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( SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH

COUNCIL)

Volume 46/ Numbers 2-3 / June-September 1992

605 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10158

The National Security Education Program

defining and implementing provi ion are con i tent with the canon and criteria of cholarly integrity and excellence. Thi report provide background on the legi lation and ugge t orne of the major i ue about which cholar need to be concerned. Senator Boren i Chair of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, a po ition that he hold for a limited term of ix year (concluding in 1992). Member are rotated on and off the Intelligence Committee after fixed term of ervice 0 a to limit the potential for cooptation of the committee by the intelligence community. A former Rhode Scholar and current Tru tee of Yale Univer ity, Senator Boren ha long been convinced that the United State uffers from inadequate experti e on foreign area . He believe

A review and analysis by Stanley J. Heginbotham* I. Background New form of federal upport for higher education are generally extremely difficult to mobilize in thi period of highly con trained re ource ,rna ive budget deficit , and wide pread di agreement among member of Congre and the admini tration a to national prioritie and trategie . The National Security Education Act of 1991 wa one of the major achievement in thi arena in recent year , but it came to pa very largely a the re ult of the effort of one legi lator, Senator David Boren of Oklahoma. It benefited from ugge tion of taff at cholarly a ociation, but it pa age owe little to the mobilizing and lobbying effort of the cholarly community. Indeed, many cholar have only belatedly become aware of the legi lation, and con iderable confu ion and controversy urround it provi ion , the procedure for it implementation, and the appropriate re pon e of cholars to it. Becau e the legi lation bear directly on the interdi ciplinary training of cholar in the ocial cience and humanitie and on diver ifying our knowledge of pattern of human experience and behavior, Social Science Re earch Council (SSRC) taff have played, and continue to play, an active role in trying to clarify the character of the program and to find way to a ure that it

• tanley J. Heginbotham i vice pre id nt of the Social Science Research Council.

CONTENTS OF TIDS ISSUE ational Security Education Program. Stonlty J. Htgin·

TIle

botham

17

horing Up the Man ion·Hou Cora B. Marrttt

24

An Ag nda for Comparative and Tran national Re arch. Eric Htr hbtrg

27

Frontiers of Social Science and the SSRC. David L. FtathtrflUln

Coun il Personnel New Directors and Officers taff Change New Staff Appointment Recent Council Publication

32 35 35 35 35 36

Current Activitie at the Council Global Environmental Ch nge Seminar African Archive and Mu urns Project Conference on the African Dia pora Conducting Social Science Research in the Developing World Council Fellow hip and Grant Program • 1992-93 Award Offered in 1992 (Li t of Name) Grant Received by th Council in 1991-92

3 38 38 39

40 41 44

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that a useful trategy for remedying that ituation i to get more undergraduate exposed to foreign experience through tudy abroad and then to facilitate their tudy of foreign language and culture by as uring that both academic training program and funding are available for tudy of a broad range of foreign areas. Boren was active in effort to increase dramatically the extent of two-way educational exchange program with the Soviet Union through the United State Information Agency, but he and like-minded colleague uch as Senator Pell and Kerry were unable to mobilize ignificant re ource in the foreign as i tance budget for uch purpo e . Boren remain , however, actively engaged in effort to mobilize the federal, foundation, and educational communitie to promote international training and expertise in the United State .

n. Provi ions Faced with a federal executive-Iegi lative budget agreement that trictly limited inve tment in dome tic and foreign as i tance program , an opportunity in a po t-Cold War period to argue that minor cut could be made in intelligence expenditure without jeopardizing national ecurity, and hi own po ilion of influence on the Intelligence Committee, Boren pon ored, as one element in hi effort to promote foreign area experti e, a National Security Education Program (NSEP) a a part of the Intelligence Authorization Act, Fi cal Year 1992. Though he had hoped to house the program in an independent governmental foundation, hi effort were blocked by an Office of Management and Budget (OMB) ruling that, to qualify a a defense budget- upported program under the budget agreement, the NSEP would have to be hou ed in the Department of Defen . Moreover, Boren needed to build a broad coalition of legi lative upport for the legi lation, for taking money from intelligence program , and for taking money out of the defen e budget. Becau e of the complex budgeting proce for intelligence program , he had to hepherd the legi lation through the Armed Service Committee , the Intelligence Committee , and the Appropriation Committee of both house . To meet the demand of OMB and hi congre ional colleague , Boren hou ed the program in the Department of Defen e l and created an over ight board that include representation from the major I In an effort to trengthen the credibility of the program in academic circle , Boren included a provi ion that the Secretary of Defense hould admini ter the program through the Defen Intelligence College. Few observers were reas ured by thi provi ion. however. and all of the centers of influence involved in selting up the program seem now to concede th t any role for the college will be nominal . It i widely expected th t mention of the college will be deleted in "perfecting" amendments to the legi lation . It i unclear whether other mechani m will be sought to in ulate admini tration of the program from the Office of the Secretary of Defense .

18\ITEM

national security agencie as well as tho e having re pon ibility for international education. That body, the National Security Education Board, con i t of ix official or their de ignee -the Secretary of Defense (the tatutory chair), the Secretary of Education, the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Commerce, the Director of Centrallntelligence (DCI),2 and the Director of the United State Information Agency-as well as four expert in the fields of international, language, and area tudie education who are appointed by the Pre ident and confinned by the Senate. Boren reportedly plan to propo e in an amendment to the legi lation that the Chair of the National Endowment for the Humanitie be added as a tatutory member. Since that change would hift the balance of governmental and public member of the Board, there seem to be a trong argument for adding a fifth pre idential appointee at the ame time. The board i not as igned re pon ibility for management of the program, nor i it accorded a direct role in the awarding of scholarship , fellow hip , or grant . Rather, it i charged with developing criteria for award under the program, a uring di emination of information on the program, e tabli hing qualification for tudent and in titution seeking award , recommending which language , di cipline , countrie , and areas hould be eligible for funding under the program, and reviewing the admini tration of the program. The legi lation call for the creation of a "National Security Education Tru t Fund" in the Treasury of the United State , re ource for which are to be drawn from 150 million of fund authorized and appropriated from cut to be made in intelligence program for fi cal year 1992. The chedule of appropriation did not provide any line item for the fund, however, and protracted and complex negotiation are ti11 in proce among the relevant authorizing and appropriating committee and ubcommittee of both hou e and the Department of Defen e a to which intelligence line item in the defense budget are to provide the $150 mi11ion for the tru t fund. Those negotiation are now caught up in maneuvering on a range of i ue relating to both the fiscal year 1992 and 1993 budget. Senator Boren' legi lative acumen and priori tie wi11 be te ted a he bargain with colleague to e tabli h, in hi la t year a Chair of the Intelligence Committee, a workable and u tainable basi for a National Security Education Program. The legi lation permits up to $35 million to be pent 1 TIle position of Director of Central Intelligence, though hi torically alway filled by the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, involves quite different re pon ibilitie . TIle Director of Central Intelligence i charged with coordination of all of the intelligence agencie • which include not only the CIA but also the Nation I Security Agency, the State Department Bureau of Intelligence and Research, the Defense Intelligence Agency. and the intelligence agencie of the individual armed services.

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from the tru t fund in fiscal year 1992 (which end September 30, 1992), and for subsequent years indicate that fund hould be drawn from the intere t on the assets of the tru t fund. It i widely believed that Boren hoped to see the re ources in the tru t fund augmented from federal appropriation in fi cal years ubsequent to 1992, to the extent that it would be po ible to u tain annual expenditure roughly equivalent to the 35 million projected for the first year. Thi trategy i de igned to produce a izable endowment for foreign area training that would be exempt from annual budget battle in either the intelligence or the education arena. In the absence of further appropriation in fi cal year 1993 or ubsequent years , however, the tru t fund eem unlikely to be able to u tain training program in exce of 6-8 million per year (after admini trative expense and repleni hment of the principal to compen ate for inflation). Reflecting Boren' trategy for promoting expertise on foreign area , the National Security Education Program has three component , each of which i targeted to receive roughly equal amount of money annUally. The first i to provide as i tance to undergraduate for tudy abroad. The second i to provide as i tance to graduate tudent tudying in the United State for training in foreign language as well a foreign area and international tudie. The third i to provide as i tance for the creation and trengthening of foreign area program at U.S. in titution of higher learning. All award are to be ba ed on merit review proce se . Each component of the program i to provide upport on "critical" countrie or area. In the undergraduate cholarhip component, "critical" refers to countrie that are not "emphasized in other United State tudy abroad program , uch as countrie in which few United State tudent are tudying." In the graduate fellow hip program, " critical" refer to areas within " the di cipline of foreign language , area tudie , and other international field ... in which United State tudent are deficient in learning . ... " In the in titutional upport component, " critical" refers to area "in foreign language ,area tudie and other international field ... in which United State tudent , educators, and Government employee are deficient in learning and in which in ub tantial numbers of United State in titution of higher education provide training .... " A central function of the National Security Education Board i to make recommendation to the Secretary of Defense a to the countrie and areas that are " critical" under the e three criteria. The empha i of the program i on increasing the numbers of training program and expanding field of coverage of training program . In thi re pect, it i de igned to complement, not replace or undermine, other federal program uch a Title VI foreign area centers and Title vm upport for Soviet and Eastern Ju

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European tudie . It seem al 0 de igned to complement, not reinforce, the traditional emphasi on major We tern European language and culture . The legi lation al 0 call for "con ideration to be given to" equitable geographic di tribution in the making of award and "the extent to which the di tribution of scholar hip and fellow hip to individual reflect the cultural, racial and ethnic diversity of the population of the United State ." Finally, the legi lation include important but ambiguou " service" requirements for individual who receive fund under the Act' provi ion . Undergraduate receiving scholar hip covering period in exce of one year, a well a all individuals receiving graduate training award , are required to serve either in the field of education or in government ervice for a period of between one and three time the length of their award. The legi lation al 0 prohibits any department, agency, or entity of the U.S. government that engage in intelligence activitie from u ing any recipient of fund under the program to undertake any activity on it behalf while the individual i being upported by the program.

m. Administration The Secretary of Defense as igned re pon ibility for implementation of the program to the Office of the As i tant Secretary for Command, Control , Communication , and Intelligence, which ha , in turn, appointed Martin Hurwitz a Admini trator for National Security Education. Hurwitz i a senior program manager whose primary experience ha been in defense work. Although only marginally familiar with cholarly training program when he a umed re pon ibility for the National Security Education Program , Hurwitz and hi mall taff have made themselve widely acce ible to a broad range of cholars and in titution repre enting variou segment of the cholarly community. The in titutional culture from which Hurwitz and hi cholarly interlocutor come to these di cu ion are trikingly different, but seriou effort seem to have been made to understand and bridge the con iderable gap in approach , terminology, priori tie , and goal that are revealed in the di cu ion . Though anxiou to get the program in operation 0 that ignificant fund can be expended in fi cal year 1992, Hurwitz ha been everely con trained by the delay in getting money into the National Security Education Tru t Fund, by the complex procedural and political tep involved in e tabli hing the National Security Education Board under an official charter, by the need for regulation to govern operation of the program, and the need for authoritative determination of " critical" countrie , areas , ITEMS/ 19


and di cipline that can be tudied under upport from the program. Work on the procedural requirement has gone forward, notwith tanding the lack of fund and the very limited personnel available to admini ter the efforts.

IV. I u SSRC h had the greate t experience with and mo t direct programmatic concern for the graduate training component of the NSEP. We have endeavored to help articulate concern and identify minimum requirement for scholarly integrity and quality for uch a program. If the financial, tatutory, regulatory, and personnel provi ion for implementation of the program eem to meet those minimum requirement , the governing bodie of the Council wi1\ be a ked to review que tion of whether, and under what circum tance , SSRC might appropriately participate in the program. A the provi ion for implementation of the program continue to be developed, the Council give particular attention to ix i ue:

A. Implementation of the Merit Review Proc Provisions The concept of merit review i fundamental to allocation of re ource in the academic community. It provide clear term of reference for a competition: eligibility, application procedure, election criteria, etc., and provide, a well, for the appointment of diverse and independent individual who can make judgment on academic and/or cholarly merit of propo al and individual . It eparate the selection proce from the in titutional intere t and bia e of the pon oring and admini tering in titution with re pect to pecific ca e . Merit review i of pecial importance to the integrity and reputation of any program that i funded, admini tered and/or overseen by in titution that have their own operational intere t . Sen itivity to these i ue i e pecially keen in thi case becau the program i adminitered out of the Department of Defense and representative of foreign policy, intelligence, and defen agencie are repre ented on an oversight board. Notwith tanding legal provi ion protecting tudent , while recipient of fund , from use by agencie engaged in intelligence activitie , the academic and cholarly communitie need firm a urance that election proce se wi1\ be free from political or bureaucratic interference beyond as uring compliance with term of reference and efficient management of cholar hip and fellow hip program . It would not seem acceptable, for example, to have candidate creened on the ba i of their political view , their oppo ed to educawi1\ingne to serve in government 20\ ITEM

tional in titution , their ability to obtain ecurity clearance , or other criteria not directly related to academic promise, the ub tantive focu of the propo ed training, etc. Scholars and cholarly organization are, in hort, understandably and appropriately concerned that they not become involved in, or lend their pre tige to, activitie that, under the guise of providing educational opportunity. put individual or in titution under pre ure to erve the intere ts of intelligence, military, or foreign policy agencie . In the context of graduate training program under thi legi lation , merit review procedure would need to involve several form of protection. • First, individual grant need to be made by independent panel of cholars and educators who represent excellence in a variety of approache and area of expertise within the juri diction of the program. • Second, ince the program i admini tered by the Defen e Department, and it oversight board contain repre entative of defen e, intelligence, and foreign policy agencie , the proce of selecting the panel of cholars and educator need to be tran parently independent of tho e agencie . Thi ugge t the need for a proce under which organization that are intere ted in managing cholarship and fellow hip program would ubmit propo al to an independent panel of cholar and other international training expert who would recommend which organization would be elected to manage the program . • Third, the publicizing of the fellow hip program as well as the admini tration of the term of individual fellow hip need to be equally clearly separated from the defense, intelligence, and foreign policy agencie 0 as to avoid bias, or the perception of bia , in the unive~ of candidate for fellow hip and in the treatment of individual elected to receive award . The danger i that uch agencie might how preference to tudents from particular chool or favor like-minded tudent over ympathetic to agency goal , program , or tho Ie policie . • Fourth, the term of reference under which the program i to be admini tered need to be ufficiently broadly drawn to make po ible an intellectually and academically coherent program based on merit. Limiting the program to a relatively mall number of areas and di cipline on which the intelligence community need analy t in the hort term would, for example, seem an unacceptable ba i for defining fellow hip opportunitie . Similarly, exten ive pecification of how fellow hip hould be di tributed among region in the United State undermine the principle of merit selection.

It would seem e sential for the purpo e of the graduate fellow hip component of the NSEP that the admini tering VOLUME

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agency e tabli h a merit review proce for the identification and selection of appropriate in titution to conduct and admini ter the graduate fellow hip program . It i al 0 important that the term of reference of the invitation to in titution to compete for uch a role be publicly available and define a program that can be haped in an intellectually and educationally coherent way. " Pa -through" or "intermediary" organization are frequently u ed to manage fellow hip program because they develop experti e and efficiency in doing o. Tho e argument are valid in thi ca e, but they are much Ie important than the argument that intermediarie will help to provide e ential eparation from and independence of interference by defen e, intelligence, and foreign policy agencie .

B. Specification and Transparency of the Service Requirement Perhap the mo t worri ome operational problem with the NSEP tem from it ervice requirement. Some of the problem with thi requirement may be correctable in the drafting of program regulation , but other may require modification in the language of the legi lation itself. The e do not seem to be i ue of principle on which there i ignificant di agreement, but failure to addre them could well undermine the willingne of in titution and individual to participate in the program. Clearly the extent and nature of the service requirement need to be pecified. Requiring one year of ervice for a year of training eem within the bound of rea on and pa t practice, whereas requiring three year eem exceively burden ome and con training. It will be important al 0 that the regulation be clear and explicit about what range of job in what range of in titution would be con idered "service in the field of education in the area of tudy for which the fellow hip was awarded .... " The ervice requirement eem , in the ab ence of clarifying regulation , unduly inflexible. It seem not to provide for deferral of ervice if the recipient of an award wi he to pur ue further tudy beyond the degree for which the award wa made. Nor doe it provide for an appeal proce in case where appropriate employment that draw on the individual' training i imply not available in government or education. Many who were trained in area tudie during the 1960 remember all too vividly the truggle during the 1970 to find any employment relevant to their training . The ervice requirement al 0 seem to exclude many form of ervice out ide government and education that would benefit the national intere t, uch a work for voluntary agencie , not-for-profit re earch in titution , or new media. Thi limitation could likely be corrected only through legi lative change. The Council has informally encouraged the program Ju

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managers to propo e interpretation and/or modification of the language of the requirement to limit liability to one year of service per year of training and to expand eligible service to include any employment that make use of the training to the benefit of the nation' international educational, diplomatic, defen e, or economic role, irre pective of the employer. It has argued for a grace period of up to three years after completion of full-time tudy and for an appeal proce .

C. Separation of the Selection Process for FeUow hip from the Proc of Monitoring and Enforcement of the Service Requirement The integrity and independence of the screening and selection proce e for award depend on their being fully independent of the admini tration of the service requirement. For an organization admini tering fellow hip program to be involved in recruiting for, facilitating employment at, or otherwi e linking training to service for pecific employer would undermine the perceived independence of the organization. Thi i e pecially important when many of the potential government employers have intelligence or defense agenda . Any organization re pon ible for the fellow hip awarding proce would need to make explicit, both in promotion of the program and in offering the award , the preci e character of the ervice requirement. Beyond that role, however, the training function and management of the service requirement need to be kept at arm length. Though Senator Boren seem fully to upport thi principle, the po ition of NSEP taff i Ie clear and the Council i continuing to emphasize the importance of making the eparation explicit.

D. Balance Between Training of Scholars and Teacher and Training of Practitioner Senator Boren' trategy recognize the importance of building the in titutional re ource for providing foreign area training to more tudents on a broader range of area . What ometime get 10 t in thinking about the graduate fellow hip program, however, i that the training of Ph.D. who will become the faculty for training in titution -as well as the training of the practitioner themselve -i e ential to in titution building. Thi need for doctoral training i e pecially clear and critical in areas that we now recognize as having been understudied in recent years. The need i al 0 great, however, in many area where faculty trained during the 1950 and 1960 are beginning to retire in large numbers, leaving e tabli hed training program without qualified faculty to provide the range of course that are needed. ITEM 121


The need for more practitioner ,in hort, i immediately apparent to those who will give hape to the NSEP graduate fellow hip program. The case for doctoral training of cholar who can provide faculty for training program i quite a powerful, but it need to be made explicitly and forcefully or it may get 10 t in the ru h to produce hort-term re ult .

E. Identification of Critical Disciplin ,Countries and

Are Crucial to the credibility and ucce of the National Security Education Program will be the proce it u e to identify critical di cipline , countrie , and area . Recommendation to the Secretary of Defen e on critical di cipline , countrie , and area are to be made by the National Security Education Board . It eem immediately apparent that the board itself will not be well equipped to generate Ii t of countrie and area . NSEP taff have prepared a draft charter for tile board that provide for advi ory bodie to help with thi proce It will be important that these bodie con i t of experts on foreign area training who have a broad comparative per pective on need , and who take an appropriately long-term and catholic view in their a e ment of adequacy of exi ting program . Approache that eek to identify what the United State need over the next three years, or that focu on the need of pecific government agencie , will produce Ii ting of di cipline , countrie , and area that are far too narrow and re trictive. Rather, it will be important that the time frame be a long one, recognizing the long lead time that are involved in training area cholars. It will al 0 be important that a broad range of national need be con idered, including the need to conduct a variety of economic relation , to contribute to the growth and development of mall and remote tate , and to trengthen our capacity to conduct public diplomacy through nongovernmental agencie in the art and cultural affair a well a through more traditional governmental agencie . Though the proce may re onably produce the conclu ion that a number of foreign areas are not "critical" for the purpo e of graduate training, it would be everely damaging to the program if it identified as critical only a few area that are prominent in the new a potential trouble pot for U.S. national curity policy.

F. Impact of Perception of the Program on the Conduct of Training and R earch Abro d The concern about the program that has attracted the greate t attention of cholars, but that i mo t intractable, i the way it i likely to be perceiVed by scholars and 22\ITEM

attentive public in other nation . The concern focuse e pecially on the presence of the de ignee of the Director of Central Intelligence on the National Security Education Board, but include as well the presence of the A i tant Secretary of Defen e a chair of the board and the fact that the program i being admini tered in the Office of the A i tant Secretary of Defen e for Command, Control, Communication and Intelligence. Area cholars are extremely sen itive to the damage that can be done to their personal reputation and to their ability to conduct cholarship abroad when they come to be perceived as involved with intelligence or defense agencie of the U .S. government. The credibility of American cholars in a number of countrie ha been undermined by program through which the intelligence community did coopt cholars to contribute to intelligence collection or covert action goal . Credibility in other countrie ha been undermined by unfounded rumors or allegation of uch cooptation. Many cholars are quite fearful that their ociation with thi program, however remote, could set back effort to overcom thi legacy. In the hort term it seem unlikely that effort to remove the DC I and/or the Secretary of Defense from the board and to tran fer re pon ibility for the program to the Department of Education will ucceed. Senator Boren i widely believed to have made the ca e for uch admini trative arrangement when he negotiated the provi ion of the program through the legi lative proce . Having had to compromise on the e points in order to get the legi lation approved, he i thought to feel unable to refight these battle . Rather hi attention i likely to focu on a uring that ignificant re ource are placed in the National Security Education Tru t Fund before hi tenure as Chair of the Intelligence Committee end . The problem i intractable a well becau e it i peculative in nature. It i difficult to anticipate how eriou the repercu ion would be, for example, for a graduate tudent wi hing to do field work in any given country following a period of training in the United State that had been upported by the National Security Education Program. In orne ituation, it might compromi hi or her reputation, ability to get to the field, or ability to complete the research. In other ituation it might go unnoticed. It doe eem reasonably clear, however, that the problem with re pect to the graduate tudent training evere than it component of the program i likely to be Ie would be if NSEP fund could be used for training out ide the United State . To orne extent, the eriou ne of the problem may be affected by the degree to which the admini trative proviion of the program protect the independence and integrity of the election proce . Title VllI, for example, though admini tered through the Department of State, eem to have e tabli hed a reputation of independence and cholVOLUME

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arly excellence that has generally protected recipients of its grant from charge of ubservience to the foreign policy of the United State. Sen itivity on uch i ue may, however, be Ie intense in countrie erved by that program than orne that would pre umably be covered by the National Security Education Program. In large measure, however, the seriou ne of the reputational problem in the hort term at least seem likely to be independent of the cholarly integrity of the election proce s and it protection from intelligence or defense agency influence. Rather, it will be determined by the international diplomacy relating to, and the politic of, a number of different countrie . The e factors are difficult

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enough to pecify in the pre ent, and far Ie ea y to project several years into the future. Clearly, however, once the term and funding of the program are e tabli hed, the compo ition of the National Security Education Board and its charter are determined, and the regulation governing the program' implementation are clearly e tabli hed, the governing bodie of SSRC, like those of other intere ted scholarly in titution , will have to weigh the po ible benefits of applying for participation in the program with a view to promoting cholarly integrity and excellence in the di tribution of federal re ource again t the po ible co t to it own reputation and the reputation of it committee and their potential graduate tudent grantee . •

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Shoring Up the Mansion-House by Cora B. Marrett* In the e, the inaugural day of the Directorate for the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Science, no word eem more apt than the e: "A k not what the directorate can do for you; a k what you can do for the directorate." But thi i not the etting for uttering tho e word . The invitation from the Social Science Re earch Council (SSRC) ignal the willingne of thi organization to heed the concern and need of the new directorate . My objective , hence, are threefold: (1) to portray the organization, as it currently exi t , in who e fortune I ask the SSRC and related bodie to inve t; (2) to ketch a vi ion for that organization; and (3) to reflect on the role that the SSRC can play in giving to that vi ion ub tance and u tenance.

The current organization of the Directorate The Directorate for the Social, Behavioral, and Economic (SBE) Science repre ent one of even directorate -the principal entitie -of the National Science Foundation. Six of the directorate empha ize the re earch mi ion of the foundation; the evenththe Directorate for Education and Human Reource -addre e the mandate of the foundation to create and u tain the per onnel ba e for cience and engineering. The SBE directorate it elf con i t of five ubunit: two centered on the infra tructure for all of cience; two devoted principally to the funding of re earch in the ocial, behavioral, and economic cience; and a fifth that upport inquirie on the place of cience and engineering in ociety. The Divi ion of International Program con titute one of the infra tructural component . Thi divi ion work mainly to promote re earch collaboration acro international boundarie . The Divi ion of Science Re earch Studie track • Cora B. Mam:tt , a profe r of i logy and Afro-American tudie i tant dire tor of t the University of Wi on in , Madi n, wa n med the newly¡ formed Direct rate for the Social , Beh vioral, and Economic Science at the National SCience Foundati n, effective May 17, 1992 . M . Mam:tt rved ch ir of the Council' board of direct rs from June 1990 until May 1992 . Thi article i based on an addre delivered by M . Mam:n before the SSRC board of directors on June I , 1992. 24\ ITEM

change in the human, financial, and related reource a ociated with cience and engineering. The Office of Studie in Science, Technology and Society encourage inquirie on the hi tory and philo ophy of cience, on ethical and value premi e of cience, and on the economic and related return of re earch in cience and engineering. The Divi ion of the Behavioral and Cognitive Science erve a one of the re earch entitie . It i home to program in anthropology-archeology, cultural anthropology, and phy ical anthropologylingui tic ,cognitive cience, and ocial p ychology. The Divi ion of Social and Economic Science hou e program in economic, geography, ociology, methodology and mea urement, political cience, law and ocial cience, and deci ion, ri k, and management cience. The arrangement ha produced knowledge of the highe t quality, but many development and opportunitie render problematic a tructure that re t 0 heavily on di cipline a traditionally conceived. The mo t immediate challenge: to devi e a y tem that attend to advance made and promi ed in the human cience .

Promoting" i terhood" No y tern hould be devi ed a eparate from the aim to be achieved; what mu t undergird an organization i a vi ion of the end ought. In piring and appropriate i the vi ion of the univer ity which John Henry Cardinal Newman et forth. He envi aged that in titution a "the home, the man ion-hou e, of the goodly family of the Science, iter all, and i terly in their mutual di po it ion ." The National Science Foundation repre ent a po ible man ionhou e, an edifice where mutual re pect and exchange acro the cience hould thrive. Where better to build that tructure than in the new directorate, the product of concern that tran cend the eparate di cipline and the ite where hared approache and idea mu t flouri h? The directorate mu t begin, however, by revamping it own quarter. The building of a tructure to promote interchange among field of inquiry i timely, given (1) the advance wrought through the blending of formerly di tinct field into ingle area ; (2) the fact that the foundation has embarked on a course that emphasize intellectual integration and organizational adaptability; and (3) the recognition that many of the que tion to VOLUME

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which we eek an wers cro s di ciplinary line . The importance of the ftr t i ue need no elaboration, here in an organization that did 0 much to create the fteld of ocial p ychology. The econd matter i one high on the agenda of the foundation, a it ets it cour e for the next ftve years. On the third matter, one ee a continued trend toward collaboration around large- cale societal and intellectual concern . At the foundation, the initiative already under way on global change illu trate the empha i on connection that peak to ocietal problem ,a doe an initiative planned for manufacturing. A thru t on cognitive cience aims to coale ce the several approache taken to human perception and rea oning. What the re earch organization of the directorate i likely to re emble in the near future i a model now being in tituted in the Directorate for Biological Science . That model arrange re earch funding around the knowledge that is to be created, rather than around the di cipline from which the knowledge might emanate. Fundamentally, the model encourage di ciplinary re earch but tre e it intellectual rather than its fteld- peciftc base. The detail of the model, as applied to the new directorate, remain to be fie hed out.

SSRC as model and support No place erve a a more appropriate etting for ketching a vi ion of a new arrangement than the SSRC, in light of it hi tory of promoting exchange and its own search for a new architecture. For one thing, the SSRC repre ent a model; it repre ent a way in which the ocial, behavioral, and economic cience may indeed be brought together. Secondly, where thi directorate move will depend heavily on re pon e from tho e outside of 1800 G Street in Wa hington. We rely on the creative re earch propo al that come in, on the new idea that evolve. SSRC, then, along with other bodie concerned with the future of the ocial, behavioral, and economic ciences is where we mu t neces arily turn for upport, for intere t, for idea . But let me ay why the SSRC repre ent a model to u . Looking back at the early hi tory of the SSRC, I wa struck by how imilar were the concern of the people who founded this Council, who wre tIed with the question, What hould we do? and who decided that the Council' role would be to concern it elf with tho e issue that would tran cend any given di ciJUNE/SEPTEMBER 1992

pline, and to think of the collective concern . Tho e concern at many point were methodological one : How do we be t enhance rigor in the inquirie we undertake? Tho e concern at time are per onnelrelated: How do we prepare the next generation to conduct re earch of the highe t quality? Tho e were the deci ion made early on about thinking of our common hared intere t , and planning toward the addre ing of tho e hared intere t . Nothing then i more in piring to tho e of u who are engaged in creating a new organization than looking back at that hi tory and aying there are Ie on to be learned. I can think of no better li t of objective for the new directorate than tho e articulated by the SSRC in the late 1920 and that till tend to u tain the work of the Council. They are 0 appropriate becau e they have to do with the facilitation of re earch, with the provi ion of per onnel, but alway based on the notion that the concern mu t be with the community of ocial, behavioral, and economic cience . They are: • Improvement of re earch organization • Development of per onnel • Enlargement, improvement, and pre ervation of material • Improvement of re earch method • Facilitation of the di emination of material , method , and re ult of inve tigation • Facilitation of re earch work • Enhancement of the general appreciation of the igniftcance of the ocial cience There i then the commonality, a common thread between what the founder of SSRC envi ioned and what I ee as our hope, if thi directorate i going to thrive. SSRC ha already aided the new organization by providing it with end to eek and ucce e to emulate. The SSRC undoubtedly will continue to aid our operation ,a both the SSRC and the directorate pur ue vigorou Iy the re earch i ue that tand at the cro road of the ocial, behavioral, and economic cience .

Sharing the mansion-house The ocial and behavioral cience, and not ju t the new directorate, mu t attend to all of the room of the man ion-hou e-for trategic and intellectual rea ons. Strategically, the re ource base for cience 1TEMS/ 25


tend increa ingly to be tied to large- cale initiative that tran cend di ciplinary bound . Significant increa e for the ocial, behavioral, and economic cience eem mo t likely in the near future if the e field explore the opportunitie that exi t for ba ic inquiry into the proce e a ociated with global change, the demand of manufacturing, the context of biotechnology - orne of the area identified for empha i at the federal level. Connection with other di cipline provide exciting opportunitie of broadba ed inquiry and for building in the other di cipline an appreciation of our own. Ideally, the appreciation would extend to the recognition that (1) the ocial and behavioral cience have their own fundamental concern , a ide from the general i ue they hare with all of the cience; and (2) the pur uit of the e

26\ITEM

concern benefit. all. Collaboration in the man ionhou e hould permit u room to trengthen our own intellectual agenda. The directorate, paralleling more e tabli hed organization uch a the SSRC, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Science , and the Federation of Cognitive, Behavioral, and Psychological Science, mu t exi t for the larger cau es to which it peak. Neither the horing up of the directorate nor the creation of a man ion-hou e erve a a ufficient ju tification for upport. Rather, the directorate mu t join with others in articulating what mu t be the ultimate aim: to improve human welfare by providing the knowledge that can enrich u • all-intellectually, economically, and culturally.

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An Agenda for Transnational

and Comparative Research by Eric Hershberg* A the 20th century draws to a clo e, communitie and ocietie acro the globe confront unprecedented change in the character and cope of the underlying proce e that hape ocial and cultural life. The e change and their local effects po e e pecially noteworthy challenge for re earchers in the ocial cience and humanities. In the pa t, boundarie e tabli hed by tate provided an organizing principle through which re earcher could interpret di tinctive cultural, ocial, political, and economic behavior and in titution . Scholar have tended to tudy culture and ociety within tate, or to engage in compari on acro tate to explain similaritie and difference . Re earch in thi tradition remain e ential to the development of knowledge in the humanitie and ocial cience . Yet it i no longer sufficient. Many of the critical force now haping ocial proce e and collective identitie are not rooted in territoriallydefined tate . Rather, they involve a multiplicity of proce e which originate out ide of-and commonly tran cend-state boundarie . Accelerating flow of ideas, information, and capital, wide pread exchange of vi ual image and good , and expanding mobility of population and production facHitie are among the mo t important tran national interaction affecting human culture and ociety, often in contradictory way. To a con iderable degree, the e widely experienced phenomena reinforce political and economic interdependence and inten ify pre ure for tandardization. The diffu ion of We tern con umer culture i evidenced by pattern of individual behavior which are manife t in virtually all contemporary ocietie. Economic contraction and expan ion , and the y tern of production and exchange which cau e them, take place on a global cale, and elicit overlapping policy re pon e in highly divergent context. Similarly, change in the • Eric Hershberg, a political scienti t, i the program director of the Joint Committee on utin American Studie . Thi article ynthe ize the contribution of a number of Council program officers who have been discu ing these i ue in recent month . The author i particularly grateful to Steven Heydemann, Frank Ke sel, and John Mollenkopf for their input. Errors of fact or omi ion are lely the author' .

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natural environment are experienced by citizen and governments on a global cale, and have led to wide pread experimentation with new regulatory practice and with innovative form of re ource management. From the per pective of tudie of international peace and ecurity, interdependence may generate incentive for cooperation and for the e tablishrnent of tran national organization (regime, in international relation parlance) to create framework for con en ual deci ion-making and for peaceful conflict re olution. Simultaneou ly, however, the every proce es may exacerbate centrifugal force that are already pre ent and unleash entirely new one , both within and acro exi ting tate . The growing influence of fundamentalist religiou movements, the proliferation of ethnic unre t, and the renewed inten ity of popular mobilization behind religiou and nationali t banner , all reflect heightened en itivitie to cultural difference . The e development te tify to the breakdown of barriers once reinforced by the centrality of the tate and the emergence of boundarie that tate previou ly uppre ed, and confirm the need to better understand ub- tate a well a upranational variation in idea, intere t , and behaviors. The tran national phenomena currently attracting the attention of ocial cienti ts and humani t are not without precedent in human hi tory. After all, the modem tate i , by definition, a unit of relatively recent creation and, even at it mo t all-encompa ing tage, the tate failed to incorporate fully the entire range of ocially relevant proce e. Neither the "Kurdi h problem," nor the growth of a tran national narcotic indu'try, nor even acid rain are phenomena of particularly recent vintage. Yet for different (if perhap related) rea on , rock and roll mu ic, Word Perfect, and even global warming are phenomena pecific to our age. A information technology continue to brink di tance between culture , breaking down long tanding barrier to human interaction , it i e ential to focu cholarly attention on the pecificitie of tran national proce e and their impact on individual con ciou ne and ocial proce e within and acro different etting . Understanding how tran national phenomena alter collective identitie, hape the character of ocial organization at both the micro and macro level , and provoke varying re pon e under different circumtance , con titute a fundamental challenge for ITEMS127


re earch by ocial cienti t and humani t in the coming year . The knowledge required to analyze tran national phenomena, and to a e their full range of con equence ,i differentially- ituated, di persed acro academic di cipline ,area tudie communitie, and methodological tradition . (For a di cu ion that focu e e pecially on the di tinctive approache taken by international relation peciali t and area tudie cholar, ee F. Wakeman, Items 42[4], December 1988.) Particularly worthy of mention i the potential utility of comparative technique , including interregionaj compari on , to explain variation in the impact of tran national phenomena in different etting , to identify di tinctive re pon e to tran national proce e, and, ultimately, to produce generalizable propo ition about the nature and con equence of tran national phenomena. It i important to note, however, that not all re earch analyzing tran national phenomena will be comparative. A David Szanton ha pointed out, * one e pecially intere ting tran national phenomenon, the Sikh dia pora, would need to be tudied comparatively if the focu of the com pari on i the differential integration of Sikh communitie in variou ociopolitical etting , e.g., in the United Kingdom , the United State, and Au tralia. On the other hand, if the i ue of concern i the influence of the dia pora on Sikh re i tance to Indian tate authority, formal comparative work would not be central to the re earch trategy. The critical point here i that it will be nece ary to tailor the methodology to the particular re earch que tion , rather than the other way around (which i not to imply that tran national re earch cannot offer e pecially challenging material for comparativi t , which in turn can be u ed to refine method of com pari on in both the humanitie and ocial cience). To advance our under tanding of tran national proce e will require a rare combination of lingui tic competence, cultural en itivity, and hi torical ophi tication, a well a a methodological ecumenici m that i rarely encountered in a ingle cholar. Re earcher trained in a number of di cipline in the ocial cience and humanitie ,a well a in a variety of regional context , will have to contribute in order for the nece ary ynthe e to emerge. Effort to develop network of cholars engaged • Internal SSRC memorandum. pring 1990. 28 \ ITEM

with tran national and comparative i ue have been under way at the SSRC and the American Council of Learned Societie for the pa t two year . During this period, more than a dozen work hop, eminar, and conference have been held, in mo tin tance under the au pice of the Council ' committee , to explore a wide range of tran national and comparative theme , including the influence of global adverti ing on changing cultural norm and con umption pattern in advanced and developing region ; the impact of European political and economic unification on European cultural identitie and on the in titutional land cape of the continent; the interaction in different region of imultaneou political democratization and economic liberalization; and the ignificance of different form of property owner hip for environmental u tainability and degradation. Participant in the e project have brought to bear a wide range of re earch methodologie , di ciplinary tradition and area background to the tudy of tran national and comparative i ue. In an effort to timulate further the development of uch multidi ciplinary network among cholar affiliated with the two Council , the Ford Foundation and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation have made fund available to upport a competition for eed grant to encourage the initiation of collaborative project de igned to analyze tran national phenomena and/or to employ interregional compari on to advance ub tantive or methodological knowledge in the ocial cience and humanitie . Fund provided by the MacArthur Foundation are intended to upport innovative multidi ciplinary re earch in the area of international peace and ecurity. Central to the aim of the Council and the Foundation i the encouragement of cholar hip at the inter ection of international relation and area tudie , economic, hi tory, ociology, anthropology, p ychology, and the phy ical cience, and thu to contribute to the po t-Cold War reformulation of international relation theory and policie . Through the e grants we hope not only to contribute to the development of entirely new initiative , but al 0 to trengthen the et of ongoing re earch planning activitie now under way at the Council . While the range of theme which could be tudied in uch project i immen e, the Council are particularly eager to develop comparative and/or tran national project in the following, omewhat overlapping, area: VOLUME

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• Rethinking relationships between social. economic. environmental. and political transitions and transformations in the developing world. The demise of the bipolar ystem of international relations which prevailed during the Cold War year i but one element of a profoundly tran formed context in which relatively impoverished nation eek viable strategie for achieving su tained economic growth and enhanced social equity. The continuing globalization of indu trial production and of trade are two additional transnational phenomena that have timulated fundamental change in once acro anct belief about the challenge to development. To better under tand the range of option available to promote u tainable development in different ettings. re earch i needed to clarify the nature of the tran national proce e that are under way and to analyze the con traint and opportunitie they introduce. • Comparative perspectives on health. human development. and behavior. At the ame time that major ocial tran formations in the North and the South have ignificantly altered the ources and pattern of mortality and morbidity. and of well-being and uffering, cholar increa ingly recognize that belief and practice relating to health and human development vary markedly acro s cultural, and ub-cultural context. We need far deeper under tanding framed in pecific comparative term , of all major dimensions of thi picture-the link between ocial tran formations and pattern of mortality and morbidity; the locally ituated and regional pattern of well-being and suffering; the cultural and ubcultural variation in belief and practice relating to health and development acro the life- pan. Even more, conceptual and empirical re earch is needed that will build bridge between the e domain , and that can inform di cu ion of ocial policy, public health, and individual well-being in different cultural context . • International migration and transnational population flows. The renewed influx of immigrant to the United State during the past decade i but one element of a wider expan ion of cro -border population hift in different region of the world. The flow of people from relatively impoveri hed region to the comparatively wealthier nation of We tern Europe, North America and Southea t A ia ha had a ignificant impact on ending a well a receiving communities. Yet we can only speculate about the implication of the e proce e for the persi tence of cultural identitie ; the inten ification of JUNE/SEPTEMBER

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ethnic, lingui tic, racial and religiou ten ion; or for pattern of political and economic change in area undergoing major demographic hift. On a practical level, the con equence of the e change for the provi ion of education, hou ing, and job opportunitie po e major challenge to policy-makers in all region . Migration i al 0 influencing the tructure of labor markets in both the North and the South, a development which will have a powerful impact on the capacity of many ocietie to adapt to the increasing globalization of the world economy. Re earch i needed on the way in which immigration hape the culture, economy, intergroup relation, and politic of receiving ocietie , and on the way in which emigration re olve orne problem , and contribute to the development of new one , in communitie which are experiencing emigration. Finally, u tained re earch i needed to better under tand the ecurity implication of tran national population movement . • Cultural dimensions of human conflict. including disputes rooted in ethnic. linguistic. racial. or religious differences. The breakdown of long tanding tate boundarie ha rekindled ethnic and religiou con ciou ne acro much of Asia, the former Soviet Union, Ea tern Europe, and el ewhere. The e change have profound ramification for repre entation of competing group at the ub- tate levelwhether the e are located in the Middle Ea t or the Ande , in citie or in the country ide-and ugge t the need to develop innovative approache to the tudy of collective identitie within and acro nation . Re earch i needed to pecify further how collective identitie are formed through hared pattern of cultural expre ion, interpretation of hared tradition, and common experience. The potential of new in titutional framework to confront the ecurity dimen ion of religiou , ethnic, and nationali t conflict i of particular concern. • The impact of globalization on the transformation of urban centers. and the emergence of new forms of inequality. both within cities and between urban and rural areas. Citie have fo tered the tran national proce e that are reorganizing the global economy. Shifts in the global economy have in tum tran formed the economic and ocial makeup of citie . Some citie have reinforced their po ition a produceer of advanced ervice for the global market, while other remain dependent on indu trial production; and yet other have failed to u tain either function. In addition to economic and technological change, uch ITEM

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new factor a cultural generativity, emerging regional alignment , and tran border migration appear to be affecting the relative po ition of citie in the urban hierarchy. At the arne time, urban inequality appear to be growing. A a re ult, citie are increa ingly faced with the need to addre the ocial and political con equence of wide pread and per i tent poverty, particularly when concentrated along line of gender, race, and ethnicity. Comparative re earch i needed not only to detennine the economic, political, and cultural force that are driving the evolution of the y tern of citie , but to

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understand their relation hip to the emerging pattern of urban inequality. The reque t for propo al that follow thi article i intended to generate interdi ciplinary, collaborative re earch project on the e topic ,a well a on other a pect of comparative and tran national reearch . Working together with the broad range of cholars affiliated with the two Council , we hope to enhance the capacity of the ocial cience and humanitie to contribute to an under tanding of human culture and ociety in a complex and rapidly changing world.

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The Soci I Science Research Council ( and The American Council of Learned Societi

RC) (CLS)

Requ t Proposals for Seed Grants for Transnational and Comparative R earch Planning Projects The Program: The Council invite propo aI for seed grants of up to SI5.000 to initiate collaborative. interdisciplinary research projects that analyze tran national phenomena and/or that employ interregional comparison to gain fre h perspective on social and cultural proce se and in titution . For purpose of thi competition. " region .. corre pond to the are of re pon ibility of the Council • joint committee : Africa. China. Eastern Europe. Japan . Korea. Latin America/Caribbean. Near and Middle East. South A ia. Southe t A ia. the Soviet Union and Its Succe r State , and We tern Europe. Propo al ubmitted to thi competition may aI 0 treat North America as one of the region to be tudied . To be con idered interregional. propo al mu t incorporate more than one of these region . Through these grants we hope to timulate innovative appro che to tran national proce se and to explore the potential of interdisciplinary. comparative research to enrich knowledge in the social ience and humanitie . The Council will encourage ucce ful applicant to u e these eed fund to develop propo aI for extramural upport for long-term program of research and/or training in the field of scholarship addre d by their projects. Themes: Half of the award made through thi competition will upport activitie that employ tran national and/or comparative approache to analyze i ue of international peace and security. While the remainder of the award can be made in any area of the humanitie and social science • the Council are particularly eager to develop projects on tran national and/or comparative dimen ion of the following topic : • The relation hip between social. economic. and political change in the developing world . and/or the impact of global tran formation on pro pects for u tainable development • Comparative perspective on health. human development. and behavior. particularly in the context of cultural and ubcultural variation in belief • practice • and policy • International migration and tran national population flow • including security dimen ion of population movement and/or the impact of migration on sending and receiving communitie • Cultural dimen ion of human conflict. including di pute rooted in ethnic. lingui tic. racial . or religiou difference • The impact of globalization on the tran formation of urban centers. and the emergence of new form of inequality. both within citie and between urban and rural areas EliglblUty: Funding for thi competition h been provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation in order to fo ter collaboration acro different program at the Council and among scholars representing a range of Council con tituencie . Thu • to be eligible for thi competition. projects mu t be initiated by: Council committee; members of Council committee. working group or selection panel; or recipients of Council po (doctoral fellow hip ince 1988. Applicant mu t meet one or more of these criteria and are expected to playa leading role in the activitie funded through thi program. However, it i not nece ary for all participant in funded activitie (e.g .• work hop or seminars) to meet the eligibility criteria outlined above . Grants will not be awarded to upport individual research. to upplement exi ting grants. or to u tain ongoing projects. Fund provided through thi program cannot be used to fund alarie or indirect co ts. Application Guideline : For further information and to receive application guideline , pro pective applicants hould contact: Program on Tran national and Comparative Re arch Social Science Research Council 605 Third Avenue New York. NY 10158 In order to receive application guideline • pro pective applicants hould ubmit an ab tract of no more than 250 word

ummarizing:

• Topic to be analyzed in the propo ed project • Regional and di iplinary expertise of participant • Eligibility of the applicant( ) Letters mu t be sent to the SSRC in ufficient time to allow for ubmi ion of completed proposal no later than the deadline pecified below. Deadlin : The deadline for receipt of completed application will be December I. 1992. Award will be announced by the pre ident of the SSRC and the ACLS on February 15. 1992.

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Frontiers of Social Science and the SSRC by David L. Featherman* It Is Our Future that Lays Down the Law of Our Today. -Friedrich Nietzche, Human, All Too Human

Nietzche' word have a particular re onance at thi time in the Council' hi tory. During the past year, we have engaged in laying out trategie that will prepare u to meet what i already upon u : the ocial cience of the future. Let me de cribe three a umption that underlie the Council' program which are evolving even a I write. Fir t, the future depend on the ability of ocial cience to tran cend the limitation of trictly di ciplinary thinking and to galvanize multi· and interdi ciplinary di cour e. Toward thi end, ocial cience will have to rely more heavily than in the past upon multidi ciplinary re earch team and Ie exclu ively upon the ingle inve tigator. Al 0, interdi ciplinary·ba ed re earch project hould not be accorded lower priority or Ie funding from federal and private ource than project that are di cipline. ba ed. In fact, one could imagine the funding priori tie favoring the interdi ciplinary approach. The political, ocio·economic, environmental, and health·related problem that ocial cience will be a ked and expected to addre in the coming de· cade -e.g., political and economic re tructuring of po t·Communi t ocietie , persi tent impoveri hment, u tainable development, AIDS pandemic panning continent -require team effort and defy di ciplinary di aggregation. A rationale for thi conclu ion lie in the econd and third a umption. Second, the future of ocial cience al 0 depend upon the willingne of ocial cienti t to attach re earch priority to topic uch a persi tent poverty, environmental degradation, and health pandemic the e and other i ue that are of high public importance and concern not only in thi country but el ewhere a well. It i toward thi goal that "mi·

• David L. Feathennan i pre iden! of the Council. Thi ankle i d on hi e y which appears in the SSRC Annual R~port. 1990-1991 . Thi Annual R~porl iIIu trate the integration of the variou concept de ribed by Mr. Feathennan into the Council" program d their interconne • ti n . A uch, it i a d panure from previou Annual R~porlS publi hed by the Council which con i ted of individual comminee repom . 32\ITEM

ion·oriented ba ic re earch" play a key role. Mi ion·oriented ba ic cience i re earch in which practical concern guide cienti t ' choice of topic . The re earch i conducted, however, in way that do not nece arily yield immediate or directly fore ee· able application (ee the author in Items, December 1991). I ugge t two rea on for attaching high priority to embedding our methodologic and theoretic advancement within the context of mi ion·oriented ba ic re earch. The frrst i that by doing 0 we are Ie likely to get 10 t in arcane e oterica. Science of all varietie i a ocial and cultural activity that ultimately depend on building credible argument , commonly held meaning , and conditional con en u , however tran itory or inclu ive that may be. We gain no advantage, a cienti ts, by exclu ive u e of terminology and technology that enable only a very few to under tand the driving que tion or rationale . And thi lead to the econd and more pragmatic rationale for mi ion·oriented empha i : Social cience i likely to have a dimini hed role in future national cience policy if it fail to u e thi trategy of demon trating its u efulne a well a it intellec· tual elegance. Increasingly, public funding of cience i tied to mar halling knowledge via cience and technology in behalf of achieving national or regional objective . Thi i patently true acro the ix federal agencie that con titute 80 percent of the decentral· ized ba i of our national cience policy. Like it or not, it i ever more true that our one ource of funding for o·called "ba ic" re earch, the National Science Foundation, may be adding "program or mi ion relevance" to the criteria by which project are competitively evaluated for funding. The third a umption i that the future of ocial cience increa ingly i international. If American ocial cience fail to gra p that inevitability, it may wither or become i olated from fronr.running theoretical and methodological developments. It material re ource , e pecially a declining acce to key databa e about contemporary a well a hi toric trend , could limit the growth and vitality of ocial cience a practiced in the United State . To over· come uch potential i olation, we have to internation· alize American ocial cience. We mu t create a new generation that i prepared for cro ·cultural cientific di cour e, that understand the language and the ocial and cultural in titution of other ocietie, and that collaborate a equal partner with their foreign counterpart . Further, I believe it i part of our ta k VOLUME

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to realize a vision of ocial science a an international corpus of knowledge, with differentiated experti e between-a well a within-national "academie " of cience, that can be marshalled, applied (Le., te ted in the field), and refonnulated in the course of carrying out mission-oriented re earch. Doe ocial cience not face the equivalent cientific and technical challenges to tho e embodied in de igning the supercollider or mapping of the human genome, for which the as embly of the be t mind acros the globe is essential, and for which the co ts of re earch could not be borne by any ingle nation? Could we not accelerate our scientific advance by giving high priority to problem and intellectual is ues that are transnational in their manife tion or that require comparative historical, cro s- y tern analysi ? With the e premise a guide , the Council has been po itioning it elf to meet the challenge facing ocial science in the coming decade. As we continue to do 0, we hall base our program upon the foundations of SSRC that were laid nearly 70 year ago. Tho e foundations include a vision of SSRC a a politically autonomou and intellectually eclectic in titution that (1) provide a unique forum for interdi ciplinary discour e; (2) con titute a national academy of the mo t cientifically active and eminent ocial cientists; and (3) is dedicated wholly to advancing the frontier of re earch and to tran lating and interpreting the e advance for diverse public , including it many private funder and their board , as well a for academe. The tructure we place upon the e foundation mu t equip u as an in titution to as i t the ocial cience in the future. While no radical tran fonnation of SSRC will be required, certain metamorpho e eem to be in order. One i to more fully internationalize and diversify the committee member hip, taff, and governance board of the Council. If we are to prepare for the future challenge outlined earlier, the SSRC mu t become an international, rather than a national, academy of the ocial cience. We need to be capable of conceptualizing and nurturing mi ionoriented re earch that addre e American intellectual and practical concerns-but re earch that al 0 infonn the e i ue with the advantage of comparative analy i and the benefit of frame of intellectual and policy reference that reflect contra ting and complementary "cultural" commitment . We mu t more effectively integrate what heretofore SSRC compartJUNE/SEPTEMBER

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mentalized into "area" or international re earch, on the one hand, and "thematic" or dome tic re earch driven by ocial cience di cipline , on the other. Our intellectual program at the Council i carried out by nearly two dozen committee and many related working group , ta k force , and re earch con ortia. The e bodies are a si ted by SSRC profe sional staff. Six major function infonn SSRC' organizational groupings. It i the e ix tran cending function that together con titute the Council' intellectual and cientific program - its programmatic empha e .

(1) Training the next generation In addition to being a major ource of fellow hip upport, SSRC i broadening its training of doctoral and po tdoctoral cholars through Council-wide fellows' conferences and topical training work hop. Current empha e in training equip the next generation for an increasingly international approach to the elaboration and differentiation of ocial cience theory and method and to their application .

(2) Extending geocultural knowledge Ba ic to the advancement of ocial cience i a nuanced understanding of the hi tory, culture, language, and in titution of world region and ocietie . Ju t a ba ic training in one or more di cipline provide a basi for intellectual comparion and interdi ciplinary di cour e, building detailed knowledge of other geocultural y tern offer a framework for de cribing and understanding commonalitie and difference in human behavior and in in titutional functioning .

(3) Expanding the range of interregional analysis Compari on i a ba ic tool of cientific analy i and theory con truction . SSRC' own re earch re ource are being applied electively to fo ter more inter ocietal compari on within world region and more interregional analy i . The Council i al 0 preparing to upgrade and extend the methodological ophi tication with which ocial cienti t carry out comparative tudie . ITEM

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(4) Exploring transnational phenomena It i alleged by orne analy t that tomorrow' world will manife t greater influence of tran national force - tho e factors that effect change at the local level but which tran cend the limiting condition of any particular place (e.g., land-u e pattern in China affecting the weather globally and thereby, the economy of coa tal economie of Southea t A ia). Whether or not there are uch tran national force (including tho e that are uper- a well a ubnational in character), and (if they exi t) whether or not they are proliferating, are open que tion . * However, the tudy of tran national proce e - tho e marked by nonlinearitie , feedback loop , and dynamic di equilibria, for example-would require recon ideration of many a umption that now typify re earch on ingle nation and ocietie, a well a many conventional form of comparative analy e .

(5) Organizing mi ion-oriented basic research Whether the focu i on the United State or another ociety, framing re earch and advanced re earch training within the context of contemporary problem in no way negate the need for fundamental tudie . However, orne of the greate t fundamental advance in the theory and method of the ocial • ee E. Hershberg article in thl i ue .

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cience , both here and abroad, have occurred within project that were mi ion-motivated. Without any reduction of it commitment to fo tering the advancement of the frontiers of method or theory, SSRC i increa ing its focu on intellectual and practical i ue on the public agenda.

(6) Developing social science infrastructures There are few in titution in the United State who e mi ion include the welfare of the ocial cience . There i no National Endowment for the Social Science, for example, and until the creation of a directorate for the ocial, economic, and behavioral cience within the National Science Foundation in late 1991, there ha been no federal funding ource that wa pecifically charged to develop the corpu of ba ic ocial cience knowledge. SSRC, in league with the e few other in titution both here and abroad, will continue to play uch a role . However, the building of ocial cience network , of person and of in titution ,will be accompli hed on an international cale in the month and year to come. It i the e ix function -a executed, haped, and focu ed by each SSRC committee and working group according to it unique intellectual mi ion - that order our prioritie and provide clarity as we move ahead.

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Council Personnel New Directors and Officers At its meeting on June 2, 1992, the Council's board of director elected three directors-at-large: Paul B. Baltes, Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Education (Berlin); Barbara Heyns, New York University; and Nagayo Homma, Tokyo Woman' Chri tian University. They will erve three-year terms, effective July 1, 1992. The Council's officers for 1991-92 were also elected or re-elected by the board. Newly elected as chair of the board of directors: Robert M. Coen, Northwe tern Univer ity; a vice-chair: Albert Fishlow, Univer ity of California, Berkeley; as ecretary: Marta Tienda, Univer ity of Chicago; and a trea urer: Emily Martin, The John Hopkins Univer ity. David L. Featherman was re-elected as pre ident, and Ronald J. Peleck was re-elected a a si tant trea urer. The following were newly appointed to the Executive Committee: Paul B. Balte , Barbara Heyn , and David Ward (Univer ity of Wi con in, Madi on). New appointment to the Committee on Problems and Policy (P&P) are: David Magnu on, Stockholm Univer ity; and Martha Minow, Harvard Law School. All will erve one-year term , effective July 1, 1992.

Staff Change DORlE SINOCCHI, formerly as i tant to the pre ident, has been named human re ource Ju

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director at the Council, effective July 1, 1992. In her new po ition, M . Sinocchi will a ume a larger et of re pon ibilitie a ociated with human re ource development and management at the Council. Primary among her dutie will be the coordination of the Council' new initiative in diver ifying taff and committee . M . Sinocchi joined the Council in October 1985.

Note: Profe ional taff title have been changed at the Council, effective July 1992. Staff A ociate will be Program Director ; Program A ociate will be Program Officers. The e change are intended to more accurately reflect the nature of the profes ionaJ taff po ition at the Council.

New Staff Appointments MARY-LE Cox i the new program officer erving a liai on in Tokyo for the Council' Abe Fellow hip Program, effective April 1992. A graduate of Duke Univer ity, M . Cox earned her M.A . (1982) in political behavior and her Ph.D . (1990) in government at the School of Comparative Studie , Univer ity of E ex (Colche ter, England) . M . Cox' di ertation i entitled "The Political Role of Women: Shake peare and the Modem World ." The work approache the i ue of women, politic , and power by examining Shake peare' characterization of powerful women . M . Cox' interdi ciplinary methodology i

ba ed on the premi e that literary narrative i a vital tool in addre ing the problem of the modem world. The di ertation wa awarded the Erne t Barker Prize by the Political Studie A ociation of Great Britain a the mo t out tanding in the field of political theory. Since 1988, M . Cox ha been living in Tokyo and working in public relation and adverti ing in the corporate ector. She i currently revi ing her di ertation for publication. HLix V . MATOS RODRfGUEZ wa named program officer to the Committee on Public Policy Re earch on Contemporary Hi panic I ue, effective March 1, 1992. The committee was formerly taffed by Raquel Ovryn Rivera who re igned from the Council to a ume new dutie at San Franci co State Univerity. A graduate of Yale University, Mr. Mato Rodriguez earned hi M.A . (1985), and M. Phil. (1988) in hi tory at Columbia Univer ity, and expect to receive hi Ph.D. from there in the faJl of 1992. The title of hi di ertation i "The Foremother : Women in San Juan, Puerto Rico. A Socio-Economic and Demographic Analy i (1820-1870)." Mr. Mato Rodriguez' re earch intere t include Latin American and Caribbean ocial, cultural, and political hi tory, a well a Latin American and Caribbean women' hi tory in the 18th and 19th centurie . Prior to coming to the Council, he wa a vi iting lecturer at Yale Univer ity and an in tructor at the City UniverITEMS/ 35


ity of New York. He al 0 wa as i tant chaplain at the Bayam6n (P.R.) Regional Penitentiary. Currently, Mr. Mato Rod-

rfguez erve a a con ultant to the Connecticut Council for the Humanitie on a project concerned with the hi tory of Puerto Rican in Connecticut. He i al 0

editing and tran lating the journal and letter of Edward Bli Emerson (Ralph Waldo' younger brother), who lived in San Juan, P.R. from 1831-34.

Recent Council Publications International Productivity and Competitiveness, edited by Bert G. Hickman. Paper from a conference held in Palo Alto, California on October 28-30, 1988, pon ored by the Committee on Economic Stability and Growth. New York: Oxford Univer ity Pre ,1992. 407 page. Shrinking productivity growth in the United State , and to a Ie er extent in all other indu trialized nation after 1973, ha had profound effect upon the relative perfonnance of countrie in the international market. Adopting a worldwide per pective that feature comparative analy e of both indu trialized and developing countrie , thi book contain e ay by international cholar covering a range of complementary topic and approache . Among the theme di cu ed are the mea urement of labor and total factor productivity, accounting for the ource of productivity growth, the worldwide productivity lowdown, the extent of productivity convergence among developed economie , the primacy of exchange rate fluctuation in hort-tenn movement of competitivene ince the 1970 , and the cau e of 36\ ITEM

the apparent 10 of U.S. competltlvene during the 1980 . Bert G. Hickman i profe or of economic at Stanford Univer ity.

The Landscape of Modernity, edited by David Ward and Olivier Zunz. Spon ored by the Committee on New York City. New York: Ru ell Sage Foundation, 1992. 356 page. New York City tand as the fir t expre ion of the modem city, a mo aic of di parate neighborhood born in 1898 with the amalgamation of the five borough and haped by developer and regulators, architect and engineers, politician and refonner , immigrant entrepreneur and corporate builder . Through their labor, their ideal , and their often fierce battle , the phy ical and ocial dimen ion of the modem city were forged. E ay in thi volume tell the tory of the growth of New York City from 1900 to 1940, from the beginning of it ky craper kyline to the expanding reache of uburbanization. At the beginning of the century, New York City wa already one of the world' leading

corporate and commercial centers. The Zoning Ordinance of 1916, initially propo ed by Fifth A venue merchant a a means of halting the uptown pread of the garment indu try, became the nation' first comprehen ive zoning law and the proving ground for a new occupation-the urban planner. During the 1920 , frenzied development created a vertical metamorpho i in Manhattan' booming bu ine s di trict, culminating in it mo t pectacular modem icon, the Empire State Building. The city al 0 pread laterally, with the controversial development of ubway y tern and the creation of the powerful Port of New York Authority, who e new bridge and tunnel decentralized the population and indu try of New York. Illu trated with 25 photo and 15 map , the volume link important cene of growth and development to the larger political, economic, ocial, and cultural proce e of the early 20th century, a period that aw the creation of the modem urban land cape. David Ward i profe or of geography and vice-chancellor at the University of Wi con in, Madi on. Olivier Zunz i VOLUME

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profe or of hi tory at the Univer ity of Virginia.

Pilgrims and Sacred Sites in China, edited by Su an Naquin and Chiln-fang Yil . Ba ed on a January 1989 conference ponored by the Joint Committee on China. Studie on China 15 . Berkeley: Univer ity of California Pre , 1992. xiii + 445 page . Until recently, China wa carcely repre ented in the burgeoning comparative literature on pilgrimage. The nine cholar who have contributed to thi volume di cu the interaction between pilgrim and acred ite in Chine e culture from the 10th century until the pre ent. Approaching the ubject from the per pective of literature, art, hi tory, religion , politic , and anthropology, the e ay focu on many of China' mo t famou pilgrimage mountain a well a everalles er-known ite to how how literary, imperial, clerical ,

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and lay tradition of pilgrimage encouraged the continuou growth of brine to local , regional , and national deitie . The contributors al 0 confront the methodological difficultie of tudying pilgrimage without the benefit of field work and with few written account by pilgrim them elve . Thi volume open up a previou Iy neglected area by empha izing the polyphony of meaning and voice brought to and embedded in a acred ite in China. Su an Naquin i profe or of hi tory at the University of Penn ylvania. Chiln-fang Yil i as ociate profe or of religion at Rutger Univer ity.

Guide to Resources on Southeast Asia within the United States and Guide to Resources on Southeast Asia outside of the United States. Spon ored by the Indochina Studie Program of the Joint Committee on Southea t A ia, with upport from the Ford

Foundation, the William Joiner Center (Univer ity of Ma achuett , 80 ton) , the Henry Luce Foundation , and the National Endowment for the Humanitie . New York: Social Science Re earch Council , 1992. Paper, unpaginated. The e two directorie Ii t librarie where ignificant material on Sou thea t A ia are hou ed. Size and nature of the collection and condition of acce are noted for each library. Also noted: The Rational Public: Fifty years of Trends in Americans' Policy Preferences, by Benjamin I. Page and Robert Y. Shapiro. Partially upported by the Council' Center for the Coordination of Re earch on Social Indicators . Chicago: Univer ity of Chicago Pre , 1992. xvi + 489 page . A portrait of the collective political view of American , utilizing opinion urvey from 1935 to the beginning of the 1990 .

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Current Activities at the Council Global Environmental Change Seminar The Committee for Re earch on Global Environmental Change held one of it erie of eminar on the human dimen ion of global environmental change during it meeting on April 30 and May I, 1992, in Upperville, Virginia. The eminar, on the political and in titutional dimen ion of global environmental change, wa arranged by Edith Brown Wei , Georgetown Law Center (committee chair), and Harold Jacob on, Univer ity of Michigan. Invited participant were Richard Benedick, a United State diplomat who i on leave a a enior fellow at the World Wildlife Fund; Robert Keohane, Harvard Univer ity; and Elinor 0 trom, Indiana Univer ity. M . Brown Wei wa the e ion moderator. M . 0 trom began the di cu ion with a presentation of her work and that of her colleague on common-pool re ource . The general que tion wa the extent to which micro-level tudie yielded Ie on at the global level. While there i no automatic caling-up, there are u eful Ie on to be drawn from tho e comm n-pool re ource ituation which are longenduring, and M . 0 trom preented orne of the principal characteri tic of the e ituation. Mr. Keohane di cu ed hi work on international in titution relating to environmental and other problem , with reference to a forthcoming volume edited by him, Marc A. Levy, and Peter M. Haas, Institution for the Earth: Source of Effective International Ellviroll3

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mentaL Protection, MIT Pre . A principal conclu ion i that while international in titution generally cannot enforce policie , they can play an important role through cooperation, particularly in making agreement , monitoring performance, and prom ting the reevaluation of national intere ts. Mr. Keohane' re ults are imilar to those of M . 0 trom, although the domain of analy i are different. Finally, Mr. Benedick decribed the background to the United Nation Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro in June, from the tandpoint of hi work a Special A i tant to the Secretary General and one of the principal negotiator of the preliminary agreement for the conference: He noted that the conference would link environment and development both ub tantively and philo ophically, and that 175 nation would be repre ented together with a wide range of nongovernmental organization . In hi view the Rio conference would ultimately be een a a crucial turning point in the ability of nation to jointly manage environmental problem . Thi wa the first of the committee' eminars to be videotaped for po ible future u e in outreach activitie ; it i expected that future eminar will be taped a well .

African Archives and Museums Project: Re ults of the First Competition The Joint Committee on African Studie recently awarded the fir t grant under the African Archive and Mu eum Project.

Thi project wa e tabli hed with fund from the Ford Foundation to invigorate and trengthen the work of archive and mu eum in Africa. It operate a an annual mall grant competition, awarding up to 15,000 to African archive and mu eum for activitie that will enable the e financially pre ed cultural in titution to broaden their con tituencie and ba e of upport. Admini tered with the help of an international election committee, * the project upport effort to pre erve and augment ignificant but e pecially endangered collection; document, catalogue, and exhibit pecial holding ; and enhance public and cholarly u e of archival and mu eum re ource . It i e pecially receptive to project that draw on local experti e and community re ource and bring together in titution in cooperative venture. The 1991 competition drew 95 propo al from 29 African countrie . Propo al were ubmitted by univer itie a well • elecllon committee members include Claude Daniel rdouin. anthropologi I and direclor. We I African Museum Projecl. Dakar. cnegal. Chri lraud M. Geary. anlhropologi I and curalor. Eliol Eli fon Pholographic Archi\e. lional Mu um of African An. the Smilh nian In lilulion. V a hlOgl n. D.C: abakinu Kivulu. hi Irian nd vi e dean. Fa ulty of Philo phy nd Letters. Universily of Kin h a. Zaire: M h med Mbodj . hi lorian. Faculty of Letters. University Chelkh Anle Dlop. Dakar. enegal: mu I jov na. archivi I nd depuly direclor. alional Archive of Zimbab\\'e: John Wembah-R hid. anlhropologi I and member. In mUle of African IUdie. Unh'ersily of lrobl. Kenya: and Doran Ro • art hi lorian and depuly dire lor. Fowler Mu um of Cullural Hi lOry. Lo Angele . California. VOLU iE

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a by archive and mu eum . On October 27-28, 1991, the committee met and voted to award ix grant to archive and mu eum in we t, ea t, central, and outh Africa. The ix project that received funding call attention to the rich holding a well a to the wide-ranging need of African mu eum and archive : • Archives du Centre Aequatoria. Zaire. To microfilm and thu afeguard from de truction the archive' collection of ethnographic note, cientific and government corre pondence, and African-language pamphlet; the latter repre ent over 39 Bantu language . The collection ha its origin in documents ama ed by Mi ionarie of the Sacred Heart in the 1930 . The microfilm will be depo ited at the Archive Nationale du Zaire. • Arquivo Historico NacionalCabo Verde. To tran fer the papers of the Secretaria Geral do Governo from the city hall of Praia to the archive , where they will be orted, helved, and made available to local and visiting cholar . Spanning four centurie (1660-1926) and filling over 1,000 metal ca es, thi collection contain the hand-written document and book of Cape Verde' highe t civil and military office-holder under Portuguese admini tration. One of the mo t important collection of Portugue e document from the colonial era, the Governo paper are currently "kept under precarious condition ." • Lamu Museum, Kenya. To arre t the phy ical deterioration of thi ea ide mu eum' rich collection of Swahili and Mijikenda material culture Ju

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through the purchase and in tallation of climate control equipment. Hou ed in a two- tory building erected in 1892 by the i land' former governor, the collection ha uffered urface damage from aline ocean breeze , fluctuating temperature and humidity level , and inten e light from verandah window . • Natal Museum, South Africa. To upport a ix-month pilot project involving the collection and di play of vi ual image of the truggle again t apartheid in Natal. Thi collection will complement the mu eum' s holding of artifacts, ign, and symbol from the apartheid era and, in keeping with the mu eurn' outreach program, the project will draw member of the local black communi tie into it planning, management, and implementation. • National Museum Library Department, Nigeria. To microfilm and con erve a collection of Arabic manu cript hou ed in the National Mu eum Library in Jo . E ential re ource on the ethnography and archeology of the Mo lem area of northern Nigeria, the manu cript need urgent attention becau e the paper on which they are written ha gone brittle. • Livingstone Museum. Zambia . To initiate exchange visit between document con ervator from the Living tone Mu eum and the National Archive of Zimbabwe. The e vi it will enable the Living tone Mu eum to as e it need and devi e a uitable con ervation program for it exten ive collection of ethnographic, archeological, and archival material. Ideally, the vi it will lay the groundwork for

long-term exchange and training work hop between the two in titution . During the econd year of the competition, applicant will be pecifically challenged to con ider the impact the propo ed project will have on widening the in titution' public and cholarly con tituencie ; to eek out local support; and to focu on activitie involving pecial collection rather than on day-to-day function of the in titution. Becau e the challenge of public outreach differ from one region to another, a great deal of creative thinking will be required for popular and u tainable outreach activitie to emerge.

Conference on the African Diaspora In cooperation with the Univer ity of Michigan, the Joint Committee on African Studie pon ored an interdi ci pli nary , international conference on "The World the Dia pora Make: Social Science and the Reinvention of Africa," June 5-7, 1992, in Ann Arbor. Five panel of cholar examined, from a variety of locale and theoretical per pective , African hi tory, politic , and culture in the light of the continent' relation hip with out ide communitie and African ' vi ion of the e communitie . The common intent in thi exploration of the African dia pora wa to contribute to a proce of "decentering" cholarly under tanding of world hi torical and ocial proce e that the "periphery" become more than a pa ive recipient of great idea and powerful compulITEMS/ 39


ion from the indu trial ocietie of the North. For example, a panel entitled • Identity and Difference: The Politic of Repre entation," chaired by Thoma Holt, included Nahum Chandler on W.E.B. DuBoi and the que tion of ocial difference; Laura Lewi on African and Indian in comparative per pective in colonial Mexico' and Joiio Jo e Rei on lave and freedmen in Brazil. Other panel explored i ue of Pan-Africani m, cultural continuitie and tran formation , and dia pora a imagined communitie . Di cu ion were lively and energetic and demon trated the continued vitality of the dia pora a a window on the experience of African population in the Caribbean, the United State , and Europe. A younger generation of cholar i emerging who are both benefiting from the dia pora cholarship which ha come before them and contributing a new under tanding which draw on recent cholar hip on competing identitie , di cour e , and repre entation . A publication i planned under the continuing leader hip of the dia pora working group (chaired by Karen Field, Univer ity of Roche ter, and including Leith Mulling , City Univer ity of New York; John Higgin on, Univer ity of Ma achu ett , Amher t; Robin Kelley, Univer ity of Michigan; and Thoma Holt, Univer ity of Chicago).

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Conducting Social Science in the Developing World On June 5-8, 1992, the International Predi ertation Fellow hip Program pon ored a work hop on "Conducting Social Science Re earch in the Developing World ' in Boothbay Harbor, Maine. The purpo e of the work hop wa to trengthen re earch de ign kill of young ocial cienti t by providing an interdi ciplinary forum in which participant might explore the variety of methodological option available in the conduct of ocial cience re earch, and the way in which re earch method developed in one di cipline might be u eful in another. The work hop wa de igned to fo ter intellectual cro -fertilization between different di cipline and different regional foci, and an appreciation of the crucial interaction between the deci ion about what to tudy and the deci ion about how to tudy it. Twenty-two SSRC fellow , including fellow from the International Predi ertation Fellow hip Program, the Soviet, Middle Ea t, South A ia, and Japan program participated in the work hop. The following cholar erved a faculty: Bradford Barham, economic , Univer ity of Wi con in, Madi on; Jill Cry tal, political cience, Univer ity of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Alma Gottlieb, anthropology, Univer ity of IIIinoi , Urbana-Champaign; Denni Hogan, ociology, Penn ylvania State Univer ity; Sunita Parikh, political cience, Columbia University; Jo eph

Potter, demography, University of Texa , Au tin; and Robert Weller, anthropology, Bo ton Univer ity . The work hop began with a plenary e ion on methodological option available to ocial cienti t tudying the developing world. Faculty made pre entation on the u e of ethnographic, archival, urvey, and quantitative re earch technique in developing countrie . Participant then broke up into three concurrent di cu ion group in which each fellow wa offered feedback on a re earch project he or he had ubmitted for thi purpo e, from an interdi ciplinary and interregional group of even to eight fellow and two to three faculty. Re earch projects di cu ed in one group ranged from "Mu ic and Politic in Zimbabwe" to "The Effect of Changing Level of State Intervention in the Economy on the Pro pect for Dome tic Stability" to • AIDS and Con truction of Sexuality in Brazil." In another, topic included "A Compari on of French and I lamic Court a Impo ed In titution in the Sine-Saloum region of Senegal," "The Middle Horde Kazakh under Ru ian Rule, 1822-1891," and "Concept of Deviance in Children and Adole cent , Comparing Japan and the United State ." The third group di cu ed' Hi torical Dynamic of Re ource Degradation in the Hill of Nepal" and "Language Learning in the Chine e Countryide," among other topic .

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Council Fellowships and Grants for Training and Research 1992-93 Joint International Programs for Area and Comparative Training and Research (1) Predissertation Awards International Precf rtation Fellow hip Program: Twelve month of uppon for graduate tudents at elected universitie in the field of economic. political science. and sociology. and other social science • de igned to enrich their disciplinary tudie with area and language kill focused on the developing world. For deadline: Contact SSRC or the American Council of Learned Societie ,228 Ea t 45th Street. New York. NY 10017. Africa: Predi senation Fellow hip for hon-term field trip to ub-Saharan Africa for graduate tudents in the social science and the humanitie . Deadline: November I. 1992. Eastern Europe: Fellow hip for Advanced Graduate Training for tudent who need an academic year of extra training before beginning the di senation. Deadline: December I. 1992.-Eastern Europe: Predi senation Travel Grant for travel to Eastern Europe to help tudent define their di senation programs. Deadline: March I. 1993.-Soutbe t ia: Predi enation Fellow hip for hon-term field trip to Southeast A ia to inve tigate potential re earch ite and material. training in Southeast A ian language not available in the U.S .• and e tabli hing local research contacts. Deadline: November I. 1992. r tates: Graduate Training Fellow hip for 24 month ot uppon to tudents in their third and Soviet Union and Its ucc founh. or founh and fifth year of graduate tudy. Deadline: December I. 1992.

(2) Dissertation Awards Nine to 18 month of uppon for doctoral di senation research abroad in the social science and the humanitie Africa, Latin America and tbe Caribbean, Near and Middle East, South ia ( epa), Paki tan, ri Lanka, India, 8anglad b), Southeast A ia, Western Europe. Deadline: November I. 1992. China, -- Eastern Europe, -- Soviet Union and Its ucc

r

tates. Deadline: December I. 1992.

Japan (fellow hip for di senation write-up). Korea. Deadline: January I. 1993.

(3) Other Predoctoral Awards in Area Research Africa: Fellow hip for Training in Agriculture and Health. Suppon for natural or technical cience training and di senation research for ocial science Ph.D. candidate whose topic addre i ue of African agriculture or health. Deadline: To be announced. African Humaniti FeUow hip. Year-long re idential seminar at the In titute for Advanced Study and Re arch in the African Humanitie • Nonhwe tern University for advanced predoctoral tudent and po tdoctoral scholars. Deadline: Fall 1992. date to be announced. Berlin Program for Advanced German and European tudi • Nine to 24 month of uppon for comparative and interdi ciplinary tudy of the economic, political. and social a pect of modern German and European affairs. Open to applicant who have completed all requirement (except the di senation) for the Ph.D .• and to anthropologi t , economi t • political scienti t. ociologi t • and all scholars in germane social science and cultural tudie fields. Deadline: February I. 1993. East European Language Training Grants. Summer training in any Ea t European language (except tho e of the Commonwealth of Independent State) in the United State or Eastern Europe. Advanced undergraduate • graduate tudent • and po tdoctoral scholars may apply. Deadline : November 1. 1992 and March I. 1993.-• University of California. Berkeley; University of California. Los Angele ; University of California. San Diego; University of Chicago: Columbia University; Cornell University; Duke University; Harvard University; University of IIIinoi • Urbana-Champaign; Indiana University. Bloomington: Mas chu tts In titute of Technology; Michigan State University: University of Michigan. Ann Arbor; University of Minne tao Twin Citie Campu ; University of Nonh Carolina. Ch pel Hill; Nonhwe tern University: University of Penn ylvania; Princeton University; Stanford University; Unive ity of Tex • Au tin; University of W hington; University of Wi on in. Madi n; Yale University . •• For detail and in truction on how to apply for these fellow hip and grants. addre the American Council of Learned ocietie. 228 East 45th Street. New York. NY 10017. For all others. addre the pecific program at the Social Science Re arch Council.

JUNE/SEPTEMBER 1992

ITEMS/41


Soviet Union and Its ucc r tat • Summer workshop in (a) Soviet and East European Economic; (b) Soviet Dome. tic Politic and Society; (c) Sociology and Anthropology; and (d) Early East Slavic Culture. Workshop are de igned to provide an opportunity to interact with peers. e tabli h contact. and promote innovative research. Open to tudents enrolled in Ph .D. program and junior scholars who received their Ph .D. after June 1986. Deadline: To be announced .

(4) Advanced Research Grants up to one year of upport to projects

holars in the social

ience and th humanitie for dvanced area and comparative re arch

Mrica, China,· Eastern Europe,· Japan, Korea, Latin America and the Caribbean, ear and Middle East, ia, Southe t ia, Sovl t Union and Its ucc r tat . Deadline: December I. 1992.

utb

(5) Other Awards to Advanced Scholars in Area Research Mrlcan Humanlti Fellow hips. Yearlong re idential seminar at the In titute for Advanced Study and Research in the African Humanitie • Northwe tern University. Advanced predoctoraI tudent and po tdoctoral holars may apply. Deadline: Fall 1992. date to be announced. Berlin Program for Advanced German and European tudi . Nine to 24 month of upport for comparative and interdi iplinary tudy of the economic. political . and social aspects of modem German and European affairs . Open to applicant who have completed all requirements (except the di sertation) for the Ph.D .• and to anthropologi t • economi t • political ienti t • sociologi ts. and all scholars in germane social ience and cultural tudie field. Deadline: February I. 1993. East European Languag Training Grants. Summer training in any Ea t European language (ex ept tho e of the Commonwealth of Independent State) in the United State or Ea tern Europe. Advanced undergraduate • graduate tudent. and postdoctoral cholars may apply. Deadline : November I. 1992 and March I. 1993.· Japan. Gran for Collaborative Activiti between American and Japan Scholars. Re arch. work hop. minan. or conference on pecific theme lected by the Council. The program e pecially encourage cooperation between younger holars and more mature scholars on a ingle project. Preliminary d adline: July 31. 1992. Japan. Grants for R arch Activiti • Seed gran intended to advance research concerning Japan in the social ience and humanitie . Innovative project at the planning tage which promote comparative or interdisciplinary perspective are particularly encouraged. Deadline : October 15. 1992 and February 15. 1993. Korea. Grants for Research Planning Activities. Seed grant intended to advance re arch concerning Korea in the social ience and humanitie . Th program eeks to identify new topic that will advance the tate of theory or methodology and those where ub tantial new re arch i under way. Deadline : November I. 1992 and February I. 1993. Soviet Union and Its ucc r tat • Summer work hop in (a) Soviet and East European Economic ; (b) Soviet Dome tic Politic and Society; (c) Sociology and Anthropology; and (d) Early Ea t Slavic Culture. Work hop are de igned to provide an opportunity to interact with peers. e tabli h contact. and promote innovative research . Open to tudents enrolled in Ph.D. program and junior . holars who received their Ph .D. after June 19 6. Deadline: To be announced.

(6) In titutional Awards in Area Research and Training African Archiv and Museums Project. Grant in upport of activitie that will help trengthen and in igorate the work of archive and mu urn in Africa. The program particularly encourage project that draw on local experti e and community re urce and bring together different in titution in cooperative venture . Deadline: To be announced . Eastern Europe. In titutional grant to upport in truction in Albanian. Bulgarian. Czech. Hungarian. Macedonian. Poli h. Romanian. Serbo-Croatian. Slovak. or Slovene. Deadline : November I. 1992 and March 1993.vi t Uni n and Its ucc a. First-year Fellow hip in Underrepre nted Field in Soviet Studie . Award to university departments in di ipline which are underrepre nted in Soviet Studie . For 1992-93. awards will be in ociology and anthropology. De dline: December I. 1992. b. Summer Language In titute for Ru ian and Soviet Language (other than Ru ian) . Award proVIde fellow hip to tuden enrolled in language training program for the ummer of 1993; provide financial i tan e to teachers enrolled in uch program; upport cultural activitie. to enhance the language curriculum; and upport improvement of exi. ting programs of ummer language in titute . Deadline: December I . 1992. c. Program to Alleviate B klog in oviet and East European Colle tion in the United State. Award to universitie and rearch librarie ~ r the purpo of making currently uncatalogued material ce ible to u . Deadline: December I. 1992. • Contact Americ n Council of Learned oci t. . 228 East 45th Street.

42\1TEM

cw Yorl.. NY 10017.

V OLU t E

46.

tBER

213


Other Award Programs at the SSRC Abe Fellow hip Program. Awards to Japanese and American research profe ional or third-country national affiliated with an American or Japane institution for the purpose of conducting re arch on anyone or combination of the following: global i u • problems common to advanced industrial ocietie • and i ue that relate to improving U.S.-Japane relation. Deadline: September 15. 1992. PubUc Policy Research on Contemporary H' panic • Summer Workshop on Stati tical Re arch Methods. De igned to provide Hi panic faculty. researche • and graduate tuden with the opportunity to develop knowledge of national data sets relevant to th tudy of the Hi panic population and tati tical research methods. Workshop take place at the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Re arch (ICPSR) at the Unive ity of Michigan. Ann Arbor. Deadline: To be announced. Research on the Urban Underd (I) Undergraduate Re arch A i tantship. niversity or college! culty or admini trato may apply for the upport of undergraduate i tants who conduct individual or group-based research in collaboration with! ulty. Application for re arch by a ingle tudent mu t be for upport of a minority undergraduate; for a group project. at Ie t half the tudent mu t be members of a minority group. Deadline: December 10. 1992. (2) Di sertation Fellow hips. Up to 18 months of upport for graduate tudents in the social requirements for the Ph.D. except the di rtation. Deadline: December 10. 1992.

ience who have completed all

RC-MacArthur Found tion Fellow hips on Peace and Security in a Changing World. The program offers two-year di rtation and two-year postdoctoral fellow hip intended to upport re arch on the implications for security i ue of worldwide cultural. social. economic. and political change . Fellow are required to undertake training that adds a new competence to their exi ting di iplinary kill ; training must permit a ignificant departure from previous work. De dline: December I. 1992. International Peace and Security (I) Research Workshop Competition. Grants to upport mall work hops on topic that te t e tabli hed as umption about peace and security. Workshop mu t be initiated by recipients of SSRC-MacArthur Foundation Fellow hips in International Peace and Security (p t & present). MacArthur Foundation Grants for Research and Writing. MacArthur Collaborative Studie Grants. or any other direct or indirect grant from the MacArthur Program on Peace and Security. Deadline: September 15. 1992 and February 15. 1992. (2) 1992-93 Vi iting Scholar Fellow hip Competition. Three-month fellow hip allow holars. journali • public servan • lawyers. and othen. to pursue re arch on innovative topic in international peace and security tudie at universitie and major research centers outside their home region . The 1992-93 fellowship are offered to African, Eastern European. and Central European scholars and re archers. Deadline: September 15. 1992.

Louis Dupree Prize The SSRC announce the inauguration of the Loui Dupree Prize. to be awarded annually to the m t ou tanding proposal for di rtation field research in Central or Inner A ia (in luding Azerbaijan. Kazakhstan. Kirghizia. Mongolia. Turkrneni tan. Tajiki tan. and Uzbeki tan) funded by the Coun iI' joint committee. The prize of $1.000 will upplement the tipend awarded to the winning applicant and i intended to enrich hi or her field experience by making po ible a longer tay or more extensive travel within the region . Nomination for the award will be made by the joint committee on China. the ear and Middle East, South A ia. the Soviet Union and Its Succe r State. and by the Committee on International Peace and Security. A panel of holars will be formed for the purpose of selecting the winning proposal. Support for thi prize i provided by the Loui Dupree Fund. e tabli hed at the SSRC to honor the memory of Loui Dupree and hi pioneering holarship on Central and Inner A ia.

J

FJ

EPTEMBER

1992

ITEM

/43


Awards Offered in 1992 FOLLOWING are the name , affiliation , and topic of the individual who were offered fellow hip or grant by Council committee in the mo t recent annual competition for re earch in the ocial cience and humanitie . The area tudie research award were made by the committee jointly pon ored by the Council and the American Council of Learned Societie (ACLS). They are upported by grants from the Ford Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanitie . Additional funding for individual program i provided by the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Cultural Exchange, the Ford Foundation, the French-American Foundation, the German Marshall Fund of the United State , the Japan-United State Friend hip Commi ion, the Henry Luce Foundation , the Chri topher Reynold Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the U.S . Department of State under the Soviet-Eastern European Re earch and Training Act of 1983 (Title VUI). Fellow hip in international peace and security are upported by a grant from the John D. and Catherine T . MacArthur Foundation . Grant from the Ford Foundation upport fellow hip for public policy research on contemporary Hi panic i ue. The Ford Foundation al 0 upport the joint ACLS/SSRC International Predi sertation Fellow hip Program. The Abe Fellow hip program i upported by the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership. Award for research on the urban underclas are upported by the Rockefeller Foundation and the Foundation for Child Development. Unle It I pecifically noted that a program i adminitered by the ACLS, the program Ii ted are admini tered by the Council. The Council doe not di criminate on the ba i of age, color, creed, di ability, marital tatu, national origin, race, gender, or any other characteri tic protected by applicable law . The program change omewhat every year, and intere ted cholars hould write to the Council for a copy of the current general brochure. Individual program aI 0 publi h brochure , with more complete description of their aim and procedure , at variou time during the year. See aI 0 the ummary of all current fellow hip and grant program on page 41-43.

44\ ITEMS

PREDISSERTATION AND DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIPS FOR AREA AND COMPARATIVE TRAINING AND RESEARCH International Predissertation FeUow hip Program The following graduate training fellow hip were awarded by the program committee of the International Predi ertation Fellow hip Program-Albert I. Hermalin (chair) , Li a Anderson, Kelet 0 Atkin , Robert H. Bate , Stephen G. Bunker, Peter Gourevitch, Stevan Harrell, Dwight H. Perkin , Michael J. Piore, and Peter Xeno . The committee was as i ted by a creening panelWilliam Beeman, Thorn Biersteker, Laurie Brand, Daniel Chirot, David Dollar, Dale Eickelman, Jonathan Fox, Mary Gergen, Gerald Green, France Hagopian, Charlotte Ikel , Patricia Lyon John on, Philip Kuhn, Michael Lofchie, Sylvia Maxfield, Laura Nader, Gayl Ne , Anne Pebley, Elizabeth Perry, Dorothy Solinger, Lance Taylor, Shibley Telhami , Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Peter van der Veer, Stephen Vlasto , Daniel Wagner, Jame Wat on, Robert Weller, Lawrence We tphal, Brantley Womack, and Crawford Young. Ellen Perecman, Katherine Hoffman, and Amy Chazkel served as taff for thi program. Sara Abraham , graduate tudent in ociology, University of Wi con in, Madi on, to tudy East Indian and the tate in the Engli h- peaking Caribbean Michael A. Barletta, graduate tudent in political science, University of Wi con in, Madi on, to tudy nuclear arm control in South America Clifford A. Bob, graduate tudent in political science, Ma achusett In titute of Technology, to tudy Malayia' indigenou people' movement from a national and international perspective Rebecca E. Bryant, graduate tudent in anthropology, University of Chicago, to tudy conflict and hi tory on the Greek-Turki h border Cameron D. Campbell, graduate tudent in demography, University of Penn ylvania, to tudy ource for the tudy of mortality in contemporary China. and Taiw~ Chri topher M. Edmond, graduate tudent 10 economIc '. University of California, Berkeley, to tu~y the de~erml足 nant of income among poor household 10 ArgentlOa, Chile and Uruguay Michael C. Enni -McMillan, graduate tudent in anthropology, Michigan State University, to tudy participation in Latin American ocial movements related to health i ue Jame C. Farrer, graduate tudent in ociology, University of Chicago, to tudy Chine popular culture and courtship rule Brian C. Folk, graduate tudent in ociology, University of VOLUME

46,

NUMBER

2/3


California, Berkeley, to tudy the formation of a national bourgeoi ie in Malay ia Jeremy D. Foltz, graduate tudent in economic, Univerity of Wi con in, Madi on, to tudy the economic cau e of de ertification and re ource depletion in North African agriculture Paul K. Gellert, graduate tudent in ociology, University of Wi con in, Madi on, to tudy ocial and economic a pects of development in Indone ia through a commodity-based analy i Charle S. Gitomer, graduate tudent in economic, University of Minne ota, to tudy the political economy of economic growth and in titutional change in China Bradley L. Glas er, graduate tudent in political cience, Columbia University, to tudy rentier and semi-rentier tate in the Middle Ea t Emily Hannum-Demopolo ,graduate tudent in ociology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, to tudy Uyghurs and Mongolian a minoritie in the Chine e education y tem Janice L. Harper, graduate tudent in .anthropology, Michigan State Univer ity, to tudy changing phannacopeia in Malaga y medical y tem Eng Seng Ho, graduate tudent in anthropology, University of Chicago, to tudy regional connection in an Indian Ocean port city in outhern Yemen Shawn M. Kanaiaupuni, graduate tudent in ociology, University of Chicago, to tudy women in the ocial proce of migration in Mexico Carol E. Kaufman, graduate tudent in ociology, Univerity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, to tudy child urvival in Angola Peggy J . Levitt, graduate tudent in urban tudie and planning, Mas achu ett In titute of Technology, to tudy ocial and political a pect of migration and development in Latin America Gorjana Litvinovic, graduate tudent in p ychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, to tudy p ychological, ociological, and ociocultural problem of child care in Brazil Ramanujam Manikkalingam, graduate tudent in political cience, Mas achu ett In titute of Technology, to tudy the politic of con titution-making in Colombia Walter Molano, graduate tudent in political cience, Duke Univer ity, to tudy the redi tribution of a et during privatization in Argentina Ann Marie Murphy, graduate tudent in political cience, Columbia University, to tudy international political economy in Thailand Seth H. Racu en, graduate tudent in political cience, Mas achu ett In titute of Technology, to tudy race and ethnicity in labor market and ocial formation in Brazil Bruce Rutherford, graduate tudent in political cience, Yale University, to tudy the adapt ion of I lam to rapid ocial and economic change in Egypt There a L. Selfa, graduate tudent in rural ociology, Cornell Univer ity, to tudy export agricultural production' impact on rural population in Brazil Claudia B. Sershen, graduate tudent in ociology, Indiana University, to tudy the impact of tructural adju tment on women and children in Kenya JUNE/SEPTEMBER

1992

Sharon Stash, graduate tudent in ociology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, to tudy ocial network and diffu ion of fertility innovation in Nepal Marc A. Stem, graduate tudent in political cience, University of California, San Diego, to tudy environmental public good in Mexico from an in titutional approach William A. Talcott, graduate tudent in ociology, University of California, San Diego, to tudy national unity and ethnic difference in Ecuador and Bolivia Patricia Taylor, graduate tudent in political cience, Columbia University, to tudyapproache to the Latin American tate through the example of Brazil Deborah P. Theado, graduate tudent in ociology, Michigan State Univer ity, to tudy emergent economie and ocial relation in Angola Linda S. Van Gelder, graduate tudent in economic, Cornell University, to tudy the role of in titutional incentive in economic development in Indone ia Merle Wallace, graduate tudent in p ychology, University of lIIinoi , Urbana-Champaign, to tudy the cultural and p ychological aspect of identity development among the Lahu in Thailand Steven I. Wilkin on, graduate tudent in political cience, Mas achusett In titute of Technology, to tudy cen orhip, the communication revolution and communal conflict in India Dougla C. Wil on, graduate tudent in ociology, Michigan State University, to tudy property right and the management of African fi herie in Tanzania

Mrica The following di sertation fellow hip were awarded by the Joint Committee on African Studie -Kwame A. Appiah (chair), Charle M. Becker, Frederick Cooper, Jonathan Cru h, Mamadou Diouf, Gillian Feeley-Hamik, Paula Girshick, Lemuel John on, Catharine Newbury and Paul Richard -at it meeting on March 20-21, 1992. The committee was as i ted by a creening committee-Alma Gottlieb (chair), Adam A hforth, Katherine Demuth, Margaret Thomp on Drewal, Jeffrey Herb t, Chri tine Jone ,Jame McCann and Parker Shipton-and a election committee-Edri Makward (chair), Denni D. Cordell, Gillian Feeley-Hamik, John Higgin on, Edmond J. Keller, and Peter D. Little. M. Pri cilia Stone, Barbara Bianco, Marty Baker, and Rebecca Gershen on erved a taff for thi program.

Dougla A. Anthony, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Northwe tern University, for a tudy of the economic and ocial reintegration of Igbo immigrants in po t-civil war Kano, Nigeria Le lie A. A hbaugh, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Northwe tern Univer ity, for re earch on gender, kin hip, and return migration in the Eastern Province of Zambia ITEMS/45


Linda J. Beck, candidate in political cience, University of Wi con in, Madi on, for research on the role of cultural pI ural i m and ethnopolitic in the 1993 Senegalese national election David A. Eaton, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for research on the proce of how young Congole e men change their attitude , deci ion-making, and action in re pon e to AIDS Alaine S. Hut on, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Indiana University, for a tudy of women' participation in I lamic my tical orders and I lamic scholarship in Kano, Nigeria Nnali T. Mbilinyi, Ph.D. candidate in economic, Columbia University, for re arch on the impact of AIDS on the Tanzanian economy Jennifer M. 01 on, Ph.D. candidate in geography, Michigan State Univer ity, for a tudy of coping trategie for land degradation in Gikongoro, Rwanda Matthew J. Richard, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, State University of New York, Binghamton, for a tudy of peri-urban areas in Gaborone, Bot wana Muhammad S. Umar, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory and literature of religion, Northwe tern University, for an intellectual hi tory of Mu lim re pon to Briti h coloniali m in northern Nigeria from 1903 to 1945 Matthew J. Warning, Ph.D. candidate in agricultural and re ource economic, University of California, Berkeley, for a tudy of the re pon e of pea ant in outhwe tern Senegal to economic liberalization policie The following Fellow hip for Training and Di ertation Re earch were al 0 awarded at the committee' meeting on March 20-21, 1992 with the as i tance of a selection committee-Ivan Karp (chair), Margaret Bentley, Frederick Dunn, Atieno Odhiambo, Randall Packard, Paul Richard, and Patricia Rosenfield. Patrick A ea, Ph.D. candidate in economic, The John Hopkin Univer ity, for training in epidemiology and population dynamic to inve tigate the economic impact of AIDS in Uganda Patricia Benjamin, Ph.D. candidate in geography, Clark University, for coursework in agricultural cience at the Sokoine University of Agriculture and for re earch on the relation hip between u tainable development and environmental change in Tanzania Li a Colburn, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Connecticut, for training in marine and fre hwater fi herie and for re earch on intrahousehold food and re ource di tribution pattern in relation to involvement in fi hing among arti anal fi her people in Madaga car Tamara Gile , Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, The John Hopkin Univer ity, for training in hi torical ecology and the ecology of rainfore t and for re earch into the proce se by which contemporary hi tory i created and it contribution to land u trategie among relocated worker in Bayanga, the Central African Republic The following predi sertation fellow hip were al 46\1TEM

0

awarded at the committee' meeting on March 20-21, 1992, with the a i tance of the creening committee. Jennifer M. A tone, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, State University of New York, Binghamton, for travel to Guinea for preliminary re earch on gender and natural re ource use Li a C. Cliggett, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Indiana University, for travel to Zambia for preliminary re earch on upport y tem for the elderly Su anne E. Freidberg, Ph.D. candidate in geography, University of California, Berkeley, for travel to Burkina Fa 0 and Mali for preliminary re earch on peri-urban agriculture Heidi Gengenbach, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of Minne ota, for travel to Mozambique for preliminary re earch on labor-exporting communitie Andrew L. Helling, Ph.D. candidate in public policy, Indiana University, for travel to Angola for preliminary re earch on local in titutional development Deborah L. John on, Ph.D. candidate in communication, Stanford University, for travel to Ethiopia for preliminary re earch on the Eritrean People' Liberation Front o aak Amukambwa Olumwullah, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Rice University, for travel to Kenya for preliminary re earch on the relation hip between biomedicine and African folk medicine Stanley J. Tarver, Ph.D. candidate in art hi tory, Yale University, for travel to Senegal and Gambia for preliminary re earch on Senegambian wre tling Edward E.D. Ram amy, Ph.D. candidate in urban planning, the State University of New Jersey, Rutger , for travel to Kenya for preliminary re earch on World Bank policie toward urban development Chri tine J. Walley, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, New York Univer ity, for travel to Kenya for preliminary re arch on the ocial implication of fertility control

The Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies The following di ertation re earch fellow hip , tenable at the Free University in Berlin, were awarded by the lection committee of the Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studie : Peter J. Katzen tein (chair), Thoma Childer, Ru ell Dalton and Martin Kohli. Kenton W. Worce ter and David Terrien erved a taff for thi program. Heidi Applegate, Ph.D. candidate in economic, Penn ylvania State University: "The Effect of Entry Without Exit on Ea t German Economic Performance" Gary Finder, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Univer ity of Chicago: "The Role of Sexuality in the Development of German and Au trian Criminology from the Fin de Si~c1e to 1945" Jonathan Huener, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory. University of IIIinoi , Urbana-Champaign: "Remembering Au chwitz; VOLU IE 46, NUMBER

2/3


The Memory, Iconography and Politic of the Former Extermination Camp 1945-1989" Patricia Mazon, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Stanford University: "The Debate Over the Admi ion of Women to German Universitie , 1865-1910" Bronwyn McFarland , Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Univerity of Chicago: "Moral Con ciou ne and the Politic of Exclu ion; A Hi tory of Nursing in Nazi Germany " Ali a Shethar, Ph.D. candidate in education, University of California, Berkeley: "The Wall in Our Head; The Tran formation of Cultural Identitie and Schooling Practice in Eastern Berlin School " Elizabeth Strom, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, City University of New York: "Politic , Market and Federal Tran fers ; Planning and Development in Berlin" Akira Takenaka, Ph .D. candidate in political cience, Columbia Univer ity: " Comparative Study of Policie toward Foreign Workers in Japan and the Federal Republic of Germany after World War II" Benjamin Veghte , Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of Chicago: "A Comparative Analy i of Urban Planning in Bremen and Ro tock from 1945- 1975" Charle Vincent , Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Harvard Univer ity: " Patron-Client State Relation"

of Chicago, for research in Taiwan on televi ed folk opera, pectatorship, and gender identity in Taiwane e culture Miin-ling Lydia Yu , Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, New York University, for re earch in Ru ia on the impact of the Soviet experience on Chine e tudent in the USSR, 1921-1935 Fang Zhu , Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Columbia University, for re earch in Hong Kong on civil-military relation in Mao' China

Eastern Europe The Joint Committee on Ea tern Europe (admini tered by the American Council of Learned Societie )-Madeline G . Levine (chair), Ivo Banac, Jo ef C. Brada, Su an Gal , Andrew C . Jano , Deborah D. Milenkovitch, Norman M. Naimark, Virgil P. Nemoianu , Adam Przeworski , Kazimierz M. Slomczyn ki , and David Stark-at it meeting on March 6-7 , 1992 voted to award di sertation fellow hip to the following individual . Ja on H. Parker and Ruth Water erved as taff for thi program.

China The Fellow hip Selection Comminee of the Joint Comminee on Chine e Studie (admini tered by the American Council of Learned Societie )-Deborah Davi (chair), Robert E. Hegel , Robert Hyrne , William C . Kirby, Loui Putterman, P. Steven Sangren, Dorothy J. Solinger, and Wu Hung - at it meeting on March 27, 1992, awarded fellow hip to the following individual. Jason H. Parker and Ruth Water erved as taff for thi program. All recipient are Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation Fellow upported by funding received from the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation Yuan-ling Chao, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of California, Lo Angele , for re earch in Japan and Taiwan on medicine and the tran mi ion of knowledge in late imperial China: phy ician from Suzhou Sarah E. Fraser, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory of art, University of California, Berkeley, for re earch in France and England on the arti t' practice in Tang dyna ty China and how tyli tic and technical trend found in Dunhuang ketchbook reflect culture Kri tine M. Harri , Ph.D. candidate in Ea t A ian language and culture , Columbia Univer ity, for re earch in Japan on children of troubled time : nation, gender, and the emergent film culture of modem China, 1925-1937 Chri topher M . I en, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Univerity of California, Lo Angeles, for research in Japan on the agricultural hi tory of Manchuria and outh China: a comparative tudy of cropping y tern Teri J. Silvio, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Univer ity JUNE/SEPTEMBER

1992

Bradley F . Abram , Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Stanford University. Czech culture in cri i : non-Communi t intellectual in the immediate po t-war world Samuel D. Albert, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory of art, Yale University. Nationali m and public architecture in Au tria-Hungary Arista Maria Cirtautas, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, University of California, Berkeley. The ethic of Solidarity and the pirit of democracy Katherine O . David, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Yale University. The 1890 generation: moderni m and national identity in Czech culture, 1890-1900 Kri ti S. Evan , Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Univerity of Chicago. Women 's hi torical con ciou ne of Solidarity: a compari on of the working cia women of Gdan k and Lodz Cathleen M. Giu tino, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Univer ity of Chicago. Late Imperial Czech Prague: politic and culture, 1879-1913 Jame M. Gro klag , Ph.D. candidate in modern European hi tory, University of Chicago. Locating the nation- tate: the con titution of boundarie in Central Europe, 1919-1939 Katherine R. Jolluck, Ph.D. candidate in Ru ian and Ea t European hi tory, Stanford University. Gender, identity, and the Poli h experience of war, 1939-1945 Eric A. Larsen, Ph.D. candidate in ociology, University of Washington. Conflicting legitimacy claim on Communi t regime : a theory of the East-Central European revolution of 1989 Samuel T. Myovich, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Indiana University, Bloomington. Between tate-church and civil religion: a tudy of Jo ephi m in Galicia, 1772-1790 Benjamin B. Robin on, Ph.D. candidate in German tudie , Stanford Univer ity. De criptive hortfall : ITEMS/ 47


fulfillment and di ati faction in presenting a better Germany Pamela B. Roth tein, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Yale University. Serb and the IIIyriani t movement: a tudy in national ideologie , 1830-1848 Konrad Sadkow ki, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Nation, tate, and religion in Poland: the Catholic Church in Lublin Province,

1918-1939 The following graduate training fellow hip were al awarded by the committee.

0

David S. Dorni ch, graduate tudent in ociology, Cornell University. An in titutional perspective on the pro pects for the emergence of the middle cia in Poland Audrey L. Helfant, graduate tudent in hi tory, Harvard University. Language tudy and background reading to complete preparation for work on a di ertation on the hi tory of Communi m in Yugo lavia lzabela Kalinow ka-Blackwood, graduate tudent in Slavic language and literature , Yale University. Preliminary research for di sertation on Poli h and Ru ian literary travel accounts Gerald A. McDermott, graduate tudent in political science, Mas achusett In titute of Technology. Additional training and exploratory research for comparative tudy of property right in Czecho lovakia and eastern Germany Su an J. Overdorf, graduate tudent in political cience, University of California, Berkeley. Advanced language training and preparation to write a di ertation on elite legitimation in East Germany and Czecho lavakia before

1989 John W. Schiemann, graduate tudent in political cience, Columbia University. Czech language tudy and preparation of research de ign for di sertation on democratic tran ition in Hungary and Czecho lovakia Claudia M. Stachel, graduate tudent in economic, University of Penn ylvania. Training and preparatory research on in titution and indu try tructure and privatization program in Czecho lovakia Carol A. Timko, graduate tudent in political cience, University of California, Berkeley. Training in urvey research, quantitative analy i ,and ocial mobilization tability for di sertation on democracy in Poland The following predi rtation ummer travel grants were approved by pecial ubcommittee on May 19, 1992. Timothy J . Cooley, graduate tudent, department of mu ic, Brown Univer ity Marta Elliott, graduate tudent, department of ociology, The John Hopkin Univer ity Richard A. Hall, graduate tudent, department of political ience, Indiana Univer ity Paul E. Nadasdy, graduate tudent , department of anthropology, The John Hopkin Univer ity Steven D. Roper, graduate tudent, department of political cience, University of Mi ouri, Columbia 48 \ ITEM

Eastern Europe-Language Training Grants The East European Language Grant Committee of the Joint Committee on Eastern Europe (admini tered by the American Council of Learned Societie )-Ronelle Alexander, Victor A. Friedman, Michael H. Heim, Madeline G. Levine, Robert A. Roth tein, and Erne t A. Scatton-at its meeting on April 12, 1992 voted to award language training grants to the following individual. Jason H. Parker and Ruth Waters served as taff for thi program. Hilary B. Appel, (Czech) graduate tudent in Ru ian and East European tudie , Stanford University Phineas R. Baxandall, (Hungarian) graduate tudent in political cience, Mas achusett In titute of Technology Michael S. Boyd, (Czech) graduate tudent in Slavic and East European language and literature , Ohio State University Maria Bucur, (Hungarian) graduate tudent in hi tory, University of IIIinoi , Urbana-Champaign Angela Cannon, (Czech) tudent in continuing education, Princeton University El peth Carruther , (Poli h) graduate tudent in hi tory, Princeton University Stark C. Draper, (Albanian) undergraduate tudent in hi tory, Stanford University Marta Elliott, (Poli h) graduate tudent in ociology, The John Hopkin University Amanda J . Floan, (Lithuanian) graduate tudent in Ru ian area tudie , Univer ity of Wa hington John M. Grondel ki, (Slovak) as i tant profe or of theology, St. John' University Nancy L. Heingartner, (Czech) graduate tudent in Slavic language , Brown University Jo ph D. Humphrie , (Macedon ian) graduate tudent in Slavic language , University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Michelle H. Landers, (Hungarian) graduate tudent in anthropology, Univer ity of Roche ter Judith A. Mabary, (Czech) graduate tudent in mu ic, Wa hington University Elizabeth A. Murphy, (Czech) graduate tudent in hi tory, Cornell University Erica Nadelhaft, (Poli h) graduate tudent in Near Eastern and Judaic tudie ,Brandei University Mitchell Oren tein, (Czech) graduate tudent in political cience, Yale Univer ity Mark J. Pi aro, (Czech) graduate tudent in Slavic language and literature , University of Chicago Elizabeth A. Pullen, (Romanian) graduate tudent in religiou tudie, University of California, Santa Barbara Elizabeth Ran orne, (Poli h) graduate tudent in Slavic language and literature , Harvard University Tamara J. Re ler, (Lithuanian) graduate tudent in political cience, Univer ity of IIIinoi , Urbana-Champaign John P. Richard on, (Czech) graduate tudent in political cience, University of California, San Diego Karl W. Ryavec, (Slovene) profe or of political cience, University of Ma achu tt, Amherst Je se M. Savage, (Macedonian) graduate tudent in Sla ic tudie , University of orth Carolina, Chapel Hill VOLUME

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Jennifer A. Sell, (Hungarian) graduate tudent in ociology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Li a E. Shiff, (Poli h) graduate tudent in political cience, Northwe tern University Sarah E. Shull, (Czech) graduate tudent in Slavic language and literature , University of California, Berkeley Charle E. Townsend, (Poli h) profe or of Slavic lingui tic , Princeton University Daniel L. Unow ky, (Poli h) graduate tudent in hi tory, Columbia University Gillian Wedon-Lumer, (Czech) graduate tudent in tudie of Ea t Central Europe, Columbia University

Institutional Support Programs The Ea t European Language Grant Committee of the Joint Committee on Ea tern Europe voted to award grants to the following in titution in upport of Ea t European language in truction. Arizona State Univer ity, Department of Foreign Language , for the teaching of Serbo-Croatian in ummer 1992 Beloit College, Center for Language Studie , for the teaching of Hungarian; ummer 1992 Columbia University, In titute on East Central Europe, for the teaching of Hungarian; ummer 1992 Harvard University, Exten ion School; for the teaching of Czech; ummer 1992 Indiana University, Summer Work hop in Slavic and Ea t European Language ; for the teaching of Bulgarian; ummer 1993 Indiana Univer ity, Summer Work hop in Slavic and East European Language ; for the teaching of econd year Czech; ummer 1992 Indiana Univer ity, Summer Work hop in Slavic and Ea t European Language ; for the teaching of second-year Poli h; ummer 1992 Indiana University, Summer Work hop in Slavic and Ea t European Language ; for the teaching of Romanian; ummer 1993

Japan The following di ertation write-up grant were awarded by the Joint Committee on Japane e Studie -Jame White (chair), William Kelly, Irmela Hijiya-Kir chnereit, Margaret Lock, Hideo Otake, Richard Samuel , Henry Smith, and Frank Upham-at it April 1-2, 1992 meeting in Washington, D.C. The committee wa a i ted by a grants election ubcommittee-Mr. Kelly (chair), Gary Allin on, Paul Anderer, and Eleanor We tney. Mary Byrne McDonnell, Mimi M. Kim, Dee Warren, and Felicia Sullivan erved a taff for thi program.

routine and language ocialization in a Japanese elementary cia room Lorna M.Brau, Ph.D. candidate in theatre, New York University, for research on Rakugo torytelling performance in contemporary Japan Robert W. Bullock, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, University of California, Berkeley, for research on the ocial base of the developmental tate: agriculture and the con ervative coalition in po twar Japan David S. Cry tal, Ph.D. candidate in p ychology, Univerity of Michigan, for research on concept of deviance in children and adole cent : a compari on between Japan and the United State David L. Gardiner, Ph.D. candidate in religion, Stanford University, for re earch on Kukai' theory on the uperiority of e oteric Buddhi m Takaaki Suzuki, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Columbia University, for research on the political economy of Japanese fi cal policy: as e ing the international and dome tic determinant of Japanese government pending in the 1970 and 1980 David Tucker, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of Iowa, for re earch on the ideology of Japanese city planning in Manchukuo, 1932-1945

Korea The following di ertation fellow hip were awarded by the Joint Committee on Korean Studie - Michael Robinon (chair), Alice Am den, Jang-jip Choi, Carter Eckert, Stephan Haggard, Uchang Kim, Chung-in Moon, and Clark Sorensen-at it April 1-2, 1992 meeting in Washington, D.C. Mary Byrne McDonnell, Mimi M. Kim, and Patricia Dwyer served as taff for thi program. David C. Kang, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, University of California, Berkeley, for an examination of the role played by bureaucracie in South Korea under the Park regime Kenneth Kang, Ph.D. candidate in economic, Harvard University, for re earch on the development of unregulated financial market in Korea Hyun-Mee Kim, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Wa hington, for re earch on Korean women in tran ition: toward a femini t politic Jong Myong Kim, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of California, Lo Angele , for re earch on Buddhi t ritual and the tate in Korea, 1095-1308: a new hermeneutical approach, with the P'algwanhoe at the center Namhee Lee, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of Chicago, for re earch on the South Korean tudent movement, 1960-1987 Yung Chul Lee, Ph.D. candidate in government and international tudie, University of Notre Dame, for re earch on the making of labor policie in Korea, 1970-1988

Latin America and the Caribbean Fred E. Anderson, Ph.D. candidate in lingui tic , Univerity of Hawaii, Manoa, for research on interactional JUNE/SEPTEMBER

1992

The following di sertation fellow hip award were awarded by the Joint Committee on Latin American ITEM

149


Studie -Barbara Stalling (chair), Eliana Cardo 0, Elizabeth Jelfn, Brooke Larson, Enrique Mayer, Stuart Schwartz, Rodolfo Stavenhagen, Laurence Whitehead, and George Yudice at it meeting on March 5-7, 1992. The committee wa as i ted by a election committeeBryan Robert, Kathleen Newman, Manuel Pa tor, Irene Silverblatt, Brian Smith, and Barbara Wein tein. Eric Hershberg, Nick Fro t, and Nancy L6pez erved as taff for thi program.

Elena Arengo, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, New School for Social Research, for research in Argentina on the con truction of ethnic identitie in the Argentine Chaco Jorge A. Canizare , Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of Wi con in, Madi on, for re earch in Mexico and Spain on the anthropological dimen ion of Creole nationali m in late colonial Mexico Cynthia H. Chalker, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, University of Pitt burgh, for research in Co ta Rica on the politic of economic reform Colin Danby, Ph.D. candidate in economic, University of Ma achusett, Arnher t, for re earch in Mexico on financial liberalization Ada Ferrer, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, for re earch in Cuba on race, c1 and nationali m, 1868-1898 Julie Frank, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, State University of New York, Stony Brook, for re earch in the Dominican Republic on land privatization, 1880-1935 Laura E. S. Gotkowitz, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of Chicago, for re arch in Bolivia on tate formation and the politic of ethnicity, 1900-1946 John A. Guidry, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, for re earch in Brazil on everyday life and political con ciou ne on the urban frontier Patricia J . Hammer, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Illinoi , Urbana-Champaign, for research in Bolivia on women' reproductive knowledge and practice Michael J. Heckenberger, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Univer ity of Pittsburgh, for re earch in Brazil on cultural development in the upper Singu region of central Brazil Meli a A. John on, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, for re earch in Belize on local participation, wild life con ervation, ecotouri m, and pro pect for u tainable development David A. Kyle, Ph.D. candidate in ociology, The John Hopkin Univer ity, for re earch in Ecuador on economic migration from the Ecuadorian ierra to New York City Ro ario A. Montoya, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, for re earch in Nicaragua on community writers, the tate, and cultural politic under the Sandini ta government, 1979-1990 Roxana Patino, Ph.D. candidate in literature, Univer ity of Maryland, College Park, for re arch in Argentina on 50\ ITEM

literature, politic and joumali m during the tran ition to democracy, 198\-1987 John T. Stile, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Univerity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, for research in Martinique on nation, citizen hip, and cia in the making of a Martinican tran national community Heidi E. Tin man, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Yale University, for re earch in Chile on women grape worker in central Chile and the politic of sex and work, 1958-1989

ear and Middle East Th following di sertation fellow hip were awarded by the Joint Committee on the Near and Middle East-Joel S. Migdal (chair), Soraya Altorki, Kiren Aziz Chaudhry, Andrew C . He , Huricihan i lamo~lu-inan, Mary Layoun. Zachary Lockman, and Timothy Mitchell-at it meeting on March 27, 1992. Steven Heydemann and Rachel Rosenbloom served as taff for thi program. Bruce W. Dunne. Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Georgetown University. for re earch in Egypt, France, and Great Britain on pro titution and the tate in late 19th- and early 20th-century Egypt Jane E. Goodman, Ph .D. candidate in anthropology, Brandei University, for re earch in Algeria and France on mu ical expre ion of Algerian identity Raymond M. Taylor, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Univerity of Illinoi , for re earch in Mauritania and Mali on blood tie and the con truction of collective identity in the Southwe t Sahara, 1840-1980 Elizabeth F. Thomp on, Ph .D. candidate in hi tory, Columbia University. for re earch in Syria, Turkey, and France on gender and imperiali m in the Levant. 1880-1940

South A ia The following di ertation re earch fellow hip were awarded by the Joint Committee on South A ia-Paul Greenough (chair) , Jame K. Boyce, E. Valentine Daniel. Patricia Jeffery, Atul Kohli, David Ludden. Jonathan Parry. Sheldon Pollock, Regula Qure hi, and V. Narayana Rao-at its meeting on March 13, 1992. Toby Alice Volkman. Kate Frie on. and Rachel Rosenbloom erved a taff for thi program. Aditya Behl. Ph.D. candidate in hi tory of religion, the Divinity School of the Univer ity of Chicago, for re earch in Great Britain on Shaikh Muhammad Ghau and ufi allegorical poetry in medieval India Om Gurung , Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Cornell University. for re earch in epal on cultural trategie for re ource management Tamara Hudec. Ph.D. candidate in hi tory. University of Penn ylvania. for re earch in Great Britain and the VOLUME

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Netherland on capital accumulation in the Bay of Bengal, 1780-1830 Pradeep Jeganathan , Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Chicago, for research in Sri Lanka on collective violence and thuggery Pratyou h Onta, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of Penn ylvania, for re earch in Nepal on Ghurkas and the haping of ethnicity and nationali m, 1886-1960 Southeast Asia The following di ertation fellow hip were awarded by the Joint Committee on Sou thea t A ia-Karl L. Hutterer (chair), Jane Atkin on , Richard Doner, Robert Hefner, Hue-Tam Ho Tai, Yoneo I hii, Chetana Nagavajara, Anthony Reid, Renato Ro aldo, Guy Standing, and Robert Taylor-at it meeting on March 28-30, 1992. Toby Alice Volkman, Kate Frie on, and Yukie Ohta served as taff for thi program. Yasuhito A ami , Ph.D. candidate in government, Harvard University, for re earch on development of indu trial relation in Thailand Michael Benjamin Bakan, Ph.D. candidate at the Univerity of California, Lo Angele, for research on Baline e Krea i Baleganjur Cathy Ann Ho hour, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Harvard University, for re earch on population movement, ethnic identity, and the tate in Indone ia John Amo Mar ton, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Washington, for re earch on the di course of hierarchy and equality in Cambodia Ro alind Cannel Morri , Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Chicago, for re earch on pirit medium hip in Chiang Mai, Thailand Sheila Nair, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Univerity of Minne ota, for re earch on ocial movement , the tate, and international relation in Malay ia and Singapore Franki Raden, Ph.D. candidate in mu ic, University of Wi con in, Madi on, for research on the emergence of a new mu ical tradition in Indone ia Martin Erec Rouse, Ph.D. candidate in government, Cornell Univer ity, for research on ASEAN-U.S . relation and emerging regionali m in Thailand and Indone ia Jonathan R. Strom eth, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Columbia Univer ity, for re earch on tateociety relation in Vietnam ince 1975 Nora Anne ley Taylor, Ph.D. candidate in art hi tory, Cornell Univer ity, for research on the archeological ite of Sa-Huynh, Vietnam, and its cultural context Su an Pratt Walton, Ph.D . candidate in mu icology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, for re earch on mu ical tyle and life hi torie of 010 female ingers in Java

Soviet Union and Its Successor States The following di ertation fellow hip were awarded by the Joint Committee on the Soviet Union and It Succe or Ju

ElSEPTEMBER

1992

State -Brian Silver (chair), Barbara Ander on, Jane Burbank, Robert Campbell, Caryl Emer on, Nancy Shield Kollmann, Nancy Lubin, Mary McAuley, Jack Snyder, Richard Stite , Roman Szporluk, and Reginald Zelnik-at it meeting on April 24-25, 1992. The committee was as i ted by a creening committee-Jane Burbank (chair), John Litwack, Kathleen Parthe, William Rei inger, Daniel Rowland, and John Willerton. Robert T . Huber, Su an Bron on, Sarah Tarrow, and Valli Rajah served a taff for thi program. Nora Dudwick, Ph .D. candidate in anthropology, Univerity of Penn ylvania, for a di ertation on ymbol, myth, and trategy in a contemporary ocial movement: the ca e of Armenia Sara Fenander, Ph.D. candidate in language and literature, Stanford University, for a di ertation on Andrei Sinyav ky/Abram Tertz and dominant cultural tendencie in po t-StaJini t literature Marc Garcelon, Ph.D. candidate in ociology, University of California, Berkeley, for a di sertation on Mo cow' democratic movement, 1987-1991 Robert Geraci, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of California, Berkeley, for a disertation on ethnography, orthodoxy, and Ru ian nationality in Kazan, 1870-1917 Gavin Helf, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Univerity of California, Berkeley, for a di ertation on regional politic and the Communi t party of the Soviet Union, 1981-1991 Au tin Jer ild, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of California, Davi , for a di ertation on ethnography, I lam, and colonial rule in the Caucasu , 1840-1906 Tracy King, Ph.D. candidate in lingui tic, Stanford University, for a di sertation on word order and the encoding of topic and focu Sarah Mendel on, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Columbia University, for a di ertation on explaining change in foreign policy: the Soviet withdrawal from Afghani tan Benjamin Nathan , Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of California, Berkeley, for a di sertation on Jew, Ru ian, and the "Jewi h que tion" in St. Peter burg, 1859-1914 Karen Petrone, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Univer ity of Michigan, for a di ertation on Stalini t celebration between 1934 and 1939 Vera Shevzov, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Yale University, for a di sertation on popular orthodoxy in late imperial Ru ia, 1861-1918 Gunti Smidchen, Ph.D. candidate in folklore, Indiana University, for a di sertation on folklore and nationali m in the Baltic State , 1960-1992 Kathleen Smith, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Univer ity of California, Berkeley, for a di ertation on civic activi m and tate re pon e in the Soviet Union The following graduate training fellow hip were al 0 awarded by the Joint Committee on the Soviet Union and Its Succe or State . ITEMS/ 51


Jame Bell, graduate tudent in geography, University of W hington, to tudy the patial organization of the contemporary Ru ian city, women' live, and the ocial con truction of gender role Peter Blit tein, graduate tudent in political cience, University of California, Berkeley, to tudy ethnic fragmentation ince the end of World War I Theodore Gerber, graduate tudent in ociology, University of California, Berkeley, to tudy clas tructure and cia relation in Ru ia and th Soviet Union and the ocial and in titutional contexts of economic reform Charle King, graduate tudent in hi tory, Oxford Univerity, St. Antony' College, to tudy Soviet cultural policy in the former Soviet Sociali t Republic of Moldavia Virginia Martin, graduate tudent in hi tory, University of Southern California, to tudy the middle horde Kazakh under Ru ian Rule, 1822-1891 Jane Prokop, graduate tudent in government, Harvard University, to tudy the role of labor union in the tran ition to a market economy in Ru ia and the Baltic Regina Smyth, graduate tudent in political ience, Duke University, to tudy legi lative in titution building in the Ru ian Republic Brian Taylor, graduate tudent in political science, Ma achusett In titute of Technology, to tudy po tSoviet tran ition and change: Ukrainian language, hi tory, and politic Cynthia Werner, graduate tudent in anthropology, Indiana University, to tudy current proce e of economic and political change in rural Kazakh tan Ellen Wimberg, graduate tudent in hi tory, University of Pittsburgh, to tudy Soviet theorie of penology and penal practice from 1917-1930 David Woodruff, graduate tudent in political cience, University of California, Berkeley, to tudy pro pects for market liberal ideologie in ex-Stalini t context

W tern Europe At the pring meeting of the Joint Committee on We tern Europe on April 11, 1992, the following were awarded doctoral di ertation re earch fellow hip . Members of the committee were: Peter A. Hall (chair), Go ta E ping-Ander en, Mary Fulbrook, Michael Herzfeld, Peter Lange, Philip Nord, Su an Rogers, and David So kice. The committee w a i ted by a creening committee: Jeffrey Ander on, Peter Baldwin, Anthony Cardoza, Patrick Ireland, Thoma Jano ki, Su an Rogers, Caroline Ford, Deborah Silverman, Anne Higonnet, Robert Ulin, and Lynne Wozniak. Kenton W. Worce ter and David Terrien erved as taff for thi program. Keith S. Brown, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Chicago: "Macedonia, Past and Pre nt; Di puted Imagining and National Identitie " Rita S. Goodman, Ph.D. candidate in art hi tory, Univerity of Michigan: ' Th~odore G~ricault' Portrait of the In ane" 52\ITEM

Philip S. Gorski, Ph.D. candidate in ociology, University of California, Berkeley: "Religion, Republicani m and State-Formation in Early Modem Europe" Brad S. Gregory, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Princeton University: "The Anathema of Compromi e. Chri tian Martyrs in the Reformation and Counter-Reformation" Darcy Grimaldo Grig by, Ph.D. candidate in art hi tory, University of Michigan: "Cia ici m, Nationali m, and Hi tory; The Prix Decennaux of 1810 and the Politic of Art under Po t-Revolutionary Empire" Su an B. Hyatt, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Univerity of Mas achu ett , Amherst: "Accidental Activi t ; Women' Politic and Cultural Change in Northern England" Yvonne M. Las alle, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, The Graduate Center, City University of New York: "Old Chri tian and Re-newed Moors; Conversion and the Politic of Identity in Contemporary Andalu ia" Abby L. McGehee, Ph.D. candidate in art hi tory, University of California, Berkeley, "The Pari h Church of SS Gervai et Protai ; Pari ian Flamboyant of the 15th and 16th Centurie " John A. Mendel ohn, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Princeton University: "A Cultural Hi tory of Bacteriology, 1880-1930" Ton oterman, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Mas achusetts In titute of Technology: "The Rise and Decline of the Social Democratic Macroeconomic Policy Regime" Stephen Quinn, Ph.D. candidate in economic, University of Illinoi , Urbana-Champaign: "The Development of London' Financial Market, 1648 to 1694; The Story of the Gold mith Bankers" Ali a L. Shethar, Ph.D. candidate in education, Univerity of California, Berkeley: "Cultural Identity and Schooling Practice in East Berlin School " Sigurt I. Vitol , Ph.D. candidate in ociology, University of Wi con in, Madi on: "Financial Sy tern , Labor Market In titution , and Indu trial Re tructuring" Lori R. Weintrob, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of California, Lo Angele : "Organizing Solidarity; The Culture and Politic of Mutual Aid Societie in France, 1880-1914"

ADV ANCED GRANTS FOR AREA AND COMPARATIVE RESEARCH AND TRAINING Africa The following grant for advanced area research were awarded by the Joint Committee on African Studie Kwame A. Appiah (chair),Charle M. Becker, Frederick Cooper, Jonathan Cru h, Mamadou Diouf, Gillian FeeleyHamik, Paula Girshick, Lemuel John on, Catharine Newbury, and Paul Richard -at it meeting on March 20-21, 1992. M. Pri illa Stone, Barbara Bianco, Marty Baker, and Becca Gershen on rved as taff for thi program. VOLUME

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Sara Berry, profe or of hi tory, The John Hopkin University, to examine the effect of economic and tatutory change on pattern of land u e and the way in which kin hip, bureaucracy, and political relation are invoked in and influenced by truggle over land acce in Southwe tern Nigeria Jim Campbell, as i tant profe or of hi tory, Northwe tern University, to examine a erie of pecific conjuncture of African and African-American hi tory, and the importance of the diaspora as a ite for the con truction of new form of black identity and con ciou ne Denni Cordell, a ociate profe or of hi tory, Southern Methodi t Univer ity, and adjunct profe or of demography, Univer ite de Montreal, to examine the role of the lave trade in the Tran aharan caravan commerce between black Africa, and North Africa and the I lamic heartland Pier Lar on, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of Wi con in, Madi on, for a tudy of tran formation in gender and fertility in the ri e of the Merina kingdom of Central Madagascar

China The Fellow hip Selection Committee of the Joint Committee on Chine e Studie (admini tered by the American Council of Learned Societie )-Deborah Davi (chair), Robert E. Hegel, Robert Hyrne, William C. Kirby, Loui Putterman, P. Steven Sangren, Dorothy J. Solinger, and Wu Hung-at it meeting on March 27, 1992, awarded fellow hip to the following individual. Ja on H. Parker and Ruth Water erved a taff for thi program. All recipient are Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation Fellow upported by funding received from the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation Alan J. Berkowitz, a i tant profe or of Chine e, Swarthmore College. On the in ide looking out: literati writing on rec1u ion in medieval China Robert F. Campany, a i tant profe or of religiou tudie , Indiana Univer ity, Bloomington. Chine e "Account of the Strange" ("zhiguai") and local hrine and temple in the early medieval period Grace S. Fong, a i tant profe or of Chine e, McGill University. Between gender and genre: the flight of the feminine in premodern Chinese poetry Thomas G. Raw ki, profe or of economic, University of Pitt burgh. Reform and innovation in Chine indu try Gilbert F. Rozman, profe or of ociology, Princeton University. Regionali m and realignment in Northea t A ia Daniel B. Steven on, as i tant profe or of philo ophy, Butler University. The rite of the four Samadhi in Chinese T'ien-t'ai Buddhi m Lyman P. Van Slyke, profe or of hi tory, Stanford University. The life and death of Liang Chi (1859-1918) Thoma A. Wil on, as i tant profe or of hi tory, HamilJUNE/SEPTEMBER

1992

ton College. Canonizing the age and con tructing the Confucian tradition in late Imperial China

Eastern Europe The Joint Committee on Eastern Europe (admini tered by the American Council of Learned Societie )-Madeline G. Levine (chair), Ivo Banac, Jo ef C. Brada, Su an Gal, Andrew C. Jano , Deborah D. Milenkovitch, Norman M. Naimark, Virgil P. Nemoianu, Adam przeworski, Kazimierz M. Slomczyn ki, and David Stark-at it meeting on March 6-7, 1992 voted to award fellow hip to the following individual. Ja on H. Parker and Ruth Waters erved a taff for thi program. Eugene A. Hammel, profe or of demography, University of California, Berkeley. The relative trength of cultural and economic explanation of demographic fluctuation and trend in the north-we t Balkan Laura A. Janda, as ociate profe or of Czech, Ru ian, and Slavic Lingui tic , Univer ity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Back from the brink: a tudy of how relic form in language erve as ource material for analogical exten ion Hillel J. Kieval, as ociate profe or of modem Jewi h hi tory, University of Wa hington. Myth, Jew and modem culture: the ritual murder trial in Eastern Europe at the turn of the century

Japan The following advanced re earch grant were awarded by the Joint Committee on Japane e Studie -Jame White (chair), William Kelly, lrmela Hijiya-Kirschnereit, Margaret Lock, Hideo Otake, Richard Samuel , Henry Smith, and Frank Upham-at it April 1-2, 1992 meeting in Washington, DC. The committee was a i ted by a grant election ubcommittee-Mr. Kelly (chair), Gary Allin on, Paul Anderer, and Eleanor We tney. Mary Byrne McDonnell, Mimi M. Kim, Dee Warren, and Felicia Sullivan erved as taff for thi program. Andrew Bar hay, a i tant profe or of hi tory, Univer ity of California, Berkeley, for research on ocial cience and empire in Japan, 1925-1945 Samuel K. Coleman, a i tant profe or of anthropology, University of Oregon, for research on Japane e laboratory ocial organization Gregory J. Kasza, a ociate profe or of political cience, Indiana Univer ity, for re earch on admini tered rna organization : the imperial rule as i tance movement in comparative perspective Herman Oom ,profe or of hi tory, Univer ity of California, Lo Angele , for re earch on early modem Japanese judicial practice: law and politic in Tokugawa village life Edith Sarra, a i tant profe or of Ea t A ian language, ITEMS/53


Indiana University, for research on fiction of femininity: literary of gender and identity in Japanese court literature Haruo Shirane, as ociate profe or of literature, Columbia University, for re earch on language and ocial interaction in late 17th century Japan: a tudy of Mat uo Basho' haikai David Eli Wein tein, as i tant profe or of economic, Harvard University, for re earch on the effect of quota and cartel on Japanese finn behavior Denni Tet u hi Yasutomo, a ociate profe or of political cience, Smith College, for research on the new multilaterali m in Japan' cold-war diplomacy

Korea The following advanced research grant wa awarded by the Joint Committee on Korean Studie -Michael Robinon (chair), Alice Am den, Jang-jip Choi, Carter Eckert, Stephan Haggard , Uchang Kim, Chung-in Moon, and Clark Sorensen-at its April 1-2, 1992 meeting in Washington, D.C. Mary Byrne McDonnell, Mimi M. Kim, and Patricia Dwyer served as taff for thi program. David R. McCann, as ociate profe or of A ian tudie, Cornell University, for the tran lation and tudy of the poetry of So WOl (Kim CMng ik, 1902-1934) Research Planning Grants Gina L. Barne, enior re earcher, St. John' College, Cambridge, England, for an examination of the role of the outhern Korean coast in A.D. 4th-5th century regional relation J. Ro P. King, lecturer in Korean Language and Literature, University of London, England, for research on Soviet Korean dialect , folklore, and hi tory

the Saint Domingue lave revolt and the rise of Tou aint Louverture, 1780-1795 Merilee S. Grindle, as ociate researcher at the Harvard In titute for International Development, for research in Mexico and Nairobi on economic and political change in Latin America and Africa Kaye G. Hu band , as i tant profe or of economic , William College, for re earch in Mexico on the economic policie of global indu trie in the development of the Mexican automobile indu try Nil Jacob on, as i tant profe or of hi tory, University of Illinoi , Urbana-Champaign, for research in Peru on the impact of the Peruvian Revolution on the development of the Peruvian tate, 1894-1895 Erick D. Langer, as ociate profe or of hi tory, Carnegie Mellon University, for re earch in Bolivia on internal market and export economie in the South-Central Ande , 1830-1930 Anthony W. Marx, a i tant profe or of political cience, Columbia Univer ity, for re earch in Brazil on the fonnation of racial identity and popular mobilization in corporati t Brazil Muriel Nazzari, as i tant profe or of hi tory, Indiana University, for research in Brazil on the truggle for legal change to facilitate capitali t development in Brazil, 1808-1907 Kathleen E. Newman, a i tant profe or of Spani h, Univer ity of Iowa, for re earch in Argentina on Argentine ilent film, femini m, democracy, and modernity Anton Ro enthal, a i tant profe or of hi tory, Univer ity of Kan as, for research in Uruguay on the ocial hi tory of the electric treetcar in Montevideo, 1906-1936 Catalina Smulovitz, as ociate re earcher at the Center for the Study of Society and State (CEDES), for re earch in Argentina on the effect of Argentine democratization on the judiciary and the Argentine legal y tern Donald F. Steven, a ociate profe or, Drexel Univer ity, for research in Mexico on the cholera epidemic in 19th-century Mexico

Latin America and the Caribbean The Joint Committee on Latin American Studie Barbara Stalling (chair), Eliana Cardo 0, Elizabeth Jelfn, Brooke Larson, Enrique Mayer, Stuart Schwartz, Rodolfo Stavenhagen, Laurence Whitehead and George Yudice-at its meeting on March 5-7, 1992 awarded grant to the following individual . Eric Hershberg, Nick Fro t, and Nancy L6pez served a taff for thi program. Scott Atran, as ociate re earcher in anthropology, Univerity of Michigan and re earcher, National Center for Scientific Re earch (CNRS), Pari , for re earch in Guatemala on the cultural and biological urvival of the Maya rainfore t Arturo E cobar, a i tant profe or of anthropology, Smith College, for re earch in Colombia on cultural politic and Afro-Colombian re pon e to development David Geggu , as ociate profe or of hi tory, University of Rorida, Gaine ville, for research in Haiti and France on 54\ ITEM

Near and Middle East The following advanced re earch grant were awarded by the Joint Committee on the Near and Middle East-Joel S. Migdal (chair), Soraya Altorki, Kiren Aziz Chaudhry, Andrew C. He ,Huricihan i lamoglu-inan, Mary Layoun, Zachary Lockman, and Timothy Mitchell-at it meeting on March 27, 1992. Steven Heydemann and Rachel Ro enbloom erved as taff for thi program. Joel Beinin, a ociate profe or of hi tory, Stanford University, for re earch on the hi tory of the EgyptianJewi h community, 1948-1957, and the dynamic of it di per ion in I rael, Europe, and the United State Zeynep Celik, a ociate profe or of architecture, ew Jersey In titute of Technology, for research on the cultural politic of French colonial hou ing projects in Algiers , 1930-1962 Re at Ka aba, as ociate profe or of ociology, Jack on VOLU 1E

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School of International Studie , University of Wa hington, for research on migration in the Ottoman Empire and Turkey Le lie P. Peirce, a i tant profe or of Near Eastern tudie , Cornell University, for research on family, neighborhood, and the law in the 16th- and 17th-century Ottoman Empire Suzanne P. Stetkevych, a istant profe or of Arabic literature, Indiana Univer ity, for re earch on poetic creativity versu the inimitability of the Qur'an in Arabo-I larnic culture South Asia The following advanced research grants were awarded by the Joint Committee on South A ia-Paul Greenough (chair), Jame K. Boyce, E. Valentine Daniel, Patricia Jeffery, Atul Kohli, David Ludden, Jonathan Parry, Sheldon Pollock, Regula Qure hi, V. Narayana Rao-at it meeting on March 13, 1992. Toby Alice Volkman, Kate Frie on, and Rachel Ro enbloom erved as taff for thi program. Alice W. Clark, re earch a ociate, Center for South A ian Studie , University of California, Berkeley, for re earch on the demographic tran ition and the changing tatu of women and children in Gujarat, India John C. Holt, profe or of religion, Bowdoin College, for re earch on the politic of ethnic exclu ion and inclu ion in 18th-century Sri Lanka Denni B. McGilvray, a ociate profe or of anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, for re earch on matrilineal caste and kin hip organization among Mu lim and Tamil in Sri Lanka Gail Minault, as ociate profe sor of hi tory, University of Texas, Au tin, for research on the intellectual hi tory of Delhi, 1827-1857 Seyyed Vali Nasr, po t-doctoral fellow, Foundation for Iranian Studie , for re earch on the Jama'at-i I lami of Paki tan David A. Scott, as istant profe or of anthropology, Bate College, for re earch on cultural critic and cultural critici m in colonial Sri Lanka Southeast Asia The following advanced re earch grant were awarded by the Joint Committee on Southeast A ia-Karl L. Hutterer (chair), Jane Atkin on, Richard Doner, Robert Hefner, Hue-Tam Ho Tai, Yoneo I hii, Chetana Nagavajara, Anthony Reid, Renato Ro aldo, Guy Standing, and Robert Taylor-at its meeting on March 28-30, 1992. Toby Alice Volkman, Kate Frie on, and Yukie Ohta served as staff for this program. Peter David Koret, independent cholar, Department of Southea t A ian Studie , School of Oriental and African JUNE/SEPTEMBER

1992

Studie , University of London, for re earch on the role of adaptation in the evolution of Lao literature Vincente Rafael, a ociate profe or, Department of Communication, Univer ity of California, San Diego, for research on language, gender, and race in the Philippine from 1870-1940 Thongchai Winichakul, as i tant profe or, Department of Hi tory, University of Wi con in, Madison, for re earch on the emergence of hi tory as a biography of Siam Soviet Union and Its Successor States The following advanced research grants were awarded by the Joint Committee on the Soviet Union and Its Succe or State -Brian Silver (chair), Barbara Anderson, Jane Burbank, Robert Campbell, Caryl Emerson, Nancy Shield Kollmann, Nancy Lubin, Mary McAuley, Jack Snyder, Richard Stite , Roman Szporluk, and Reginald Zelnik-at it meeting on April 24-25, 1992. The committee was as i ted by a screening committee-Robert Campbell (chair), Harley Balzer, Victoria Bonnell, Donald Kelley, and Stephanie Sandler. Robert T. Huber, Su an Bron on, and Sarah Tarrow erved as taff for thi program. Jeffrey Burd ,a ociate profe or of hi tory, University of Roche ter, for re earch on village communitie and the ocial control of labor in rural-urban Ru ia from emancipation to revolution Sibelan Forre ter, as ociate profe or of literature, Oberlin College, for re earch on women's language and self-creation in Ru ian lyric poetry Linda Goldberg, as ociate profe or of economic, New York Univer ity, for re earch on exchange-rate regime and black markets in the Soviet Union Ann Koblitz, as ociate profe or of hi tory, Hartwick College, for re earch on cience, women, and revolution in Ru ia: the generation of the 1860 Stephen Kotkin, as ociate profe or of hi tory, Princeton University, for research on po t-Communi t economic and political tructure: the case of Siberia Eric Naiman, as ociate profes or of language and literature, University of Colorado, for re earch on exuality, utopia, and culture: the incarnation of early Soviet ociety Michael Smith, as ociate profes or of hi tory, University of Dayton, for re earch on linguistic theorie , language reforms, and the nationalities que tion in the USSR, particularly Georgia, from 1917-1937 Stephen Wegren, as ociated profe or of political cience, Southern Methodi t University, for research on the politic of rural tran ition in Ru ia In two competition for the program of upport for research and development initiative in Soviet tudie , the following award were made by the Joint Committee on the Soviet Union and It Succe sor State . Genrich Deych, profe or of hi tory, and Benjamin Nathan, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of ITEMS/55


California, Berkeley, for the preparation of an archival guide for the field of Ru ian-Jewi h hi tory during the period 1800-1917 Cynthia Buckley, as i tant profe or of ociology, Univerity of Texa , Au tin, for a collaborative re earch project on ocial and economic barriers to the emergence of a labor market and the gmentation and tratification of labor market condition developing in the Ru ian Republic Michael Burawoy, profe or of ociology, University of California, Berkeley, for a collaborative re earch project on the tran ition to a market economy in Ru ia Jeffrey Checkel, as i tant profe or of political cience, University of Pitt burgh; and John Lepingwell, as i tant profe or of political cience, University of lllinoi , Urbana-Champaign, for a work hop entitled, "Bringing Ru ia Back In: International Relation , Comparative Politic , and the Study of the Former USSR" Patricia Kerig, a i tant profe or of p ychology, Simon Fra er University, for a research project in Ru ia on cro -cultural view of gender, family relation hip, and child clinical p ychology Ru 11 Martin, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, Harvard University, and Marshall Poe, Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of California, Berkeley, for the development of a Mu covite database

Marjorie Balzer, William Bielby, Melvin Croan, and Michael Fi her. Robert T. Huber and Valli Rajah erved as taff for the program. The following award were made: Anthropology: University of Chicago, Indiana University, and Univer ity of Pitt burgh Sociology: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor In the first national competition for the Program to Alleviate Backlog in Soviet and East European Collection in the United State , the Joint Committee on the Soviet Union and Its Succe or State , was as i ted by a screening committee-Blair Ruble (chair), Janet Crayne, Keith Hitchin , Patricia Polan ky, and Leena Siegelbaum. Robert T. Huber, Su an Bron on, and Sarah Tarrow served as taff for the program. Award were made to the Amher t College librarie , Teachers College at Columbia University, the Hoover In titute, the Indiana University Iibrarie , the Library of Congre ,the University of Michigan librarie , New York Public Library, the Stanford University librarie , and the University of Wi con in (Madi on) Iibrarie .

Institutional Support Programs

OTHER PROGRAMS

In it eighth national competition of grant to American in titute that offer inten ive training in the Ru ian and non-Ru ian language of the former Soviet Union, the Joint Committee on the Soviet Union and It Succe or State , as i ted by a creening committee-Caryl Emerson (chair), David Bethea, Michael Aier, Victor Friedman, and Azade-Ayse Rorlich-made the following award at it meeting on February 15, 1992. Robert T. Huber, Valli Rajah, and Sarah Tarrow served a taff for the program.

Abe Fellow hip Program

Ru ian Language Competition: Beloit College, Center for Language Studie ; Bryn Mawr College, Ru ian Language In titute; Indiana University, Ru ian In titute; University of Iowa, Department of Ru ian; The John Hopkin University, School of International Studie ; Middlebury College, Ru ian School; Monterey In titute for International Affairs, Ru ian Program; and Norwich University, Ru ian School Non-Ru ian Language Competition: University of California, Lo Angele, Azeri and Uzbek program ; Harvard University, Ukrainian program; Indiana University, Georgian and Uzbek program; University of Washington, Kazakh, Tajik, and Uzbek program; University of Wi con in, Madi on, Kazan Tatar and Kazakh program In its third national competition of grants for first-year fellow hip in underrepresented field , the Joint Committee on the Soviet Union and It Succe or State wa as i ted by a creening committee-Reginald Zelnik (chair), 56\ITEMS

The following grant were awarded by the Abe Fellowhip Program Committee-Charle Hirschman, Sumiko Iwao, Akira Kojima, Karen O. Mason, Take hi Matsuda, Hugh Patrick, Thorn Rimer, Akihiko Tanaka, Ken'ichi Tominaga, and Jame White-at it meeting on March 8-9, 1992. Mary Byrne McDonnell, Helen Chauncey, and Vane a Vinarub served a taff for the program. John Caldwell, a ociate profe or, Title XII Chair for International Vegetable Production, Department of Horticulture, Virginia Polytechnic In titute and State University. "Principle and Method of Implementation of Agricultural Development: A Comparative Study of Approache in Japan and the United State " Wayne Corneliu , Gildred Profe or of U.S.-Mexican Relation and profe or of political cience, University of California, San Diego. "Controlling Illegal Immigration in Indu trialized Societie : Japan and the U.S. in Comparative Perspective" Robert Gilpin, Dwight D. Eisenhower Profe or of International Affair, The Woodrow Wil on School of Public and International Affairs and the Department of Politic , Princeton University. "The Tran formation of the Global Political Economy" Tomoko Hamada, as ociate profe or of anthropology and chair of East A ian tudie, College of William and Mary. "Japane e Enterprise in America" Richard Hanson, journali t, editor, and publi her of the Japan Financial Report. "Internationalization and MOF: VOLUME

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The Impact of Japan' Rise as a Financial Superpower on Global Economic Policy Formation, 1965-1991" Vladimir Ivanov, Advanced Research Fellow, The Program on U.S.-Japan Relation, Center for International Affair , Harvard University. "Multilaterali m and Non-Conventional Security in the North Pacific" Sadafumi Kawato, profe or of political cience, Faculty of Law, Hokkaido University. "Comparative Study of Legi lature and the Development of Political Partie. ': Fumiaki Kubo, a ociate profe or, Department of Pohtlcal Science, Faculty of Law, Keio University. "U.S. Environmental Politic under the Divided Government: The I ue Network and the In titutionalized Movement" Hiro Lee, as i tant profe or, Department of Economic, University of California, Irvine. "Cooperative Approache to Shifting Comparative Advantage: The Case of Bilateral Trade between the United State and Japan" Catherine Lewis, adjunct a ociate profe or and re earch p ychologi t, pediatric , Univer ity of California, San Franci co, and director of the Formative Re earch Developmental Studie Center. "Cro -Cultural Experience a a Cataly t to Educational Thinking and Practice: Development and Te ting of 'Trigger' Videotape " Elizabeth Lillehoj, a i tant profe or, Department of Art, DePaul Univer ity. "Women' Art a a Reflection of Political and Social Ideal: Japane e Women Arti ts in Comparative Perspective" Yuji Murayama, a i tant profe or, In titute of Geocience, University of T ukuba. "Interdependency in the International City-Sy tem" Steven Ro efielde, profe or of economic , University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. "Soviet Di union and Conflict Avoidance in the Pacific Rim: Japan' Role in Financing the Soviet Union' Economic Tran formation" David Wein tein, as i tant profe or of economic , Harvard University. "The Effect of Quota and Cartel on Japane e Firm Behavior" To hio Yamagi hi, a ociate profe or, Department of Behavioral Science, Faculty of Letters, Hokkaido Univer ity. "Tru t, Commitment, and Network Formation in the United State and Japan"

Wright). Steven Heydemann, Cary Fraser, Lori Gronich, Ali on Streit, and Patricia Murillo erved a taff for thi program.

Dissertation Fellowships Clement Emenike Adibe (Nigeria), Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Queen' University. "Hegemony, Cooperation and Sub-Regional Security in a Changing World: Ghana, Nigeria and ECOWAS Integration" Lars-Erik Cederman (Sweden), Ph.D. candidate in political cience, University of Michigan. "The Propagation of Peaceful I land : Peace and Democracy a Emergent Propertie of Complex Adaptive Sy tem " Alexandra M. Hrycak (United State ), Ph.D. candidate in ociology, University of Chicago. "Between Democracy and Nationality: The Practice of Politic and the Poetic of Identity in the Ukrainian Civil Sphere" Marzenna A. Kowalik (Poland), Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Princeton University. "National Power and Trade Relation Between Germany and Ea tern Europe: Impact on Security" Patricia B. Lawrence (United State ), Ph.D. candidate in cultural anthropology, Univer ity of Colorado, Boulder. "Godde Cults in the Context of Ethnic Terror" Chri tian G. Reu -Smit (Au tralia), Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Cornell University. "Environmental Protection and International Ju tice: Ethical Claim , Political Conflicts, and the Evolution of Global Environmental Regime " Janet L. Roitman (United State ), Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Univer ity of Penn ylvania. "The Logic and Legitimacy of Exchange: Cattle, Cotton and Millet in Northern Cameroon" Hanan H. Sabea (Egypt), Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, The John Hopkin Univer ity. "Tanzania: Redefining the 'Building of a New Society', The Case of the Amboni Group, Tanga Region"

Postdoctoral Fellowships SSRC路MacArthur Foundation Fellow hip on Peace and Security in a Changing World The Committee on International Peace and Security, at it pring 1992 meeting, voted to award eight di ertation and even po tdoctoral SSRC-MacArthur Foundation Fellow hip on Peace and Security in a Changing World. The committee member are Gordon Adam , Albert Fi hlow, David J. Holloway, Caroline Humphrey, Peter Katzen tein, Sam Nolutshungu, Michel Ok enberg, Robert O'Neill, Judith V. Reppy, Su anne H. Rudolph, Jeremiah Sullivan, and David Wright. The committee wa a i ted by a di ertation creening committee (Mr. Sullivan [chair], Thomas Callaghy, John Coat worth, Lynn Eden, Caroline Humphrey, Helen Milner) and a po tdoctoral creening committee (Ms. Reppy [chair], Barton Bern tein, Catherine Kelleher, Atul Kohli, Daniel Little, David JUNE/SEPTEMBER

1992

Richard G. Biernacki (United State ), a ociate profe or of ociology, University of California, San Diego. "The Cultural Con truction of Communitie Acro National Boundarie : A Comparative Study of the U.S.-Mexican and German-Poli h Borderland " Suha Bolukba i (Turkey), a ociate profe or of international relation, Middle Ea t Technical University. "Peace and Security in Soviet A ia" Oleg Bukharin (USSR), phy ici t, Center for Arm Control, Energy, and Environmental Studie , Princeton University. "Decentralization of the Soviet Union: Implications for Proliferation of Nuclear and Conventional Weapon " Alexander Naty (Ethiopia), Ph.D. candidate in ociocultural anthropology, Stanford University. "Unitary State Law Versu Ethnic Diversity in Ethiopia: A Frontier for National and Regional Peace and Security" Robert D. Nixon (South Africa), a i tant profe or of EnITEM

/57


gli h and Comparative literature, Columbia University. " Relation Between Inkatha, the Rise of Ethnic Nationali m, and the Tran formation of the South African State" A huto h Varshney (India), as i tant profe or of government, Harvard University. " Religion , Nationali m and Insecurity: I lam in India' Political Proce " Stefan Y. Zhurek (USSR), senior researcher in economic , USSR In titute of Foreign Economic Relation . "Economic Liberalization in the USSR and Eastern Europe and it Impact on the World Food Security"

Kofi E. Quashigah (Ghana), law, University of Nigeria. "Protection of Human Right in the Changing Dome tic and International Scene: Pro peets in Sub-Saharan Africa" Kie-Hyun Shin (Korea), political science, Chonbuk National Univer ity, Korea. "Korean Reunification in the Capitali t World Sy tem" Simon N. Tata (Cameroon), hi tory, Yaounde University. "Sovereign National Conference: A New Political Phenomenon in Africa' Democratization Proce "

International Peace and Security

Public Policy Research on Contemporary Hispanic I u

The Committee on International Peace and Security al made the following award :

0

Research VVorkshops Elizabeth Economy and Miranda Schreur , Univer ity of Michigan. "The United Nation Conference on Environment and Development and the Social Scienti t" David Fagel on, independent cholar, and Michael Froman, Harvard University. "Challenge to the Rule of Law and Democracy in the New Eastern Europe" Karen Jacob en, independent cholar. "The Impact of Refugee Movement on Food Security and the Environment in the Third World" Yevgeny Kuznetsov , Cornell Univer ity. "Long-Run High-Tech Indu trial Policy in Short-Run Cri i Management" Andrzej Tymow ki, independent cholar. "Youth Culture and Political Participation in Po t-1989 East-Central Europe" Visiting Scholar Fellowships John A. Ayam (Nigeria), political cience, Ahmadu Bello University. "Nigeria and Peace-Keeping Efforts in Africa. A Comparative Analy i of it Participation in United Nation Peace-Keeping Force in the Congo (ONUC) and Economic Community of We t African State Monitoring Group (ECOMOG)" Shedrach Gaya Be t (Nigeria), political cience, Univer ity of Jo , Nigeria. "Economic Cooperation and Regional Security in Southern Africa: Problem and Pro pect " Elijah D. Mu hemeza (Uganda), political cience, Makerere Univer ity. " Politic and the Refugee Experience in Uganda" John A. Odhiambo (Kenya), political cience, Moi University. " Beyond Conflict in the Hom of Africa; Pro pect for Peace, Security, and Cooperation in a Changing World" Kolawole J. Olufemi (Nigeria), political cience, Obafemi Awolowo University. "Economic Adju tment, Ethnic Nationali m, and the Pro pect for Democracy and Stability in Africa" Kenneth C. Omeje (Nigeria), political cience, Peace Research In titute of Nigeria. "Structural Adju tment Program and the Politic of Human Right Violation in Rural Nigeria: Implication for the Peace Proce " 58 \ ITEM

The following grant were awarded by the Committee for Public Policy Re earch on Contemporary Hi panic I ue -Rodolfo de la Garza (chair), David H. Bauti ta, Douglas Mas y, John Palmer, Li andro Perez, Janice Petrovich, Saskia Sa sen, and Maxine Baca Zinn-at its June 7, 1991 meeting. Raquel Ovryn Rivera and Jaime Andre Castaneda served as taff for thi program. Richard Barff, a ociate profe or of geography, Dartmouth College, and John Elli , as i tant profe or of geography, Florida State Univer ity, for a tudy of "Hi panic Immigration and the Migration Deci ion of African American " Guillermo Grenier, i tant profe or of ociology, Florida International University, and Max Jo e C tro, executive director, Greater Miami United, for a tudy of "BlackLatino Relation under Condition of Latino Empowerment: The Miami Case" Chri topher King, re earch scienti t, University of Tex , Au tin, and Deanna Schexnayder, research as ociate, University of Texa , Au tin, for a tudy of "Pattern of Hi panic Participation in Texa JTPA and AFDC Program " Kenneth J. Meier, profe or of political cience, University of Wi con in, Milwaukee, for a tudy of "The Interrelation among Ability Grouping, Di cipline and Performance of Latino Student : The Role of Latino Teachers and the Urban Community" Merry Mora h, a i tant profe or of criminal ju tice, Michigan State University, and Anna Maria Santiago, research fellow, University of Michigan, for a tudy of "Intimate Violence among Latino Couple" Richard Santo ,a ociate profe or of economic , Univerity of New Mexico, and Philip T . Ganderton, as i tant profe or of economic , Univer ity of New Mexico, for a tudy of "Education and Work Pattern of Hi panic High School Graduate : Evidence from the High School and Beyond Survey " Daniel Villeg ,as ociate profe or of economic , California Polytechnic State University Foundation, for a tudy of "An Economic Analy i of the Wealth and Debt of Hi panic Hou ehold " Puerto Rican Poverty Initiative The following grants were awarded by the Committee for the Cause and Consequence of Puerto Rican Poverty, VOL ME

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jointly funded by the Committee for Public Policy Re earch on Contemporary Hi panic I ue and the Committee for Research on the Urban Underclas -Frank Bonilla (cochair), Peter Hall (cochair), Vilma Ortiz, John U. Ogbu, and Terry Rosenberg-at it January 29, 1992 meeting. Raquel Ovryn Rivera, F6lix V. Mato Rodrfguez, and Jaime Andre Castaneda served as taff for thi program.

Mari a Alicea, a i tant profe or, School for New Learning, DePaul University, for re earch on cyclical migration and it economic con equence for Puerto Rican Jani Barry Figueroa, i tant profe or, New School for Social Science , Fordham University at Lincoln Center for re earch on the ignificance of family employment characteri tic for predicting youth employment: a compari on of Puerto Rican, non-Hi panic black, and non-Hi panic white youth Ramon Borge -Mendez, Ph .D. candidate, Department of Urban Studie and Planning, M achu ett In titute of Technology, for research on urban and regional re tructuring and barrio formation in Mas achu en : the ca e of Lowell , Lawrence, and Holyoke Hector R. Cordero-Guzman, Ph.D. candidate in ociology, University of Chicago, for re earch on the ocioeconomic and demographic determinant of difference in the wage of Puerto Rican, Latino, white, and black youth: 1959-1987 Katharine M. Donato, research as ociate, Population Re earch Center, Univer ity of Chicago, for research on poverty among Puerto Rican : difference between working and nonworking poor i tant profe or, Department of Geography, Mark Elli, Rorida State University; and Adrian Bailey, a i tant profe or, Department of Geography, Dartmouth College, for re earch on a longitudinal analy i of the re idential ojoum of Puerto Rican-born women in New York City Lui M. Falcon, as i tant profe or, Department of Sociology, Northea tern University, for re earch on the labor market experience of Puerto Rican in Bo ton Ramon Fink, profe or, Community and Preventive Medicine, ew York Medical College; Annette Ramirez de Arellano, ociate dean and as ociate profe or, School of Health Science , Hunter College; and Melvin Krasner, Senior Director for Research, United Ho pital Fund, for research on health tatu and the u of health service among Puerto Rican and other Hi panic in New York City Judith Freidenberg, as i tant profe or, Department of Community Medicine and Department of Geriatric and Adult Development, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, for research on growing old a Puerto Rican in East Harlem: poverty and health i ue Keith R. Ihlanfeldt, profe or Department of Economic , Georgia State Univer ity, for research on intra-urban job acce ibility and the employment of Puerto Rican and other Hi panic youth JUNE/SEPTEMBER

1992

Marya Munoz Va quez, ociate profe or, Department of Economic , Univer ity of Puerto Rico; and Neftali Garcia Martinez, profe or, Department of P ychology, University of Puerto Rico, for research on the relationhip between poverty, deteriorating health tatu, and indu trial pollution in Puerto Rico Clara G . Mu chkin, re arch as ociate. Center for Demographic Studie • Duke University; and Jose Miguel Sandoval. research a ociate, In titute for Research in Social Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. for re earch on determinant of econdary earner trategie among Puerto Rican hou ehold Su an M. Rigdon. research as ociate. Department of Anthropology. University of Illinoi , for re arch on orne limitation of the culture concept in explaining Puerto Rican poverty Anna Maria Santiago, re earch fellow, Population Studie Center, University of Michigan; and George Gal ter, profe or, Department of Economic, The College of Woo ter. Woo ter, Ohio, for research on the impact of changing opportunity tructure and re idential segregation on the economic tatu of Puerto Rican Donna Shai, as i tant profe or, Department of Sociology, Villanova University, for research on child mortality and poverty among Puerto Rican in New York City and Puerto Rico, 1980-1990

R earch on the Urban Undercl The Fellow hip Selection Committee of the Committee for Re earch on the Urban Underclas -Jame H. John on, Jr. (Chair), Rebecca Blank, Robin D.G. Kelley. Vonnie McLoyd, Martin Sanchez-Jankow ki and Kenneth Wongvoted at it March 23 , 1992 meeting to award fellow hip and grant to the following individual . Martha Gephart, Alice O'Connor, Greg Brook. Le lie Dwight. and Karen Green tein erved as taff for thi program.

Undergraduate Research Assistantship Grants Beaulah Rournoy, coordinator. Invitational Scholars Program, Rorida International University, to upport re arch by four undergraduate to examine the condition , adaptation , and mobility of urban undercl youth in Miami Metropolitan Dade County from a cro -cultural perspective Joyce Gelb. profe or of political cience and director, Ro enberglHumphrey Program in Public Affairs, City College of New York. to upport research by four undergraduate to examine the relation hip between community-based hou ing and neighborhood change in low income black and Hi panic neighborhood in Manhattan John Hudgin , as i tant profe or of ociology; and Mamie Locke, as i tant dean. School of Liberal Art and Education, both at Hampton University, to upport research by four undergraduate to examine the impact of public as i tance program utilization on family ITEM

159


functioning and family tructure among black, undercla familie in ewport New , Virginia Gretchen Maclachlan, as i tant profe or of political cience and enior re earch ociate, Southern Center for Studie in Public Policy, Clark Atlanta University, to upport re earch by four undergraduate in a di advantaged, urban black community, with a focu on public policy, gender, and ocial i olation within the community Marlynn May, profe or of ociology and director, Community Research and Policy Studie Center; Lawrence Breitbord, ociate profe or of anthropology; Charle Elli ,a i tant director, Educational Development Program; and John McDonnell, profe or of education, all at Beloit College, to upport comparative research by four undergraduate on the extent of familie 'tie to chool and neighborhood in two imilar, poverty-ridden urban neighborhood, one that i predominantly white and the other that i predominantly black Jan Ro enberg, ociate profe or of ociology, Long I land University, Brooklyn Campu ,to upport re earch by four undergraduate on persi tently poor urban neighborhood in Brooklyn, which will include an inten ive, umrner-long period of focused ethnographic research under the upervi ion of an e tabli hed, New York City based research mentor

Dissertation Fellow hips Yvette M. Alex, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, Ohio State University, for re earch on how contextual influence affect political orientation, and how political orientation influence political participation, in extremeversu low-poverty neighborhood Robert A. Brown, Ph.D. candidate in political cience, University of Michigan, for re earch on the extent to which black urban elected official can alter local public policy, particularly government expenditure , to help alleviate the impoveri hed condition of their lower income con tituent Su an L. Craddock, Ph.D. candidate in medical geography, Univer ity of California, Berkeley, for re earch that evaluate the health tatu of home Ie women in San Franci co, the potential cau e of ill health, and their acce to medical care Ann A. Ferguson, Ph.D. candidate in ociology, Univerity of California, Berkeley, for re earch on the effects of the ocial con truction of ma culinity in chool, family, and peer group on the chooling experience of African-American boy from low-income and poor familie Jennifer L. Gunn, Ph.D. candidate in the hi tory of cience, University of Penn ylvania, for research that explore hi torically how the di cipline of the ocial cience have haped the concept of an underclas at the bottom of the American ocio-economic hierarchy John Hartigan, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in the Hi tory of Con ciou ne Program, Univerity of California, Santa Cruz, for research that examine how racial and clas identitie are fonned among the inner city poor 6O\ITEM

Maria D. Mulero, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Temple University, for re arch on the impact of tructural economic change in the northeastern United State on the participation of immigrant Puerto Rican women in the formal labor force Karen E. Needle, Ph.D. candidate in economic, Princeton University, for re earch on how the tran itional financial a i tance given to individual during their first ix month after release from pri on affects long-term job quality and recidivi m rate Yolanda C. Padilla, Ph.D. candidate in ocial work and ociology, University of Michigan, for re earch that se se the effects of geographic mobility acro labor market on the economic well-being of Hi panic Renee P. Smith-Maddox, Ph.D. candidate in ocial policy, Brandei University, for re earch on the relation hip between ability-grouped cla as ignment and other factors which may influence the a piration of AfricanAmerican eighth graders M. Jane Sundiu , Ph.D. candidate in ociology, The John Hopkin Univer ity, for research on the influence of family tructure, tability, and economic re ource on the academic performance of urban chool children

1992 Summer Dissertation Workshop Participants Bernice Black, Ph.D. candidate in educational theory and policy, Penn ylvania State University, for re earch that examine how middle, working, and undercla AfricanAmerican parent perceive and interpret the impact of education on their live and the live of their children Aixa N. Cintron, Ph.D. candidate in ocial work and ociology, University of Michigan, for re earch that review the effect of change in educational attainment, indu try tructure, and ethnic market concentration on the labor force participation of Puerto Rican women Regena M. Fail, Ph.D. candidate in education and p ychology, Univer ity of Michigan, for re earch on the effect of tandardized te ting on chool di trict policie and on teacher 'perception of poor children a learners Nilda Aore -Gonzalez, Ph.D. candidate in ociology, University of Chicago, for re earch that examine the meaning that Puerto Rican tudent as ign to their life experience , and how the e interpretation hape their educational choice and ucce ful completion of high chool Lionel A. Henderson, Ph.D. candidate in education, University of Penn ylvania, for research on the relative effectivene of pecially funded inner-city educational program on black male performance at po t- econdary in titution Belinda I. Reye , candidate in economic , University of California, Berkeley, for re earch on the locational electivity of Puerto Rican migrant , and the effect of selectivity on poverty Deni e William -Shannon, Ph.D. candidate in urban affairs and public policy, University of Delaware, for research that examine the extent to which community-based organization ucceed or fail in reaching their community economic development goal , and the organizational VOLUME

46,

NUMBER

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characteri tic and environmental condition that affect their succe or failure Kri ti J. Wood , Ph.D. candidate in hi tory, University of Southern California, for research that examine cy-

cle in the changing relation hip between the police and the African-American community of Lo Angele, and the perception of that relation hip, from 19651991

Grants Received by the Council in 1991-92 A summary of grants received during the year ending June 30, 1992* Bank of Japan Project LINK (Committee on Economic Stability and Growth)

Japan Foundation Center for Global Partner hip $15,000

Ford Foundation Multiyear international program $5,000,000 Project on war, the tate, and ociety in the Middle East (Joint Committee on the Near and Middle Ea t) $47,360 Support for ummer in titute on modem Sou thea t A ian literature (Joint Committee on Southea t A ia) $23,400 Support for a conference on marketization in Southea t A ia (Joint Committee on Sou thea t A ia) $44,000 Project on international law and global environmental change: a y tematic tudy of international environmental accord (Committee for Research on $200,000 Global Environmental Change) Support of multi-city tudy of urban inequality (Committee for Re earch on the Urban Undercla ) $43,000 Summer work hop on Soviet and Ea t European economic (Joint Committee on the Soviet Union and It Succe or State) $70,000

French-American Foundation 1992 Tocqueville fellow hip award (Joint Committee on We tern Europe)

$17,000

William T. Grant Foundation Neighborhood and family influence on the development of poor urban children (Committee for Research on the Urban Undercla )

343,753

Japan Foundation Economic globalization and immigrant labor (Urban Initiative program)

39,963

Abe Fellow hip Program in international multidi ciplinary re earch on global concern

$1,440,016

Harvard Univer ity Project on ocial learning in the management of global environmental ri k (Committee for Re earch on Global Environmental Change)

62,400

Henry Luce Foundation Support for a graduate training program on neglected topic in Southeast A ian tudie (Joint Committee on South A ia)

$250,000

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Project on environmentali m and the poor (Joint Committee on Latin American Studie ) A ubgrant i ued by the Foundation' Re earch Network on Succe ful Midlife Development, to conduct pilot tudie of midlife experience among the racial and ethnic communitie of New York City. Project title: "Diversity in Midlife Development"

$31 ,000

$50,000

German Marshall Fund of the United States Support for a tudy of the effect of recent change in Europe on European tudie in the United State (Joint Committee on We tern Europe)

$40,000

John Merck Foundation Support for re earch on population growth and environmental problem (Committee for Re earch on Global Environmental Change)

$20,000

National Endowment for the Humanities • Doe not include " in kind" gran ; that i. uppon of travel. hotel. conference. and imilar expense received by Council committee in the fonn of direct payments by other organization . JUNE/SEPTEMBER

1992

Project on modem Sou thea t A ian literature (Joint Committee on Sou thea t A ia)

$196,000 ITEMS/61


National Science Foundation Continued support for research on global environmental change (Committee for Research on Global Environmental Change) Pew Charitable Trusts Support for tudie of proce e of economic liberalization and democratization (Joint Committee on Latin American Studie and the Joint Committee on the Soviet Union and It Succe or State ) Christopher Reynolds Foundation Support for a Cambodian to attend Berea College (Joint Committee on Southeast A ia) Rockefeller Foundation Continued upport for the tudy of the undercla (Committee for Re earch on the Urban Underclas ) Support for re earch on the relation hip between population growth and the quality of environment (Committee for Re earch on Global Environmental Change) Multiyear program to mobilize the academic community for interdi ciplinary research on the

62 \ ITEMS

$102,084

$200 ,000

$7,750

$500,000

$23,610

underclas (Committee for Research on the Urban Underclas ) $625,000 Russell Sage Foundation Support for a working group on communitie and neighborhood , family proce s, and individual development (Committee for Re earch on the Urban Underclas ) 190,290 Support for a meeting on public use of microdata ample from the 1990 cen u (Committee for Research on the Urban Undercla ) $10,000 Toyota Foundation Support for the participation of a Japanese researcher at meeting of the Joint Committee on Southea t A ia $13,268 United Nations Project LINK (Committee on Economic Stability and Growth) $90,000 U.S. Department of State Continued program upport (Joint Committee on the Soviet Union and It Succe or State) $2,029,000 United States Institute of Peace Support for project on liberalization and democratic con olidation (Joint Committee on Latin American Studie ) 30,000 Total $11.771,374

VOLUME

46. NUMBER 2/3


SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL 60S THIRD AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY 10lS8 (212) 661-0280

FAX (212) 370-7896

11r~ Council was incorporat~d in th~ Stat~ of JIIinois , D~c~m1Nr 27, 1924, for th~ purpos~ of advancing r~uarch in th~ social sci~nc~s . Nongov~rnm~ntal int~rdisciplinary in natur~ , th~ Council appoints committus of scholars which suk to achi~v~ th~ Council's purpos~ through tM g~Mration of n~w id~as th~ training of scholars. ~ activiti~s of th~ Council are support~d primarily by grants from privat~ foundations and gov~rn~nt ag~nci~s .

and and

Dirutors, 1991- 92: PAUL B. BALTES, Max Planck [n titute for Human Development and Education (Berlin); LAwllE CE D. B080, University of California, Lo Angeles; ROBERT M. COEN, Northwe tern University; DAVID L. FEATHERMAN, Social Science Research Council; ALBERT FISHWW, University of California, Berkeley; BARBARA HEY S, New York University; NAGAYO HOMMA, Tokyo Woman's Chri tian University; DAVID MAG USSO , Stockholm University; EMILY MARTI , The John Hopkin Universily; JOEL SHERZER, University of Texas, Au lin; BURTO H. SI GER, Yale University; MARTA TIE DA , University of Chicago; DAVID WARD, University of Wiscon in, Madison; ROBERT B. :lAJONC, University of Michigan. OjfiCtrS and Staff: DAVID L. FEATHERMA ,Pr~sid~nt; STA LEY J. HEGI BOTHAM, Viu Pr~sid~nt; Ro ALD J. PELECK, Viu Pr~sid~nt for Financ~ ; GLORJA

KJRCHHEIMER , Editor; DoRJ E SI OCCHI , Human R~souru Dirutor; BARBARA A. BIA CO, SUSA BRO so ,GREG BROOKS, MARy-LEA Cox , CARY FRA ER, KATE FRIESON, MARTHA A. GEPHART, LoRJ HELE E GRONI H, ERJC HERSH BERG, STEVEN HEYDEMAN ,ROBERT T. HUBER, FRA K KE EL, MIMI M. KIM, DAVID C. MAJOR, FtLix V. MATOS RODRfGUEZ, MARY BYR EM Do ELL, JOH H. MOLLE KOPF, ALICE O'Co NOR , WWDZIMIERZ OKRA A, ELLE PEIlECMA ,M. PRJSCILLA STONE, TOBY ALICE VOLKMA , KE TO W. WORCESTER.

The Social Science Research Council upports the program of the Commi ion on Preservation and Acce and i repre nted on the National Advisory Council on Pre rvation. The paper used in !hi publicalion meets the minimum requiremen of American National Standard for [nformalion Science -Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Material . ANSI Z39.48-1984. The infinity ymbol placed in a circle indicate compliance wi!h!hi tandard.

300

Social Science Research Council 605 Third Avenue New York, NY 10158

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64\ ITEMS

ISSN

0049-0903

VOLUM E

46,

NUMBER

213

Items Vol. 46 No. 2-3 (1992)  
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