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SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL

VOLUME 19 . NUMBER 3 . SEPTEMBER 1965 230 PARK AVENUE路 NEW YORK, N.Y. 10017

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPARATIVE SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH, APRIL 22-24, 1965 by Stein Rokkan and Gabriel A. Almond A ROUND TABLE conference on comparative social science research was held at UNESCO House, Paris, on April 22-24, 1965, under the auspices of the International Social Science Council. Joint sponsorship and support was provided by the Committee on Comparative Politics 1 of the Social Science Research Council. Planning and Alirection of the conference were in the hands of Stein ' W'Rokkan, Director of Research at the Chr. Michelsen Institute of Bergen, Norway, who served as rapporteurgeneral of the conference and K. Szczerba-Likiernik, Secretary General of the ISSC. The purpose of the conference was to evaluate the progress made within a program of studies and confrontations organized by UNESCO and the ISSC since 1961-62. This program must be understood against the background of earlier efforts to advance comparative research within the UNESCO framework. In earlier efforts to develop cross-national research UNESCO had tried to focus attention on a few substantive fields of interest within its over-all program: studies of the sources of tensions between nations and races, studies of stereotypes and prejudices, and studies of opinions on international issues. The principal product of these early efforts to promote comparative research was the Cantril-Buchanan sample survey made in nine countries in 1949 and reported in How Nations See Each Other.2 1 The members of the committee are Lucian W. Pye (chairman), Gabriel A. Almond, Leonard Binder, R. Taylor Cole, James S. Coleman, Herbert Hyman, Joseph LaPalombara, Sidney Verba, Robert E. Myron Weiner; staff, Bryce Wood. 2 William Buchanan and Hadley Cantril, How Nations See Each Other, Urbana: University of lllinois Press, 1958.

These early efforts did not generate a continuing program. Large-scale survey research was very costly and required a complex administrative apparatus; and the studies themselves came under criticism for their tendency to pursue abstract comparisons without consideration of the historical contexts and the relation of attitudes to other components of the social and political process. By the mid-fifties the UNESCO Department of Social Sciences had become heavily involved in the promotion of training and research in the developing countries, and found it increasingly difficult to pursue explicitly comparative studies. An attempt was made in 1956 to launch a program of comparative surveys but this proved to be very difficult, and in a sense the current program grew out of the recognition of failure in this earlier venture. It became more and more obvious that UNESCO could use its limited funds much more effectively if instead of organizing fresh comparative studies it concentrated its efforts on what might be called the "infrastructure" of comparative research, that is, if it undertook as a longterm task the establishment of better facilities for research workers interested in cross-cultural or crossnational anaylsis of one type or another. This meant at least in the beginning a concentration on methods, on sources of information, and on access to data for analysis. The International Social Science Council was given a central role in the development and execution of the new program. It decided to focus the first series of conferences under the program on quantitative methods of comparison. The round-table conference on

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uses of sample survey data in comparative cross-national espoused by Deutsch and associates. Robert Textor of research, held at La Napoule on June 29 - July 3, 1962, Stanford University had recently tried to organize a developed ideas about comparative survey research.s computer-produced "cross-cultural summary" for a samThe conference on the use of quantitative political and ple of 400 cultures. This comprehensive effort at data social data in cross-national comparisons, held at Yale processing 10 was the basis for the discussion at the first_ University on September 10-21, 1963, dealt with aggre- session of the conference, concerned with the possibility gate national statistics and the possibilities of correla- of extending and improving the kind of cross-cultural tional analyses using nations as units. 4 Both these in- analysis which exploits such repositories of information terests have been pursued in subsequent conferences as the Human Relations Area Files, and involves the and in publications. The work in the field of compara- coding of the basic characteristics of a large number of tive survey data has concentrated on problems of ac- societies. Papers for discussion at this session had been cess to data, data archives, and data retrieva1. 6 Research prepared by Textor as well as by Andre Kobben of the on aggregate statistical comparisons has taken two di- University of Amsterdam. The discussants were I. Chiva rections. The conference at Yale recommended that the of the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Daryll Forde approach developed in the World Handbook oj Political of the University of London, and Otto Klineberg of the and Social Indicators 6 be discussed in detail by social University of Paris. scientists in each major region of the world in order to The second and third sessions dealt with two closely promote broader coverage, better evaluations, and more related subjects, the comparative analysis of historical realistic analyses of the data at hand. A first regional change and comparative analysis of processes of modconference under the program, the International Con- ernization. In both sessions the discussion of processes ference on Comparative Social Research on Developing of nation-building and modernization led to a confronCountries: Intracountry Discontinuities in the Process tation between the concern of the historian for detailed of Economic and Social Development in Latin America, documentation and the concern of the sociologist and was held in Buenos Aires on September 8-15, 1964,1 and the system theorist with the development of models and another is planned for 1966 in New Delhi. The Yale typologies across a wide range of concrete cases. The conference also recommended that data programs of the basic papers on the comparative analysis of historical type developed by Deutsch and Russett should be sup- change had been prepared by Reinhard Bendix of the plemented by ecological archives within nations to per- University of California, Berkeley, Lee Benson of mit studies of the sources of variations between different University of Pennsylvania, and Val R. Lorwin of types of localities and between advanced and backward the University of Oregon. Discussants included the hisareas of each country.s A first discussion of the develop- torians P. Furet and E. LeRoy Ladurie of the Ecole Prament of such ecological archives took place at the Sec- tique des Hautes Etudes, L. Makkai of the Academy of ond Conference on Data Archives in the Social Sciences, Sciences, Budapest, and T. H. Marshall of the UniverSeptember 28-30, 1964,9 and a technical conference on sity of Cambridge. Papers on the comparative analysis Quantitative Ecological Analysis has been planned for of processes of modernization were prepared by Daniel Lerner and Lucian Pye of the Massachusetts Institute 1966. of Technology, and Richard Rose of the University of Since the ISSC has for some time wished to extend its concern beyond strictly quantitative methods and to Manchester. Discussants included Reinhard Bendix, K. explore further approaches to systematic comparisons A. Busia of the University of Oxford, and Hans Daalder among cultural and political units, three new subjects of the University of Leyden. The fourth session was concerned with evaluation of were placed first on the agenda of the Paris conference. The first of these was the cross-cultural method: the the research that has been done on aggregate statistical qualitative alternative to the aggregate comparisons comparisons of nations. A paper by Goran Ohlin of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and DevelopS See the report on the conference in Social Sciences Information, ment, Paris, presented a critique of the Yale Political 1(3):32-38, October 1962. Data Program. This was discussed by Phyllis Deane of "See ibid., 2(4):89-108, December 1963. the University of Cambridge, Mattei Dogan of the 6 Ibid., pp. 109-114, and 4(1):67-84, March 1965. 6 Bruce M. Russett, and Hayward R. Alker, Jr., Karl W. Deutsch, Centre d'Etudes Sociologiques, Paris, Bertrand de J ouvand Harold D. Lasswell, World Handbook of Political and Social Indienel of the Societe d'Etudes et de Documentation Ecocators, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1964. nomique, Paris, and Erwin K. Scheuch of the University 7 See Social Sciences Information, 4(2):156-172, June 1965. 8 See ibid., 2(4):98-103, December 1963, and Richard L. Merritt and of Cologne.

th.

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Stein Rokkan, eds., Comparing Nations, to be published by Yale University Press, fall 1965. 9 See Social Sciences Information, 4(1):69-72, March 1965.

10 Ar.thur S. Banks and Rob~rt B. Textor, The Cross.Polity Survey, Cambndge: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 1963.

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ning and sponsorship of a seminar in the next year or two on the methodology of cross-cultural comparisons using coded information of the type assembled in the Human Relations Area Files and other collections. A second recommendation was that historians and other social scientists undertake joint comparative analyses of RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CONFERENCE the processes of nation-building, urbanization, indusAt its final session the conference recommended to trialization, and demographic transformation. It was the International Social Science Council that it develop hoped that such a conference might be organized in a broad interdisciplinary program of comparative cross- 1967 or 1968. A third recommendation urged the plancultural and cross-national research. Such a program was ning of conferences and symposia on regional disparijustified on the basis that it would contribute signifi- ties in Eastern and Western Europe. These should be cantly to the internationalization of the social sciences closely coordinated with research on backward regions and to the advancement of effective cooperation on con- within developed countries such as that currently under crete objective research across national, cultural, and way at the European Center for Coordination of Social ideological boundaries. The appraisal of recent research Science Research and Documentation, Vienna. It was efforts carried through at the conference suggested a also proposed in this connection that the ISSC support convergence of interest in comparative studies among the compilation and evaluation of statistical indicators scholars in different nations and cultural areas, and for the principal regions within countries. This would having different ideological tendencies. The discussion add importantly to the compilation of aggregate indiat the conference also emphasized the need for coopera- cators for entire nations that was attempted in the tive action to improve the empirical data for comparison World Handbook of Political and Social Indicators. A fourth specific recommendation was that the ISSC and to develop the basic methodologies of classification, analysis, and inference. The conference stressed the im- take action to accelerate the development in different portance of such cooperative endeavor not only for the countries of historical data archives, to allow computer advancement of social science theory in the developed processing of statistical time series for different units of countries of the world, but also for deepening the un- nations. International cooperation among the developers derstanding of the processes of change from traditional of such archives is essential for exploration of the possito modem forms ' of life in the developing countries. bilities of detailed comparisons of rates of modernizaThe conference also stressed the importance of full rep- tion, mobilization, and integration. It was recommended resentation of all major areas of the world in such a that the ISSC establish a Committee on Social Science cooperative effort-particularly of Africa and the social- Data Archives, to ensure cooperation and coordination ist countries. among the various nations now engaged in the develop, Specific proposals made by the conference to the ment of such data archives. A fifth recommendation International Social Science Council included the plan- proposed that a symposium and conference on the theory and logic of comparative research be organized within 11 A detailed report of the proceedings of the conference will be the next year or two. published in Social Sciences Information, December 1965.

The fifth session dealt with comparative sample surveys. Papers presented by Gino Germani of the University of Buenos Aires and by Erwin K. Scheuch were discussed by Gabriel A. Almond, Daniel Lerner, and Stein Rokkan. u

PLANS OF THE COMMISSION ON HUMAN RESOURCES AND ADVANCED EDUCATION by John K. Folger¡ THE Commission on Human Resources and Advanced and major professional areas will all be examined. AlEducation is making a two-year study of talent develop- though the perspective is broad, many of the studies ment and utilization in American society. Talent de- necessarily will be carried out on samples of individuals velopment in all fields of specialization is included: the in a few selected fields. The emphasis of the Commisarts and humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, sion's work will be on the more able segment of society, John W. Riley, Jr., Richard Schlatter, Elbridge Sibley, Gordon B. Turner, and Frederick T. Wall. In addition to the Director, the Commission's staff includes Helen Astin and Alan Bayer, Research Associates. Several university faculty members are expected to participate in the Commission's work on a part-time basis.

• The author is Director of the Commission on Human Resources and Advanced Education, appointed by the Conference Board of Associated Research Councils. Members of the Commission are: Dael Wolfle (chairman), M. H. Trytten (vice-chairman), Robert D. Calkins, Allan M. Cartter, Henry Chauncey, Kenneth Pitzer, Gordon N. Ray,

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defined generally as those persons with the ability to pursue advanced study, whether or not they continue beyond the bachelor's degree. The present Commission is a successor to the earlier Commission on Human Resources and Advanced Training, which produced America's Resources of Specialized Talent, by Dael WoHle, in 1954. This Commission has the same general objective of making a comprehensive study of the development of talent in American society. It will assess the large number of studies of talent development, manpower needs, and manpower utilization that have been completed since the work of the earlier Commission, and will also conduct some research and collect new data. Financial support for the work of the Commission has been provided by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Russell Sage Foundation. The National Academy of Sciences is providing administrative support for the project. The Commission's staff will develop a comprehensive review of current information and research findings about manpower supply, career planning, and manpower demands and needs. A second task will be a statistical description of the flow of talent from high school to college, and from college to graduate school and into jobs, with separate information provided for major academic and professional fields (medicine, social work, physical sciences, etc.). Efforts will also be made to describe the educational and occupational progress of important subgroups of the population, as determined by characteristics such as sex, color, urban-rural residence, and ability. This description of educational progress of important subgroups of the population will utilize the results of several national sample studies and the sources of basic statistical information of the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Office of Education, the Bureau of the Census, and others. Another study will develop information on the magnitude and direction of changes in career plans during the high school and college years, and changes from major field of education to field of employment among jobholders. The data will be examined in relation to

current theories of occupational choice, with major analysis of factors that are related to changes in career plans. This study should produce better understanding of the way career choices are made and why they are changed, and indicate how predictions of the occupational future of individuals can be improved. Another area of concentration in the Commission's work will be graduate departments and professional schools as the primary organizational units producing scientists, professionals, and scholars. A sample of departments and schools will be examined to determine how they plan for growth, how they establish standards for admission and retention of students, how they affect the careers of their graduates, and how the resources available to them affect their production of graduates. The Commission will also examine the market for talented manpower in several specific fields. Efforts will be made to conceptualize' and quantify important economic and noneconomic factors which affect the market and its operation, and to see how these factors could be projected into the future. The relation of manpower utilization to changes in demand for talented persons will be one important aspect of this study. Throughout its work the Commission will be concerned with the development and improvement of current statistics about manpower, and will make suggestions for ways of collecting and analyzing information which would improve our ability to study both shortand long-range manpower problems. The development of mathematical models of talent flows and of manpower market conditions will be emphasized as one promising approach to both better prediction of the future, and more comprehensive specification of improvements needed in current manpower statistics. There are several special problems of talent development and utilization which the Commission will explore if time is available. These include: the role of foreign students and foreign manpower, cultural deprivation and high-level talent, the education and careers of professional women, and the geographic distribution and redistribution of talent.

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COMMITTEE BRIEFS AFRICAN STUDIES (Joint with American Council of Learned Societies)

Alan P. Merriam (chairman), L. Gray Cowan, Philip D. Curtin, William O. Jones, Horace Miner, Roy Sieber, Benjamin E. Thomas; staff, Rowland L. Mitchell, Jr. With the cooperation of Indiana University and the University of Nevada Desert Research Institute, the committee held a conference on the Traditional Artist in African So-

ciety at the University of California, Berkeley, Alumni Conference Center at Lake Tahoe, California on May 28-30. The plans for the conference had been made by Warren L. d'Azevedo of the University of Nevada, George Mills of Lake Forest College, and Messrs. Merriam and Sieber. The following papers-all except two written by anthropologists -had been circulated in advance: "A Sociocultural View of Hausa Musical Activity," by David W. Ames, San Francisco State College; "The Artist Archetype in Gola Culture,"

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by Mr. d'Azevedo; "A Yoruba Master Carver: Duga of Meko," by William B. Bascom, University of California, Berkeley; "Aesthetic Value and Professionalism in African Art: Three Cases from the Katanga Chokwe," by Daniel J. Crowley, University of California, Davis; "The Exposition and Imposition of Order: Artistic Expression in Fang Culture," by J. W. Fernandez, Dartmouth College; "The Bala (Basongye) Musician," by Mr. Merriam; "The Role of the Carver in Anang Society," by John C. Messenger, Indiana University; "The Musician in Akan Society," by J. H. Kwabena Nketia, University of Ghana; "Yoruba Artistic Criticism," by Robert F. Thompson, Yale University; "Ingkyagu as Artists in Marghi Society," by James H. Vaughan, Jr., University of Cincinnati. Discussants were K. Peter Etzkorn of the University of Nevada, John Ladd of Brown University, and Messrs. Mills and Sieber. The papers are being revised for possible publication as a collection under the editorship of Mr. d'Azevedo. The committee regarded this conference as an important first step in directing attention to social science research on the arts, and hopes that the impetus generated by the conference to advance such research will not be lost.

sity. The volume will also contain an introductory chapter by Mr. Hess, a concluding chapter by Mrs. Rheingold, and introductions by Mr. Stevenson for each chapter. In addition to authors and the members of the committee, Francis H. Palmer, Institute for Child Development and Experimental Education, City University of New York, and Milton Trapold, University of Minnesota, attended the conference; and Robert Klein, University of Minnesota, assisted in the organization and conduct of the conference. CONTEMPORARY CHINA (Joint with American Council of Learned Societies) John M. H. Lindbeck (chairman), Alexander Eckstein, John K. Fairbank, Walter Galenson, Robert A. Scalapino, G. William Skinner, George E. Taylor, Mary C. Wright; staff. Bryce Wood. Support for expansion of the joint committee's program has been made available by the Ford Foundation in the amount of $1,000,000 for the next five years. Under the expanded program, grants will continue to be offered to individuals for research on contemporary China (the period since 1949) and, in addition, for research on the Chinese Revolution of 1911 and the Republican period (1911-49), on the Communist areas of North Korea, North Vietnam, and Outer Mongolia, and on relations between mainland China and contiguous areas since 1911. A new category of grants for cross-disciplinary study and research will be available to historians of China who are interested in work on the post-Imperial period. The new funds also provide further support for conferences under the committee's auspices, particularly in the fields of political science and Communist Chinese law. The committee with the Joint Committee on Slavic Studies held a conference on "Soviet and Chinese Communism: Similarities and Differences" at the Tahoe Alumni Center of the University of California, Berkeley, June 13-17. The purpose of the conference was to make a start at comparison of some aspects of the development of Communist ideologies, policies, and institutions in China and the Soviet Union, since such comparisons are difficult for a number of reasons-the relative lack. of available data about China; the small number of social scientists who have engaged in research on China, compared to those who have studied the Soviet Union for a longer period; and the relative inaccessibility of China. The sessions of the conference were devoted mainly to discussion of prepared papers on the following subjects: elements in pre-Communist thought and institutions relevant to the establishment of Communist rule; the Communist party: transformations after the assumption of power; law and its function; social structure and social change; freedom and control; strategies and tactics of economic development; Russia, China, and the world; theory, method, and summary. Predictions about Chinese developments on the basis of the Russian experience were regarded as hazardous by the 50 participants in the conference, who considered a number

COMPARATIVE DEVELOPMENTAL BEHAVIOR Harold W. Stevenson (chairman), Eckhard H. Hess, Harriet L. Rheingold. The committee held its second conference on learned and . . nonlearned behavior in immature organisms at Stillwater, ~ Minnesota, June 13-17. The purpose of the conference was to provide opportunity for critical review and discussion of papers prepared for a volume tentatively entitled "Early Behavior: Comparative and Developmental Approaches," which is expected to be published in 1966. The subjects of the papers and their authors are: sexual imprinting in altricial birds, Erich Klinghammer, University of Chicago; development of learning in infra-primate mammals, Bryon A. Campbell, Princeton University; development of handedness in cats and rhesus monkeys, J. M. Warren, Pennsylvania State University; concepts of ethology and their significance for the study of human behavior, Irenaus Eibl-Eibesfeldt, Max-Planck-Institut, Seewiesen, German Federal Republic; learning, motivation, and ingestive behavior in the neonatal dog, Walter C. Stanley, Laboratory of Psychology, National Institute of Mental Health; development of learning in the primate, Robert R. Zimmerman, Cornell University; motivational aspects of social responsiveness in young chimpanzees, William A. Mason, Delta Regional Primate Research Center, Tulane University; visual perception and experience in early infancy: a brief glance at the hidden side of behavior development, Robert L. Fantz, Western Reserve University; sucking and looking: two congenitally organized patterns of behavior in the human newborn, William Kessen, Yale University; experimental studies of appetitional behavior in human newborns, Hanus Papousek, Institute for the Care of Mother and Child, Prague; studies of learning in the human infant, Lewis P. Lipsitt, Brown Univer-

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of factors to be unique in one or the other country. The conference was deemed particularly useful in indicating the present status of comparative studies of Communist societies. It is hoped that the proceedings, which are to be published by the University of Washington Press, may stimulate new and more rigorous research on some questions raised but not answered at the conference. Funds for the expenses of a conference on a reappraisal of the Chinese Revolution of 1911, organized by Mrs. Wright and scheduled to be held in Portsmouth, N.H. on August 22-27, 1965, were provided by the Joint Committee on Contemporary China. ECONOMY OF CHINA Simon Kuznets (chairman), Walter Galenson (director of research), Abram Bergson, Alexander Eckstein, TaChung Liu; staff, Paul Webbink. Three new studies have been undertaken under the auspices of the committee: M. Gardner Clark of Cornell University has begun research for a monograph dealing with aid to China by the Soviet Union and satellite countries. Edwin F. Jones is to spend the academic year 1965-66, on leave from the U.S. Department of State, in research on recent economic policy in China. Dwight H. Perkins of Harvard University has begun a comprehensive study of Chinese economic history. The limited supply of copies of "The Economy of Mainland China, 1949-1963: A Bibliography of Materials in English," compiled by Nai-Ruenn Chen, which had been made available to interested libraries and individuals upon request, was exhausted early in the summer. Additional copies have been produced, and may be requested from the office of the committee, 2500 Durant Avenue, Apartment 307, Berkeley, California 94704. The committee is continuing its search for qualified economists who may be interested in undertaking additional studies of the Chinese economy. Among the research areas which have been given a high priority in this respect are agriculture, the handicraft industries, and demography.

Malcolm H. Gotterer, Associate Professor of Business Administration, Pennsylvania State University, for study with T. B. Steel, Jr., Head, Information Processing Staff, System Development Corporation, of simulation of conflict resolution; Werner F. Grunbaum, Professor of Political Science, University _ of Houston, for study with Ithiel de Sola Pool, Professor of . , Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, of computer simulation of voting behavior; Roy Lachman, Associate Professor of Psychology, State University of New York at Buffalo, for study with Lee W. Gregg, Professor of Psychology, Carnegie Institute of Technology, of use of Information Processing Language-V and other computer languages in simulation of memory and language behavior; Rosa C. Mann, Director, Research Unit, School of Social Work, University of Puerto Rico, for study with Ithiel de Sola Pool, Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, of methods of simulation; Sol L. Rabin, Ph.D. candidate in regional science, University of Pennsylvania, for study with George W. Evans, II, Head, Mathematical Sciences Department, Stanford Research Institute, of computer simulation of armed combat; John G. Wallace, Ph.D. candidate in psychology, University of Bristol, for study with Herbert A. Simon, Professor of Administration and Psychology, Carnegie Institute of Technology, of use of Information Processing Language-V and computer techniques in research on children's thought processes.

Applications for grants under this program, which provide for spending up to 15 days at a computer installation for intensive training arranged with a particular investigator, will be accepted at any time. TRANSNATIONAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

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Leon Festinger (chairman), Leonardo Ancona, Jaap Koekebakker, John T. Lanzetta, Serge Moscovici, Ithiel de Sola Pool, Ragnar Rommetveit, Stanley Schachter.

SIMULATION OF PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL PROCESSES Bert F. Green, Jr. (chairman), Robert P. Abelson, James S. Coleman, Robert K. Lindsay, Philip J. Stone. The committee has made 8 additional grants for intensive study of computer simulation programs: Richard F. Barton, Associate Professor of Business Administration, University of Kansas, for study with Gerald H. Shure, Decision Processes Staff, System Development Corporation, of computer simulation of subjects in experimental studies of bargaining behavior; Phillip L. Emerson, Ph.D. candidate in psychology, Washington State University, for study with Leonard Uhr, Research Psychologist, Mental Health Research Institute, University of Michigan, of simulating processes of pattern recognition, specifically, testing a hypothesis concerning the necessity of eye movements in normal form perception;

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At the committee's conference in Frascati in December (see Items, December 1964, page 56) the participants elected an independent group to be concerned with forming an organization of social psychologists from different European countries so that they could have further opportunities to meet personally, to learn more about each other's work, and establish a basis for continuing communication and interchange of ideas. At the committee's request the Council provided funds for meetings of this independent group, which has set up a European Association for the Advancement of Experimental Social Psychology. The committee has cooperated with European groups in planning two summer training sessions for the purpose of training younger European social psychologists in research methodology. The first of these, the European Summer School on Social-psychological Problems in Organizations, was held in The Hague from July 15 to August 11, 1965, in collaboration with the European Foundation for Social Psychology and the Netherlands Universities Foundation for International Cooperation, and under the direction of Mr. Koekebakker. Members of the faculty included Morton Deutsch, Teachers College, Columbia University; Fred E. Emery, Tavistock Institute of Human Relations; Claude Faucheux, University of Paris; Claude Flament,

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University of Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence; Phil Herbst, Technical University of Norway; Jozef M. Nuttin, Jr., University of Louvain; Robert B. Zajonc, University of Michigan. It is hoped that the second institute on research methodology can be held from August 15 to September 15,

1966 at the University of Louvain, under joint sponsorship of the committee and the European Association for the Advancement of Experimental Social Psychology. The committee in charge of plans consists of Messrs. Moscovici (chairman), Nuttin, and Schachter.

PERSONNEL FOREIGN AREA FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

training and research in the United States and Kenya on the problems of economic development and integration of the local government system in Kenya. Herbert M. Cole, Ph.D. candidate in art, Columbia University, for Ibo language training, multidisciplinary course work, and research in the United States, England, and Nigeria on Ibo art. Richard T. Curley, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for multidisciplinary area studies and research in the United States and Uganda on ethnic identity and culture change among the Lango of Northern Uganda. Clive M. Davis, Ph.D. in psychology, University of Iowa, for multidisciplinary course work, training in an Mrican language, and research in the United States and East Africa. John D. Esseks, Ph.D. candidate in government, Harvard University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Ghana, England, and the United States on the policies of the Ghana Government toward foreign private enterprise, 1957-64 (renewal). Steven M. Feierman, Ph.D. candidate in history, Northwestern University, for Swahili language training and research in Germany and Tanzania on the history of Shambala, 1800-1930 (renewal). Elon H. Gilbert, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Stanford University, for research in Nigeria on the marketing of domestic food crops in Northern Nigeria (renewal).

In the third year of administration of the Foreign Area Fellowship Program by the Social Science Research Council and American Council of Learned Societies, fellowships have been awarded for study of five major world areas. As of August 1, the following 207 appointments have been accepted for 1965-66 (a few additional appointments are expected): African Studies Program

Corinne P. Armstrong, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles, for Portuguese and Sasoto language training and multidisciplinary course work. Dan R. Aronson, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Chicago, for Yoruba language training, multidisciplinary area studies, and research in the United States and Nigeria on the Ijebu Yoruba in Western Nigeria. Joel D. Barkan, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Los Angeles, for completion of degree requirements, course work in sociology, and research in the United States on modem African elites. Lucy C. Behrman, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Boston University, for historical research in Paris and Senegal (renewal). Paula D. Ben-Amos, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Indiana University, for Bini language training and research in the United States and Nigeria on the structure and function of the wood carvers' guild of the Bini in Western Nigeria. Gerald J. Bender, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Los An~eles, for completion of degree requirements, multidisoplinary course work, and Portuguese language training. Fred J. Berg, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Wisconsin, for research in London and Kenya on the growth and development of the city of Mombasa during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (renewal). Rene A. Bravmann, Ph.D. candidate in art, Indiana University, for museum study, Twi language training, and research in Europe and Ghana on the art of the Brong of central Ghana. Louis Brenner, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for multidisciplinary course work and research in Nigeria on Bornu under Sheikh Muhammad AI-Amin AI-Kanemi (renewal). Everett W. Chard, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Berkeley, for Swahili language

James D. Graham, Ph.D. candidate in history, Northwestern University, for research in Tanzania on changing socioeconomic patterns in a district of the Southern Highlands Province of Tanzania. Isebill V. Gruhn, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Berkeley, for a study in Ethiopia, Nigeria, London, Paris, and the United States of the Commission for Technical Cooperation in Africa South of the Sahara. Nicholas J. Gubser, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Oxford University, for multidisciplinary course work and Amharic and Galla language training in Paris (renewal). Fred M. Hayward, Ph.D. candidate in politics, Princeton University, for French language training and research in France, Sierra Leone, and Guinea on the formation of jolitically oriented organizations in Sierra Leone an Guinea. Raymond F. Hopkins, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Yale University, for Swahili language training, study of anthropology, and research in the United States and Tanzania on political role recruitment and role expectations in Tanzania. 35


Kennell A. Jackson, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Los Angeles, for completion of degree requirements in history relating to Africa. Conrad P. Kottak, Ph.D. in anthropology, Columbia University, for research in Paris and Malagasy on the expansion of wet rice cultivation in south central Malagasy. William F. Lye, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Los Angeles, for research in the United States, London, South Africa, Bechuanaland, and Basutoland on the tribal history of the interior high veld of South Africa. Wyatt MacGaffey, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles, for completion of research in the Republic of the Congo and Belgium on social structure and evolution of customary law among the BaKongo (renewal). Irving L. Markovitz, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Berkeley, for preparation of a dissertation on ideology, opposition, and consensus in a developing area (renewal). Stuart A. Marks, Ph.D. candidate in ecology, Michigan State University, for multidisciplinary studies relating to Zambia or East Africa, and African language training in London. Robert F. Melson, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for multidisciplinary course work and completion of a dissertation on the relationship between government and labor in Nigeria. Robert C. Mitchell, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Northwestern University, for Yoruba language training and research in the United States and Nigeria on the role of the Aladura Religious Movement in Yoruba social change. Paul Newman, Ph.D. candidate in linguistics, University of California, Los Angeles, for a linguistic and ethnographic study in Nigeria of the Tera-speaking peoples of Northern Nigeria.

Jack R. Stauder, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Cambridge University, for completion of research in Ethiopia on the ecology and social organization of the Majangir of Southwest Ethiopia (renewal). Richard E. Stryker, Ph.D. candidate in political science, A University of California, Los Angeles, for research i n . Senegal and Ivory Coast on political processes in an Ivory Coast community as part of a test of the relevance of Western theories of decision making. Rodney N. Vlasak, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for multidisciplinary course work and research in Nigeria among the Fulani and Hausa groups on the role of cognitive factors in mediating interpersonal encounters.

Asia and Near East Studies Program Lawrence A. Babb, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Rochester, for Hindi language training and multidisciplinary course work relating to India. Frank P. Baldwin, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for completion of research in Japan and Korea on the Korean Independence Movement of March 1919 with reference to Japanese colonial administration (renewal). Wayne E. Begley, Ph.D. candidate in art history, University of Pennsylvania, for research in India, Afghanistan. and Ceylon on the history and chronology of the wall paintings at Ajanta. Joseph N. Bell, Ph.D. candidate in comparative literature, Princeton University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Egypt and the United. . States on secular love in late classical Arabic literature., (renewal). James A. Bill, Ph.D. candidate in politics, Princeton University, for Persian language training and research in the United States, London. Paris. and Iran on Iranian politics and modernization (renewal). John A. Brim. Ph.D. candidate in anthropology. Stanford University. for Chinese language training. multidiscip.linary course work. and completion of degree reqUIrements. Morton Brown. Ph.D. candidate in sociology. University of California, Berkeley, for Chinese language training and multidisciplinary course work relating to Asia. Philip B. Calkins, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Chicago, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in England and the United States on Mughal administration in seventeenth- and eighteenthcentury Bengal (renewal).

Philip A. Noss, Ph.D. candidate in linguistics, University of Wisconsin, for completion of degree requirements in African language and literature. Amnon Orent, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Boston University, for Amharic language training and research in Ethiopia on social change among the Kaffa peoples of Southwest Ethiopia. Arnold G. Rubin, Ph.D. candidate in art history, Indiana University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Nigeria and the United States on the arts of the Jukun-speaking peoples of Nigeria (renewal).

Paul Friedland, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Washington, for Japanese language training and research in the United States and Japan on institutional aspects of the military reforms of Wang An-shih (renewal).

Renaud Santerre, Ph.D. candidate in ethnology, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, for research in Nigeria, Camerouns, and Paris on the ethno-linguistic problems of the Peuls of Northern Cameroun since independence. John S. Saul, Ph.D. candidate in politics, Princeton University, for Swahili language training and research in Tanzania on its political history.

Lois A. Giffen, Ph.D. candidate in language and literature, Columbia University, for research in the United States, Europe, and Turkey on the history of Arabic literature on the theory of profane love, its sources, and varieties. Mary Lou Green, Ph.D. candidate in Turkish literature, Columbia University, for completion of research and

Dick W. Simpson, Ph.D. candidate in government, Indiana University, for research in London and Sierra Leone on political recruitment of urban inHuential citizens in Sierra Leone. 36

e


Matthew V. Lamberti, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for Japanese language training and research in Tokyo on a political biography of Tokugawa N ariaki. Richard J. Landry, Ph.D. candidate in government, Cornell University, for Japanese language training and multidisciplinary course work including Chinese law. Robert J. Lapham, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, University of Michigan, for research in Morocco on the social and economic organizations of peasants in the Sais Plain. Steven I. Levine, Ph.D. candidate in government, Harvard University, for multidisciplinary course work relating to Asia. Harry M. Lindquist, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Xansas, for Japanese and Chinese language training and course work relating to China. Stanley B. Lubman, J.S.D. candidate in comparative law, Columbia University, for Chinese language training and research in Hong Kong on the nature and role of law in Communist China. Arsenio P. Martinez, Ph.D. candidate in Iranian Studies, Columbia University, for course work in sociology, completion of degree requirements, and preparation of a dissertation in the United States and Iran on a history of the Il-Xanid state. Michael J. Mazer, Ph.D. candidate in government, Harvard University, for Hindi language training, multidisciplinary course work relating to South Asia. and research in the United States and India on panchayati raj's performance as an initiator of economic change.

preparation of a dissertation in Turkey and the United States on the poetry of Kaygusuz Abdal (renewal). Ivan P. Hall, Ph.D. candidate in history and Far Eastern languages, Harvard University, for completion of research and preparation of a dIssertation in the United States and Japan on the life and thought of Mori Arinori. Robert L. Hardgrave, Ir., Ph.D. candidate in political science, University 0 Chicago, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertat~on in Londo.n and the United States on the behaVIOral dynamICS of political change in Tamilnad, India (renewal). Boruch K. Helman, Ph.D. candidate in government and Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University, for completion of course requirements, Arabic language trainmg, and research in the United States on Islam as a contemporary political factor (renewal). Paul G. Hiebert, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Minnesota, for preparation of a dissertation on a socioeconomic study of the Amrahbad Plateau in India (renewal). William G. Irons, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Michigan, for field study in Iran of a nomadic or seminomadic tribe. John C. Jamieson, Ph.D. candidate in Oriental languages, University of California, Berkeley, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Korea and the United States on a mid-twelfth century Korean history (renewal). Paula S. Johnson, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for Chinese language training, study of Chinese history, preparation for examinations, and research on Sino-Japanese relations.

William J. McCoy, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in linguistics, Cornell University, for completion of research in Hong Kong on a phonological description of the four major subdialects of the Szeyap region, Kwangtung Province (renewal).

Delmos T. Jones, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Come If University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Thailand and the Umted States on the nature and extent of variation among Lahu villages (renewal).

Bruce W. McGowan, Ph.D. candidate in Turkish history, Columbia University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Turkey, Yugoslavia, and the United States on a transcription of an Ottoman land survey (renewal).

David N. Keightley, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for Chinese language training and research in the United States and Taiwan on public works in Pre-Ch'in China.

George A. McGrane, Ph.D. candidate in Asian history, Columbia University, for Korean language training, completion of degree requirements, and research in the United States, Korea, and Japan on postwar JapaneseKorean relations.

Thomas L. Kennedy, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for completion of degree requirements, course work. in Western European history, Chinese language training, and research in the United States and Taiwan on modernization of the Chinese munitions industry.

Peter M. Mitchell, Ph.D. candidate in history, Indiana University, for study of Chinese history, and Japanese and Chinese language training (renewal).

Ian J. Kerr, Ph.D. candidate in history, and M.A. candidate in sociology, University of Minnesota, for Urdu and Hindi language training and course work in sociology.

Roy P. Mottahedeh, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for study of sociology and government relating to the Middle East and research in Europe, Istanbul, and Baghdad on the history of Western Persia in the late tenth and early eleventh centuries.

Lawrence D. Kessler, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Chicago, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Taiwan and the United States on the early years of the K'ang-hsi emperor, 1662-84 (renewal).

David B. Nissman, Ph.D. candidate in Turkic Studies, Columbia University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Turkey and the United States on an analysis of Kipchak manuscripts (renewal).

Richard A. Kraus, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Harvard University, for Chinese language training and research in Taiwan on the economic determinants of the growth of the modem Chinese textile industry, 1890-1937.

Friedrich G. Notehelfer, Ph.D. candidate in history, Princeton University, for course work in Japanese politics and research in Japan on Kotoku Shusui. the Meiji socialist and anarchist. 37


Charles D. Smith, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in history, Univer-' sity of Michigan, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Egypt and the United States on the thought and political activity of Muhammad Husayn Haykal (renewal).

James A. O'Brien, Ph.D. candidate in Japanese literature, Indiana University, for Japanese language training and multidisciplinary course work relating to modern Japan. Michel C. Oksenberg, Ph.D. candidate in government, Columbia University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, and the United States on the political process in rural Communist China, 1955-58 (renewal).

e

Ellis G. Smith, Ph.D. candidate in Tibetan Studies, University of Washington, for completion of research in India and Nepal on a comparison of the religious and social philosophies of several Tibetan authors with the Klu sgrub dgongs rgyan, an attempted synthesis of Buddhism and Marxism (renewal).

Roger K. Paget, Ph.D. candidate in government, Cornell University, for research in Indonesia on the effect of central government ideologies on Javanese society.

Henry D. Smith, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for multidisciplinary course work and research in the United States and Japan on Japanese intellectual history in the Taisho era.

Ronald Provencher, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Malaysia and the United States on social interaction and urbanization among the Malays of Kuala Lumpur (renewal).

Richard H. Solomon, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for completion of research in Hong Kong and the United States on Chinese cultural attitudes toward social authority and political leadership (renewal).

Robert R. Reed, Ph.D. candidate in geography, University of California, Berkeley, for Malayan and Dutch language training and course work relating to Southeast Asia (renewal).

George W. Spencer, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Berkeley, for research in the United States and India on the imperial conquests of the Chola Empire in eleventh-century South India.

John F. Richards, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Berkeley, for Persian language training and preparation for examinations in the history of South Asia.

Thomas R. Stauffer, Ph.D. candidate in economics and Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University, for completion of degree requirements and course work in the humanities relating to the Middle East.

Carl A. Riskin, Ph.D. candidate in economics, University of California, Berkeley, for Chinese language training, course work in political science, and research in the United States and Hong Kong on aspects of economic development since 1957 in Kwangtung Province (renewal).

Donald Y. Sur, Ph.D. candidate in ethnomusicology, University of California, Los Angeles, for completion of research in Korea on Korean court music (renewal).

Arthur L. Rosenbaum, Ph.D. candidate in history, Yale University, for completion of research in Tokyo and England on the Peking-Mukden Railway, 1880-1911 (renewal).

Glen W. Swanson, Ph.D. candidate in history, Indiana_ University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Vienna, Paris, London, and the United States on the Ottoman military institution from the reign of Abdul Hamid II to World War I (renewal).

John E. Rothenberger, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for colloquial Arabic language training and research in Lebanon on the system of law and conflict resolution in a Sunni Muslim village (renewal).

Royall Tyler, M.A. candidate in history, Columbia University, for completion of degree and East Asian Institute Certificate requirements and beginning of work toward Ph.D. in Chinese and Japanese.

Stuart A. Schlegel, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Chicago, for Tiruray language training, multidisciplinary course work relating to Southeast Asia, and research in the United States and the Philippines on Philippine social structure.

Richard N. Verdery, Ph.D. candidate in Oriental Studies, Princeton University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in the United States on the chronicles of the Egyptian historian Abd-al-Rahman al Jabarti.

James C. Scott, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Yale University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Malaysia and the United States on bureaucratic behavior, personality, and political beliefs of civil servants in Malaya (renewal).

John Waterbury, Ph.D. candidate in government, Columbia University, for Moroccan Arabic language training and research in Morocco on the organization of political support for the Moroccan monarchy. John R. Watt, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for research in the United States on local government in China, 1736-1850 (renewal).

Carl G. Sesar, Ph.D. candidate in Japanese literature, Columbia University, for course work in social sciences and research in the United States and Japan on critical analysis and translation of J apanese No plays with Chinese materials as the central theme.

John K. Whitmore, Ph.D. candidate in history, Cornell University, for research in Paris, Vietnam, and Japan on a fifteenth-century history of Vietnam.

Richard J. Smethurst, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Michigan, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Japan and the United States on the Teikoku zaigo gunjinkai and its role in dissemination of military ideology to the general public (renewal).

Alexander B. Woodside, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for Chinese language training and A, research in the United States, Taiwan, Vietnam, and. Japan on Vietnam and the Chinese institutional model (renewal). 38


./ Latin American Studies Program

A

•

training and research in the United States and Mexico on culture and personality in a village in Morelos (renewal). Susan B. Kaufman, Ph.D. candidate in government, C0lumbia University, for completion of course requirements, preparation for examinations, and Portuguese language training. Peter!. Klaren, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of CalIfornia, Los Angeles, for Spanish language training, course work in sociology and political science, and research in the United States and Peru on the Partido Aprista Peruano, 1918-30. Linda F. Leopold, M.A. candidate in history, Columbia University, for completion of degree and Institute of Latin American Studies Certificate requirements. Joseph L. Love, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Brazil and the United States on the Republican Party of Rio Grande do SuI in Brazilian politics, 1918-42 (renewal). Mary . Lo~enthal, Ph.D. ca!1didate in history, Columbia Umverslty, for completlon of course requirements, preparation for examinations, and preliminary research (renewal). James Malloy, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Pittsburgh, for Spanish language training and research in Bolivia on pohtical change in Bolivia since 1952 (renewal). Paul I. Mandell, Ph.D. candidate in geography, Columbia University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Brazil and the United States on the changing patterns of land use in Southern Gohis (renewal). Peter G. Marzahl, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Wisconsin, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Ecuador, Colombia, and the United States on the Cabildo of Popayan in the seventeenth century (renewal).

David P. Barkin, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Yale 'l!niv:rsity, f?r research and. preparation of a dissertatlon 10 ~exl~o ~nd the Umted States on comparative effects of 1Ostltutlonal change on small-scale agriculture in Mexico (renewal). David E. Blank, Ph.D. candidate in government, Columbia University, for Spanish language training and research in the United States and Venezuela on the role of the Office of Co-ordination and Planning in Venezuela since 1959. William R. Cline, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Yale University, for study of Latin American politics and anthropology, and research in the United States and Brazil on the economic need for land reform in Brazil. Carlos E. Cortes, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of New Mexico, for multidisciplinary course work and research in the United States and Brazil on the triumph of Rio Grande do SuI in Brazilian national politics, 1920-64. David M. Davidson, Ph.D. candidate in history, Yale Univ~rsity, for ml!lti~isciplinary course work and preparatlon for exammatlons. John T. Deiner, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Rutgers - The State University, for Spanish language training, multidisciplinary course work, and research in Argentina and the United States on the inter-American labor organization in Argentina. Ronald H. Dolkart, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Los Angeles, for completion of research an~ preparation of a dissertation in Argentina and the Umted States on the nature of Argentine Fascism in the twentieth century (renewal). Matthew D. Edel, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Yale University, for Portuguese language training, and multidisciplinary course work. June E. Hahner, Ph.D. candidate in history, Cornell University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Brazil and the United States on Brazilian civilian-military relations, 1889-98 (renewal).

R. Herbert Minnich, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Universityof Florida, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on a comparison of two Mennonite communities in Brazil (renewal).

Michael McD. Hall, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for research in Brazil on its immigration policy, 1808-1930.

Ricardo Julio Moran, Ph.D. candidate in economics, University of California, Berkeley, for completion of course requirements, preparation for examinations, and multidisciplinary course work.

Emil B. Haney, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in agricultural economics, University of Wisconsin, for multidisciplinary course work relating to Latin America.

David J. Myers, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Los Angeles, for course work in Latin American history and economics, Spanish language training, and preliminary research (renewal).

John H. Hann, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Te~as, for study of political science and research in the Umted States and Brazil on its foreign policy toward its Spanish American neighbors of the Plata Bas1O, 1808-70.

Michael G. Owen, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Yale University, for multidisciplinary course work and preliminary research for a dissertation on the Mayan languages (renewal).

Jon P .. Hegga~, P~.D. candi~ate in political science, Universltr of Ill!nOlS, fo~ Spamsh la.nguage training, course work 10 Lat10 Amencan educatIOn and economics, and research in the United States and Colombia on the influence of contrasting educational patterns on the political attitudes and behavior of students in Colombia.

P. David Pavy, III, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Tulane University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Colombia and the United States on the Negro in Western Colombia: an investigation of social change and personality (renewal).

Cynthia N. Hewitt, M.I.A. candidate in Hispanic Studies, Columbia University, for completion of degree requirements and multidisciplinary course work.

Carlos Manuel Pelaez, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Columbia University, for multidisciplinary course work and Portuguese language training.

John ÂĽ. Ingham, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, UniversIty of California, Berkeley, for Spanish language 39


Robert D. Reischauer, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Columbia University, for completion of course requirements with an emphasis on Latin America. Russell O. Salmon, II, Ph.D. candidate in Spanish language and literature, Columbia University, for courses in the social sciences relating to Latin America and research in the United States and Chile on the concept of the "roto" as reflected in Chilean literature. Claire H. Siegelbaum, Ph.D. candidate in government, Harvard University, for completion of course requirements, multidisciplinary course work, and Spanish language training. Harold D. Sims, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Florida, for research in the United States and Mexico on the expulsion of the Spaniards from Mexico, 1827-29 (renewal). Alan P. Sloan, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for research in Venezuela on the role of interest groups in the political process in Latin America. Berkley A. Spencer, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Cornell University, for multidisciplinary course work and research in the United States and Guatemala on the differentiation and solidarity of a Guatemalan village in the context of an intervillage system. Alfred C. Stepan, Ph.D. candidate in government, Columbia University, for multidisciplinary course work. Judith D. Tendler, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Columbia University, for preparation of a dissertation on the role of the electric power sector in the economic expansion of Brazil (renewal). Agnes E. Toward, Ph.D. candidate in education, University of Texas, for preparation of a dissertation on Brazilian educational administration since 1961 (renewal). Frederick S. Weaver, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Cornell University, for Spanish language training, multidisciplinary course work, and research in the United States and Chile on the economic development of Chile. James A. Whittington, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Tulane University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Colombia and the United States on the family, kinship, and status in the Departamento del Choco (renewal).

research on use by the Soviet Union and the United States of strategic military power to achieve political objectives (renewal). Frank L. Casale, M.A. candidate in government, Harvar_d University, for completion of program in Russian R gional Studies. Paul M. Cocks, Ph.D. candidate in government, Harvard University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on the historical and institutional role of the Party Control Commission and its successors in the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China (renewal). Stephen F. Cohen, Ph.D. candidate in government, Columbia University, for preparation of a dissertation on the political thought of N. I. Bukharin (renewal). Edwin G. Dolan, M.A. candidate in economics, and Russian and East European Institute Certificate candidate, Indiana University, for completion of program in East European studies. Zvi Y. Gitelman, Ph.D. candidate in government, Columbia University, for preparation for examinations and research on Communism and Jewish nationalism (renewal). Peter B. Golden, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for study of Soviet economics, Georgian language training, completion of course requirements, and preparation for examinations (renewal). Pierre R. Hart, Ph.D. candidate in literature, University of Wisconsin, for completion of course requirements, preparation for exammations, and research on the image of the City of St. Petersburg in Russian literature.

John D. Wirth, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for preparation of a dissertation on the role of students and opinion in Brazilian politics (renewal).

Frank L. Ingram, Ph.D. candidate in language and literature, Indiana University, for research and preparation of a dissertation on Koz'ma Prutkov in the context of Russian humorous satirical literature (re-newal).

Soviet and East European Studies Program

Mildred R. Howe, Ph.D. candidate in economics, u n a versity of California, Berkeley, for multidisciplina course work, and research on factors affecting income distribution in the Soviet Union. Thomas W. Hoya, LL.M. and Russian Institute Certificate candidate, Columbia University, for Russian language training and completion of course requirements (renewal). Ellen Stiskin Hurwitz, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for course work including Russian geography, literature, and economics.

Robert G. Jensen, Assistant Professor of Geography, Syracuse University, for intensive Russian conversationallanguage traming, study of Soviet economics and politics, and research in the Soviet Union, Poland, and the United States on Soviet agricultural regionalization.

John T. Alexander, Ph.D. candidate in history, Indiana University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on the Russian government and Pugachev's revolt (renewal).

A. Ross Johnson, Ph.D. candidate in government, Columbia University, for language training and completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Yugoslavia, German Federal RepUblic, and the United States on the dynamics of ideological change in Yugoslavia, 1948-54 (renewal).

Kendall E. Bailes, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for completion of course work and oral examinations (renewal). Raymond W. Baker, M.A. candidate in government, Harvard University, for intensive Russian language training and course work in Russian Regional Studies.

Diane E. Kurop, M.A. candidate in language and literaA ture, and East European Institute Certificate candidate" Indiana University, for completion of program in East European studies.

Larry T. Caldwell, Ph.D. candidate in international rei atio~s, F!etcher .Scho~l of La~ and Diplomacy, Tufts Umversity, for mtensive RUSSIan language training and 40


Richard L. Rudolph, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Wisconsin, for research in the United States and Vienna on finance and industry in Bohemia, 18401914 (renewal). Joseph Schiebel, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Washington, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on early Russian Marxist concepts of pre-Capitalist Russian society (renewal). Donald V. Schwartz, Ph.D. candidate in flolitical science, and Russian Studies Certificate candidate, University of Wisconsin, for completion of course requirements, preliminary examinations, and interdisciplinary course work. Peter H. Solomon, Jr., M.A. candidate in public law and government, and Russian Institute Certificate candidate, Columbia University, for completion of program in Russian studies.

Ingrun Lafleur, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for completion of course requirements, language training, study of a discipline other than history, and preparation for examinations. IA Robert H. Legvold, Ph.D. candidate in international re~. lations, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, for intensive French language training, a course on social structure of the Soviet Union, and research in the United States, London, the Soviet Union, and Senegal on recent Soviet policy toward West Africa. Francis M. Leversedge, Ph.D. candidate in geography, University of Chicago, for multidisciplinary course work, including Russian language, relating to the Soviet Union (renewal). William B. Lincoln, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Chicago, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on Nicholas Milyutin and state reform, and course work in Soviet politics and economics. Linda L. Lubrano, Ph.D. candidate in government, Indiana University, for completion of course work and lan~age requirements, and preparation for examinations (renewal). Paul J. Marantz, Ph.D. candidate in government, Harvard University, for preparation for examinations and research on the evolution of Soviet ideology since Stalin (renewal). Harold A. McFarlin, Ph.D. candidate in history and Russian Area Certificate candidate, Indiana University, for completion of course requirements and preliminary research for a dissertation. .a Gerald E. Mikkelson, Ph.D. candidate in literature, University of Wisconsin, for research on the relationship • of Pushkin's art to historical settings of his literary works. Thomas G. Pesek, Ph.D. candidate in history, Indiana University, for completion of a dissertation on Karel Havlicek and the origins of Czech political life (renewal). Geraldine M. Phipps, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Pennsylvania, for intensive Russian language training, multidisciplinary course work, and research in the United States and England on Russian-British relations in the seventeenth century. Mark Pinson, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for completion of a program in East European economics and government, and research in the United States, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and Turkey on relationships among the Ottoman reform movement, Balkan nationalism, and Russian policy, 1856-76.

Gerald B. Sperling, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Wisconsin, for preparation of a dissertation on Soviet industrial admmistration: Leninist roots and current applications (renewal). Gale Stokes, Ph.D. candidate in history, Indiana University, for intensive Serbo-Croatian and Russian language training, completion of course work, and preparation for examinations (renewal). John R. Swanson, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Wisconsin, for completion of course requirements, Arabic language training, and research on Soviet policy toward Syria and Lebanon (renewal). Roser L. Thiede, Ph.D. candidate in geography, UniverSIty of Washington, for research and preparation of a dissertation on the changing location and development of industrial settlements in the Ukraine, 1870-1914. Charles E. Timberlake, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Washington, for research in Helsinki on nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian society and the nature of Zemstvo constitutionalism. Ben T. Trout, Ph.D. candidate in government, and Russian and East European Institute Certificate candidate, Indiana University, for intensive Russian language training and East European studies. Aurele J. Violette, Ph.D. candidate in history, and Russian Area Studies Certificate candidate, Ohio State University, for intensive Russian language training and completion of program in Russian studies. Elizabeth A. Weinberg, M.A. candidate in Russian Regional Studies, Harvard University, for completion of course work. Robert T. Whittaker, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in literature, Indiana University, for completion of preparation for examinations and research on A. A. Grigor'ev and Russian literary criticism in the 1850's and early 1860's (renewal).

John B. Quigley, Jr., M.A. and LL.B. candidate, Harvard University, for course work in law and Soviet area studies (renewal). William G. Rosenberg, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on the Russian Constitutional Democratic Party (Kadet), from February 1917 until its demise in emigration (renewal).

Paul R. Willging, M.LA. candidate in international relations, and Russian Institute Certificate candidate, Columbia University, for intensive Russian language training and completion of program in Russian studies.

tA Andrew ..

Betty Jo Winchester, Ph.D. candidate in history, Indiana University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on Hungarian-German relations, 193739 (renewal).

Rossos, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for research in the United States, Yugoslavia, Greece, Vienna, and Prague on Russia and the Balkans, 1908-14. 41


Western European Studies Program

Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in Latin American Studies

William B. Cohen, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for research in Senegal on colonial administrators in French West Africa, 1880-1914.

Under this separate program administered by the Foreign Area Fellowship Program during 1964-65, five appointments .. were made:

Stanley A. Corngold, Ph.D. candidate in literature, Cornell University, for research in Zurich, Tiibingen, and the United States on comparative German, English, and French Romanticism, and training in philology and philosophy.

Michael D. Butler, Tunior Fellow in History, Society Fellows, Harvard University, for a study in Mexico of the effective sources of support for and opposition to land reform in Mexico since the late nineteenth century.

0"'"

Ronald K. Calgaard, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Kansas, for intensive Spanish language training and research in the United States and Chile on the current development of its economic planning activities. Francis A. Cancian, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Stanford University, for study of economics and research in the United States and Mexico on the effects of government programs on the production process and social structures of communities in Chiapas. Terence Grieder, Instructor in Art, University of Texas, for research in the United States, Mexico, Peru, and Ecuador on the forms of pre-Columbian art. Ronald H. McDonald, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Syracuse University, for research in Chile and Colombia on political party systems as instruments of national political integration.

Alexander J. De Grand, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Chicago, for intensive German language training, conversational Italian language training, and re-search in the United States, German Federal Republic, and Italy on the Action Franraise and Italian nationalism, 1900-15: the problem of influence. Edward C. Hansen, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, U niversity of Michigan, for research in Spain on the sharecropping system in the vineyard area of Catalonia. Gerald J. Hewitt, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Chicago, for completion of degree require-ments except the dissertation, course work in economics, French and German language training, and preparatory research. Gerald N. Izenberg, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for research in Zurich on the existentialist critique of psychoanalytic theory. Dominick C. LaCapra, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for course work in sociology and anthropology and research in England and France on the influence of Emile Durkheim's thought.

GRANTS FOR AFRICAN STUDIES In addition to the awards listed in the March issue of Items, the Joint Committee on African Studies has made • the following grant for research: Darius L. Thieme, Reference Librarian, Music Divisio Library of Congress, for research in Nigeria on Yoruba village musical practices (renewal).

Michael A. Ledeen, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Wisconsin, for German language training, preparation for examinations, intensive Italian language training, and research in the United States and Italy on the Fascist International, 1930-38.

GRANTS FOR RESEARCH ON CONTEMPORARY CHINA

Charles S. Maier, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on conservative politics in France, Germany, and Italy, 1918-24 (renewal).

In addition to the awards listed in the March issue of Items, the Joint Committee on Contemporary China has made the following grant for research:

Carl P. McCarthy, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for research in Liechtenstein on cultural change from an agricultural to a mixed agrarian and industrial society and the relationships between law and social control.

Olga Lang, Associate Professor of Russian Language and Literature, Swarthmore College, for research on the image of China and the Chinese as reflected in Russian literature in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Jack E. Reece, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for French and Italian language training, multidisciplinary course work relating to Western Europe, and studies relevant to a research project.

GRANTS FOR RESEARCH ON INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION

Dean B. Savage, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Columbia University, for completion of course work and intensive German and French language training.

In addition to the awards listed in the March issue of I terns, the Committee on International Organization has made the following grants for research:

Jane C. Schneider, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Michigan, for research in Italy on the patron-~lient relationship as a means of Italian political mtegratIon.

Georges Goriely, Director of Political Research, Institute of European Studies, Free University of Brussels, for research on the role of the Economic and Social Committee of the European Communities in their decisionmaking process. Youn& W. Kihl, Assistant Professor of. ~olitical Sciene Jumata College, for research on polItical processes in the International Civil Aviation Organization.

Rodney P. Stiefbold, Ph.D. candidate in public law and government, Columbia University, for research in Austria and the United States on social integration, mass political participation, and political stability in Austria.

42


BEN WILLERMAN 1917-1965 It is with deep sorrow and a continuing sense of loss that the death of Ben Willerman on June 21, 1965 is recorded "ere. A member of the Council's staff since October 1, 1963, on leave from the University of Minnesota, he was most highly esteemed and beloved by his associates in the work of the Council as by those in other organizations with which he had been affiliated. His devotion to the interests of the Council and of his own field of social psychology was constantly revealed in the steadfast attention that he gave unsparingly to innumerable tasks. His sensitive understanding, sympathy, and thoughtfulness, and his keen

sense of humor were warmly appreciated by all who knew him. The Council committees with which Ben Willerman worked as staff were those on Comparative Developmental Behavior, Genetics and Behavior, Learning and the Educational Process, Simulation of Psychological and Social Processes, Socialization and Social Structure, and Transnational Social Psychology. His many intellectual and administrative contributions to the development and execution of their programs have received grateful recognition from their members and other participants in their concerns, and will have enduring influence.

PUBLICATIONS The Brookings Quarterly Econometric Model of the United States, edited by James S. Duesenberry, Gary Fromm, Lawrence R. Klein, and Edwin Kuh. Sponsored by the Committee on Economic Stability. Chicago: Rand McNally & Company, and Amsterdam: North-Holland Publishing Company, October 1965. c. 800 pages. c. $9.00. Continuity and Change in Latin America, edited by John J. Johnson. Product of the conference held by the Joint Committee on Latin American Studies, January 30 - Feb.A ruary 2, 1963. Stanford: Stanford University Press, Sep. . tember 1964. 295 pages. $6.75. Economic Growth and Structure: Selected Essays, by Simon Kuznets. Based in part on work initiated under the auspices of the Committee on Economic Growth. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, September 1965. 386 pages. $7.50. Economic Transition in Africa, edited by Melville J. Herskovits and Mitchell Harwitz. Based on papers prepared for the conference on the economies of Sub-Saharan Africa, November 16-18, 1961, sponsored by the Committee on Economic Growth. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, August 1964. 462 pages. $7.95. Education and Economic Development, edited by C. Arnold Anderson and Mary Jean Bowman. Outgrowth of a conference, April 4-6, 1963, jointly sponsored by the Committee on Economic Growth and the University of Chicago Comparative Education Center. Chicago: AIdine Publishing Company, August 1965. c. 425 pages. $10.75. Education and Political Development, edited by James S. Coleman. Studies in Political Development 4, sponsored by the Committee on Comparative Politics. Princeton: Princeton University Press, June 1965. 632 pages. $10.00.

Political Culture and Political Development, edited by Lucian W. Pye and Sidney Verba. Studies in Political Development 5, sponsored by the Committee on Comparative Politics. Princeton: Princeton University Press, July 1965. 584 pages. $10.00. Population Trends in the United States: 1900 to 1960, by Irene B. Taeuber. U.S. Bureau of the Census Technical Paper No. 10. Based on work done under the program of the Committee on Population Census Monographs in cooperation with the Bureau of the Census. Washmgton, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, January 1965. 422 pages. $2.25. Postwar Economic Growth: Four Lectures, by Simon Kuznets. Based in part on work initiated under the auspices of the CommIttee on Economic Growth. Cambndge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, December 1964. 148 pages. $4.25. Quantitative Planning of Economic Policy: A Conference of the Social Science Research Council Committee on Economic Stability, edited by Bert G. Hickman. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, April 1965. 292 pages. $7.95. Social Science Research on Latin America: Report and Papers of a Seminar on Latin American Studies in the United States, Held at Stanford, California, July 8 - August 23, 1963, edited by Charles Wagley. New York: Columbia University Press, November 1964. 352 pages. $4.00. The Study of Urbanization, edited by Philip M. Hauser and Leo F. Schnore. Sponsored by the former Committee on Urbanization. New York: John Wiley & Sons, July 1965. 562 pages. $9.75.

Mathematical Learning, edited by Lloyd N. Morrisett and John Vinsonhaler. Monographs of the Society for Re- Studying Politics Abroad: Field Research in the Developing search in Child Development, Vol. 30, No.1 (Serial No. Areas, by Robert E. Ward, with Frank Bonilla, James S. ~ 99), July 1965. Report of a conference sponsored by the Coleman, Herbert H. Hyman, Lucian W. Pye, and Myron Weiner. Sponsored by the Committee on Comparative , . , former Committee on Intellective Processes Research. Chicago: Child Development Publications, University of Politics. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, August 1964. 254 pages. $2.50. Chicago Press. 150 pages. $3.00. 43


COUNCIL FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS OFFERED IN 1965-66: DATES FOR FILING APPLICATIONS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS OF AWARDS Applications for fellowships and grants offered by the Council during the coming year will be due, and awards will be announced, on or before the respective dates listed below. Because full consideration cannot be assured for late applications, and because preliminary correspondence is frequently necessary to determine under which program a given proposal should be submitted, prospective applicants should communicate with the Council if possible at least three weeks in advance of the pertinent closing date. Inquiries and requests for application forms should indicate the candidate's age, place of permanent residence, present position or activity, degrees held and degree currently sought if any, the general nature of the proposed training or research, and the duration and amount of support desired. A brochure describing the several programs is available on request addressed to Social Science Research Council Fellowships and Grants, 230 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10017.

• Grants for African Studies, applications, December 1965; awards, February 1, 1966

15,e

• Grants for Asian Studies, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N . Y. 10017, December 1, 1965; awards, about 12 weeks thereafter • Grants for Research on Contemporary China, applications, December 15, 1965; awards, February 1, 1966 • Grants for Latin American Studies, applications, December 15, 1965; awards, February 1, 1966 • Grants for Near and Middle Eastern Studies, applications, December 15, 1965; awards, February 1, 1966 • Grants for Slavic and East European Studies, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N. Y. 10017, December 15, 1965; awards, within 10 weeks thereafter Grants for Intensive Study of Computer Simulation Programs, applications at any time; awards, within 6 weeks after receipt of applications

Research Training Fellowships, applications, December 1, 1965; awards, March 15, 1966 Faculty Research Grants, first competition: applications, November 1, 1965; awards, January 3, 1966; second competition: applications, February 1, 1966; awards, April 1, 1966 Grants for Research on Governmental and Legal Processes, applications, December 1, 1965; awards, February 15, 1966 Grants for Research on International Organization, applications, December 1, 1965; awards, February 15, 1966

• Travel grants for international conferences on Slavic and East European Studies, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N. Y. 10017 • Foreign Area Fellowships, applications to be submitted to Foreign Area Fellowship Program, 444 Madiso. Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10022, by November 1, 1965, awards April 1, 1966 • Offered under a joint program of the American Council of Learned Societies and the Social Science Research Council.

SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL 230

PARK

AVENUE,

NEW

YORK,

N.Y.

10017

Incorporated in the State of Illinois, December 27, 1924, for the purpose of advancing research in the social sciences Directors, 1965:

WILUAM O. AYDELOITE, BERNARD BAILYN, ABRAM BERGSON, JOHN R. BORCHERT, DORWIN CARTWRIGHT, JOSEPH B . CASAGRANDE,

HAROLD C. CoNKUN, LEE J . CRONBACH, KARL A. Fox, WILUAM J. GOODE, JR., MORRIS H. HANSEN, CHAUNCY D. HARRIS, PENDLETON HERRING, GEORGE H . HILDEBRAND, DELL HYMES, THOMAS S. KUHN, STANLEY LEBERGOTT, GARDNER LINDZEY, QUINN McNEMAR, FRANCO MODIGLIANI, LOUIS MORTON, FREDERICK MOSTELLER,

J.

ROLAND PENNOCK, DON K. PRICE,

LEo F. ScHNORE, HEIlBERT A. SIMON, DAVID B. TRUMAN, RALPH H. TURNER, JOHN

USEEM, ROBERT E. WARD

Officers and Staff: C. ISBELL, ROWLAND

President; PAUL WEBBINK, Vice-President; ELBRIDGE SmLEY, Staff Associates; CATHERINE V. RONNAN, Financial Secretary

PENDLETON HERRING,

L.

MITCHELL, JR.,

44

BRYCE WOOD,

Executive Associates;

ELEANOR

Items Vol. 19 No. 3 (1965)  
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