beach

Cruisin’ in My Wagon: Engaging ELLs in Language Learning and Culture Study through Doo Wop & Swing Songs This workshop and PowerPoint will focus on use of Doo Wop and Pop songs to engage ELLs in language learning, cadence/rhythm, stress, intonation, and history/culture study. Participants will work on ways to implement applications in their classes. Door prizes include posters and a Doo Wop/Pop CD produced by presenters. Cynthia Haring, Pasco County School District Katia Valdeos, Hernando County School District Sandra Hancock, Flagler College-Tallahassee Debbie Wedding, Pasco County School District

A Journey into Instructional Technology Resources for ELLs Participants will be provided with resources to better utilize the rapidly growing body of emerging instructional technologies to enhance the academic achievement levels of English Language Learners. Technologies, including iPad apps and websites, to promote the development of language skills as well as content area learning will be presented. Annmarie Masi, Miami Dade College Oneyda M. Paneque, Miami Dade College

Friday, 10:00am – 11:30am Dade

Straight from the Horse’s Mouth: How to Teach Idioms and Not Lose Your Marbles If you dare to be different and are not afraid of taking risks, then this workshop is for YOU! This quick-paced, hands-on workshop demonstrates how to teach idiomatic expressions regardless of personal teaching method and style. Come in and watch yourself and others begin to “spill the beans” about idioms. John I. Liontas, University of South Florida

Technology

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Teacher Education

Dual language/ Bilingual Education

Community College EA P/Adult/ IE P Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

Special Topics

Advocacy

25


FRIDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS Friday, 11:00am – 11:45am Broward

Friday, 10:00am – 10:45am Florida Keys

Advancing Critical Literacies in Online EAP Courses Blended and online EAP courses offer students unique opportunities to learn and practice critical academic literacy skills. The presenters share strategies for teaching students to annotate, paraphrase, summarize and synthesize printed and digital texts to plan and write effective source-based essays. Synchronous and asynchronous online feedback tools are also demonstrated.

FRIDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

Help! I Don’t Speak Their Language Monolingual teachers have been criticized for ignoring ELLs or not using bilingual strategies. Bilingual teachers may not provide comparable assistance to students whose languages they do not speak. We will consider the implications and ways in which we can use bilingual VWUDWHJLHVHYHQLIZHGRQ¡WVSHDNVWXGHQWV¡ÀUVWODQJXDJH V  Evelyn Torrey, Florida Atlantic University

Li-Lee Tunceren, St. Petersburg College Susan Benson, St. Petersburg College

Friday, 11:00am – 11:45am Florida Keys

11:00 a.m. Friday, 11:00am – 11:45am Cape Canaveral

The Flipped Class: Year Two ,QP\VHFRQG\HDURIXVLQJWKHà LSSHGFODVVURRPPRGHO,ZLOOUHYLHZ the instructional model and discuss my implementation of the model in an intermediate ESL writing class. I will also discuss how it has changed my teaching of reading classes. John M. Graney, Santa Fe College Friday, 11:00am – 11:45am Volusia

Professional Development in ESL: a Virtual Model 5XUDOVFKRROVLQWKH86DUHH[SHULHQFLQJUDSLGLQĂ X[HVRI(QJOLVK learners. Teachers in these areas need professional development to help them provide effective instruction. This session highlights Project LEAP, a grant-funded school and strategy-based program that has produced excellent outcomes through a series of virtual graduate courses. Jane Manner, East Carolina University Kathering Foronda, East Carolina University Elaine Powell, East Carolina University Octo Flores, East Carolina University

Lunch Keynote Speaker The English Language Fellow Program Dr. Tim Collins During this session, attendees will learn about the English Language “What’s Wrong Right with ebooks? What’s the Fellow Program, funded by the U.S. Department of State and Georgetown University. The presenter will cover the intent of the ideal ebook for language learning?� program and how to become a Fellow. Orange Ballroom Teachers, including language teachers, have always adopted technological innovation, whether it is the photocopier, CD player, or the personal computer, in order to improve their support of students. Yet acceptance of ebooks in educational settings, even in higher education, has been very slow. Industry statistics show that while ebook sales continue to grow in almost every sector, epublications have a very low acceptance rate among students. This presentation will examine the kinds of technological innovations available for online publications, consider reasons why students and teachers continue to express disinterest in epublications, and examine cultural and economic factors that result in the acceptance of new technologies.

1:45 p.m. Friday, 1:45pm – 2:30pm Cape Canaveral

Assessing speaking in an ESL classroom has always been challenging due to the subjectivity of assessing productive skills, the time constraints that may accompany assessing a large classroom, and student fears of speaking in front of others. Learn ways to do this effectively with and without the use of technology.

In this session, the presenters discuss confusing participial -ing and –ed adjectives (I am boring/bored). Grammar textbooks explain this issue in a very general way, but we will hear the results of a corpus-based study of these confusing adjective pairs and consider implications for ESL teachers.

Nicole Hammond Carrasquel, Center for Multilingual Multicultural Studies (CMMS)

Natalia Reilly, University of Central Florida Keith Folse, University of Central Florida

26

Cynthia Hewett, English Language Fellow Program

Friday, 1:45pm – 2:30pm Palm Beach

Methodology and Implementation of Mobile and Blended Learning in an Intensive ESL Program Presentation on the methodologies and techniques used to develop an intensive ESL program using mobile technology and full campus and community immersion. The program was implemented with iPads, allowing language instruction, exposure to the target language and reinforcement in or out of the classroom and lab environments. Olivia Destrades-Mendoza, Full Sail Rosemeire Johnstone, Full Sail

Assessing ESL Speaking Skills (With and Without Technology)

I Am Boring: A Corpus Study of -ing and -ed Participial Adjectives

K-12 Programs

Friday, 1:45pm – 2:30pm Volusia

12:00 p.m.

Friday, 1:45pm – 2:30pm Broward

Implementation of Instructional Strategies in ESL through Collaboration and Technology This presentation will address critical information about preparing teachers to work effectively with English learners, as well as implications for professional development through online courses. Practicing educators will analyze how theories of practice evolve during teaching and will share effective strategies for enhancing educational practice in K-12 classrooms. Jane Manner, East Carolina University Maria Delgado, Lenoir County Public Schools, North Carolina Yvonne Hardy, Lenoir County Public Schools, North Carolina Wendy Piro, Wayne County Public Schools, North Carolina

EFL

Technology

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Teacher Education

Dual language/ Bilingual Education

Community College EA P/Adult/ IE P Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

Special Topics

Advocacy

27


FRIDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS Friday, 2:45pm – 3:30pm Volusia

Friday, 1:45pm – 2:30pm Dade

Common Core Standards for ELLS in Middle School Technological preservice teachers are being introduced to mobile technology as a means to academically prepare ELL middle school students for the demanding curricula changes brought on by the implementation of the Common Core Standards. Middle school classroom teachers need to become competent and capable to further enhance the learning environment for ELLS by learning to use the newest applications and mobile devices.

FRIDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

Five Practical ways to Teach Present Perfect 7KLVSUHVHQWDWLRQH[SODLQVWKHGLIĂ€FXOWLHV(//VIDFHZLWKSUHVHQW perfect tense, including form and usage. The majority of the SUHVHQWDWLRQLVDGHPRQVWUDWLRQRIĂ€YHSUDFWLFDOSUDFWLFHDFWLYLWLHVIRU this tough tense. Handouts will be provided. Ame Proietti, University of Central Florida Keith Folse, University of Central Florida Anna Denisenko, University of Central Florida

Susanne I Lapp, Florida Atlantic University Roberta Weber, Florida Atlantic University Eileen Ariza, Florida Atlantic University Renee Zelden, Miami Dade College

Building your own Interactive Textbook In this hands-on, interactive workshop, participants will work together in teams to create the design of a custom epublication for their students. First, participants will examine a number of new and emergent technologies for epublishing and eLearning. Then the SDUWLFLSDQWVZLOOXVHWKHVHHPHUJLQJWHFKQRORJLHVWRGHVLJQVSHFLĂ€F lessons and learning aids for their students. Participants will leave with new ideas on using technology with their students, as well as new understandings of the epublications of the future. Tim Collins, National Louis University, Chicago

2:45 p.m. Friday, 2:45pm – 4:15pm Cape Canaveral

Interactive Notebooks and Foldables for ELLs Teachers will learn how to create and use interactive notebooks and foldables in the classroom. Based on the work of Dinah Zike, ELLs EHQHĂ€WIURPFUHDWLQJOHDUQLQJWRROWKDWLQYROYHYLVXDONLQHVWKHWLFDQG linguistic support for content mastery.

28

We will discuss aspects of the Spanish language to learn some of WKHPDQ\UHDVRQVZK\RXU6SDQLVKVSHDNLQJ(//VKDYHGLIĂ€FXOW\ pronouncing English. Spelling and pronunciation rules in Spanish will be covered, including cognates. Some cultural differences will be explained as well. Mary Quijano, VALF and Learn to Read

Getting published: The SSTESOL Journal This presentation will discuss the SSTESOL Journal, its mission, and how to prepare and submit manuscripts for this journal and other MRXUQDOVLQWKH7(62/Ă€HOG Ester deJong, University of Florida

Friday, 2:45pm – 3:30pm Broward

Friday, 2:45pm – 3:30pm Florida Keys

Reading, writing, listening, and speaking strategies presented in textbooks are often sound. However, university students need to apply the content beyond the given samples. This session discusses students implementing the textbook strategies to authentic materials outside the classroom and discussing the content and the strategies inside the classroom. Robyn Brinks Lockwood, Stanford University Kelly Sippell, University of Michigan Press

EFL

Ebooks offer a means to provide cheap and targeted materials for classes. Teachers can edit and compile ebooks relatively inexpensively. However, there are pitfalls. This presentation will discuss how the avoid some of the pitfalls while demonstrating the basics of ebook making. John Graney, Santa Fe College

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Teacher Education

What is the perception of native and non-native English teachers in Asia? Our study elicited opinions from both native and non-native English-speaking teachers who have taught in Asia on the strengths and weaknesses of each teacher type. This presentation summarizes RXUĂ€QGLQJVDQGLPSOLFDWLRQVIRUWHDFKLQJ()/LQ$VLDQFRXQWULHV Charlotte Jones, University of Central Florida Ame Proietti, University of Central Florida Jane Keeler, University of Central Florida

Friday, 3:45pm – 4:30pm Broward

TFAs and ELLs: Lessons Taught & Lessons Learned 7KHVWUXJJOHVRIDĂ€UVW\HDUWHDFKHUFRPHWROLJKWWKURXJKWKHH\HV of Teach for America Corps Members. While struggling to become masters of their new careers, these new teachers must learn to adapt the TFA methods to their ESOL classrooms. But can it be done? Thais Arsolino, Duval County Public Schools Jasmin Esparza, Duval County Public Schools

3:45 p.m. Friday, 3:45pm – 4:30pm Volusia

Conversation Essentials Join us for Conversation Essentials, an interactive presentation on adult ESL conversation groups. While Conversation Essentials are informal, drop-in sessions facilitated by volunteers, each meeting LQFRUSRUDWHVLPSRUWDQWJUDPPDUSRLQWVLGHQWLĂ€HGE\QRWHGDXWKRU Keith Folse. Training guide, grammar keys, topics, and prompts created by the presenters are free to download. Katie Devanny, Jacksonville Public Library Center for Adult Learning Katie Walton, Jacksonville Public Library Center for Adult Learning

Technology

Perceptions of Native and Non-Native Teachers in Asia

0DNLQJDQHERRN%HQHĂ€WWLQJIURP0\ Mistakes

Trying to Flip the ESL Classroom: Applying Academic Strategies in Textbooks to Authentic Materials

Daniel L. Fisher, Rockdale County Public Schools, Conyers, Georgia

K-12 Programs

How to Better Assist our Spanish ELLs

Friday, 2:45pm – 3:30pm Palm Beach

Friday, 1:45pm – 2:30pm Florida Keys

Friday, 4:45pm – 5:30pm Palm Beach

Friday, 2:45pm – 4:15pm Dade

Dual language/ Bilingual Education

Friday, 3:45pm – 4:30pm Florida Keys

Using Technology to Support ESL Teaching and Learning This demonstration shares some online tools that can be integrated in classroom instruction to engage students in different activities, or they can be used by the students outside the classroom. Eman Elturki, Washington State University Reima Abobaker, Washington State University

Community College EA P/Adult/ IE P Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

Special Topics

Advocacy

29


FRIDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

FRIDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS Friday, 4:45pm – 5:30pm Broward

4:45 p.m. Friday, 4:45pm – 5:30pm Cape Canaveral

E-learning or Traditional Format for ESOL Teacher Preparation Courses The two stand-alone ESOL courses in the infused teacher education programs in universities have to cover theory, skills, and applications, deal with student resistance, and meet the 2010 Domains and Standards. Can either course be offered effectively online? What about assessments and accountability? How can we share with each other? Evelyn Torrey, Florida Atlantic University

Lillian E. Vargas, University of Florida English Language Institute Victoria C. Shelly, University of Florida English Language Institute

The organization’s annual business meeting is open to the public. The SSTESOL executive board encourages all members to attend. SSTESOL Executive Board

Friday, 4:45pm – 4:30pm Palm Beach

Challenges Faced by Hispanic ELLs and Ways to Overcome Them In this session, the presenters will demonstrate fun and interactive activities that are targeted towards Hispanic ELLs. These activities address phonetic, syntactic, and vocabulary problems that they tend to have. Activities include primarily group work. Handouts will be provided.

Interactive Read Aloud This session will share a read aloud activity as a poetry workshop based on the Interactive Read Aloud, “Momma, Where Are You From?� by Marie Bradby. Learn new techniques to get your students involved! The target population for this activity is K-5, ESL. Elin Seren, South-Western City Schools, Grove City, Ohio

Friday, 5:45pm – 6:30pm Broward

Elizabeth Maldonado, University of Central Florida Maria S. Rojas, University of Central Florida Friday, 4:45pm – 5:30pm Dade

Friday, 4:45pm – 5:30pm Volusia

SSTESOL Annual Business Meeting

Friday, 5:45pm – 6:30pm Cape Canaveral

Supplementing Academic ESL Curricula with Authentic Materials The presenters have noticed a lack of authentic materials offered in textbooks and have created lessons that achieve objectives and have been proven successful. Grounded in theory and informed by instructional observations, this session presents examples of activities, resources, and strategies for use in the academic ESL context.

Friday, 5:45pm – 6:30pm Broward

5:45 p.m.

Contextualizing Oracy and Literacy Instruction in the Content Areas Research has demonstrated that the comprehension of academic/literary and authentic idiomatic texts involves diverse reading strategies and (meta)cognitive processes. This presentation highlights the most pertinent principles of contextualizing oracy/literacy instruction in the content areas and emphasizes effective reading strategies shown to impact instruction, readers’ attitudes, strategy use, and metalinguistic knowledge.

Friday, 5:45pm – 6:30pm Volusia

AEROBIC & Visual PRONUNCIATION The goal of this workshop is to provide ESL/EFL instructors with fun, interesting, & lively activities to teach pronunciation via physical movements set to aerobic music and visual aids. It aims to create an active & motivating environment to teach pronunciation in a sensory/ visual way.

Please TURN ON your Cell Phones The widespread of personal handheld mobile devices has added new potential for communication, accessibility and learning (Demouy & +XOPH 7KLVSUHVHQWDWLRQH[DPLQHVĂ€QGLQJVIURPDFODVVURRP case study where students used mobile devices to self-direct their language learning. The presentation reviews myths and truths of technology in the classrooms. Edward Contreras, University of South Florida Giovanni Espinal, University of South Florida

Mary Goodman, Everest University Caitlin Davis, American Heritage School

Friday, 5:45pm – 6:30pm Florida Keys

John I. Liontas, University of South Florida

Linking Minds to Technology

Friday, 5:45pm – 6:30pm

Our demonstration will bring together three of many ways of incorporating technological resources in reaching ELL students and making learning English interesting and interactive. We will explore how Google’s more than a search engine, hyperlinks expand on learning, and games become more that just boards and game pieces. Lena Shaqareq, University of North Florida Catherine McMurria, University of North Florida

Using iPads to Enhance Intensive Academic English Instruction

ESL Students in the Writing Center: Inquiry and Action

&UHDWLYHXVHRIL3DGDSSOLFDWLRQVFDQVLJQLĂ€FDQWO\HQKDQFHWKHZD\ students engage both with new knowledge and with their learning environment. This presentation will introduce a variety of apps and demonstrate how they can be effectively utilized in the English language classroom.

Writing Centers offer academic writing consultations for students of DXQLYHUVLW\EXW(6/OHDUQHUVSUHVHQWXQLTXHGLIĂ€FXOWLHVIRUZULWLQJ WXWRUVZKRIHHOXQSUHSDUHGWRDGGUHVVVSHFLĂ€FODQJXDJHQHHGV$IWHU research, we survey writing consultant and extend an implementation plan for tutor training and outreach to ESL students and their professors.

Olivia Destrades-Mendoza, Full Sail Rosemeire Johnstone, Full Sail

K-12 Programs

30

EFL

Palm Beach

Friday, 4:45pm – 5:30pm Florida Keys

Technology

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Balancing Common Core, Technology, and Cooperative Learning for ESOL Students Common Core is here! In order to teach common core, teachers must integrate subjects, use technology effectively and meet the language, social, and academic needs of all students. This interactive presentation will go over free and paid Internet resources, cooperative learning strategies, and tips to help students “dig deeper.� Amy Trujillo, Orlando Science Elementary School

Charlotte Jones, University of Central Florida Leah DeLorenzo, University of Central Florida

Teacher Education

Dual language/ Bilingual Education

Community College EA P/Adult/ IE P Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

Special Topics

Advocacy

31


SATURDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

SATURDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

Saturday, 10:15am – 11:00am Volusia

9:00 a.m. Keynote Speaker Dr. Thomas Cobb “10 Uses Of A Million Word Corpus In ESL� Orange Ballroom A `language corpus` is a sampled collection of written or spoken texts large enough to represent part of a language (medical, economic) or even a language as a whole. The applied linguistics literature is full of references to research involving corpora, and ESL teacher-training courses exhort new teachers to get familiar with corpora and use them for various purposes in their teaching. But - when teachers get into the classroom, do they follow this advice? And if so what do they use a corpus for? The Lextutor website (wwww.lextutor.ca) offers teachers access to several smallish corpora and checks whether and how they use them. User data shows that more than 1,000 (mainly teachers) per day consult a corpus via Lextutor’s concordance corpus-search tools. This data along with email queries and conference presentation makes it clear what teachers are using corpora for, and has made it possible to evolve the tools in line with teachers’ needs and goals.

10:15 a.m.

Avoiding Heterosexism: The New Normal What is heterosexism? And what does it have to do with TESOL? Come to this session to learn what heterosexism is, why it’s problematic, and what English Language professionals can do to avoid it. We’ll also cover basic LGBTQ facts and discuss how LGBTQ issues relate to our international ELLs. Krista Bittenbender Royal, University of South Florida

Know Your True Value as a Teacher Let no one underestimate the job we do. Doctors save lives, lawyers defend lives, but teachers develop lives. Upon leaving this session the participants will gain a true understanding of the importance and value of being a teacher. Our responsibilities are great but so are the rewards. Handouts will be provided. Ronald J. Anton, Via Music Communications

Saturday, 10:15am – 11:00am Palm Beach

%HQHÀFLDO)XQFWLRQVRI3RHWU\LQ6HFRQG Language Learning Based on the analysis of the examples of poetic forms and literature UHYLHZWKHSDSHUGHPRQVWUDWHVWKHEHQHÀFLDOUROHRISRHWU\LQVXFK major aspects of second language learning as the development of L2 complex syntax and vocabulary, development of understanding of the L2 discourse, cultural awareness, and students’ motivation.

Saturday, 10:15am – 11:45am Florida Keys

Embedded Reading: Scaffolding Text for Student Success Embedded Reading creates successful reader interaction and skill development. It is designed to pinpoint and to elevate comprehension levels through carefully scaffolded versions of text. This session will demonstrate: a) choosing or create a text, b) scaffolding the reading for success, c) utilizing activities that develop skills and engage interest.

Participants will gain hands-on experience with Lextutor’s *Builder* Routines, including cloze, dictation, database, tests, and error correction. Participants will graduate with usable skills. Thomas Cobb, University of Quebec at Montreal

11:15 a.m.

Laurie Clarcq, Marcus Whitman High School, Rushville, NY

Saturday, 10:15am – 11:00am Broward

Integrating Technology into Genre Based Writing Classes The presentation will demonstrate how applying the teachinglearning cycle (TLC) stages (modeling stage, joint negotiation stage and independent stage) is effective in improving students` writing through the use of technology. Ibtesam Hussein, Washington State University

A Study of the Effectiveness of Recasts: The Case of ELT in Jiangsu Union Technical Institute The presentation will review recasts, as one type of corrective feedback, and then delineate the results of a quantitative study to investigate its effectiveness on Chinese EFL learners in a Chinese YRFDWLRQDOLQVWLWXWH7KHĂ€QGLQJVZLOOFRQWULEXWHWRWKHWHDFKLQJRI English grammar in China. Xuan Jiang, Florida International University Kyle Perkins, Florida International University

Saturday, 11:15am – 12:00pm Broward

Building Your Own Web Content for Learners in 10 Minutes

Natalia Reilly, University of Central Florida Saturday, 10:15am – 11:45am Cape Canaveral

Saturday, 11:15am – 12:00pm Palm Beach

Saturday, 10:15am – 11:00am Dade

Saturday, 11:15am – 12:00pm Volusia

Parental Beliefs and Attitudes on Enrollment in a Dual Language Program at a Central Florida Elementary School This project is a graduate level thesis focused on enrollment in dual language educational programs. Data collected from a questionnaire completed by parents of Elementary aged students revealed ethnic/ language group demographics, and reasons for enrollment rated by a Likert scale. Leah DeLorenzo, University of Central Florida

A Team-Based Learning Approach in the ESP Classroom This presentation will demonstrate the use of a particular team-based OHDUQLQJDSSURDFKLQ(QJOLVKIRU6SHFLĂ€F3XUSRVHV (63 FODVVURRPV By employing the Readiness Assurance Process (RAP) and the Instant Feedback Assessment Technique (IFAT) to work through course content, the learners are held accountable to each other in their small teams. Sabine Peters, United States Air Force

Saturday, 10:15am – 11:00am Dade

Implementing CCSS for TESOL/BE courses in Teacher Education Programs :KDWDUHWKHSRWHQWLDOEHQHĂ€WVDQGFKDOOHQJHVRIWKH&&66IRU ELLs? How do we prepare teachers implementing CCSS for ELLs LQWHDFKLQJDQGDVVHVVPHQW"+RZGRHVODQJXDJHGHYHORSPHQWĂ€WLQWR ELA and math standards? How do we equip teachers to incorporate bilingual strategies? Is college and career readiness feasible? Evelyn Torrey, Florida Atlantic University

K-12 Programs

32

EFL

Technology

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Teacher Education

Dual language/ Bilingual Education

Community College EA P/Adult/ IE P Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

Special Topics

Advocacy

33


SATURDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

SATURDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

Saturday, 12:15pm – 1:00pm Palm Beach

12:15 p.m. Saturday, 12:15pm – 1:00pm Cape Canaveral

The Effect of Native Writing Systems on the Interlanguage English Pronunciation of EFL The Contemporary Music Approach to Teaching and ESL Learners Recent evidence indicates that the writing system, not only ESL The CMA is a simple yet effective way to teach ten key grammar lessons necessary for language acquisition. Just follow the eight simple steps: cooperative learning, art, choreography, and original composition all make-up the CMA. It has been proven effective from grades three through university level. No musical experience necessary. Handouts will be provided.

WKHSKRQRORJ\RIDOHDUQHU¡VQDWLYHODQJXDJHFDQLQà XHQFH mispronunciations of native-like, target English language utterances. This presentation will use Japanese EFL and ESL learners as a case study to demonstrate and offer bilingual media solutions for ESL and EFL instructors. Tyler McPeek, University of Florida

Ronald J. Anton, Via Music Communications Saturday, 12:15pm – 1:00pm Broward

Saturday, 12:15pm – 1:00pm Volusia

Developing a Service Learning Course for IEP Students This presentation will discuss the process a university IEP went through to develop a new service-learning course for upper-intermediate ELLs. Presenters will share student survey results, the new service-learning course guide and schedule, class activities and lesson ideas, and will discuss how students responded to the experience. Krista Bittenbender Royal, University of South Florida Kristen McGreger, University of South Florida Laura Murphy, University of South Florida Sangita Victor, University of South Florida Justyna Kikowska, University of South Florida

K-12 Programs

34

EFL

A Treasure Hunt Approach: Using eLibraryUSA to Teach Literature Reviews and Increase Digital Literacy

Saturday, 12:15pm – 1:00pm Florida Keys

Saturday, 12:15pm – 1:00pm Dade

Reconceptualization of Validity: Post Methods Integrating Technology in the Classroom Perspective There is a new generation of students with new expectations and A dominant assumption in the post methods era is that any post method pedagogy must be sensitive to a particular group of learners in a particular context with a particular set of goals. What is inferred is that the more a test accounts for the individualization and idiosyncrasies of test takers, the more valid it would be. The three important domains of learning, that is, affective, cognitive, and UHà HFWLYHDUHQRWDFFRXQWHGIRUE\DOPRVWDOOWHVWV:KDWWKHWHVWV DWWHPSWWRPHDVXUHLVWKHFRQVWUXFWXQGHUO\LQJDVSHFLÀFEHKDYLRU which is within the cognitive domain. But what makes test takers FRPSOHWHO\GLIIHUHQWIURPHDFKRWKHULVKRZWKH\DSSURDFKDVSHFLÀF test – affective domain, and how they themselves consider the DGHTXDF\DQGDSSURSULDWHQHVVRIWKHWHVWUHVXOWVUHà HFWLYHGRPDLQ

capacities, looking for different interactions and ways of learning. This demonstration will provide examples and activities to successfully blend technology with teaching while preparing and engaging our ESL/ELL students. Participants will have access to more than 200 free online resources. Sonia I Lopez-Lopez, Washington State University

Kaveh Jalilzadeh, Dokuz Eylul University, Ankara, Turkey Adel Dastgoshadeh, Dokuz Eylul University, Ankara, Turkey

This demonstration will guide participants through the steps used with students and faculty in Zambia to introduce eLibraryUSA as a source IRUĂ€QGLQJDFDGHPLFUHVHDUFK7KHWUHDVXUHKXQWVWUDWHJ\OHGVWXGHQWV ZLWKOLPLWHGGLJLWDOOLWHUDF\WKURXJKWKHEDVLFVQHFHVVDU\IRUĂ€QGLQJ and evaluating relevant published research. Jenica Smith, University of Alabama, English Language Institute

Technology

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Teacher Education Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

35


LIST OF EXHIBITORS Beacon Educator

New Readers Press/ProLiteracy

Cambridge University Press/McGraw-Hill

Pearson Education ELT

Cengage Learning

School Specialty, Inc.

Compass Publishing

SuccessEd

English Language Fellow Program

Topics Entertainment

ESLgo.com

Velazquez Press

Franklin Electronic Publishers Grand Canyon University National Geographic Learning

36

Sunshine State TESOL Conference


ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PRESENTERS Abobaker, Reima – Reima Abobaker is a doctoral candidate in Language, Literacy and Technology Education in the Department of Teaching and Learning at Washington State University, Pullman. She is currently teaching at the American Language and Cultural Program at the University of Idaho. Before beginning her doctoral studies, she taught Second Language Listening Comprehension for intermediate and advanced students in the English Department in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Garyounis for 3 years. She was awarded her Master’s degree in Applied Translation from the School of Modern Languages at the University of Exeter, UK. rabobaker@uidaho.edu

Bittenbender Royal, Krista – Krista Bittenbender Royal is an instructor and the Special Academic Programs Coordinator at the USF English Language Program, INTO USF. She has been teaching language learners since 2002 and has her MA in Applied Linguistics/TESL. kbittenb@usf.edu Bonet, María C – María C. Bonet has a BA in Liberal Studies and a Master’s in library Science. She is currently the Department Chair of Library Services in Prince Georges Community College, MD.

Acevedo, Miriam – Miriam has been teaching in Broward County for 21 years - 6 years as an ESOL instructional facilitator. She has provided support and trainings to schools with high ELL population.

Brinks Lockwood, Robyn – Robyn Brinks Lockwood is an EFS lecturer at Stanford University. She teaches courses and develops materials to prepare second-language learners for academic programs and success at the university level. rbrinks@stanford.edu

Al Khiayali, Al Tiyb – Al Tiyb Al Khiayali is a PhD Candidate (Language, Literacy, Education, Technology) from Washington State University with a primary research interest in the incorporation of children’s literature into ESL/EFL classrooms to in order to improve language and literacy skills. aalkhaiyali@wsu.edu

Chou, Arthur – Arthur Chou is the managing director at Academic Learning Company. He previously taught Math in college and become a linguist later in his life. He has presented several research papers in more than 30 conferences throughout the years. Achou@academiclearningcompany.com

Anton, Ronald J. – Ronald is a 30 year teacher for Cleveland where he taught ESL and Spanish. He also taught four years at the University of Akron. He holds an A.A.in Music, B.A.ED M.A.in Spanish, and a 7(62/FHUWLÀFDWLRQ+HUHWLUHGLQYLDPXVLF#H[FLWHFRP

Clarcq, Laurie – Laurie Clarcq is a teacher with thirty years of classroom experience. In addition, she presents at workshops and conferences across the country on language, literacy and love for the profession. lclarcq@rochester.rr.com

Ariza, Eileen – Dr. Eileen Ariza is a professor of pre-service teachers who teach ELLs and foreign languages.

Davis, Caitlin – Caitlin Davis, ESL teacher at American Heritage School in Delray Beach, has taught at Everest University, FAU, Embassy CES, and in Milan, Italy.

Arsolino, Thais – Thais Arsolino joined Teach for America after graduating from Florida Atlantic University with a B.A. in Political Science and an Interdisciplinary in Social Science. Currently, Thais teaches ESOL English at Englewood High School in Jacksonville. As a former ELL student, Thais overcame many challenges that her students now face. arsolinot@duvalschools.org

Deacon, Robert – Joel Deacon is a linguistics PhD student at the University of Florida. He has taught ESL for 4 years and teaches Introduction to Linguistics and Language: Human Perspectives classes. \RUHYHULWDV#Xà HGX

Belvis, Renee – Renee Belvis is an ESOL teacher in Pinellas County, Florida and Member-at-Large with BART. She was the 2008 middle school winner of the Hispanic Heritage Month Excellence in Education Award. ebrb1@aol.com Benitez-Rosa, Deborah – Deborah Benitez-Rosa is an ESOL Instructional Facilitator in Broward County. She facilitates professional development and trainings at schools to increase ELLs academic achievement and growth. She formerly taught ESE/ESOL. deborah.benitez-rosa@ browardschools.com Benson, Susan – Susan Benson designs and teaches blended and online EAP and Composition courses at St. Petersburg College. She is a doctoral student in SLA at the University of Maryland. Susan has co-authored a textbook: Choice and Consequence (2010, U of Michigan Press).

38

Denisenko, Anna – Anna Denisenko is a student in the MA TESOL program at the University of Central Florida. Destrades-Mendoza, Olivia – Olivia Destrades-Mendoza has taught in a variety of language contexts including adult community-based ESL and intensive academic English programs. She has conducted language research in Spain related to heritage language preservation in the Basque Country and is passionate about improving language instruction for all students. odestrades@fullsail.com Devanny, Katie – Katie Devanny works for the Jacksonville Public Library Center for Adult Learning. She is an ESL instructor, site coordinator, and currently sits on the Literacy Council of Jacksonville. devanny@coj.net Dwyer, Eric – Eric Dwyer is an associate professor of Foreign Language Education at FIU. He has conducted workshops in more than 20 countries and focuses his research on literacy in poor regions. HULFGZ\HU#ÀXHGX

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PRESENTERS Elturki, Eman – Eman Elturki is a doctoral candidate in the Language, Literacy and Technology program at WSU. She holds a master’s degree in TESOL from USC. She teaches ESL at WSU. eman.elturki@email. wsu.edu Esparza, Jasmin – After graduating from the University of California, Santa Barbara, former ELL, Jasmin Esparza joined Teach for America &RUSVLQ6KHEULHà \WDXJKWLQ&KLFDJRDQGFXUUHQWO\WHDFKHV ESOL English at Lee High School in Jacksonville. Jasmin enjoys sharing her experiences with her students to inspire them to strive for success. esparzaj@duvalschools.org Estes, Kristin – Kristin Estes, M.A. is a full-time Instructor at INTO University of South Florida. She has worked in elementary and ESL/ EAP teaching for over nine years. Hammond-Carrasquel, Nicole – Nicole has been teaching adults ESL since 2001. She has conducted overseas teacher workshops and has taught ESL, Spanish/Family literacy, Accent Reduction, and all classes at UCF’s intensive English program. nicole.carrasquel@ucf.edu Chinwonno, Apasara – Apasara Chinwonno is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at Chulalongkorn University, Thailand. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in EFL Literacy, Curriculum Development and Materials Design. Her research interests include ÀUVWIRUHLJQODQJXDJHOLWHUDFLHVODQJXDJHWHDFKHUHGXFDWLRQDQG7HFKnology in language instruction. apasara.c@chula.ac.th

devices and their impact on language learning. econtreras1@mail.usf.edu Cross Halsey, Robin – Mrs. Robin Cross Halsey is a Peoria, Illinois-based English as a Second Language teacher. Robin has been testing innovative teaching ideas in language classes since 1981. rehalse@ ilstu.edu Crum, Nicole – Nicole is a graduate of Northern Illinois University with BS in Elementary Education. In her 8 years of experience with Seminole County Public Schools, Nicole has taught regular and ELL students in her classroom. She also served as President of the Seminole County Reading Council. She has organized and presented professional development workshops. Dastgoshadeh, Adel – Adel Dastgoshadeh is a PhD candidate in TEFL who has participated in different conferences and has been published in ORFDODQGLQWHUQDWLRQDOMRXUQDOVKLVPDLQLQWHUHVWVDUHODQJXDJHWHVWLQJ applied linguistics and second language acquisition and identity issues in language learning. Delgado, Maria – Maria Delgado earned a Master’s in Second Language Acquisition: Spanish from the University of Leaon, Spain, and serves as ESL teacher in Lenoir County, North Carolina. DeLorenzo, Leah – Leah DeLorenzo is a TESOL graduate student and writing center consultant at the University of Central Florida. She has earned her BA in Theatre at UCF.

Coady, Maria – Maria Coady is an Associate Professor of ESL/ Bilingual Education at the UF. Her research addresses the family-school-community partnerships. She also prepares teachers for incluVLYHPDLQVWUHDPFODVVURRPVZLWK(/VPFRDG\#FRHXà HGX

de Jong, Ester – Ester de Jong is an Associate Professor of ESL/Bilingual Education at UF. Her research includes student integration in bilingual classrooms, policy, and preparing mainstream teachers to work ZLWKELOLQJXDOFKLOGUHQHGHMRQJ#FRHXà HGX

Cobb, Thomas – Dr. Tom Cobb has taught and coordinated ESL reading programs and trained ESL teachers in many parts of the world (Saudi Arabia, Oman, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Japan, England, and Canada). He currently teaches teachers and does research and development in applied linguistics at the University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. His development work is mainly involved with building and maintaining his Lextutor website, which is devoted to supplying ESL and French teachers and learners worldwide with tools for “data driven� language learning. cobb.tom@uqam.ca

Deuel, Mellony – Mellony Deuel has 21 years of experience as an educator, including 14 years in administration in charge of compliance. She serves as the Program Manager for SuccessEd’s ELL on-line program.

Collins, Tim – Dr. Tim Collins, Ph.D., is associate professor, ESL and bilingual education, at National Louis University in Chicago, one of the oldest and most renowned colleges of education in the U.S. The author of over 25 textbooks and media publications, Dr. Collins is the founder or co-founder of two technology in education companies, and an early mover in both epublishing and mobile learning with cell phones. He has taught in Spain, Morocco, Taiwan, and the United States. Contreras, Edward – Edward Contreras is a PhD student of the SLAIT program and Instructor at INTO USF. His research interests are mobile

Eplin, Chane – For the past 30 years, Chane Eplin has served the English Language Learners of Florida as a teacher, administrator, consultant, tutor, and, perhaps most importantly, as a friend. In his current role as Chief of the Florida Department of Education’s Bureau of Student Achievement through Language Acquisition (SALA), his goal is to have a greater positive academic impact on the ELLs and their families as a servant leader. He believes in making progress, and knows that if we provide the appropriate education and tools to our ELLs and to our World Languages and Dual Language students, they will increase both their language skills and their academic achievement in content areas. &KDQH(SOLQ#Ă GRHRUJ Erben, Tony – Dr. Tony Erben is Director of the ESOL Endorsement Program in the Department of Education at the University of Tampa. He has been involved in ESOL education for the past 25 years in the USA, in Europe, in Japan and in Australia. His recent publication is “Teaching ELLs through Technologyâ€? with Routledge Press. aerben@ut.edu

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

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ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PRESENTERS Espinal, Giovanni – Giovanni Espinal is the Academic Coordinator for the Academic English Department at INTO USF. He has taught adults at the college level for the last 10 years in South America, the US and the Middle East. His research interests are Adult Education and technology.

Hancock, Sandra – Sandra Hancock, assistant professor of TESOL at Flagler College-Tallahassee, is a former elementary ESOL teacher and past president of Sunshine State TESOL. She is a frequent presenter on teaching and learning of ELLs.

Flores, Octo – Octo Flores teaches in Duplin County, North Carolina and is a graduate student with Project LEAP.

Hardy, Yvonne – Yvonne Hardy earned a Master’s with a concentration in ESL from American College of Education and serves as middle school teacher, as well as teacher/facilitator for NC Community Colleges.

Fisher, Daniel L. – Dr. Fisher, a native of Prattville, Alabama, teaches ESOL at Hightower Elementary School in Conyers, Georgia. He has presented at TESOL conference throughout the South and Midwest. GÀVKHU#URFNGDOHNJDXV

Haring, Cynthia – Cynthia is an ESL resource teacher in Pasco County and has an MA from University of Arizona. She has taught ESOL in Iowa, Chicago, Arizona, Florida, and Puerto Rico. See www.worldnaWLRQJURXSFRPFKDULQJ#SDVFRNà XV

Folse, Keith – Dr. Keith Folse is professor of TESOL at the University of Central Florida. He has taught all skill areas in the U.S. and abroad IRUPDQ\\HDUVDQGZULWWHQPRUHWKDQÀIW\(/7WH[WERRNV+LVSULPDU\ UHVHDUFKDUHDLVKRZYRFDEXODU\LVWDXJKWKHLVWKHDXWKRURI9RFDEXlary Myths (University of Michigan Press, 2004). kfolse@mail.ucf.edu

Harper, Candace – Candace Harper is an Associate Professor of ESL/ Bilingual Education at the UF. Her research addresses teacher preparation and the development of expertise/collaboration among teachers of K-12 English learners.

Foronda, Kathering – Kathering Foronda teaches in Duplin County, North Carolina and is a graduate student with Project LEAP.

Harvey, Jane – Jane Harvey, Ph.D. is a Senior Instructor at INTO University of South Florida. She has worked as an ESL teacher and teacher educator in various countries for over 20 years.

Foster, Dayna – Dayna Foster received her MA TESOL degree from Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio and is currently teaching as an adjunct in the university’s intensive English program. dayna.foster@wright.edu

Hewett, Cynthia – Cynthia Hewett received her MA in Applied Linguistics and has been teaching ESL for 20 years. She is presently the Regional Recruitment Coordinator for ELF and teaches at HCC, Tampa. FKHZHWW#KFFà HGX

Galeano, Rebecca – Rebecca Galeano is an Assistant Professor of Multicultural/Multilingual Education at Florida State University. Galeano teaches courses in ESOL and Foreign Language Teaching Methodologies for the School of Teacher Education.

Horwitz, Jeannette – Jeannette Horwitz is the Director of the Learning English for Academic and Professional Purposes Intensive English Program, Department of English Language & Literature, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio.

Gilbert, Kris – Kris Gilbert is an MA TESOL graduate student at the University of Central Florida. He has lived and taught in Korea over the past 8 years.

Hussein, Ibtesam – Ibtesam Hussein is a PhD student in Language and Learning Education at WSU. She has worked as an ESL and EFL teacher for six years in Libya and the USA. ibtesam.hussein@email. wsu.edu

Gjini, Xhuljeta – Dr.Gjini has experience as a classroom teacher (regular and ELLs), instructional coach, and presenter. As a professional development facilitator, her focus is county public schools geared toward teaching critically in the classroom. She currently works for Seminole County Public Schools. gjini.1@osu.edu Goodman, Mary – Mary Goodman, IES Program Director at Everest University, Pompano Beach campus, has taught ESL in Florida since 2001. She also directed & taught EFL in Ecuador for 20 years. MGoodman@cci.edu Graney, John M. – John Graney is the ESL Coordinator at Santa Fe College in Gainesville, Florida. john.graney@sfcollege.edu Habib, Amany – Amany Habib is an instructor/undergraduate ESOL Coordinator at the School of Education (UWF). She has been teaching for over ten years and she often volunteers at a local ESOL classroom.

40

Jalilzadeh, Kaveh – Kaveh Jalilzadeh is a PhD candidate in English ODQJXDJHWHDFKLQJKHKDVSDUWLFLSDWHGLQDORWRIFRQIHUHQFHVDOORYHU world and is published in both local and international journals. His main interests are language testing, applied linguistics, and second language acquisition. kaveh_j2004@yahoo.com Jiang, Xuan²;XDQ-LDQJLVDWKLUG\HDU3K'VWXGHQWLQ7(62/ÀHOG at Florida International University. She has presented papers in several local and regional TESOL conferences, mainly from cognitive perspecWLYHV[MLDQJ#ÀXHGX Johnstone, Rosemeire – Rosemeire Johnstone has been teaching EFL and ESL for over 20 years, both in Brazil and in the United States. In addition to supporting language acquisition for students, she has a SDVVLRQIRUWUDLQLQJQHZLQVWUXFWRUVLQWKHÀHOGRIVHFRQGODQJXDJH acquisition and language teaching.

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PRESENTERS Jones, Charlotte – Charlotte Jones is a TESOL graduate student and writing center consultant at the University of Central Florida, as well as an adjunct instructor at CMMS. charlotte@charlotteajones.com

tional University. She holds a PhD. from FSU in Multilingual/Multicultural Education, and an MS in TESOL from the University of Illinois. OXFDVW#Ă€XHGX

Karlsson, Monica – Dr. Karlsson has taught English at university level for over 15 years and she holds a permanent position at Halmstad University, Sweden. Her main research area is EFL, especially vocabulary. mica.karlsson@glocalnet.net

Maldonado, Elizabeth – Elizabeth Maldonado is a student at the University of Central Florida, where she is majoring in Spanish, with a PLQRULQ/DWLQ$PHULFDQ6WXGLHVDQGFHUWLÀFDWHVLQ7()/DQG7UDQVODtion. emaldonadodesegura@knights.ucf.edu

Keeler, Jane – Jane Keeler has taught EFL in Russia, Korea, and Kyrgyzstan. She is in the MA TESOL program at UCF. She was unable to attend the conference as she is currently teaching in Kyrgyzstan.

Manner, Jane – Jane Manner earned an Ed.D. from FIU and is on the faculty of East Carolina University. She is co-directs PROJECT LEAP, a grant funded program for professional development in ESL. mannerj@ecu.edu

Kellerman, Deborah – Deborah has been happily teaching ESL students for many years in many different places. Currently, she is a faculW\PHPEHUDWWKH(/,DWWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI)ORULGDGNHOOHUP#Xà HGX Kikowska, Justyna – Justyna is an instructor at INTO USF and has her MA in English Language Education/Applied Linguistics from Lodz University in Poland. She has taught English as a Foreign Language and English as a Second Language in the US and abroad. She has 16 years of ELT experience. Lapp, Susanne – Dr. Susanne Lapp is a professor of literacy and language at FAU. She specializes in teaching preservice teachers. slapp@fau.edu Le, Cindy – Cindy Le is the Regional Academic and Adult Education Sales Specialist for the South region for National Geographic Learning. cindy.le@cengage.com Levy, Michele Lopez-Stafford – Dr. Levy is from the west Texas/ southern New Mexico borderlands and is the new TESOL professor at Broward College in Ft. Lauderdale. She brings her experiences to south Florida with a vision of preparing all teachers for 21st century demographics. mslevy@broward.edu Liontas, John I – John is an associate Professor of ESOL/SLA Specialist, active member in (inter)national learned societies, and PI on several multimillion dollar funded projects, performing research and developPHQWLQPHWKRGRORJ\ÀJXUDWLYHFRPSHWHQFHDQGPXOWLPHGLDEDVHG learning. Liontas@usf.edu López Estrada, Patricia – Dr. López Estrada has a BA in English Teaching, a licentiate and MA degree in Applied Linguistics in Teaching, and an Education Doctorate in Curriculum and Instruction from University of Florida. plopez.estrada@gmail.com Lopez-Lopez, Sonia – Sonia Lopez-Lopez is a Spanish Instructor at WSU (Washington State University) and a doctoral student in LL&T. Lopez-Lopez has experience teaching classes at elementary, middle, and high school level as well as at the university level in both English and Spanish. silopez-lopez@wsu.edu Lucas, Teresa – Teresa Lucas is a Senior Instructor at Florida Interna-

Masi, Annmarie – Annmarie Masi, Ph.D., Miami Dade College School of Education, has specialized in Educational Foundation courses for teacher preparation incorporating the latest instructional technology to meet the needs of diverse learners. amasi@mdc.edu May, James – James May is a Professor of EAP at Valencia College in Orlando. Dr. May is SSTESOL’s conference chair and webmaster. Visit him at http://TeacherTricks.org (his video blog) to learn more about Computer Assisted Language Learning and the infusion of Web 2.0 in the classroom. jmay@valenciacollege.edu McGreger, Kristen – Kristen is an instructor at INTO USF with her MA in Applied Linguistics and ESL from the University of Memphis. She’s taught ESL and composition in the US and abroad. McMurria, Catherine – Catherine McMurria is a Visiting Instructor in the Department of Childhood Education, Literacy, and TESOL at the University of North Florida. Her interests lie in ESL, Anthropology and Russian Language. McPeek, Tyler²7\OHU0F3HHN 0$/LQJXLVWLFV7(6/&HUWLÀFDWH LV currently a PhD Candidate at UF and President of the Florida Linguistics Association (FLA). He speaks Japanese and has taught EFL in -DSDQW\OHUPFSHHN#Xà HGX Murphy, Laura – Laura is an instructor and coordinator of the General English Program at INTO USF. She has an MA in TESL from the University of San Francisco with 15 years of experience. Naghitorabi, Christy – Christy Naghitorabi teaches EAP at INTO University of South Florida. She received her MA in Linguistics/TESOL at USF and has had EFL experience in Iran, Peru, and South Korea. Nakamura, Yukari – Yukari Nakamura is a lecturer of Japanese at the University of Florida and a director of AFTJ. Navarre, Steve – CEO of SuccessEd Steve Navarre’s extensive business background and personal family experiences make him uniquely TXDOLÀHGLQHGXFDWLRQVRIWZDUHDQGFRQVXOWLQJ6XFFHVVRIWKHHGXFDWRU and student drive his passion. mellony.deuel@successed.net

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

41


ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PRESENTERS Nichols, William – William Nichols is a graduate of the University of Central Florida with a Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies DQGWKH7()/FHUWLÀFDWH O’Donnell, Martin – Martin O’Donnell is an MA TESOL graduate student at the University of Central Florida. He has taught abroad in Korea. He currently volunteer teaches at the Apopka Family Learning Center. martykodonnell@gmail.com Paneque, Oneyda M – Oneyda M. Paneque, Ed.D., Miami Dade ColOHJH6FKRRORI(GXFDWLRQKDVZRUNHGIRUWKHSDVWWZHQW\ÀYH\HDUVLQ the areas of teacher preparation for diverse students, including English Language Learners. Pappa, Elizabeth – Elizabeth Pappa is a current student at the UniverVLW\RI&HQWUDO)ORULGDZKHUHVKHLVPDMRULQJLQ6SDQLVKDFHUWLÀFDWHLQ 7UDQVODWLRQDQGWKH7()/&HUWLÀFDWH

Quijano, Mary – Mary Quijano is an impassioned ESL Adjunct Professor. She has taught grammar, reading, and writing. Teaching conversation classes, she specializes in pronunciation and supporting others in Spanish to better assist their Spanish-speaking ELLs. quijano.mary@yahoo.com

Torres, Kelly – Kelly Torres teaches courses in English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL), Educational Psychology, and Classroom Assessment. Her research focuses on heritage language learners’ experiences of acquiring and maintaining language.

Reilly, Natalia – Dr. Natalia Reilly is recently in the MA TESOL program at the University of Central Florida. She used to teach science, Russian, and English in Russia and Belarus. reillynucf@knights.ucf. edu

Torrey, Evelyn – Dr. Evelyn Torrey teaches TESOL courses at Florida Atlantic University and has taken a lead role in course revisions, compliance with TESOL standards, and designing e-learning for TESOL courses. ETorrey@fu.edu

Rodríguez, Prisca – Prisca Rodríguez has a BA in English, an MA in Liberal Studies, and is completing a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction, specializing in Literacy, Educational Technology, and Children’s Literature.

Tran, Rose²5RVH7UDQDVWXGHQWLQWKH7()/FHUWLÀFDWHSURJUDPDW the University of Central Florida, participates in conversation hours at the intensive English program. rosaleemullins@gmail.com

Rodriguez Spence, Silvia – Silvia Rodriguez Spence is Associate Professor of TESOL at Southern New Hampshire University where she teaches Graduate Language Studies. She is a 2008 recipient of the Fulbright Scholar Award.

Trotta, James – James Trotta has over 10 years of experience teaching English in South Korea. He is now pursuing a PhD. jtrotta@gmail.com

Perez-Prado, Aixa – Aixa Perez-Prado is the ESOL Coordinator at Florida International University. Her interests include using social networking to promote language acquisition and for teacher education, ELOLQJXDOHGXFDWLRQDQGGLYHUVLW\HGXFDWLRQSHUH]D#ÀXHGX

Rojas, Maria S – Maria S. Rojas is a current student at the University of Central Florida, where she is majoring in Interdisciplinary Studies, a FHUWLÀFDWHLQ7UDQVODWLRQDQGWKH7()/&HUWLÀFDWH

Perkins, Kyle – Kyle Perkins is a TESOL professor at Florida International University. He has published research on second language acquisition, reading comprehension, the composing process, and Rasch measurement.

Shaqareq, Lena – Lena Shaqareq is the Interim ESOL Coordinator in the Department of Childhood Education, Literacy, and TESOL. She JUHZXSLQ4DWDUDQGLVà XHQWLQ$UDELFOVKDTDUHT#XQIHGX

Peters, Sabine – Sabine is a doctoral candidate in FSU’s Instructional Systems program and an active duty Major in the US Air Force. She was also an Assistant Professor of German at the US Air Force Academy in Colorado. sup11@my.fsu.edu

Schroeder, Jennifer – Jennifer taught EFL in Turkey for ten years and is now teaching at the English Language Institute at the University of Florida. She has an M.Ed. from George Mason University.

Platt, Elizabeth – Since retiring from FSU in 2005, Elizabeth Platt has taught courses locally and consulted internationally. Specializing in applied linguistics and curriculum development, she has worked for brief periods in Nicaragua, Rwanda, Angola, the Dominican Republic, and Bangladesh. ejplatt@embarqmail.com

Seren, Elin – Elin Seren is a TESOL teacher from Columbus, Ohio. She currently teaches in a co-teaching setting (grades 5-6) for South-Western City Schools in Grove City, Ohio. She also teaches TESOL to adults through the ABLE program. Elin has her B.A. and M.Ed. from The Ohio State University. She has taught TESOL in Istanbul, Turkey to children and adults as well as in Chile. Her area of expertise is literacy. tap1971@yahoo.com

Piro, Wendy – Wendy Piro earned an MA.Ed. in Elementary Education from East Carolina University and serves as Teaching and Learning Coach for Wayne County Public Schools, North Carolina.

Shelly, Victoria C. – Victoria is a Florida native who earned her BA and MA in linguistics from UF. She has taught academic ESL since 2009.

Porter, Mitchell – Mitchell Porter has an MA in Linguistics, with emphasis in TESOL. He has taught English in Ecuador and China, and is currently an ESL Course Director at Full Sail University. mporter@fullsail.com

Sippell, Kelly – Kelly Sippell is the Assistant Director, ESL Manager, and Executive Acquisitions Editor at University of Michigan Press. She manages an extensive list of ESL textbooks and teacher training materials.

Powell, Elaine – Elaine Powell teaches in Duplin County, North Carolina and is a graduate student with Project LEAP. Proietti, Ame – Ame Proietti is a student in the MA TESOL program at the University of Central Florida. ame@ucf.edu

42

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PRESENTERS

Smith, Jenica – Jenica Smith, MA TESOL, has taught in Florida, China, Zambia, and Alabama. She currently teaches at the University of Alabama’s English Language Institute. jrsmith@ua.edu Templeman, Maureen – Maureen Templeman is an instructor and the Curriculum Coordinator at INTO University of South Florida. She has DQ0(GLQ7(62/DQGKDVEHHQLQWKHÀHOGIRURYHU\HDUV mtempleman@usf.edu

Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Trujillo, Amy – Amy Trujillo is a teacher of 3rd grade gifted students DQGD-U)//FRDFK6KHLVDFHUWLÀHGWHFKQRORJ\LQVWUXFWRUDQGZULWHV articles about technology integration. AmyRTrujillo@gmail.com Tunceren, Li-Lee – Li-Lee Tunceren works in faculty development and designs and teaches blended and online EAP courses at St. Petersburg College. She is a doctoral student in Second Language Acquisition and Instructional Technology at USF. Li-Lee has co-authored a textbook: Choice and Consequence (2010, U of Michigan Press). tunceren. lillien@spcollege.edu

Weber, Roberta – Dr. Roberta Weber in a specialist in instructional program design at FAU. Wedding, Debbie – Debbie Wedding, Literacy Coach at Shady Hills Elementary in Pasco, has an M.A. from Ball State University. She has 36 years in education, including 22 years as a literacy coach. Williams, Gwendolyn M – Gwendolyn M. Williams is an assistant professor of ESOL at the University of West Florida. Her research interests include ESOL teacher education and identity issues with international students. gwilliams1@uwf.edu Zadina, Janet – Dr. Janet Zadina is an Educational Neuroscientist who sees brain research through the eyes of a teacher and teaching through the eyes of a researcher. After twenty years’ teaching experience at both high school and college levels she became a cognitive neuroscientist. 6KHEULGJHVWKHÀHOGVRIHGXFDWLRQDQGQHXURVFLHQFHWKURXJKKHUZRUN as a researcher, teacher, author, and international speaker. jzadina@ uno.edu Zelden, Renee – Renee Zelden holds a MS in TESOL and teaches EAP at Miami Dade College. She specializes in teaching reading, writing, and technology.

Valdeos, Katia –Katia is an ESOL Lead Teacher in Hernando County and has an M.A. from University of Leeds in England. She is a frequent presenter on Dream Act, bullying, and advocacy. Vargas, Lillian E. – Lillian graduated from Rutgers University with an MA in Language Education and is currently an adjunct lecturer at UF’s (QJOLVK/DQJXDJH,QVWLWXWHOYDUJDV#Xà HGX Vecchio, Lindsay – Lindsay Vecchio has taught ESL to children and adults in Paris, Baltimore, and Detroit. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Education at the University of Florida. Her most recent research has been DERXW+DLWLDQ(QJOLVKODQJXDJHOHDUQHUVLQ)ORULGDOYHFFKLR#Xà HGX Verde, Jesus – Jesus has taught elementary, high school, and adult education. He is currently a Research Consultant with Velazquez Press. jverde@academiclearningcompany.com Victor, Sangita – Sangita is an instructor at INTO USF and has her MA in Applied Linguistics: TESL from the University of South Florida. She has taught many ESL courses, including service-learning. Walton, Katie – Katie Walton works for the Jacksonville Public Library Center for Adult Learning. She is an ESL coordinator, volunteer trainer, and was formerly an AmeriCorps*VISTA with the Florida Literacy Coalition.

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

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FEEDBACK SURVEY

FEEDBACK SURVEY Please circle your answers. Leave comments in the space provided. The input you provide will be used to make next year’s conference even better! 3OHDVHGURSRIIFRPSOHWHGVXUYH\VDWWKHUHJLVWUDWLRQDUHD,I\RXSUHIHU\RXPD\ÀOORXWWKLVVXUYH\ electronically by clicking the conference survey link at www.sstesol.org.

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Comments:

1. What is your primary interest in attending SSTESOL 2013? 3URIHVVLRQDOGHYHORSPHQW



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Other:

8. How helpful were the publisher exhibits to your overall conference experience? Very helpful

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Comments: 2. What is your primary interest strand? Advocacy

Higher Ed

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EFL

K-12

Dual Language

Teacher Education

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Comments:

3. How would you rate the overall quality of the concurrent sessions? Great

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10. Please rate your overall conference experience on a scale of 1-10.

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11. Next year, the Sunshine State TESOL Conference will be held in Clearwater. Do you plan to attend? Please add your comments and suggestions in the box below for the 2014 conference team.

4. What was the best presentation you attended?

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Comments: 5. How well did the conference program guide meet your needs in scheduling and attending sessions and events? Very well

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Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

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NOTES

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Sunshine State TESOL Conference

Orlando, May 16 - 18, 2013

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Sunshine State TESOL Conference

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Sunshine State TESOL Conference


SSTESOL 2013 Conference Program  

This is the official program for the 35th annual SSTESOL Conference

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