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SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL

• VOLUME 16 . NUMBER 2 . JUNE 1962 230 PARK AVENUE¡ NEW YORK 17, N. Y.

THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN LATIN AMERICA by Pendleton Herring

ARE there ways in which the good offices of the Social Science Research Council can be extended to aid in the advancement of social science research and in the development of the social sciences outside the United States? This question has been raised with respect to Latin America. As th~ countries of the southern hemisphere face the _array of problems that have arisen in connection with efforts at economic growth, the high relevance of social science has become increasingly evident. If the social science disciplines were able to contribute proportionately to their pertinence, advance would be rapid indeed. It hardly seems necessary to argue the case for the applicability of social science research in countries faced by the need for land reform, the pressures of urban growth, the problems of industrialization, and the multiple adjustments called for in family and traditional spheres in response to the demands of modern technology. However, for the social sciences to contribute appropriately to the resolution of such questions, many handicaps must be recognized and reduced. The difficulties are largely expressions of the underdevelopment within the society itself. There are no easy prescriptions, but an analysis of the situation may direct attention to certain measures worth attempting. The plight of the social sciences in Latin America is one expression of the conditions confronting the universities there. While there are exceptions, and efforts at improvement are being made, the general academic picture is predominantly that of part-time faculty and part_ time students, both suffering from distractions and de• mands that limit their time and energy for scholarly and scientific pursuits. The professor complains of overly

large classes and tired and indifferent students. He is poorly paid and overworked, and has virtually no opportunity for research on his own. He must work at one or even two jobs other than his academic duties in order to gain a livelihood. Such demands often result in inferior teaching and inadequate attention to the needs of individual students. The organization of the university is such that the incumbent of each professorial chair is solely responsible for the course instruction within his special field and wields virtually complete authority over the staff of younger colleagues associated with his academic jurisdiction. This is in contrast to the departmental system in North American universities where, although departmental autonomy sometimes may be carried too far, the hazards of arbitrary judgment are at least tempered by the opinions of colleagues possessing substantial academic independence. Social mobility upward is the aim that motivates the great mass of students who demand admission to the crowded universities. As elsewhere, higher education holds out the best hope for the aspiring youth seeking to establish himself. Reference is frequently made to students who seem more desirous of gaining a degree than acquiring an education. Their aspirations are doubtless no different from the ambitions of youth generally; but the pressures within the society are severe, and the resources of the universities are not equal to the strain. The result is overcrowding, discontent, and frequent student protests. Students strike in the hope of forcing improvement in the level of instruction and the conduct of examinations. In other words, political protest is only one cause of student unrest.

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for support of science and technology in Latin America, directed attention to what might be done for the social sciences, among other fields. The report was simply advisory, and what may come of its recommendations remains to be determined. The proposal for the establish-e ment of an inter-American social science research council was presented as follows:

Prevailing admission policies permit excessive enrollments and overburden the teaching staff. While only a limited percentage of the student body fulfill degree requirements, a large proportion unduly prolong their academic connections. Customary methods call for more classroom hours than are considered necessary in North American institutions. However, both library and laboratory facilities are so inadequate that independent work on the part of the student is hardly feasible. A visitor soon discovers ample and vocal discontent with prevailing academic practices and conditions. It is easier to see what is wrong, however, than to suggest acceptable means of achieving the drastic changes that are required. Viewed in the large, the problems seem staggering, but the visitor is most impressed with the lack of complacency and the centers of excellence that do exist. In these, able and enterprising academic leaders demonstrate that high standards can be maintained. Within this academic setting that leaves so much to be desired in terms of present-day standards, distinguished contributions have been made by individual scholars in the scattered research institutes. In this situation an organization standing solely and staunchly for the advancement of the social sciences could be a rallying point. Such a body could provide opportunities for collaborative efforts by social scientists and thus enable them both to strengthen their own university programs and to transcend institutional, disciplinary, and national boundaries in cooperative endeavor to advance social science research throughout Latin America.

The Need: Some mechanism must be found to lead and stimulate the development of the social sciences in Latin America, and to bring together the professional communities of the Americas into active collaboration. An Inter-American Social Science Research Council could: (1) Act as a clearing house to bring Latin American and U. S. scholars and universities together to develop cooperative programs of research, training, and scholarly exchange in the fields of the social sciences. (2) Initiate and administer fellowships and grants to further research and training of social scientists. (3) Serve in an advisory capacity to organizations and institutions with active programs supporting social sciences in Latin America. (4) Sponsor and/or undertake surveys and studies of problems and needs for advancement of the social sciences. (5) Organize, support, and encourage exchange of information and ideas among social scientists through institutes, conferences, and seminars. Procedure: It is suggested that the Social Science Research Council be requested to initiate discussions with Latin American and o~er foundati?ns, institutions, and individuals as [to] the feasibIlIty of formmg the Inter-American Social Science Research Council. !f fou~d feas~ble, the SSRC could serve as a sponsor, and prOVIde active assIstance, to the new institution.s

During December 19-23, 1961, a Round Table on Culture Shock and Social Change was heJd in Mexico.a City, concurrently with the Seventh Inter-American. Congress of Psychology. Organized by CISAC, the Center for Social Investigations with offices in Monterrey, Mexico City, and Austin, Texas, the Round Table consisted primarily of anthropologists, psychologists, social psychiatrists, and sociologists from throughout North and South America. Support from the Agency for International Development made it possible for participants from South America to attend the Round Table. Rogelio Diaz Guerrero of the University of Mexico, who served with Wayne H. Holtzman as a co-chairman of the Round Table, was largely responsible for the initial invitations to Latin American participants. The Round Table formulated a statement that reviewed the characteristics of social science activities in Latin America. The following excerpts indicate the nature of this analysis:

SUGGESTIONS FOR AN INTER-AMERICAN COUNCIL It is pertinent, then, that within recent months several groups have proposed independently that an interAmerican social science research "council" be organized. At the conference of sociologists from North and South America, held at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, last August under the auspices of the Joint Committee on Latin American Studies,! it was suggested that an organization comparable to the Social Science Research Council should be established. Such a body might be turned to for research assistance and might also serve as an intermediary to administer research funds. The functions of such an agency were indicated in more detail in the report of a task force of consultants to the Agency for International Development. 2 This group, in proposing an initial program

Information gathered at the Round Table reveals marked differences in the degree of progress achieved by Latin American countries. Brazil and Mexico, for example, have a variety of centers that have already realized some degree of success in developing relatively stable programs of research dealing with problems of social change, urbanization and industrialization education, and psychological development. Such countries a~ Bolivia and Ecuador, however, have very little research activity or training in the s~cial sciences. Only the introductory aspects of anthropology, sOCIology, or psychology are covered in existing

1 For a report on this conference, "The Social Sciences: Parochial or Cosmopolitan?" by Bryce Wood and Charles Wagley, see Items, December 1961, pp. 41-45. 2 "Proposed Initial Program for Support of Science and Technology in Latin America" (mimeo., October 1961).

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Ibid., p. 107.

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training centers. Most countries have institutions falling be路 tween these two extremes, institutions that show great promise of further development if properly stimulated. In recent years, organizations such as UNESCO and OAS have occasionally published directories of social science institutions throughout Latin America. Although some of the listed institutions are active in their stated fields, many others function in name only. Still others are unable to function properly for a variety of reasons in spite of competent individuals associated with them.... Universities in Latin America have developed strong traditions of distinguished scholarship and creativity in the humanities and arts; comparable devefopments in the social sciences, however, have been generally lacking, particularly in those fields concerned with contemporary man in society such as psychology, sociology, and cultural anthropology. A number of special problems are created by this lack of tradition which becomes particularly critical in conducting detailed scientific research. Some of the more crucial factors that have impeded the development of the social sciences in Latin America are outlined below: 1. With the possible exception of economics, tlle social sciences in Latin America have remained predominantly in the earlier philosophic and synthetic traditions. Consequently, Latin American universities have had little experience with the problem of encouraging the growth of scientific competence in fields concerned with the social behavior of man. 2. Most Latin American universities are plagued by too many part-time faculty members with inadequate salaries, forcing most of the faculty to make multiple professional commitments that distract them from their main occupations of teaching and research. 3. In most Latin American universities the lack of adequate material resources--books, journals, desk calculators, and computer facilities--severely handicaps the social scientist and his students. In some cases, a very modest investment in facilities would yield high returns. 4. Currently, there is a shortage of technically competent field mvesug .. tors who can work effectively under professional supervision. Because of the generally low prestige attributed to fieldwork ... , this shortage will not be easily overcome unless longterm research programs can be inaugurated. 5. In tlle absence of visible career opportunities and strong disciplinary models, students often fail to see the necessity of developing the quantitative and linguistic skills required for original research. Failure to realize tlle importance of both descriptive and inferential statistics, of sampling theory and stratification, of base-line data for the future study of social change, and of such concepts as reliability and validity of measurement frequently leads to wasted effort and erroneous or incomplete conclusions. 6. Administrators are ill-prepared to understand the difficulties of a scientific approach to social problems, an approach which requires long years of special methodological training as well as sophistication in theoretical issues. Too frequently the social scientist is forced to make policy recommendations to government solely on the basis of personal experience and a quick survey of relevant literature, rather than on the basis of systematic scientific investigation. 7. Impatience and a sense of urgency in seeking quick answers to complex issues too frequently lead to superficiality and incompleteness of research, particularly where administrative decisions are involved. 8. Lack of stable, attractive, long-range career opportunities for the competent social scientist interested in conducting research has proved frustrating to the small group of young Latin American social scientists who have been trained recently and who are dedicated to research on contemporary social problems in Latin America. Any long-term program of development must include special efforts to provide satisfactory career opportunities for social scientists in Latin America once they are trained. 4

The Round Table offered a number of recommendations relating to exchanges of personnel, the use of shortterm expert consultants in research projects, encouragement to the younger social scientists, the interchange of books and journals, summer language courses in Spanish and Portuguese, and additional conferences. The final recommendation called for a research board or council, because of the crucial need for international and interdisciplinary research on contemporary social issues in the Americas, and the lack of a "suitable mechanism for dealing with major questions of policy and planning or for evaluating proposals in this area." 5 The participants in the Round Table considered it essential that the proposed board have the following characteristics: It should be nonpolitical; composed solely of recognized social scientists actively engaged in research, and "drawn from throughout the Americas"; interdisciplinary, "representing in particular the several fields of social science bearing directly upon the behavior of man in society and such contemporary social issues as culture shock and social change." The board should be small enough for "effective decision-making" but large enough to represent major viewpoints. The term of membership should be long enough and appointments sufficiently staggered to assure continuity of policy and standards. The board should have authority to select its own consultants and advisers; to select and employ staff for whatever activities it might deem necessary; to make grants from funds at its disposal to individuals or organizations "which, in its opinion, would contribute substantially to the development of a high standard of research and training in the social sciences in Latin America." II The following criteria were suggested for application in consideration of proposals for grants: the expected extent of effective coordination between individuals or organizations in two or more countries; the extent of concern with contemporary social issues; the demonstrated competence of the principal investigators; the extent to which the project would contribute to research training of social scientists; the degree to which the project would serve to stimulate more permanent research activities. In the light of these developments the present writer had an opportunity during the month of February to talk with leading social scientists in Bogota, Lima, Santiago de Chile, Buenos Aires, Sao Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro. These conversations were informal and limited to the individuals who could be interviewed in the course of a brief visit. But the responses were uniformly favorable. All agreed that an inter-American organization was to be preferred, at least at the outset, and that it should be broadly interdisciplinary. There was accept-

~ "Report and Recommendations of the Round Table on Culture Shock and Social Change ... December 19-23, 1961" (mimeo.), pp. 2-3.

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Ibid., p. 5. Ibid., p. 6.


ance of the views concerning the professional, scientific, and nonpolitical nature of the proposed organization as expressed at the Mexico City meeting. The proposal for a council was placed before the Councilon Higher Education in the American Republics at its meeting in Rio de Janeiro in March and met with a sympathetic hearing.

The next step will be to hold a meeting possibly this summer in Latin America to plan at least tentatively a program of conferences on topics of common interest and to consider the problems of organization, member- • ship, staffing, and financing, that would be involved in getting under wayan inter-American research council for the social sciences.

COMMITTEE BRIEFS ANALYSIS OF ECONOMIC CENSUS DATA John Perry Miller (chairman), Francis M. Boddy. Robert W. Burgess, Howard C. Grieves, Frank A. Hanna, George J. Stigler, Ralph J. Watkins, J. Fred Weston.

Changes in the Location of Manufacturing in the United States Since 1929, by Victor R. Fuchs, was published by the Yale University Press on April 25. It is the first of several publications expected to result from the studies initiated by the committee in cooperation with the Bureau of the Census as part of an effort to bring to wider and more critical attention the data collected in the censuses of manufacturing and of business. It is expected that the manuscript of a second volume, "Concentration in the Manufacturing Industries: A Mid-Century Report," by Ralph L. Nelson, will be ready for the press by mid-summer. CONTEMPORARY CHINA: SUBCOMMITTEE ON RESEARCH ON CHINESE SOCIETY John C. Pelzel (chairman), Morton H. Fried, G. William Skinner; staff, Bryce Wood. The second seminar planned by the subcommittee, on documentary research on contemporary Chinese society, was held at the Hotel Commander, Cambridge, Mass., on March 30-Aprill, 1962. Papers prepared for the seminar and circulated in advance included: "Notes on the Use of Fiction for the Study of Chinese Society," by Ai-Ii S. Chin, Harvard University; "Some Sources for Research on Stratification and Mobility in Ming-Ch'ing Society," by Ping-ti Ho, University of British Columbia; "Chinese Communist Documentary Sources," by Anderson Shih, Union Research Institute, Hong Kong; "Methodological Notes on the Use of Documentary Materials from Communist China," by H. Franz Schurmann. University of California, Berkeley; "Republic of China: Sources of Primary Data on Population Trends and Characteristics," and "Sources of Demographic Statistics: China," by Irene B. Taeuber, Princeton University; "A Preliminary Checklist of Reference and Source Materials for the Study of Chinese Society of the Republican Period," by Eugene Wu, Hoover Institution, with comments by James T. C. Liu, Stanford University; "Notes on Categories of Traditional Chinese Documentary Sources and Their Sociological Relevance," and "Supplementary Comments on 'Random Notes as a Source,'" by C. K. Yang, University

of Pittsburgh. Memoranda also were prepared and circulated, on the following subjects: utilization of documentary sources in research on Soviet society, by Mark G. Field, University of Illinois; limitations of traditional Chinese documents for testing sociological hypotheses, by Robert M. Marsh, Cornell University. The participants in the seminar, in addition to authors of papers and the members and staff of the subcommittee, were: Raymond A. Bauer, T'ung-tsu Ch'll, Merle Fainsod, David C. McClelland, Richard U. Moench, Benjamin Schwartz, and Ezra F. Vogel, all of Harvard University; Edwin G. Beal, Jr. and Osamu Shimizu of the Library of Congress; Francis L. K. Hsu of Northwestern University; H. C. Wang Liu, Palo Alto; G. Raymond Nunn of the University of Hawaii; and Isadora Schurmann of the University of California, Berkeley. ECONOMIC GROWTH Simon Kuznets (chairman), Richard Hartshorne, Melville J. Herskovits, Bert F. Hoselitz, Wilbert E. Moore, Neil J. Smelser, Joseph J. Spengler.

The Rate and Direction of Inventive Activity: Economic and Social Factors, containing an introduction by Richard R. Nelson and revisions of 23 papers prepared for a conference held on May 12-14, 1960 at the University of Minnesota under joint sponsorship of the committee and the Universities-National Bureau Committee for Economic Research, was published in March by the Princeton University Press for the National Bureau of Economic Research as Volume 13 in its Special Conference Series."Quantitative Aspects of the Economic Growth of Nations: VII. The Share and Structure of Consumption," a seventh essay based on the chairman's comparative studies of economic growth, was published as a supplement to the January 1962 issue of Economic Development and Cultural Change. EXCHANGES WITH ASIAN INSTITUTIONS John K. Fairbank (chairman), George E. Taylor, C. Martin Wilbur, Mary C. Wright; staff, Bryce Wood. The committee held its first meeting in Boston on April 2, 1962 to select social scientists for participation in the development of research at certain Asian institutions, under

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the program being initiated this year with support from the Ford Foundation. The following two appointments have subsequently been made: Knight Biggerstaff, Professor of Chinese History at Cornell University, for research on educational development in China, 1900-1925, at the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, Taipei; and Albert Feuerwerker, Associate Professor of History, University of Michigan, for research on imperialism in China, 1895-1905, at the Institute of Modern History and at the Toyo Bunko (Oriental Library), Tokyo. MATHEMATICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH Patrick Suppes (chairman), David Blackwell, James S. Coleman, Clyde H. Coombs, Robert Dorfman, W. K. Estes, Howard Raiffa; staff, Francis H. Palmer. Under the sponsorship of the committee a conference of senior investigators in the fields of learning theory and problems of choice and measurement will meet for eight weeks at Stanford University during the summer of 1962. In addition to Messrs. Suppes, Coombs, and Estes, the participants will include Richard C. Atkinson and Gordon H. Bower, Stanford University; J. David Birch, University of Michigan; Robert R. Bush, Eugene H. Galanter, and R. Duncan Luce, University of Pennsylvania; Robert E. Dear, System Development Corporation; Roger N. Shepard, Bell Telephone Laboratories; and Joseph L. Zinnes, University of Indiana. Similar conferences of senior scientists concerned with applications of mathematical models in other areas of social science will be arranged for 1963. The committee will . , welcome suggestions for the organization of such conferences. Communications should be addressed to the committee at the office of the Council.

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SLAVIC AND EAST EUROPEAN GRANTS (Joint with American Council of Learned Societies) Evsey D. Domar (chairman), Deming Brown, Henry L. Roberts, George Y. Shevelov, Donald W. Treadgold; staff, Gordon B. Turner. In addition to the grants for research listed on page 22 infra, the committee on February 10 made one award to assist publication of the results of research: to Pertti J. Pelto, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Cornell University, toward publication by the Finnish Antiquities Society of "Individualism in Skolt Lapp Society." SOCIALIZATION AND SOCIAL STRUCTURE John A. Clausen (chairman), Orville G. Brim, Jr., Alex Inkeles, Ronald Lippitt, Eleanor E. Maccoby, M. Brewster Smith; staff, Francis H. Palmer.

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The conference on observational techniques in research on child development, which was organized for the committee by Marian Radke Yarrow and Harold L. Raush of the National Institute of Mental Health, was held on March 18-20 at Gould House, Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. Discussion was focused principally on presentations by Roger G. Barker of the University of Kansas, Sidney W. Bijou of the University

of Washington, and John D. Benjamin of the University of Colorado, of techniques and analytic approaches in observation of interactions between adults and children in social settings. Working papers or brief descriptions of their own experiences in the use of observational techniques were circulated in advance of the conference by most of the participants: "Interaction Sequences," Harold L. Raush and Richard A. Littman, University of Oregon; "Observations on Research," Marian Radke Yarrow; "A Plea for Coded Specimen Records," John Harding, Cornell University; "The Influence of Child Rearing Practices on the Behavior of Preschool Blind Children," Sadako Imamura, Harvard University; "The Observation of Children's Behavior-A Cross-Cultural Approach," John W. M. Whiting, Harvard University; "Analysis of Behavior Observations," Beatrice B. Whiting, Harvard University; memorandum on a concept of developmental issues, D. Wells Goodrich, National Institute of Mental Health; an illustrative "Condensed Behavioral Summary," John D. Benjamin; memorandum on family relationships, Daniel R. Miller, University of Michigan; "Instruments Used for the Study of Family Interaction by the Revealed Difference Method," Fred L. Strodtbeck and Anthony Kallet, both of the University of Chicago; "Maternal Care and Infant Behavior in Japan," William Caudill, National Institute of Mental Health; "Interpersonal Behavior of Children and Their Associates in City and Town," Herbert F. Wright, University of Kansas; "The Social-Psychological Environments of Disabled and Nondisabled Children," Phil Schoggen, University of Oregon; "Mother-Infant Relations as a Problem in Communication," Stuart A. Altmann, University of Alberta; and a memorandum on considerations relating to structured and unstructured observations, Eleanor E. Maccoby. Other participants included Messrs. Clausen and Palmer, and B. Irven DeVore, University of California, Berkeley, who presented a film on the behavior of feral baboons in Africa, which he and Sherwood L. Washburn of the same university had produced. A report on the accomplishments of the work group on research on relations between social class variables and socialization experiences of the child, which met at the University of Michigan during 1960-61, is being prepared under the direction of Harold M. Proshansky, now of Brooklyn College. Three additional work groups have been supported by the committee during the current year. One on research on sex differences in socialization meets at Stanford University under the chairmanship of Mrs. Maccoby and includes Sanford M. Dornbusch, David Hamburg, and Lawrence Kohlberg. That on ordinal position and family size as factors in socialization met during the fall semester at the University of California, Berkeley, under the chairmanship of Mr. Clausen. The other participants were Paul Mussen, Edward Sampson, William Smelser, Louis Stewart, Ann Stout, and Milton Yinger. The third, on the classroom as a context for socialization, organized by John C. Glidewell of the St. Louis County Health Department, meets in St. Louis and consists of Richard deCharms, Mildred B. Kantor, Paul Painter, Louis M. Smith, and Lorene A. Stringer, with Beverly B. Carter serving as research assistant.

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PERSONNEL Marysa Gerassi, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for completion of a dissertation on rightist authoritarian ideology in Argentina, 1930-55. Donald E. Ginter, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Berkeley, and Social Science Research Council research training fellow 1961-62, for research and completion of a dissertation in England on the disintegration of the Whig Party, 1789-94. J. David Greenstone, Ph.D. candidate in IJolitical science, University of Chicago, for research and completion of a dissertation on labor politics in Chicago, Detroit, and Los Angeles. Richard C. Harris, Ph.D. candidate in geography, University of Wisconsin, for research in Canada on the evolution of the commercial agricultural economy of New France, 1608-1760. Alan Harwood, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Columbia University, for an ethnographic study in southwestern Tanganyika of the Kinga of that region, with particular emphasis on their subsistence, economy, and sociopolitical organization. Leighton W. Hazlehurst, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for research in India on family organization and urbanization in a northern city. Bruce Herrick, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for research in Chile on the interrelations of urban migration, unemployment, and the country's economic growth since World War II. Patrick L. R. Higonnet, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for research in France on divergent poIi tical allegiances in two rural communities. Robert W. Hodge, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, University of Chicago, for further training in statistics and research on social mobility in the metropolis. Paul Hollander, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Princeton University, for comparative study in Euro{'e and the United States of anomie in totalitarian SOCIal systems. Paul Kay, Ph.D. candidate in social anthropology, Harvard University, postdoctoral fellowship for training at Stanford University in mathematics. Roger M. Keesing, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Harvard University, for research in Australia, Guadalcanal, and Malaita Island on the social structure and ecology of its Areare population. Allen C. Kelley, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Stanford University, for research in Australia on the nature and significance of cycles in residential and railroad capital formation in that country, 1860-1930. Gerald H. Kramer, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for further training in mathematics and completion of a dissertation on a theoretical framework for empirical study of decision making. Everett C. Ladd, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in government, Cornell University, for methodological training and research on Negro political leadership in the urban South. Lester B. Lave, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Harvard University, for completion of a dissertation on the meas-

RESEARCH TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS The Committee on Social Science Personnel-Wayne H. Holtzman (chairman), Harry Alpert, M. Margaret Ball, George H. Hildebrand, David M. Schneider, and Paul Webbink-at its meeting on March 19-20 voted a total of 53 awards, 5 postdoctoral and 48 predoctoral research training fellowships, of which 16 made provision for completion of doctoral dissertations. The complete list follows: Samuel E. Allen, Ph.D. candidate in history, Clark University, for research on the effectiveness of the zemstvo as an agent of political and civic regeneration in tsarist Russia, 1864-1905. Stuart Altman, Ph.D. candidate in economics, University of California, Los Angeles, for research on unemployment in the secondary labor force. Harvey Averch, Ph.D. candidate in economics, University of North Carolina, postdoctoral fellowship for further training in mathematics. Reginald Bartholomew, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Chicago, for a comparative study in France of political parties and Western European politics. Robert S. Cahill, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Oregon, for completion of a dissertation on small group decision-making: the family and television. Myron L. Cohen, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Columbia University, for research in Taiwan and Hong Kong on social groups in rural southeastern China and their integration at the village level. Robert M. Cook, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Princeton University, for further training in sociological theory and methodology and research on personality and group structure. Ray Ellsworth Cubberly, Ph.D. candidate in modern European history, University of Wisconsin, for research in France and completion of a dissertation on the Committee of General Security and the revolutionary government of France during the Terror (1793-94). Scott M. Eddie, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for advanced language training and research in the United States on agriculture in an industrializing economy, with special reference to Hungary. Gerald D. Feldman, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, and Social Science Research Council research training fellow 1961-62, for research in Germany and completion of a dissertation on the role of the army in German political and economic life, 1916-18. Robert M. Fogelson, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for research on the urban development of Los Angeles, 1850-1930. William W. Freehling, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Berkeley, for research on the socioeconomic causes of the South Carolina nullification controversy. Zelda F. Gamson, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Harvard University, for research on adaptations of organizations to the characteristics of their members.

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urement of technological change in United States agriculture, 1850-1955.

Richard H. Tilly, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Unive:sity of Wisconsin, and Social Science Research Council research training fellow 1961-62, for research and completion of a dissertation in Germany on the role of private bankers in industrialization of the Rhineland, 1815-70. Arpad von Lazar, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of North Carolina, for research on relaxation of totalitarian controls in the Soviet bloc of nations. Jacqueline Wei, Ph.D. candidate in linguistics, Yale University, postdoctoral fellowship for further training and research on linguistic intuition. Oliver E. Williamson, Ph.D. candidate in mathematical economics, Carnegie Institute of Technology, for research on the dynamic properties and empirical relevance of a behavioral model of the firm. William E. Willmott, Ph.D. candidate in social anthropology, University of London, for research in Cambodia on the Chinese community. Julian Wolpert, Ph.D. candidate in geography, University of Wisconsin, for completion of a dissertation on the rationality of farming in central Sweden. Calvin A. Woodward, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Brown University, for research in England and Ceylon on its parties and party system. William E. Wright, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Vanderbilt University, for research in France and Germany on party membershil> and party identification in contemporary German politics. Harriet Anne Zuckerman, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Columbia University, for research on social contexts and social processes in the growth of science: a sociological comparison of the development of biology and sociology in the United States.

Marvin Levine, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Indiana University, postdoctoral fellowship for further training at the University of Pennsylvania in mathematics and research on its application to behavior theory. R. William Liddle, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Yale University, for research in Indonesia on the political role of provincial elite groups. John D. Martz, III, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of North Carolina, for research in Venezuela on its political party system. Warren Leonard Mason, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Minnesota, for research on political behavior and social change in Great Britain since 1945. James A. Mau, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, and Social Science Research Council research training fellow 1961-62, for research in Jamaica and completion of a dissertation on planned change and social unity in an emergent nation. Charles W. McDougal, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of New Mexico, and Social Science Research Council research training fellow 1960-61, for completion of a dissertation on the social structure of the Hill Juang. Glenn David McNeill, Ph.D. candidate in psychology, University of California, Berkeley, postdoctoral fellowship for training in linguistics and research on free association. Charles C. Moskos, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, and Social Science Research Council research training fellow 1961-62, for research in British Guiana and completion of a dissertation on cohesion, disintegration, and elite groups in the West Indies. Jeffrey B. Nugent, Ph.D. candidate in economics, New School for Social Research, for research in Greece and Sicily on the use of parametric programming and other econometric techniques in the allocation of investment in underdeveloped economies. Michael B. Pulman, Ph.D. candidate in English history, University of California, Berkeley, for research in Great Britain on the Privy Council in the sixteenth century.

FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS The Committee on Faculty Research Fellowships-John Useem (chairman), Lawrence E. Fouraker, John D. Lewis, Gardner Lindzey, Joseph J. Mathews, and George E. Mowry -held the second of its two meetings scheduled for 1961-62 on March 26. It awarded the following 13 fellowships: Gordon E. Baker, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, for research on legislative representation and political power. Charles A. Barker, Professor of American History, Johns Hopkins University, for a. study of American "c,;mvictions": a history of public thought from colomal to recent times. Mark Blaug, Assistant .Professor of Ec~momics, Yale University, for research m France, BelgIUm, and Germa!1y on the pattern of innovations in European cotton textIle industries.

Richard R. Randolph, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, and Social Science Research Council research training fellow 1961-62, for completion of a dissertation on the social organization of Negev Bedouins. G. Micheal Riley, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of New Mexico, for archival research in Spain and completion of a dissertation on the history of the Cortes Estate in colonial Mexico. Dorothy Ross, Ph.D. candidate ~n history, Columbiayniversity, for research on the life and mtellectual mfluence of G. Stanley Hall.

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Urie Bronfenbrenner, Professor of Child Development and Family Relationships, Cornell University,.r0~ co~足 parative study in Zurich ~nd Mosco~ of ~pbnngmg m the family and the boardmg school m SWItzerland and the Soviet Union. Richard Glover, Professor of History, University of Manitoba, for research in Great Britain on British military and diplomatic history, 1806-14.

David Rothman, Ph.D. candidate in history, Harvard University, for research and completion of a dissertation on the United States Senate, 1870-1900. Allan Henry Spear, Ph.D. candidate in history, Yale University, for research on the acculturation of Southern Negroes in the urban North, 1915-41.

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William H. Goetzmann, Assistant Professor of History, Yale University, for research on exploration in the trans-Mississippi West in the nineteenth century. John C. Harsanyi, Professor of Economics, Wayne State University, for research on bargaining solutions for cooperative and noncooperative games. Bert James Loewenberg, Professor of History, Sarah Lawrence College, for research in England on Darwin, Darwinism, and history. Peter A. Munch, Professor of Sociology, Southern Illinois University, for research in England on the Tristan da Cunha community in Calshot. William N. Parker, Professor of Economics, University of North Carolina, for research on the growth of productivity in American agriculture, 1840-1910. Edwin Terry Prothro, Professor of Psychology, American University of Beirut, for research in Greece on rural and urban patterns of child rearing in that country. John T. Saywell, Assistant Professor of History, University of Toronto, for analysis of the development and present position of Canadian political parties. Gerhard L. Weinberg, Associate Professor of History, University of Michigan, for research in Germany on its foreign policy in relation to internal and military policy, 1933-45.

Donald R. Hodgman, Professor of Economics, University of Illinois, for research on the determinants of behavior of the commercial banking system through development of a micro-analytic model suitable for computer simulation (joint project with Robert W. Gillespie). Franklyn D. Holzman, Professor of Economics, Tufts Uni- _ versity, for an analytical survey of theories of inflation. G. Edward Janosik, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania, for research in England on relationships between local and national Labor Party organizations. David Kaplan, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Brandeis University, for research in Mexico on the political economy of a contemporary pre-industrial city. Peter B. Kenen, Associate Professor of Economics, Columbia University, for research in Europe on international movements of capital and the stability of monetary arrangements. Peter Koestenbaum, Associate Professor of Philosophy, San Jose State College, for research on the interrelation of Edmund Husserl's phenomenology and the social sciences. Seymour Leventman, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, for research on social class and ethnic tensions of Negroes in Philadelphia. Peter Paret, Research Associate, Center of International Studies, Princeton University, for research in Germany on Karl von Clausewitz's analysis of insurrection, irregular war, and politics and its significance for contemporary mili tary theory. Nelson W. Polsby, Assistant Professor of Government, Wesleyan University, for research on the politics of the . . House of Representatives: committee assignments a n d . committee structure. Bruce M. Russett, Instructor in Economics and Social Science (Political Science Section), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for research on the development and testing of a model of competitive international politics. Aron Wolfe Siegman, Research Associate Professor of Medical Psychology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, for research in Israel on juvenile delinquency in relation to cortical excitability and immigrant status. Adolf Sturmthal, Professor of Labor and Industrial Relations, University of Illinois, for research in Mexico on income distribution, capital formation, and trade union policy in that country. Dorrian Apple Sweetser, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Boston University School of Nursing, for a cross-cultural study of the custom of avoidance of parents-in-law.

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GRANTS-IN-AID The Committee on Grants-in-Aid-Vincent H. Whitney (chairman), Paul J. Bohannan, Alfred D. Chandler, Holland Hunter, William H. Riker, and Gordon Wright-held the second of its two meetings scheduled for 1961-62 on March 12-13. It awarded 20 grants-in-aid: Eugene L. Asher, Assistant Professor of History, Long Beach State College, for research in France on the political and administrative activities of the parish clergy under Louis XIV, 1660-1715. James J. Barnes, Instructor in History, Amherst College, for a quantitative analytical study of the London book trade in the nineteenth century. Hugo Adam Bedau, Fellow in Law and Philosophy, Harvard University Law School, for research on death sentence convictions in New Jersey since 1907. Marvin Bressler, Professor of Sociology, New York University, for research on the influence of level and type of education on the economic values and behavior of religious groups. Alan W. Brownsword, Assistant Professor of History, Long Beach State College, for research on the political history of Connecticut, 1817-29. Roy E. Carter, Jr., Professor of Journalism and Sociology, University of Minnesota, for research in South America on the information functions of the mass media in Santiago, with respect to public affairs. Robert W. Gillespie, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Illinois, for research on the determinants of behavior of the commercial banking system through development of a micro-analytic model suitable for computer simulation (joint project with Donald R. Hodgman).

POLITICAL THEORY AND LEGAL PHILOSOPHY FELLOWSHIPS The Committee on Political Theory and Legal Philosophy Fellowships-J. Roland Pennock (chairman), David Easton, Jerome Hall, John H. Hallowell, Robert G. McCloskey, and Sheldon S. Wolin-at its meeting on March 16 awarded 5 fellowships: Charles E. Frye, Assistant Instructor and Ph.D. candidate __ in politics, Princeton University, for research in Germany on conservatism in the Weimar Republic.

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Paul F. Kress, Teaching Assistant and Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Berkeley, for research on the concept of process in political science. Paul C. Noble, Ph.D. candidate in political science, McGill University, for research on a conceptual framework for analysis of interstate politics, with particular reference to systems theory (macroanalysis). Francis Oakley, Lecturer in History, Williams College, for research in England on the natural law theories of the late-medieval nominalist theologians. Robert J. Pranger, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Illinois, for research on citizenship and action theory.

GRANTS FOR ASIAN STUDIES The Joint Committee on Asian Studies, of the American Council of Learned Societies and the Social Science Research Council-John A. Pope (chairman), Robert I. Crane, William T. de Bary, Paul S. Dull, John L. Landgraf, and Rodger Swearingen-met on February 24-25. It has made the following grants for research during 1962-63:

SENIOR AWARDS FOR RESEARCH ON GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS Since making the senior awards announced in the March issue of Items, the Committee on Grants for Research on Governmental Affairs-Robert E. Cushman (chairman), Alexander Heard, Dean E. McHenry, Elmer B. Staats, and Benjamin F. Wright-has made 3 additional awards for research in 1962-63: William G. Carleton, Emeritus Professor of Political Science, University of Florida, for research on the art of politics and the skills of the politician. Herbert Emmerich, Consultant in Public Administration, United Nations, for research on federal reorganization. Vernon Van Dyke, Professor of Political Science, State University of Iowa, for research on concepts of interests and values in the foreign policies of the United States.

GRANTS FOR AFRICAN STUDIES Since making the awards announced in the March Items, the Joint Committee on African Studies, of the American Council of Learned Societies and the Social Science Research Council-William A. Hance (chairman), Elizabeth Colson, William O. Jones, Vernon McKay, Alan P. Merriam, William E. Welmers, and Roland Young-has made 4 additional grants for research relating to Africa south of the Sahara: Helen Codere, Professor of Anthropology, Vassar College, for completion in the United States of a study of social and political change in Ruanda. Simon Ottenberg, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Washington, for research in the United States on changes in leadership and authority in two Nigerian communities. Walter H. Sangree, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Sociology, University of Rochester, for research in the United States on shifts in residence by Bantu Tiriki in relation to age, acculturation, and other demographic factors. Herbert J. Spiro, Associate Professor of Political Science, Amherst College, for research in Rhodesia, Nyasaland, and London on the constitutional politics of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland.

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Bernard Cohn, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Rochester, for a study in Great Britain of the East India Company's College at Haileybury. Albert M. Craig, Assistant Professor of History, Harvard University, for research in Japan on the development of the modern Japanese bureaucracy, 1868-87. Robert B. Crawford, Assistant Professor of History, University of Illinois, for research in Taiwan on the life and thought of Chang Chii-cheng, 1525-82. Albert Feuerwerker, Associate Professor of History, University of Michigan, for research in Taiwan, Japan, and London on China in the Age of Imperialism, 18951905. Robert E. Frykenberg, Research Fellow, Committee on Southern Asian Studies, University of Chicago, for research in India and England on the social and economic history of South India. Leslie Harris, Director, Asian Studies Program, Sweet Briar, Randolph-Macon Woman's, and Lynchburg Colleges, for research in London and India on British policy on the northwest frontier of India. Hiroko Ikeda, Assistant Professor of Japanese, University of Hawaii, for research on type and motif index of Japanese folk Ii terature. Thomas A. Lyman, Bangkok, for research in Thailand on the language and ethnology of the Green Miao (Meo), an ethnic group in Southeast Asia. William McCormack, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Indian Studies, and Linguistics, University of Wisconsin, for research in India on the Kannada language and literature, the literary and social traditions of the Lingayat Sect, and Hindu law. Ruth T. McVey, Research Associate, Southeast Asia Studies, Yale University, for research in the United States on Indonesian communism in the era of revolutionary nationalism, 1927-49. John M. Rosenfield, Research Fellow in Oriental Art, Harvard University, for research in Japan on the history of Japanese art, especially of the Kamakura Period. Arthur E. Tiedemann, Assistant Professor of History, City College, New York, for research in Japan on Japanese political history of the Taisho and Early Showa Periods, with particular attention to parliamentary institutions and thought (renewal). Barry Ulanov, Associate Professor of English, Barnard College, for research in Europe, the Middle East, and India on the rhetoric of love in the "Song of Songs" tradition. Lea E. Williams, Associate Professor of Political Science, Brown University, and Visiting Professor of History, University of Malaya, for research in Malaya, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Japan on the spontaneous and original sociopolitical development of the overseas Chinese in nineteenth-century Malaya.


Chitoshi Yanaga, Associate Professor of Political Science, Yale University, for research in Japan on the role of organized business in the Japanese political process and foreign-policy making.

Joseph Rothschild, Assistant Professor of Government, Columbia University, for research on the causes, events, and consequences of Marshal Joseph Pilsudski's coup d'etat in Poland, May 1926. Harold B. Segel, Assistant Professor of Slavic Literatures, Columbia University, for research on the passing o f . Polish romanticism: the Napoleonic cult and the poetseer in the literature of positivism and Young Poland. William B. Slottman, Assistant Professor of History, Harvard University, for research on the history of Eastern Europe at the end of the seventeenth century. Edward Stankiewicz, Associate Professor of Slavic Linguistics, University of Chicago, for a structural analysis of contemporary Slovenian and Serbo-Croatian accent patterns, covering the spoken varieties of the literary languages and the dialects.

a

GRANTS FOR SLAVIC AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES The Joint Committee on Slavic and East European Grants, sponsored with the American Council of Learned Societies-Evsey D. Domar (chairman), Deming Brown, Henry L. Roberts, George Y. Shevelov, and Donald W. Treadgold-at its meeting on February 10 awarded the following 19 grants for research: Paul H. Avrich, Instructor in Political Science, Queens College, for research on anarcho-syndicalism in revolutionary Russia, 1905-17. Jeremy R. Azrael, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago, for research on political profiles of Soviet technical intelligentsia and managerial elite. Emily C. Brown, Professor Emeritus of Economics, Vassar College, for a study of trade unions and labor relations in Soviet industry. Robert F. Byrnes, Professor of History, Indiana University, for research on the philosophy of K. P. Pobedonostsev, and the historical work of V. O. Kliuchevsky. Michael Cherniavsky, Associate Professor of History, University of Chicago, for research on the political theories of the Russian "Old Believers." Stephen A. Fischer-Galati, Associate Professor of History, Wayne State University, for research on the Balkan revolutionary tradition. Georges V. Florovsky, Professor of Eastern Church History, Harvard University, for research on the legal position of the Russian church in the nineteenth century. Thomas T. Hammond, Associate Professor of History, University of Virginia, for preparation of an annotated bibliography on Soviet foreign relations and world communism (renewal). Heinz Kohler, Assistant Professor of Economics, Amherst College, for research on international economic integration within the communist bloc. Leon Lipson, Professor of Law, Yale University, for research on the current use of extrajudicial tribunals in Soviet law enforcement. John Mersereau, Jr., Associate Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Michigan, for research on Russian romanticism in periodical literature, 1820-50. Richard H. Moorsteen, Economics Department, RAND Corporation, for research on the size and growth of the Soviet capital stock, 1928-60. Boris P. Pesek, Associate Professor of Economics, Michigan State University, for completion of a study of the national income of Czechoslovakia, 1946-58. Richard A. Pierce, Assistant Professor of History, Queen's University, Ontario, for research on Soviet Rule in Central Asia. Gunther E. Rothenberg, Assistant Professor of History, Southern Illinois University, for research on the military border in Croatia in the nineteenth century.

AUXILIARY RESEARCH AWARDS The Committee on Auxiliary Research Awards-S. S. Wilks (chairman), John M. Blum, Dorwin Cartwright, Joseph B. Casagrande, Otis Dudley Duncan, Henry W. Ehrmann, and Joseph J. Spengler-at its meeting on April 12, 1962 selected the following 25 social scientists to receive awards of $4,000 each, to be used in their discretion for the advancement of their own behavioral research: Kathleen Gough Aberle, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Brandeis University William R. Allen, Associate Professor of Economics, University of California, Los Angeles Richard C. Atkinson, Associate Professor of Psychology,_ Stanford University .. Brian J. L. Berry, Assistant Professor of Geography, University of Chicago Leonard Binder, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago Richard E. Caves, Associate Professor of Economics, University of California, Berkeley John S. Chipman, Professor of Economics, University of Minnesota Harold C. Conklin, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Columbia University C. E. Ferguson, Associate Professor of Economics, Duke University Albert Feuerwerker, Associate Professor of History, University of Michigan Charles O. Frake, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Stanford University David Goldberg, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Michigan Ernst B. Haas, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley Jerry Hirsch, Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Illinois Dale W. Jorgenson, Associate Professor of Economics, University of California, Berkeley Arno J. Mayer, Associate Professor of History, Princeton _ University WI Bertram H. Raven, Associate Professor of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles

22


Leo F. Schnore, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Wisconsin Neil J. Smelser, Associate Professor of Sociology and Social Institutions, University of California, Berkeley Howard R. Swearer, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of California, Los Angeles Jan Vansina, Associate Professor of Anthropology and of History, University of Wisconsin Anthony F. C. Wallace, Professor of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania Michael A. Wallach, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Harold L. Wilensky, Professor of Sociology, University of Michigan Edward Zigler, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale University

Willard D. Larkin, Ph.D. candidate in psychology, University of Pennsylvania Richard B. Millward, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Brown University M. Frank Norman, Ph.D. candidate in statistics, Stanford University Anita E. Resnick, graduate student in psychology, Rutgers -The State University John Theios, Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Texas Raymond A. Wiesen, Ph.D. candidate in psychology, University of North Carolina

Models of Social Decision-Making Mechanisms and Their Implications for Political Science and Welfare Economics, Princeton University Hayward R. Alker, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in political science, Yale University Leslie P. Boudrot, graduate student in economics, Wayne State University William E. Hoehn, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in economics, Northwestern University Eugene L. Jurkowitz, graduate student in economics, Wayne State University Bernard A. Kemp, Assistant Professor of Economics, Michigan State University Jiri T. Kolaja, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Kentucky Yasumasa Kuroda, Instructor in Government, Montana State College Michael Leiserson, graduate student in political science, Yale University Richard Merritt, Ph.D. candidate in international relations, Yale University Jose Agustin Silva-Michelena, Professor of Sociology, Center for Studies on Development, Central University of Venezuela Grant B. Taplin, Ph.D. candidate in economics, New School for Social Research Robert J. Van Handel, graduate student in economics, New School for Social Research

1962 SUMMER INSTITUTES ON MATHEMATICAL MODELS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH Selection of applicants for admission to the summer institutes on mathematical models in social science research, which were announced in the December 1961 issue of Items, has been made by a subcommittee of the Committee on Mathematics in Social Science Research, consisting of the directors of the four institutes-Cletus J. Burke, John C. Harsanyi, Harold W. Kuhn, and Frank Restle. The following persons have been admitted to the respective institutes, which will be in session from June 18 through July 27:

a ..,

Application of Mathematical Learning Theory to TwoPerson Interactions, Stanford University John R. Binford, Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Louisville Donald Dorfman, Study Director, Research Center for Group Dynamics, University of Michigan Leonard Katz, Ph.D. candidate in psychology, University of Massachusetts Edith D. Neimark, Associate Professor of Psychology, New York University R. Ramakumar, Ph.D. candidate in statistics, Stanford University Seymour Rosenberg, Research Psychologist, Bell Telephone Laboratories Kellogg V. Wilson, Experimental Psychologist, Nebraska Psychiatric Institute, University of Nebraska College of Medicine

Bargaining, Negotiation, and Conflict, Princeton University James G. Abert, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Duke University Erhard Blankenburg, graduate student in sociology, Universi ty of Oregon Albert M. Chammah, Ph.D. candidate in communication sciences, University of Michigan Joseph S. Chung, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Wayne State University John G. Cross, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Princeton University Jack D. Douglas, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Princeton University Malcolm H. Gotterer, Lecturer in Business Administration, University of California, Berkeley Tsung-yuen Shen, Assistant Professor of Economics, Wayne State University Benjamin H. Stevens, Associate Professor of Regional Science, University of Pennsylvania

Psychology of Choice and Decision, Stanford University Joel W. Ager, Jr., Assistant Professor of Psychology, Wayne State University Thomas R. Burns, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Stanford University Robyn M. Dawes, Ph.D. candidate in psychology, University of Michigan Morton P. Friedman, Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles Ronald A. Kinchla, Ph.D. candidate in psychology, University of California, Los Angeles Walter Kintsch, Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Missouri

23


PUBLICATIONS Projective Techniques and Cross-Cultural Research, by Gardner Lindzey. Initiated under the auspices of the former Committee on Social Behavior. New York: _ Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1961. 348 pages. $6.00. .. Quantification: A History of the Meaning of Measurement in the Natural and Social Sciences, edited by Harry Woolf. Product of the Conference on the History of Quantification in the Sciences, November 20-21, 1959, sponsored by the former Joint Committee on the History of Science. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1961. 224 pages. $6.50. The Rate and Direction of Inventive Activity: Economic and Social Factors. A Conference of the UniversitiesNational Bureau Committee for Economic Research and the Committee on Economic Growth. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1962. 644 pages. $12.50.

COUNCIL PUBLICATIONS

Labor Commitment and Social Change in Developing Areas, edited by Wilbert E. Moore, and Arnold S. Feldman. Sponsored by the Committee on Economic Growth. December 1960. 393 pages. Cloth, $3.75. Theoretical Studies in Social Organization of the Prison, Pamphlet 15, by Richard A. Cloward, Donald R. Cressey, George H. Grosser, Richard McCleery, Lloyd E. Ohlin, and Gresham M. Sykes and Sheldon L. Messinger. Papers prepared by members of a Conference Group on Correctional Organization, sponsored by the Council in 1956-57. March 1960. 152 pages. $1.50. The publications of the Council are distributed from its office, 230 Park Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. OTHER BOOKS Historical Statistics of the United States, Colonial Times to 1957. Prepared by the Bureau of the Census, with the assistance of the former Advisory Committee on Historical Statistics. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, August 1960. 2nd printing, February 1962, 800 pages. $6.00. Capital Formation in Japan, 1868-1940, by Henry Rosovsky. Aided by the Committee on Economic Growth. New York: Free Press of Glencoe, 1961. 371 pages. $7.50. Changes in the Location of Manufacturing in the United States Since 1929, by Victor R. Fuchs. Sponsored by the Committee on Analysis of Economic Census Data. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1962, 587 pages. $10.00. Matrilineal Kinship, edited by David M. Schneider and Kathleen Gough. Product of the Interuniversity Summer Research Seminar on Kinship Research, 1954. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1961. 781 pages. $11.75. Natural Resources and Economic Growth, edited by Joseph J. Spengler. Papers presented at a conference at Ann Arbor, Michigan, April 7-9, 1960, jointly sponsored by Resources for the Future, Inc. and the Committee on Economic Growth. Washington, D.C.: Resources for the Future, Inc., 1961. 316 pages. $3.50. Organizing for Defense, by Paul Y. Hammond. Based in part on work at the Interuniversity Summer Research Seminar on National Security Policy, 1958. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1961. 414 pages. $7.95. PeTspectives in American Indian Culture Change, edited by Edward H. Spicer. Product of the Interuniversity Summer Research Seminar on Differential Culture Change, 1956. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1961. 559 pages. $10.00.

ANNOUNCEMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AWARDS FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH AND UNIVERSITY LECTURING DURING THE ACADEMIC YEAR 1963-64 UNDER THE FULBRIGHT-HAYS ACT The Committee on International Exchange of Persons, of the Conference Board of Associated Research Councils, announced the opening on May I, 1962 of the competition for 1963-64 awards under the Fulbright-Hays Act for advanced research and university lecturing in the following countries: Europe: Austria, Belgium and Luxembourg, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and United Kingdom Territories Near and Middle East: Iran, Israel, Turkey, United Arab AI Republic .. Far East: China (Taiwan), Japan, Korea Africa: Ethiopia, Ghana, British Colonial Territories

Eligibility requirements include: United States cItIZenship; for research, a doctoral degree or recognized professional standing; for lecturing, a minimum of one year of college teaching experience; in certain cases, a knowledge of the language of the host country. Awards, payable in nonconvertible foreign currency, provide: round-trip transportation for the grantee; a maintenance allowance for the grantee and his family while in residence abroad; a small incidental allowance for supplies and essential services; subject to the availability of funds, a supplemental dollar-grant to lecturers in certain countries of Asia and Africa. Applications should be submitted by August 1, 1962. Detailed information and application forms may be obtained from the Conference Board of Associated Research Councils, Committee on International Exchange of Persons, 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington 25, D.C.

SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL 230 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. Incorporated in the State of Illinois, December 27, 1924, tor the purpose of advancing research in the social sciences Directors,1962: GARDNER ACKLEY, ABRAM BERGSON, PAUL J. BOHANNAN, DORWIN CARTWRIGHT, JOHN A. CLAUSEN, THOMAS C. COCHRAN,

JAMES S.

COLEMAN, HAROLD F. DORN, LOUIS GOTTSCHALK, CHAUNCY D. HARRIS, H. FIELD HAVILAND, JR., PENDLETON HERRING, GEORGE H. HILDEBRAND, WAYNE H. HOLTZMAN, NATHAN KEYFITZ, EDWARD H. LEVI, PHIUP J. MCCARTHY, WILBERT E. MOORE, WILUAM H. NICHOLLS,

J.

ROLAND PENNOCK,

DAVID M. POTTER, NEVITT SANFORD, HERBERT A. SIMON, MELFORD E. SPIRO, GUY E. SWANSON, DAVID B. TRUMAN, CHARLES WAGLEY, S. S. WILKS, . . MALCOLM M. WILLEY, DONALD YOUNG

Officers and Staff:

PENDLETON HERRING,

ISBELL, FRANCIS H. PALMER, ROWLAND

...

Pl"esident;

Pice-President; ELBRIDGE SIBLEY, Executive Associate; Staff Associates; CATHERINE V. RONNAN, Financial Secretary

PAUL WEBBINK,

L. MITCHELL, JR.,

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BRYCE WOOD, ELEANOR C.

Items Vol. 16 No. 2 (1962)  
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