Page 1

SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL

VOLUME 26 . NUMBER 3 . SEPTEMBER 1972 230 PARK AVENUE路 NEW YORK, N.Y. 10017

NEW SSRC CENTER FOR COORDINATION OF RESEARCH ON SOCIAL INDICATORS OPENS IN WASHINGTON A NEW Social Science Research Council program in the field of social indicators is to be inaugurated with the opening in Washington, D.C. on September 15, 1972 of the Center for Coordination of Research on Social Indicators. The Center's purpose is to contribute to the development of a broad range of indicators of social change, in response to demands from both social science and policy communities over the past decade. Its role is to help organize the process by which this objective may be achieved. The Center will seek to stimulate, facilitate, and guide research on social indicators by providing a locus and source of information on research under way, and by encouraging communication among and between researchers and the broad constituency that has need for their output. The task is to encourage the application of the best social science methods to the problems of social indicators and to bring developments of potential significance to the attention of policy planners who can make use of them and statistical agencies that could assume responsibility for their regular production and analysis. The staff of the Center will be directed by Robert Parke, Jr. and will be responsible to an SSRC Advisory and Planning Committee on Social Indicators. Otis Dudley Duncan will serve as chairman of the committee; other members will be announced. The Center is funded by a grant to the Council from the National Science Foundation. A Washington location was selected by President Eleanor Sheldon in order to facilitate communication between the Center and the federal statistical and other agencies that form a considerable part of the constitu-

ency for social indicators, and agencies that support research in the social indicators field. In the Center's first year the staff will establish personal contacts with individual scholars, groups, and institutes that are conducting research related to social indicators. These contacts, national and international, are expected to provide the basis for continuing cooperation and communication, the procurement of relevant documents, and the interchange of proposals, plans, and thoughts about future activities. Published and unpublished documents describing past research and present projects will be assembled and catalogued; a periodic newsletter will be issued on current and prospective research. Concurrently, committee members, staff, and outside consultants will plan and conduct conferences on future research developments. Mr. Parke, the Center's Director, is a social statistician and demographer. He was Deputy Director of the National Commission on Population Growth and the American Future, which last spring completed a twoyear program of research and recommendations and issued its final report to President Nixon and the Congress. The Commission's report, Population and the American Future} has received wide acclaim as a comprehensive and well-written social science analysis of the implications of population change in the United States. Prior to his work for the Population Commission, Mr. Parke was a statistician in the Bureau of the Census. He served for ten years in the Bureau's Population Division, where he was responsible for the statistical program on marriage and the family and related topics, and subsequently served as a Bureau Program Planning

25


Officer. Mr. Parke has taught sociology at Muhlenberg College and Brown University. He received the M.A. degree in sociology from Columbia University, and has published several research reports on changes in marriage and the family in the United States.

Communications may be directed to Robert Parke, Jr., Director, SSRC Center for Coordination of Research on Social Indicators, 1785 Massachusetts Avenue, N .W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Telephone: 202-6678884.

STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODELS by Arthur S. Goldberger¡ A CONFERENCE on Structural Equation Models, sponsored by the Social Science Research Council, was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on November 12-16, 1970. Seventeen social scientists attended the five-day meeting, which was cosponsored by the University's Social Systems Research Institute. 1 The background of the conference may be sketched as follows: In economics and educational psychology, formal stochastic models had long been used to analyze behavior. Specifically, "simultaneous equation models" were prominent in econometrics, and "factor analysis models" were prominent in psychometrics. The parallel development in sociology was of more recent origin and came in the form of "path analysis models." Related work had begun in political science as well. The general approach had already been used in studies of macroeconomic policy formation, intergenerational occupational mobility, racial discrimination in employment and earnings, scholastic achievement, congressional voting behavior, evaluation of compensatory education programs, and many others. The relevant methodological literature referred not only to simultaneous equations, factor analysis, and path analysis, but also to "linear causal models," "multitrait-multimethod matrices," "cross-lagged panel-correlations," "dependence analysis," "test-score theory," etc. Behind the diversity of subject matter and terminology, several common elements could be discerned. One • The author is Professor of Economics, and Research Associate. Social Systems Research Institute. University of Wisconsin-Madison. He developed the plans for the conference on which he reports here. after his participation in an exploratory conference on causal analysis. held by the Council on January 9-10. 1970. 1 In addition to the author the attendants were: Hayward R. Alker. Jr. (political science). Massachusetts Institute of Technology; George Bohrnstedt (sociology). University of Minnesota; Herbert Costner (sociology). University of Washington; Otis Dudley Duncan (sociology). University of Michigan; Zvi Griliches (economics). Harvard University; Robert M. Hauser (sociology). University of Wisconsin-Madison: Neil W. Henry (sociology). Cornell University; John E. Jackson (political Science). Harvard University; Karl G. Joreskog (statistics). Educational Testing Service; David A. Kenny (psychology). Northwestern University; Kenneth C. Land (sociology). Russell Sage Foundation: Marc Nerlove (economics). University of Chicago; Karl Schuessler (sociology). Indiana University; Henri Theil (economics and business). University of Chicago; David E. Wiley (education). University of Chicago; Donald S. Shoup attended as a representative of the Council.

26

related to nonexperimental data: the absence of laboratory conditions appeared to demand statistical procedures which could substitute for conventional experimental controls. A second related to latent variables: many of the models contained hypothetical constructs which, while not directly observed, had operational implications for relationships among observable variables. A third related to systems: the models were typically built up of several, or many, equations which interact together. With a little effort, it could be seen that all the approaches might be subsumed under the rubric of "causal," or (equivalently) "structural equation," models on the understanding that a structural equation is one which is intended to depict a direct causal link rather than a mere empirical association. The statistical tools required to identify and estimate structural equations were based upon, but considerably more sophisticated than, the familiar techniques of analysis of variance and multiple regression. This, in broad measure, is the picture that emerged in discussions at an exploratory session on causal analysis held in January 1970 at the Council's New York office. The time seemed ripe for a consolidation of the work that had been done within the various disciplines and for a clarification of the outstanding problems. The Council thereupon invited a group actively engaged in research to participate in a more intensive Conference on Structural Equation Models. Each participant prepared a report on his current work, methodological or empirical, with structural equation models. Most of the papers were prepared and distributed in advance of the conference. Each paper was presented, and discussed critically, in an hour-anda-half session during the conference. Throughout the discussions it was apparent that researchers from different disciplines were concerned with very similar analytical problems, were tackling them in the same general spirit, and had some acquaintance with the methodological literature of other disciplines. At the same time it was clear that each of the participants was gaining new insights, modes of analysis, and flexibility in the formulation of models by giving attention to the work of others. VOLUME

26.

NUMBER

3


A fairly large number of problem areas were worked through during the conference. Many of the papers provided significant contributions at the frontier of structural equation model-building. A selective summary may serve to indicate this quality. Identification. Characteristically, a causal model is formulated in terms of "structural parameters" which are supposed to generate the probability distribution of observable variables. Before attempting to estimate the structural parameters from a single finite sample of observations, it is essential to determine whether they could be estimated from an infinitely large sample of observations-i.e., whether the structural parameters are "identified" in terms of the population probability distribution. If they are not, then the single sample cannot possibly provide enough information to estimate the parameters. Econometricians have worked out the rules for identification in simultaneous equation models, and psychometricians have worked out the rules for identification in factor analysis models. At the conference, progress was made toward developing the rules for identification in models that incorporate both simultaneity and hypothetical constructs. Also, some detailed results were provided for identification in dynamic models with latent variables. Estimation. An enormous variety of procedures have been developed for estimation of the parameters of structural models. The procedures span a wide range of models, statistical properties, and computational convenience, but leave some cases untouched. At the conference new results were reported on estimation for simultaneous equation models with unobservable variables. This opens up possibilities for handling empirical situations in which accurate measurement is unattainable. Also, a useful procedure was presented for dealing with macroeconometric models based on short time series. Model Revision. The statistical literature discusses significance tests in great detail, but offers surprisingly little guidance to researchers who wish to revise-rather than simply accept or reject-their causal hypotheses in the light of test results. Participants at the conference had new ideas on the way that conventional tests could be used as clues to defects in a structural model, and thus as guides to model revision. New results on discriminating among competing hypotheses in dynamic models were also reported. Socioeconomic Achievement. The causal relationships among family background, education, occupation, and income have received considerable attention on the part of sociologists and economists. Drawing on fresh bodies of data and new estimation techniques, several participants developed empirical models of these aspects of SEPTEMBER

1972

socioeconomic achievement. The models focused variously on motivation, perceptions, and ability as hypothetical constructs, whose implications for observable variables could be traced out only in the context of a carefully specified structural model. Although the range of methodological and substantive topics covered was quite wide, the scope of the conference was, in a sense, narrowly limited. Attention was confined to situations in which fairly well-developed causal theories are available and in which the objective of the empirical research is to confront the theories with data. Participants with diverse backgrounds worked with the same general principles of classical statistical inference and more specifically with the same general class of linear stochastic models. A critique of this conventional wisdom was presented, to the effect that the class of models was too restrictive to deal with the nonlinearities and goal-determined responses of some social processes. Several other issues provoked little controversy. One of these concerned standardization of variables. In some fields, notably sociology, the common practice is to standardize the observations by adjusting them to provide zero means and unit variances. Once this is done, the correlation coefficients become the primary input to regression-type analyses. In other fields, notably economics, one retains the data in raw form and thus works with the variances and covariances rather than correlation coefficients. While these conflicting practices may create confusion in communicating results, no issue of principle is involved. The form of the datastandardized or unstandardized-is a matter of convention, at least as far as the analysis of a single body of data is concerned. Parameter estimates obtained with standardized data can be translated into those that would have been obtained with unstandardized data, and vice versa. At the conference there was also a consensus (perhaps not unanimous) that unstandardized results are more likely to be comparable across different samples. The second such issue concerned path analysis as a distinct statistical procedure. The technique of path analysis, developed over 50 years ago by the geneticist Sewall Wright, has been widely adopted by sociological model-builders. It features a diagrammatic display of the structural equations from which estimating equations can be read off in accordance with certain rules set out by Wright. This approach has certain clear advantages in terms of compact representation of the assumptions and directions of causality in a structural equation model. Furthermore, the use of path analysis has facilitated the introduction of latent variables into structural models. It is now clear, however. tliat the

27


models handled graphically in path analysis can be handled algebraically in the framework of stochastic linear models. Indeed, the algebraic treatment is required so that one can fully exploit statistical techniques. Consequently, path analysis is best viewed as a heuristic aid, rather than as a distinct procedure for statistical inference. In a similar vein it was found that the problems posed in the cross-lagged panel correlation approach yielded to rigorous analysis with linear models. Over the course of the past year-and-a-half, the papers have been thoroughly reworked in response to discussion at the conference and to editorial comments. The finished manuscript has just been submitted to Seminar Press, and publication of Structural Equation Models in the Social Sciences: Proceedings of a Conference, edited by Arthur S. Goldberger and Otis Dudley Duncan, is scheduled for the spring of 1973. The table of contents follows: PREFACE, Henry W. Riecken STRUCIURAL EQUATION MODELS-AN OVERVIEW, Arthur S. Goldberger IDENTIFICATION, PARAMETER ESTIMATION, AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING IN RECURSIVE SOCIOLOGICAL MODELS, Kenneth C. Land

MEASUREMENT MODELS FOR CONTINUOUS AND DISCRETE VARIABLES, Neil W. Henry THE IDENTIFICATION PROBLEM FOR STRUCIURAL EQUATION MODELS WITH UNMEASURED VARIABLES, David E. Wiley A GENERAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING A LINEAR STRUCIURAL EQUATION SYSTEM, Karl G. Joreskog A SIMPLE MODIFICATION OF THE TWO-STAGE LEAST-SQUARES PROCEDURE FOR UNDERSIZED SAMPLES, Henri Theil EFFICIENT ESTIMATION IN OVERIDENTIFIED MODELS-AN INTERPRETIVE ANALYSIS, Arthur S. Goldberger CROSS-LAGGED AND SYNCHRONOUS COMMON FACTORS IN PANEL DATA, David A. Kenny DIAGNOSING INDICATOR ILLS IN MULTIPLE INDICATOR MODELS, Herbert Costner and Ronald Schoenberg RATIO VARIABLES AND PATH MODELS, Karl Schuessler PSYCHOLOGICAL AND CULTURAL FACIORS IN THE PROCESS OF OCCUPATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT, Otis Dudley Duncan and David L. Featherman DISAGGREGATING A SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT, Robert M. Hauser EDUCATION, INCOME, AND ABIUTY, Zvi Griliche5 and William Mason LoVE AND LIFE BETWEEN THE CENSUSES, Marc Nerlove and T. Paul Schultz SENATE VOTING-PROBLEMS OF SCAUNG AND FUNCIIONAL FORM, John E. Jackson

USES OF COMPUTER SIMULATION IN HUMAN POPULATION STUDIES: A CONFERENCE REPORT by Bennett Dyke and Jean W. MacCluer ,..

OVER the past decade, a small but growing number of workers in anthropology, demography, and human population genetics have been developing computer simulation models of human populations. Although such models have been used for diverse purposes, certain common characteristics are evident: social, demographic, and biological parameters and their interactions are implicit in most models; and no matter what the purpose of the simulation, there appears to have developed a remarkable similarity in the computer programs and basic decision techniques involved. • The authors are Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Research Associate in Anthropology, respectively, at Pennsylvania State University. The conference reported on here was organized by them and they are preparing the proceedings for publication. It was held at the University on June 12-14, 1972, with support granted to the Social Science Research Council by the Population Council and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (Center for Population Research). The conference was held under the auspices of the Committee on Biological Bases of Social Behavior, whose members are: David C. Glass, University of Texas at Austin (chairman); Paul T. Baker, Pennsylvania State University; Peter B. Dews, Harvard University; Theodosius Dobzhansky, University of California, Davis; Daniel X. Freedman, University of Chicago; Gardner Lindzey, Harvard University; Gerald E. McClearn, University of Colorado; Stanley Schachter, Columbia University; Richard F. Thompson, University of California, Irvine; staff, David Jenness.

28

Simulation models are usually so complex that investigators cannot publish their techniques in detail, but it has become apparent from conversations at professional meetings and from reading between the lines of published results that a number of similar (perhaps identical) problems have been encountered and either independently solved or dismissed at the expense of considerable duplicated time and effort. Because of the small number of workers using simulation in human population studies and their varied professional specialties, it has been difficult to exchange useful information at conferences and at meetings of the larger associations. For example, even within anthropology, those doing simulation studies of kinship and of gene flow may not be aware of each other's work. The conference was intended to provide a critical audience for the discussion of simulation models and their results, and to disseminate information otherwise difficult to transmit. 1 1 Participants in the conference, in addition to the organizers, were: John C. Barrett, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; Alice M. Brues, University of Colorado; Alice S. Clague, Columbia University; Frank Godley, National Center for Health Statistics; Eugene A. Hammel, University of California, Berkeley; Gerhard J. Hanneman, University of Connecticut; Ivar Heuch, and John C. Holland, Uni-

VOLUME 26, NUMBER S


Most of these models are of the "microsimulation" type-that is, decisions about life-cycle events are made for each individual in the artificial population, as distinct from "macrosimulation" where decisions are made for aggregates. Decision making is customarily done by a Monte Carlo process: a random number is generated by the computer and is compared with a given probability distribution in order to determine the occurrence or nonoccurrence of an event. In the microsimulation case, for example, a decision as to whether a pregnancy will terminate with the birth of a boy or a girl can be made simply by generating a random number between zero and one; if the number is less than 0.5 (assuming a sex ratio equal at birth) the child will be a girl, if greater than 0.5, it will be a boy. This type of decision making can be done for any kind of event-birth, marriage, death, etc.-throughout the life of the individual, a new random number being generated each time an independent decision is to be made. Limits on numbers of individuals in a population for which life路cycle events can be simulated are imposed by the size and speed of present computers, and to a lesser extent by the ingenuity of the programmer. Although simulation models do not give as elegant solutions as some analytical techniques used in the study of social, demographic, and genetic systems, they have certain advantages. Extreme oversimplification can be avoided, since a large number of parameters can be specified in the computer program. Moreover, combined results of repeated simulation trials can give distributions of various population measures without requiring difficult mathematical solutions. To the extent that computer models can provide analogues of those processes or phenomena in which the investigator is interested, simulation offers the opportunity of using what amounts to experimental methods on human populations. The sessions were divided about equally between discussions of method and technique and the presentaversity of Michigan; Daniel G. Horvitz, Research Triangle Institute, N.C.; Nancy Howell-Lee, Princeton University; David Hutchinson, University of Califomia, Berkeley; Hannes Hyrenius, University of Gothenburg; Albert Jacquard, Institute National d'Etudes Demographiques, Paris; Florence Koons, National Center for Health Statistics; Peter Kunstadter, University of Hawaii; Henri Uridon, Institute National d'Etudes Demographiques, Paris; Francis H. F. Li, University of Michigan; Jane A. Menken, Princeton University; Kenneth Morgan, University of New Mexico; Newton E. Morton, University of Hawaii; James Pick, University of Califomia, Irvine; Jeanne Clare Ridley, Columbia University; David Rossmann, University of Michigan; James Sakoda, Brown University; William J. Schull, University of Texas at Houston; B. V. Shah, Research Triangle Institute, N.C.; Mark Skolnick, Stanford University; Dean O. Smith, University of Gothenburg; Alexa M. Sorant, University of North Carolina; William M. Stiteler, Pennsyl. vania State University; Roy C. Treadway, Population Council; Kenneth W. Wachter, University of Oxford; Anthony V. Williams, and F. Paul Wyman, Pennsylvania State University. SEPTEMBER

1972

tion of contributed papers. The conference opened with general comments on the uses and limitations of simulation by MacCluer, who reviewed the types of problems that can be investigated using simulation, and by John C. Holland, who discussed a number of methodological difficulties often encountered in applying simulation to research problems. The first session of contributed papers, chaired by Eugene A. Hammel, was devoted to anthropology and social systems. Hammel and David Hutchinson presented the results of their experiments with the effect of incest and exogamy rules on population growth. Kenneth Morgan gave a detailed statistical analysis of a set of simulation runs based on Ramah Navaho population structure. Dyke discussed the use of simulation in estimating changing fertility rates over a 50-year period in a Caribbean isolate. Nancy Howell-Lee outlined the difficulties of making demographic measures of primitive populations, and suggested where simulation might be used for such purposes. Anthony V. Williams presented the results of a simulation study of urban emergency services; and Gerhard J. Hanneman, an application of a simulation model to the spread of information to small cliques in a peasant society. In a session on simulation methodology B. V. Shah, the chairman, contrasted simulation with analytic solutions, in terms of time, difficulty, and cost. Peter Kunstadter pointed out that in using simulation models, the experimenter is constantly confronted with the question of the validity of his assumptions about population and social structure, and that these assumptions are critical for meaningful results. Hannes Hyrenius chaired a session of contributed papers on the uses of simulation in demographic research. He reviewed the experience of the Gothenburg group with fertility and labor force models. Henri Leridon presented research by Albert Jacquard and Leridon on the use of simulation to determine the degree of complexity necessary to represent demographic phenomena with sufficient accuracy. Daniel G. Horvitz gave the results of an evaluation made by Horvitz, A. V. Rao, R. C. Bhavsar, and J. R. Batts of a number of family planning programs for India, using the North Carolina simulation program, POPSIM; Alexa M. Sorant presented a modification of POPSIM made by Peter A. Lachenbruch, Mindel C. Sheps, and Sorant, which can be used to show the effects of such problems as misreporting of dates in the estimation of fertility. Jeanne Clare Ridley and Alice Clague discussed the use of simulation in assessing alternative methods of estimating births averted by family planning. John C. Barrett showed, both by simulation and analytically, how the introduction of contraception in a

29


population causes rapidly damped oscillations in subsequent fertility rates. Kenneth W. Wachter discussed the use of simulation in the historical demography of seventeenth century England; and James Pick presented a model of national migration developed by Arthur Boughey and Pick. In a session on simulation languages. random number generation. and Monte Carlo techniques. William M. Stiteler demonstrated the generation of statistical distributions for simulation purposes. and James M. Sakoda presented the application of DYSTAL, a series of FORTRAN subprograms. to computer simulation. F. Paul Wyman compared the advantages of two special-purpose simulation languages, SIMSCRIPT and DYNAMO. The final session, devoted to genetics and adaptive systems, was chaired by William J. Schull. Alice M. Brues presented the results of a simulation of geographical distribution of gene frequencies as the result of differential rates of gene flow and selection. Newton E. Morton outlined a model of the genetic structure of a population using the analysis of kinship; and David Rossmann reported on his work with Schull using a simulation model to evaluate the effect of recessive lethal mutations on the birth interval. Holland showed the effect on rates of evolution, when coadapted linkage groups, as opposed to single genetic loci, are taken into

account. Mark H. Skolnick described the results of a simulation program developed with C. Cannings that can be used to investigate the effect of mating systems on genetic and demographic structure. MacCluer showed the effects of incest avoidance on various genetic and demographic measures in model populations. Francis H. F. Li presented the results of his simulation experiments on the survival of single mutant genes. Most investigators working in these fields are careful to incorporate social, demographic, and biological parameters in their models, and are aware of the importance of interactions of these factors. It was apparent that considerable similarity exists in the basic methodology of the models presented at the conference. N onetheless, the variety of problems to which simulation has been applied and the diversity of interests of the investigators had been underestimated by most of the partici pants. The long time required to develop programs and the considerable computer expense involved in such studies may eventually be overcome with special simulation languages and a new generation of computer hardware. However, even at this point in the state of the art, rich possibilities for the understanding of human population structure, whether the focus be social, demographic, or biological, are beginning to be realized.

PERSONNEL COUNCIL STAFF: NORMAN MANN APPOINTED BUSINESS MANAGER AND ASSISTANT TREASURER Norman Mann joined the Council on July 17, 1972 in a new staff position, that of Business Manager, with responsibili ty for the financial and business affairs of the Council, and for office management and personnel. Mr. Mann came to the Council from the Center for Urban Education, New York City, where he had been Business Manager and Controller for the past seven years. He had previously been associated with Fromm & Sichel, Inc., as Assistant to the Treasurer and Chief Accountant; and with the Madison Glue Corporation as Accountant and Assistant to the Executive Vice-President. Mr. Mann received the B.B.A. degree in accounting from the School of Business, City College, City University of New York, where he also did graduate work in management. As Warrant Officer, United States Army, 1942-46, he was Personnel Officer of an Engineer Combat Battalion, and a Finance Officer (recipient of the Bronze Star). As Assistant Treasurer of the Council Mr. Mann succeeds Donald S. Shoup, who resigned from the staff as of June 30, 1972 to become president and owner of Winnipesaukee Aviation, Boston, Massachusetts and Laconia, New Hampshire.

80

GRANTS FOR COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH ON THE NEAR AND MIDDLE EAST The Joint Committee on the Near and Middle East, sponsored with the American Council of Learned Societies-Marvin Zonis (chairman), Robert McC. Adams, Hamid Algar, Paul Ward English, Muhsin S. Mahdi, and I. William Zartman-at its meeting on May 18-19 made the following awards under its new program announced in Items, December 1971: Daniel Crecelius, Associate Professor of History, California State College at Los Angeles, and Abdul-Karim Rafeq, Associate Professor of History, University of Damascus, Syria, for a comparative study in Europe, Cairo, and Istanbul of the Ulama of Cairo and Damascus in the eighteenth century William A. Gamson, Professor of Sociology, University of Michigan, and Ephraim Yuchtman, Senior Lecturer in Sociology, Tel Aviv University, for research in Israel on social control of the police in Israeli society Harv~y E.. Goldberg, Associate.Professor of Anthropology, Umverslty of Iowa, and HaIm Blanc, Professor of Linguistics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, for research in Israel on the language and culture of Tripolitanian Jews residing in Israel _ Clement Moore Henry, Visiting Associate Professor of Political Science, American University in Cairo, and VOLU\JE

26.

NUMBER

3


A. K. Abu-Akeel, Lecturer in Engineering, Ain Shams University, Cairo, for research in Cairo on contributions of engineering education in Egypt to development _of research and manpower capabilities Nicholas S. Hopkins, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, New York University, and Abdelkader Zghal, Head, Sociology Section, Center for Economic and Social Research, University of Tunis, for a comparative study in Tunisia of modernization in two rural communities in their national context FOREIGN AREA FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM In the tenth year of administration of the Foreign Area Fellowship Program by the Social Science Research Council and American Council of Learned Societies, fellowships have been awarded for study of five major world areas, and in Latin America and the Caribbean area for research training and internships as well. As of August 1, the 222 appointments listed below had been accepted for 1972-73 (a few additional appointments are expected): Africa and the Near East

The awards were recommended by the National Screening Committee-L. Carl Brown, Princeton University; Carl K. Eicher, Michigan State University; Thomas Naff, University of Pennsylvania; William A. Shack, University of California, Berkeley; and Richard L. Sklar, University of California, Los Angeles-which met on January 21 and February 25. It had been assisted by a Preliminary Screening Committee-Nicholas S. Hopkins, New York University, and Inez Smith Reid, Brooklyn College. John Clark, Ph.D. candidate in geography, University of Michigan, for preparation of a dissertation on Turkish Cologne: an urban geography of acculturation (renewal) Bridget Connelly, Ph.D. candidate in folk literature, University of California, Berkeley, for intensive Tunisian Arabic language training and research in Tunisia on oral narrative performances in North Africa Stephen Ettinger, Ph.D. candidate in economics, University of Michigan, for preparation of a dissertation on economic relations of Botswana, Lesotho, and Swaziland with South Africa (renewal) J ames Freedman, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Princeton University, for preparation of a dissertation on the evolution of the cult of Nyabingi and the study of oral history in Northern Rwanda (renewal) Raymond Ganga, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Los Angeles, for research in Sierre Leone on effects of the Mande and Fulani-derived expansion into northern Sierre Leone during the nineteenth century Mary-Jo Good, Ph.D. candidate in sociology and regional studies, Harvard University, for research in Turkey or Iran on attitudes of women toward family planning programs Andrew Gould, Ph.D. candidate in _history, University of California, Los Angeles, for preparation of a dissertation on pashas and brigands: Ottoman provincial reSEPTEMBER

1972

form and its impact on the nomads of Southern Anatolia, 1865-75 (renewal) Bruce Haight, Ph.D. candidate in history, Northwestern University, for research in Ghana and England on the political history of the Dyula Muslims of Bole, 18601920 Robert Hill, Ph.D. candidate in sociology and demography, Princeton University, for preparation of a dissertation on urbanization and migration in Iran (renewal) Renata Holod-Tretiak, Ph.D. candidate in fine arts, Harvard University, for preparation of a dissertation on regional architecture and urbanism: Yasd in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries (renewal) Grover Hudson, Ph.D. candidate in linguistics, University of California, Los Angeles, for research in Ethiopia on a descriptive, comparative, and historical phonology of the Sidamo languages of Eastern Cushitic Katherine Johnson, Ph.D. candidate in history, Princeton University, for preparation of a dissertation on institutional change in Lagos, 1950-70 (renewal) Michael Kutilek, Ph.D. candidate in ecology, Michigan State University, for research in Kenya on population dynamics of waterbucks in Lake Nakuru National Park Richard Macken, Ph.D. candidate in Near East studies, Princeton University, for preparation of a dissertation on the indigenous reaction to the French Protectorate in Tunisia, 1881-1900 (renewal) Pat McNaughton, Ph.D. candidate in history of art, Yale University, for research in Mali on the origins, development, and achievement of the blacksmiths of Koa Ronald Mlotek, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Pittsburgh, for research in Israel on national identities in conflict and transition: from Americans to Israelis Carrie Moore, Ph.D. candidate in African literature, Indiana University, for research in France and Senegal on social realism in the works of Sembene Ousmane Martha Mundy, Ph.D. candidate in geography, Columbia University, for research in Yemen on the urban geography of Sanaa Bridget o 'Laughlin, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Yale University, for preparation of a dissertation on the distribution of services among the Mbum: mechanisms of exchange in a nonmarket economy (renewal) Donald Quataert, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Los Angeles, for lreparation of a dissertation on agrarian reform an the peasantry: Ottoman agriculture, 1876-1909 (renewal) Harry Reed, Ph.D. candidate in history, Michigan State University, for Luganda language training and research in Uganda on its cotton industry, 1918-39 Cyprian Rowe, Ph.D. candidate in English/African literature, Howard University, for preparation of a dissertation in Ghana on the aesthetic continuity and change in Ghanaian literature (renewal) Linda Schatkowski, Ph.D. candidate in oriental studies, University of Oxford, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Damascus on the role of the notables in social and political change in late nineteenth-century Syria (renewal) Philip Shea, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Wlsconsin, for preparation of a dissertation on the 31


dyeing industry in Kano Emirate in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (renewal) Elinor Sigwalt, Ph.D. candidate in cultural anthropology, University of Wisconsin, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Zaire and the United States on the urbanization of the Shi (renewal) Thomas Spear, Ph.D. ca~didate in history, University. of Wisconsin, for completIOn of research and preparatIOn of a dissertation in Kenya and the United States on a precolonial history of the Mijikenda (renewal) Carole Steere, Ph.D. candidate in social anthropology, Harvard University, for research in Tunisia on sociocultural variables affecting women's attitudes toward family planning in an urban community Allen Streicker, Ph.D. candidate in history, Northwestern University, for Arabic language training at Portland State University and research in France and French West Africa on authority and resistance in Gwandu: Zaberma responses to aggression Laura Tanna, Ph.D. candidate in African languages and literature, University of Wisconsin, for a comparative analysis in Uganda and Kenya of Swahili and Baganda oral narrative traditions J. Michael Turner, Ph.D. candidate in African studies, Boston University, for completion of research .in Dah?mey on the impact of former slaves from BahIa, Brazll on the social, political, and economic life of Dahomey during the nineteenth century (renewal) Andy Wachtel, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Northwestern University, for research in Uganda on a model of urbanism in a city undergoing industrialization Terry Walz, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for completion of research in Egypt on its relations with Central Africa in modern times, with particular reference to trade and pilgrimage patterns (renewal) S. Linn Williams, J.D. in international law and international relations, U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Judicial District, Texas, for research at the London School of Oriental and African Studies and study at the American University in Beirut, University of Alexandria, and Hebrew National University of international legal concepts of conflict resolution George Wright, Ph.D. candidate in economics, University of Michigan, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Iran and the United States on disparities in regional economic development of Iran (renewal) East, South, and Southeast Asia P1'Ogram

The awards were recommended by the National Screening Committee-Pauline Kolenda, University of Houston; Gerald S. Maryanov, Northern Illinois University; John W. Mellor, Cornell University; Barry M. Richman, University of California, Los Angeles; and H. Paul Varley, Columbia University-which met on February 4 and March 17. It had been assisted by a Preliminary Screening CommitteeThomas P. Bernstein, Yale University; Edwin Eames, Bernard M. Baruch College, City University of New York; Leonard H. D. Gordon, Purdue University; James T. Siegel, Cornell University; John Singleton, University of Pittsburgh; and A. Russell Stevenson, Agricultural Development Council. 32

East Asia Studies

Guy Alitto, Ph.D. candidate in history and Far Eastern languages, Harvard University, for completion of research and preparation .of a dissert~tion in Taiwa~ and the United States on LIang Shu-Mmg and the Chinese rural reconstruction movement (renewal) Jonathan Best, Ph.D. candidate in East Asian languages and cultural history, Harvard. University! for c?mp~e足 tion of research and preparation of a dIssertatIOn m Japan and the United States on Buddhism in Paekche: a cultural approach to early Korean history (renewal) Laurence Bresler, Ph.D. candidate in Japanese literature and cultural history, Columbia University, for research in Japan on Asai Ryoi: the transition from medieval to realistic fiction Ming Chan, Ph.D. candidate in modern Chinese histol1:' Stanford University, for research in Hong Kong, TaIwan, and London on labor and empire: the Chinese labor movement in the Canton Delta, 1831-1927 Parks Coble, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Illinois for research in Taiwan on the Shanghai commerciai, financial, and industrial elite and the Kuomintang, 1925-35 Leslie Collins Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Yale University, for ~ompletion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Taiwan and the United States on the feminist movement in China since 1900 (renewal) Michael Finegan, Ph.D. candidate in Chinese history, University of Chicago, for research in Japan on cities in Sung China Gary Glick, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for research in Hong Kong and Taiwan on the theory and practice of Chu Chin-hsin in the early Chinese Nationalist Revolution Ja Hyun Haboush, Ph.D. candidate in East Asian languages and cultures, Columbia University, for research in Korea on Hanjungnok: the incident of Prince Sado and the intellectual and social milieu of eighteenthcentury Korea Kenneth Lieberthal, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Columbia University, for preparation of a dissertation on the Communist takeover of Tientsin, 1949-53 (renewal) Margaret Lock, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for research in Japan on the interaction of folk and modern medicine in urban Japan Terry E. MacDougall, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Yale University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Japan and the United States on the emergence of local multiparty systems in Japan (renewal) S. Garrett McDowell, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Berkeley, for intensive Chinese language training and research in Taiwan and Hong Kong on administration and educational reforms in China during the Cultural Revolution (1965-70) Mary Neill, Ph.D. candidate in history of art, Yale University, for research in Taiwan and Japan on the painting and poetry of Fang Ts'ung-i (1301-72) Celia Riely, Ph.D. candidate in Far Eastern art, Harvard UniverSIty, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in lapan and the United States on the art and influence 0 Tung Ch'i-ch'ang (1555-1636) (renewal) VOLUME

26,

NUMBER

3


Paul Ropp, Ph.D. candidate in intellectual history, University of Michigan, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Taiwan and the United States on early Ch'ing society and its critics: the life and times of Wu Ching-tzu (1701-54) (renewal) William Shaw, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for research in Korea on the criminal process in its early modem period Susan Shirk, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Hong Kong and the United States on Chinese Communist university education (renewal) George Silver, Ph.D. candidate in history, Yale University, for completion of research and lreparation of a dissertation in Japan and the Unite States on nationalist thought in Japan (renewal) Richard Staubitz, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Yale University, for completion of research in Japan on the establishment of local government systems in Meiji Japan (renewal) Yoshio Sugimoto, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, University of Pittsburgh, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on social equality and pohtical opposition: the American Occupation of Japan (renewal) Lawrence Sullivan, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Michigan, for research in Taiwan on the formation of Marxist-Leninist ideology and its impact on the Chinese Communist movement Stephen Vlastos, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Berkeley, for research in Japan on local elites and political centralization, opposition movements, and political consciousness in peasant societies, 1874-82 Kim Woodard, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Stanford University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on fluctuation and recurrmg cycles in Chinese Communist foreign policy, 1949-69 (renewal) Samuel Yamashita, Ph.D. candidate in Japanese history, University of Michigan, for Japanese language training and research in Japan on the idea of practical learning in the early Meiji period (1868-83)

South Asia Studies Janet Amighi, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Missouri, for research in India on the effects of declining fertility among the Parsis of Bombay James Bjorkman, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Yale University, for preparation of a dissertation on evaluation of political value configurations in India (renewal) Carol Breckenridge, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Wisconsin, for research in India and the United Kingdom on the role of the Meenachi Temple in Madurai in social and developmental aspects of society, 1700-1850 J. Gabriel Campbell, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Columbia University, for research in Nepal on the Jhakris: Nepal's Shamans Michael Freedland, Ph.D. candidate in comparative education, University of Illinois, for completion of research in India on the social variables that structure and SEPTEMBER

1972

pattern access to education in a North Indian District (renewal) Christopher King, Ph.D. candidate in history. University of Wisconsin, for preparation of a dissertation in England and the United States on the Society for the Promotion of Nagari Script (renewal) James Levinson, Ph.D. candidate in international nutrition and food economics, Cornell University, for preparation of a dissertation on determinants of diets of preschool children and optimum means of influencing these determinants (renewal) Franklin Presler, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Chicago, for research in India on comparative party politics in Tamilnadu April Putnam, Ph.D. candidate in cultural anthropology. University of Michigan, for research in Nepal on the Rapti Stephen Rittenberg, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for research in the United Kingdom, India, and Pakistan on the Indian independence movement in the North-West Frontier PrOVInce. ]930-47 Nazif Shah rani, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Washington, for research in Afghanistan on Kirghiz pastoral nomads of the Afghan Pamirs: ecological and sociocultural adaptation Walter Winkler, Ph.D. candidate in cultural anthropology, University of Wisconsin, for research in Nepal on the caste system in Western Nepal

Southeast Asia Studies Stanley Bedlington, Ph.D. candidate in government, Cornell University, for completion of research in Singapore on its Malay community and national integration (renewal) Leslie Beebe, Ph.D. candidate in Thai language, University of Michigan, for completion of research in Thailand on the structure of question-response sequences in standard Thai (renewal) John Bums, Ph.D. candidate in sociology of law, Yale University, for intensive language training and research in the United States, Singapore, and Indonesia on the influence of the legal system on patterns of economic organization in rural Indonesia Sathi Chaiyapechara, Ph.D. candidate in forestry and conservation, University of California, Berkeley, for preparation of a dissertation on the effects of government forest management and policy on the development of forest industries (renewal) David Chandler, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Michigan, for comJ?letion of research and preparation of a dissertation m France and the United States on Cambodia before the French: the politics of a tributary state (renewal) William Collins, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology. University of California, Berkeley, for completion of research and J?reparation of a dissertation in Indonesia and the Umted States on religion and interaction in the highlands of South Sumatra (renewal) John Day, Ph.D. candidate in history, Cornell University, for research in the Netherlands and Indonesia on Ranggawarsita and Javanese thought in the nineteenth century Edilberto de Jesus, Ph.D. candidate in history. Yale University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in the Philippines and the United States

SS


on the tobacco monopoly in the Philippines, 17821882 (renewal) David Elliott, Ph.D. candidate in government, Cornell University, (or a comparative study in Hong Kong of the state and party institutions in China and North Vietnam Brian Foster, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Michigan, for preparation of a dissertation on the Mons of Thailand (renewal) G. James Keddie, Ph.D. candidate in economics and business administration, Harvard University, for research in the United States, United Kingdom, Netherlands, and Indonesia on factor intensities in Indonesian industry Dwight King, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Chicago, for Indonesian language training and research in Indonesia on social mobilization, associational life, interest representation, and political cleavage in that country Y. Mansoor Marican, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of British Columbia, for research in India, Malaysia, and Singapore on primordialism and public policy: comparison of two political parties Terry Miller, Ph.D. candidate in musicology, Indiana University, for research in Thailand on its Khen music Daniel Regan, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Yale University, for a comparative study in Malaysia of the influence of modern and traditional intellectuals Margaret Roff, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Columbia University, for research in Singapore on the political mobilization of tribal peoples in Southeast Asia Michael Vickery, Ph.D. candidate in history, Yale University, for completion of a comparative study in Thailand, Cambodia, and France of Thai and Cambodian chronicles for the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries (renewal) Soviet Union and Eastern EU1路ope

New awards were not offered since the program was terminated in 1971, but the fellowships of the following were renewed: Olavi Arens, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for preparation of a dissertation on political and social developments in Estonia from February 1917 to February 1918 Frank L. Kaplan, Ph.D. candidate in journalism, University of Wisconsin, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Germany, England, and the United States on the history of the Czech press Edward J. Lazzerini, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Washington, for preparation of a dissertation in Turkey and the United States on Ismail bey Gasprinski and the modernist movement among Russian Muslims before 1817 Carol S. Leonard, Ph.D. candidate in history, Indiana University, for preparation of a dissertation on Peter III of Russia and his reforms Pete~ ~acho~a, Ph.D. candidate in history, Northern IllinOls UnIversity, for research in Austria on the crisis of ideology and politics among the Czech intelligentsia in Vienna, 1890-1914

Brian J. MacWhinney, Ph.D. candidate in psycholinguistics, University of California, Berkeley, for preparation of a dissertation on the acquisition by Hungarian children of communicative competence Rudolf V. Perina, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Germany on intellectuals and political change in Czechoslovakia, 1952-68 Lubisa Radulovic, Ph.D. candidate in social psychology, University of California, Berkeley, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Yugoslavia and the United States on urban, social class, and ethnic differences in language development in different types of societies Alexandra D. Shecket, Ph.D. candidate in history. Columbia University, for preparation of a dissertation on the State Council of the Russian Empire, 1905-17 Roman SoIchanyk, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Michi~an, for preparation of a dissertation on the CommunIst Party of Western Ukraine in Poland, 1919-38 Sharon Zukin, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Columbia University, for preparation of a dissertation on socialist political culture: behavior and beliefs of Yugoslav citizens Western European Program

The awards were recommended by the National Screening Committee-Jean Blondel, University of Essex; Richard N. Cooper, Yale University; David D. Gregory, Dartmouth College; H. Peter Krosby, State University of New York at Albany; and Austin Ranney, University of Wisconsinwhich met on January 28 and March 3. It had been assisted by a Preliminary Screening Committee-Paul M. Hohenberg, Cornell University, and Eric A. Nordlinger, Brandeis University. Oscar L. Arnal, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Pittsburgh, for research in France on the relationshi p between the Action Fran~aise and the Catholic Church, 1899-1939 Ewa K. Bacon, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Chicago, for preparation of a dissertation on Austrian administration of Galicia, 1772-1806 (renewal) David E. Barclay, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for intensive German language training and research in Germany on Rudolf Hilferding: economics, politics, and the intellectual in Weimar Germany Richard B. Berner, Ph.D. candidate in economics, University of Pennsylvania, for preparation of a dissertation on extension and revision of a linear programming model of production and trade in the Common Market (renewal) R. Michael Berry, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Wisconsin, for research in Finland and Sweden on Finnish-American relations during World War II Pedro G. Blasco, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Yale University, for research in Spain on higher education and the growth of scientific research John W. Boyer, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Chicago, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Austria and the United States on Church and society in fin de siecle Austria (renewal) VOLUME

26,

NUMBER

11


Moncrieff M. Cochran, Ph.D. candidate in education and psychology, University of Michigan, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Sweden and the United States on two child-rearing patterns in Sweden: home and day nursery (age 12-18 months) (renewal) James N. Danziger, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Stanford University, for preparation of a dissertation on budget making and expenditure variations in English county boroughs (renewal) Robert S. Duplessis, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for completion of a case study and preparation of a dissertation in France on Lille and Douai, especially during the crisis (1560-80) and postcrisis periods (renewal) James Elden, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Los Angeles, for research in Norway on the "debureaucratization" of work as a strategy for social change Lucy M. Grace, Ph.D. candidate in history of art, Yale University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in France and the United States on Matisse's color practice and its sources (renewal) Jan T. Gross, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Yale University, for research in England and Germany on multiple authority structures in Poland during the German Occupation, 1939-45 Michael R. Haines, Ph.D. candidate in economic history, University of Pennsylvania, for preparation of a dissertation on economic-demographic interrelations and modernization in Prussian Upper Silesia, 1840-1914 (renewal) Lynn A. Hunt, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in France and the United States on the Revolution of 1789 in provincial towns: Tyrones and Reims (renewal) Richard S. Katz, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Yale University, for research in England and Italy on the impact of electoral systems on their political parties Kenneth J. Kirkland, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Michigan, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Italy and the United States on the development of working-class institutions in Italy, 1891-1915 (renewal) Peter M. Lange, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for preparation of a dissertation on the internal operations of the Italian Communist and Socialist Parties (renewal) Dario E. Longhi, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, University of Wisconsin, for preparation of a dissertation on class and changing politics in Italy (renewal) John R. Low-Beer, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Harvard University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Italy and the United States on factors affecting class consciousness among technicians in Italy (renewal) Michael P. MacDonald, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for training in psychology and research methodology and research in England on suicide and mental illness in Tudor and Stuart England Steven E. Meyer, Ph.D. candidate in government, Georgetown University, for research in the Netherlands on contemporary unrest in its political system SEPTEMBER

1972

Ricllard A. Nuccio, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Massachusetts, for research in Spain on socialization of political values Anthony J. O'Donnell, Ph.D. candidate in history, Princeton University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Germany and the United States on the National Liberal Party, 1890-1918 (renewal) Susan M. Parman, Ph.D. candidate in behavioral science, Rice University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Scotland and the United States on socioeconomic change in Scottish crofting townships (renewal) Robert M. Schwartz, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Michigan, for training in research methodology at the University, and research in France on its social problems and police operations during the late eighteenth century Carla L. Shagass, Ph.D. candidate in English, University of Wisconsin, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in England and the United States on the English Stage Company and the New English Theatre, 1956-62 (renewal) Douglas R. Skopp, Ph.D. candidate in history, Brown University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Germany and the United States on the political significance of German education, 1850-70, especially in Prussia and Wurtemberg (renewal) Ann H. L. Sontz, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Columbia University, for research in Italy and Germany on kinship and associational patterns among Italian immigrants in West Germany and in their regions of origin Timothy N. Tackett, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for completion of research in France on the parish clergy in Dauphine at the end of the eighteenth century (renewal) Jose J. Toharia, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Yale University, for preparation of a dissertation on the Spanish JudiClary (renewal) Craig S. Zwerling, Ph.D. candidate in history of science, Harvard University, for research in France on the relations between the scientific community and the republican government, 1889-1914 John A. Zysman, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for research in France on technological innovation in industry

Latin America and Caribbean Program The awards were recommended by the National Screening Committee for Research Fellowships-Hugh L. Popenoe, University of Florida; Francine Rabinowitz, University of California, Los Angeles; Daniel Schydlowsky, Harvard University; Irwin W. Sizer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Thomas E. Skidmore, University of 'Wisconsin -at a meeting on March 11-12. Preliminary screening was done by committees consisting of Harold Bierman, Cornell University; Calvin Patrick Blair, University of Texas at Austin; Mark W. Cannon, Institute of Public Administration, New York; Rene de Costa, University of Chicago; Alain de Janvry, University of California, Berkeley; Anthony Di Benedetto, University of Connecticut; Joseph P. Farrell, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education; Thomas 35


C. Greaves, University of Pennsylvania; Vera Green, Uni· versity of Houston; Russell G. Hamilton, University of Minnesota; James M. Malloy, University of Pittsburgh; Gil· bert W. Merkx, University of New Mexico; Michael C. Meyer, University of Nebraska; Gloria N. Tait, Inter·Ameri· can Development Bank; Woods Thomas, Purdue Univer· sity; Frank Verbrugge, University of Minnesota. Research Fellowships: United States

Marigene Arnold, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Uni· versity of Florida, for research on the status and role of mestizo women in Jalisco, Mexico, in affiliation with the National Institute of Anthropology and History, Mexico, D.F. (renewal) William L. Ascher, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Yale University, for research on the role of national planners in Argentina and Chile, in affiliation with the National Development Council, Buenos Aires, and the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences, Santiago (renewal) William M. Berenson, Ph.D. candidate in political sci· ence, Vanderbilt University, for research on bureaucra· cy and bureaucratic elites in Uruguay (affiliation to be determined) Mark M. Brinson, Ph.D. candidate in botany, University of Florida, for research on primary energy flows of the Lake Izabal ecosystem, in affiliation with the Division of Fauna, Ministry of Agriculture, Guatemala, and the Institute of Nutrition for Central America and Panama, Guatemala City (renewal) Elinor C. Burkett, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Pittsburgh, for research on the social history of Arequipa and the response to earthquake disasters (affiliation to be determined) Barbara Dianne Cantella, Ph.D. candidate in Spanish, University of Texas at Austin, for research on the in· fluence of orientalism in modernist poetry, in affiliation with the College of Mexico John K. Chance, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Uni· versity of Illinois, for research on ethnic relations and social structure in the city of Oaxaca, in affiliation with the Institute for Oaxacan Studies, Oaxaca (renewal) William F. Collins III, Ph.D. candidate in urban geog· raphy, University of Cincinnati, for research on the evolving spatial patterns of metropolitan residential growth in Mexico City, 1930-70, in affiliation with the College of Mexico (renewal) Joan R. Dassin, Ph.D. candidate in modem thought and literature, Stanford University, for research on the role of Mario de Andrade in the modernist movement, in affiliation with the Institute of Brazilian Studies, Uni· versity of Sao Paulo Evelyn Hu DeHart, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Texas at Austin, for research on the Yaqui Indians in the Mexican Revolution, in affiliation with the Center of Oriental Studies, College of Mexico (renewal) Michel Del Buono, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Cor· nell University, for research on the difficulties and bene· fits of payments unions among less developed countries, in affiliation with the Department of Economics, Catho· lic University of Peru (renewal) Patricia N. Deustua, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Cornell University, for research on local·level political and economic organization of the Late Chimu King. 36

dom in northern Peru, in affiliation with the Center for Research in Sociology, Economics, Politics, and Anthropology, Catholic University of Peru (renewal) David D. Gow, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, University of Wisconsin, for research on the differential impact of land reform on traditional peasant communities in the southern highlands of Peru, in affiliation with the Department of Anthropology, University of Cuzco Linn A. Hammergren, Ph.D. candidate in political sci· ence, University of Wisconsin, for research on national institutional integration (affiliation in Peru to be deter· mined) Richard A. Hansis, Ph.D. candidate in geography, Penn· sylvania State University, for research on the effects of ethnogeographic systems on the process of land reform, in affiliation with the Institute for Training and Research on Agrarian Reform, Santiago Thomas H . Holloway, Ph.D. candidate in history, Uni· versity of Wisconsin, for research on the social history of rural Sao Paulo, 1870-1920, in affiliation with the Postgraduate Course, Department of History, and Docu· mentation Center for the Social History of Contempo· rary Brazil, University of Campinas (renewal) K. David Jackson, Ph.D. candidate in Portuguese litera· ture, University of Wisconsin, for research on the modernist movement in literature in relation to other arts in Brazil, in affiliation with the Institute of Bra· zilian Studies, University of Sao Paulo (renewal) Jeffrey C. Jacob, Ph.D. candidate in education, Syracuse Umversity, for research on the behavior of children in low-income families in Guatemala City in the context of poverty theory, in affiliation with the Institute of Nutrition for Central America and Panama, Guatemala City John C. Kelley, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Teach· ers College, Columbia University, for research on the process of social and economic change in two ejidos in the Soconusco area of Chiapas, in affiliation with the National Institute of Anthropology and History, Mexico, D.F. (renewal) James D. Kelly, Ph.D. candidate in plant breeding and genetics, University of Wisconsin, for research on the inheritance of total seed protein and lrotein quality of the dry bean (phaseolus vulgaris) an on the nature of the seed proteins, in affiliation with the Interna· tional Center for Tropical Agriculture, Cali, Colombia Jan G. Laarman, Ph.D. candidate in forestry and con· servation, University of California, Berkeley, for research on dualism in the sawmill industry of southern Brazil, in affiliation with the Center of Forestry Research, Federal University of Parana Nathan Laks, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford Uni· versity, for research on politics and society in Argentina, 1874-80, and factors in the development of national organization, in affiliation with the Torcuato di Tella Institute, Buenos Aires Darrell E. Levi, Ph.D. candidate in history, Yale Univer· sity, for research on the role of the Prado family in the development of Sao Paulo in the nineteenth and twen· tieth centuries, in affiliation with the Postgraduate Program, Department of History, and the Historical Docu· mentation Service, University of Sao Paulo (renewal) Elizabeth MacLaughlin, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Indiana University, for research on traditional oral disparagement humor among Quechua·Spanish bilin· gual children in Arequipa, in affiliation with the Center VOLUME 26, NUMBER ·5


for Research in Sociology, Economics, Politics, and Anthropology, Catholic University of Peru (renewal) Peter E. Marchetti, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Yale University, for research on rural organizations among minifundistas in Chile, in affiliation with the Institute for Training and Research on Agrarian Reform, Catholic University of Chile (renewal) David J. Minderhout, Ph.D. candidate in sociolinguistics, Georgetown University, for research on Trinidad Creole English, in affiliation with the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad Thomas F. O'Brien, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Connecticut, for research on the decline of the Chilean nitrate entrepreneurs, 1881-90, in affiliation with the Center for Research on American History, Santiago Benjamin S. Orlove, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for research on regional economic organization in the southern sierra of Peru, with emphasis on the wool trade (affiliation to be determined) O. F. Peterson, Ph.D. candidate in geography, University of Minnesota, for research on the development of squatter settlements, in affiliation with the University of the Andes, Bogota Jeffrey Puryear, Ph.D. candidate in education, University of Chicago, for research on comparative systems of vocational education in Colombia, in affiliation with the National Apprenticeship Service, Bogota (renewal) 'Ransford C. Pyle, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Florida, for research on ethnosemantics as related to property and law in San Jose, Costa Rica, in affiliation with the Central Faculty of Science and Letters, University of Costa Rica (renewal) Angel Israel 'Rivera-Ortiz, Ph.D. candidate in political science, State University of New York at Buffalo, for research on the political environment of organizations dealing with development, in affiliation with the University of the Andes, Bogota Kenneth D. Roberts, Ph.D. candidate in economics, University of Wisconsin, for research on the effects of adoption of high-yielding varieties of wheat on the agricultural labor force in the Bahio area of Mexico, in affiliation with the Postgraduate College, National Agricultural School, Chapingo Michael J. Rodell, Ph.D. candidate in urban planning, University of California, Los Angeles, for research on urbanization and economic development in Bahia since 1950, in affiliation with the Federal University of Bahia, Salvador Humberto L. Rodriguez-Camilloni, Ph.D. candidate in architectural history, Yale University, for research on seventeenth-century architecture in Peru, in affiliation with the Department of Arts and Humanities, National University of Ingenierfa Jane B. Ross, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Columbia University, for research on the ecological aspects of conHict among the Candoshi Indians of northern Peru (affiliation to be determined) Mitchell A. Seligson, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Pittsburgh, for research on peasant attitudes and behavior in relation to land tenure patterns, in affiliation with the University of Costa Rica John C. Spence, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for research on SEPTEMBER

1972

decentralization of the administration of justice in Chile, in affiliation with the School of Law, University of Chile, Santiago (renewal) Mary K. Tolbert, Ph.D. candidate in developmental psychology, Harvard University, for research on aC<J.uisition of Cachiquel and Spanish languages with speafic reference to environmental influences on learning rates and patterns, in affiliation with the Institute of Nutrition for Central America and Panama, Guatemala City Walter Toop, Ph.D. candidate in Portuguese literature, University of Wisconsin, for research on the postmodernist literary movement in Fortaleza, Brazil, in affiliation with the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Ceara (renewal) M. Ann Twinam, Ph.D. candidate in history, Yale University, for research on economic change and social structure in Medellin, 1780-1880, in affiliation with the Department of Social Sciences, University of Antioquia, and the University of the Andes (renewal) Eric J. Van Young, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Berkeley, for research on the agrarian history of the Guadalajara region, 1650-1810, in affiliation with the College of Mexico

Research Fellowships: United Kingdom William I. Albert, D.Phil. candidate in economic history, School of Social Studies, University of East Anglia, for postdoctoral research on the influence of Peru's links with the international economy on her development from c. 1865 to the end of the war of the Pacific, in affiliation with the Catholic University of Peru Andrew G. Barnard, D.Phil. candidate in history, University College, London, for research on the Chilean Communist Party, 1927-47, in affiliation with the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences, Santiago (renewal) Hugh E. Bicheno, D.Phil. candidate in history, University of Cambridge, for research on Chilean fascism and the Popular Front during World War II, in affiliation with the Institute of Political Sciences, Catholic University of Chile (renewal) M. Sebastian Brett, D.Phil. candidate in sociology, University of York, for research on the informal labor market and internal economy in two contrasting squatter settlements in Bogota, in affiliation with the University of the Andes Roger J. Brew, D.Phil. candidate in history, University of Oxford, for research on the production of coffee and its effect on capital formation and industrialization in Colombia, 1870-1900, in affiliation with the University of Antioquia and the University of the Andes (renewal) Kenneth D. B. Duncan, D.Phil. candidate in geography, University of Cambridge, for research on the growth and regional development of commercial agriculture in El Salvador and Guatemala, in affiliation with the Institute of Political and Social Sciences, Rafael Landivar University Joseph W. Foweraker, D.Phil. candidate in politics and economics, University of Oxford, for research on the development of frontier economies within Brazil, in affiliation with the Brazilian Center for Analysis and Planning, Sao Paulo (renewal) Nicholas A. S. Hey, D.Phil. candidate in literature and sociology, University of Oxford, for research on Vicente

37


Huidobro's poetic practice and its sociological implications. particularly during 1925-48. in affiliation with the Institute of Chllean Literature. University of Chile Daniel M. James, D.Phil. candidate in social science, London School of Economics. for research on the structure and functioning of trade unions in Argentina since 1955. particularly ih the political sphere (affiliation to be determined) Kenneth A. King. D.Phil. candidate in economics. University of Oxford, for research on postwar monetary policy in Brazil. in affiliation with the Center for Development and Planning. Federal University of Minas Gerais. Belo Horizonte (renewal) Anthony McFarlane. D.Phil. candidate in economic history. London School of Economics. for research on the economic and social background of the Independence movement in Colombia with special reference to Cartegena. in affiliation with the Department of Political Sciences. University of the Andes (renewal) Anthony Raw. D.Phil. candidate in entomology. Rothamsted Experimental Station and Imperial College, University of London. for research on the use of solitary bees and other insects in pollination of tropical crops. in affiliation with the Department of Zoology. Umversity of the West Indies, Mona. Jamaica (renewal) Michael Sallnow, D.Phil. candidate in anthropology, University of Manchester, for research on a peasant community in the Mantaro Valley of Peru. with particular reference to individuals' use of political, economic, and religious components in achievement of social status (affiliation to be determined) Elizabeth M. Thomas-Hope, D.Phil. candidate in human geography, University of Oxford. for research on the impact of migrations on social and economic problems in the West Indies. in affiliation with the Institute of Economic and Social Research and Department of Geography, University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica (renewal) Canadian Training and Research Fellowships

Mark Blaker. M.A. candidate in anthropology, McGill University. for Spanish language training at the Intercultural Center of Documentation, Cuernavaca, and graduate study Philippe Faucher, M.A. candidate in political science. McGill University. for larticipation in the international seminar sponsore by the World University of Canada in Canada and Peru. preliminary research in Peru on the political consequences of Peruvian economic nationalism. and graduate study Douglas Hull, M.A. candidate in political science. University of Western Ontario, for Spanish language training at the Intercultural Center of Documentation, Cuernavaca, and graduate study Carol S. Liss, M.A. candidate in history, University of Calgary, for Spanish language training at the Intercultural Center of Documentation, Cuernavaca, and graduate study Claude B. Meunier, M.A. candidate in urban and regional studies, University of Montreal. for Portuguese language training, computer studies, and graduate study Luc Mougeot, M.A. candidate in geography, University o~ Ottawa. for participation in the Andean Summer Field Program, Colombia, preliminary research on the shantytowns of Cali, and graduate study 38

Danny P. Napier, M.A. candidate in geography, University of Ottawa, for preliminary research on the marketing and transportation systems of Pichincha Province, Ecuador, and graduate study at the University of Windsor Roger Young. M.A. candidate in economics. University of Toronto. for Spanish language training at the Intercultural Center of Documentation, Cuernavaca, and graduate study Professional Internships Marion T. Bentley, Ph.D. candidate in public administration. New York University, for an internship in public administration, National Institute of Planning, Lima (renewal) William F. Carey, Jr., Assistant Regional Planner, Capitol Region Planning Agency, New Haven, Connecticut, for an internship in urban planning, National Bank for Housing. Rio de Janeiro Donald A. Conover, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Yale University, for an internship in public health (affiliation in Colombia to be determined) Brian R. Cooper, Ph.D. in plant 'physiology, University of California, Berkeley, for an mternship in agricultural science, Department of Crop Science, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad (renewal) Rene Costales, Technical Staff, Communication Satellite Corporation. Washington, D.C., for an internship' in electrical engineering and communications, Brazilian Telecommunications Management. Rio de Janeiro (renewal) Michael D. Davies, Ph.D. in plant physiology, University of Illinois. for an internship in agricultural science, Agricultural High School, Federal University of Vi~osa (renewal) Stuart G. Davis, Research Associate, Sea Grant, Research Institute for Business and Economics, University of Southern California, for an internship in business administration and marine biology, Regional Bank for Development of the Far South, Santa Catarina, Brazil (renewal) H. Jesse Dubin, Ph.D. in plant pathology, University of California, Davis, for an internship in agricultural science, Faculty of Agricultural Science, Southern University of Chile Joseph C. Fischer, Ph.D. in comparative education, University of Chicago, for an internship in education, Institute of Applied Economic Research, Rio de Janeiro (renewal) Joseph Gieselman, M.B.A., Texas A&M University, for an internship in business administration, Foundation for Community Development and Municipal Promotion, Caracas Carolyn Ann Graham, M.L.S., Catalogue Librarian, University of Texas at Austin, for an internship in library science, National Library, Rio de Janeiro Hedley Griggs, M.B.S., Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration, for an internship in business ad!llinistration, Halles Investment Bank, Rio de J anelro Alan B. Henkin, Ph.D. in educational administration, University of Wisconsin, for an internship in education, Federation of Private Universities of Central America and Panama, Guatemala City Robert C. Howell, Ph.D. in minerals and metals engineering, University of Wisconsin, for an internship in minVOLUME

26,

NUMBER

3


ing engineering, Faculty of Physical Sciences and Mathematics, University of Chile, and National Mining Company, Santiago (renewal) William S. Jacoby, M.A. in public administration, University of Pittsburgh, for an internship in public administration (affiliation to be determined) Robert E. Jones, M.A. in business administration, University of California, Berkeley, for an internship in business administration, Companhia Vale do Rio Doce, Madeiras, S.A., Rio de Janeiro Jorge A. Machado, M.S. in civil engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for an internship in engineering, Institute of Engineering, National Autonomous University of Mexico, and DIRAC Robert C. Morris, M.S. in international agricultural development, University of California, Davis, for an internship in agricultural science (affiliation in Colombia to be determined) Elias Amos Padilla, M.A. in public administration, University of California, Los Angeles, for an internship in public administration, National Indian Institute, Mexico, D.F. (renewal) Christopher Parel, M.A. in economics, Harvard Univer-

sity, for an internship in economics in affiliation with the National Bank for Economic Development, Rio de Janeiro Suzanne Prysor-Jones, graduate diploma in social administration, London School of Economics, for an internship in social work administration, in affiliation with the Colombian Institute for Family Welfare, Bogota Lee C. Schaeffer, Marketing Specialist, Rohm 8c Haas, Philadelphia, for an internship in business administration, ALFA-LAVAL, S.A., Lima (renewal) Daniel Stubblefield, M.S. in chemical engineering, Washington University, for an internship in engineering, Technological Institute of Higher Studies, Monterrey Charles VanFossen, M.S. in architecture, Iowa State University, for an internship in engineering (affiliation in Chile or Brazil to be determined) Douglas Wayne Williams, Ph.D. in agricultural engineering, University of California, Davis, for an internship in agricultural science, International Center of TropIcal Agriculture, Cali Roger L. Wo til a, J.D., University of Michigan, for an internship in law, Faculty of Law, University of the Andes, Bogota (renewal)

PUBLICATIONS Africa and the West: Intellectual Responses to European Culture, edited by Philip D. Curtin. Product of a conference sponsored by the Joint Committee on African Studies, October 9-11, 1969. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, June 1972. 269 pages. $12.50. China: Management of a Revolutionary Society, edited by John M. H. Lindbeck. Product of a conference sponsored by the Subcommittee on Chinese Government and Politics, Joint Committee on Contemporary China, August 18-22, 1969. Seattle: University of Washington Press, July 1971. 406 pages. Cloth, $12.50; paper, $4.95. The City in Communist China, edited by John Wilson Lewis. Product of a conference cosponsored by the Subcommittees on Research on Chinese Society and on Chinese Government and Politics, Joint Committee on Contemporary China, December 28, 1968 - January 4, 1969. Stanford: Stanford University Press, Apri11971. 462 pages. $12.95. Crises and Sequences in Political Development by Leonard Binder, James S. Coleman, Joseph LaPalombara, Lucian W. Pye, Sidney Verba, an Myron Weiner. Studies in Political Development 7, sponsored by the Committee on Comparative Politics. Princeton: Princeton University Press, November 1971. 337 pages. $8.00. Econometric Models of Cyclical Behavior, edited by Bert G. Hickman. Papers of a conference jointly sponsored by the Committee on Economic Stability and the National Bureau of Economic Research, Conference on Research in Income and Wealth, November 14-15, 1969. Studies in Income & Wealth, of the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth, No. 36, Vols. 1 and 2, May 1972 (distributed by Columbia University Press). 1270 pages. Cloth, $17.50 each; paper, $7.50 each. Economic Organization in Chinese Society, edited by W. E. Willmott. Product of a conference held by the Subcommittee on Research on Chinese Society, Joint Committee on Contemporary China, with the aid of the former ComSEPTEMBER

1972

mittee on the Economy of China, August 16-22, 1969. Stanford: Stanford University Press, April 1972. 472 pages. $16.50. Elites in the People's Republic of China, edited by Robert A. Scalapino. Product of a conference sponsored by the Subcommittee on Chinese Government and Politics, Joint Committee on Contemporary China, August lR-24, 1970. Seattle: University of Washington Press. September 1972. c. 700 pages. Cloth, $15.00; paper, $4.95. The Foreign Trade of Mainland China, by Feng-hwa Mah. Sponsored by the former Committee on the Economy of China. Chicago and New York: AIdine . Atherton, October 1971. 287 pages. $9.75. The Machine-Building Industry in Communist China, by Chu-Yuan Cheng. Sponsored by the former Committee on the Economy of China. Chicago and New York: Aldine路 Atherton, September 1971. 356 pages. $9.75. People of the United States in the Twentieth Century, by Irene B. Taeuber and Conrad Taeuber. Sponsored by the former Committee on Population Census Monographs in cooperation with the Bureau of the Census. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, May 1972. 1084 pages. $5.75. Pidginization and Creolization of Languages, edited by Dell Hymes. Product of a conference cosponsored by the Committee on Sociolinguistics and the University of the West Indies, April 9-12. 1968. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, September 1971. 538 pages. $23.50. Social Indicators and Social Policy, edited by Andrew Shonfield and Stella Shaw. Product of a conference jointly sponsored by the U.K. and U.S. Social Science Research Councils, April 2-4, 1971. London: Heinemann Educational Books, July 1972. 163 pages. 拢2.50. (Orders should be addressed to Mr. F. L. Southgate. Bellhaven House, 1145 Bellamy Road, Scarborough, OntariO", Canada.) 39


I

COUNCIL FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS OFFERED IN 1972-73: DATES FOR FILING APPLICATIONS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS OF AWARDS Applications for fellowships and grants offered by the Council during the coming year will be due, and awards will be announced, on or before the respective dates listed below. Because applications received after the closing dates specified cannot be considered, and because preliminary correspondence is frequently necessary to determine under which program a given proposal should be submitted, prospective applicants should communicate with the Council if possible at least three weeks in advance of the pertinent closing date. Inquiries should indicate the nature of the proposed training or research j the approximate amount and duration of support needed; one's age, occupation or current activity and vocational aim, country of citizenship and country of permanent residence; academic degrees held (specifying the fields of study); and if currently working for a degree, one's present stage of advancement toward it. A brochure describing the several programs is available on request addressed to Social Science Research Council Fellowships and Grants, 230 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10017. Research Training Fellowships, applications, January 3, 1973; awards, April I, 1973 Grants for Research in Method and Theory, applications, January 3, 1973; awards, April I, 1973 Grants to Minority Scholars for Research on Racism and Other Social Factors in Mental Health, applications, October 1972; awards, December 1972 • Grants for African Studies, applications, December 1, 1972; awards, March 1973 • Grants for Research on Contemporary and Republican China, and for Research on the Economy of China, applications, December 1, 1972; awards, March 1973 NOTE: Grants for research on Chinese Civilization (pre-1911 China) are offered by the American Council of Learned SocIeties, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N.Y., 10017, to which inquiries should be addressed. ,. Grants for Japanese Studies, applications, December 1, 1972; awards, March 1973 • Grants for Korean Studies, applications, December 1, 1972; awards, March 1973

,. Grants for Research on the Near and Middle East, applications, December 1, 1972; awards, March 1973 • Grants for Collaborative Research on the Near and Middle East, applications, January 1, 1973; awards, March 1973 • Postdoctoral Grants for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, including Collaborative Research Grants, applications to be submitted to Foreign Area Fellowship Program, 110 East 59 Street, New York, N.Y. 10022, December 15, 1972; awards, March 1973 • Grants for East European Studies, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N.Y. 10017, December 31, 1972; awards, within 3 months • Grants for Study of East European Languages, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N.Y. 10017, February I, 1973; awards, within 2 months • Travel grants for international conferences abroad on East European studies, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N.Y. 10017, February 15, 1973 • Grants for Research on South Asia, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N.Y. 10017, December 1, 1972; awards, within 3 months • Grants for Soviet Studies, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N.Y. 10017, December 31, 1972; awards, within 3 months • Foreign Area Fellowships, applications to be submitted to Foreign Area FellowshIp Program, 110 East 59 Street, New York, N.Y. 10022, for: Africa and the Middle East, November 13, 1972 East, South, and Southeast Asia, November 6, 1972 Latin America and the Caribbean Research Fellowships, November 30, 1972 Professional Internships, November 30, 1972 Collaborative Research Training Fellowships, March 1, 1973 Inter-American Research Training Seminars, March 1, 1973 Western Europe, November 20, 1972 • Offered under a joint program of the American Council of Learned Societies and the Social Science Research Council.

SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL 230

PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK,

N.Y.

1001'1

Incorporated in the State of Illinois, December 27, 1924, for the purpose of advancing research in the social sciences Directors, 1972:

DORWIN CARTWRIGHT, PHILIP D. CURTIN, RENEE C. Fox, DANIEL X. FREEDMAN, LEO A. GOODMAN,

MATTHEW

HOLDEN,

JR., DELL HYMES, LAWRENCE R. KLEIN, GARDNER LINDZEY, LEON LIPSON, HERBERT MCCLOSKY, JAMES N. MORGAN, MURRAY G. MURPHEY, ALFONSO ORTIZ, JOHN W. PRATT, AumN RANNEY, ALBERT RED, HENRY W. RIECKEN, ALICE S. ROSSI, DAVID M. SCHNEIDER, WILLIAM H. SEWELL, ELEANOR BERNERT SHELDON, NEIL J. SMELSER, M. BREWSTER. SMITH, EDWARD J. TAAFFE, ROBERT

E.

Officers and Staff:

E. TAEUBER, JOHN M. THOMPSON, ANDREW P. VAYDA,

President; BRYCE WOOD, Executive Associate; Staff Associates; JOHN CREIGHTON CAMPBELL, ROBERT F. Business Manager; CATHERINE V. RONNAN, Financial Secretary ELEANOR BERNERT SHELDON,

DAVID JENNESS, ROBERT PARKE, JR., NORMAN MANN,

40

KARL

WARD, CHARLES V. WILLIE ELEANOR C. ISBELL, ROWLAND L. MITCHELL, JR., BORUCH, WILLIAM R. BRYANT,

Staff Assistants;

Items Vol. 26 No. 3 (1972)  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you