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Pictures : SRD

Publishing licence: 288-2013/CXB/07-08/TN Š SRD - 180613/AMV Quantity: 400 copies


CONTENT INTRODUCTION 4 LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 6 LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE VIETNAM UNION OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATIONS

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SRD’S PROGRAMMES 8 Sustainable Agriculture 9 Climate Change and Community Based Disaster Risk Management 10 Research and Advocacy 11 Project portfolio 12 Project map

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STORIES FROM THE COMMUNITY 15 Sustaining community health and incomes through the conservation and development of traditional remedies 16 RVT- a salt tolerance rice variety increases people’s income 18 Confidence albeit rapid urbanisation 20 Decreasing production costs through the development and application of organic fertiliser 22 An example of a good leader 24 Farmers conduct research on the system of rice intensification on local land

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A common home brings people closer together

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Putting theories into practice for the conservation of plant genetic resources 30 Obtaining legal land ownership after 20 years of living on the same plot of land 32 Integrating climate change into local Socio - Economic Development Planning

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A voice for 25 million 36 ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN 2012 38 Internal capacity building

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Review of the SRD’s 2nd Strategic Plan and development of the 3rd Strategic Plan 40 Donors 41 Local partners

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Organisational chart 44 FINANCE STATEMENTS

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Finance overview 46 Income and expenditure 46 Balance sheet 47


INTRODUCTION

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Our Vision

Our Mission

People in rural communities are empowered to sustainably manage their own livelihood systems in an equal and compassionate society.

SRD is a foremost professional Vietnamese development agency that supports poor rural communities to adapt to the changing environment and sustainably manage their own livelihoods; its success is underpinned by a holistic approach to development that spans grassroots capacity building to international advocacy.

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Our Values Ownership - Each individual should have ownership of their development. SRD respects personal self-determination as well as organisational autonomy. Accountability/transparency - In each and every activity SRD ensures that a collaborative, professional and effective working environment is maintained. SRD is accountable and transparent to its partners, beneficiaries and donors. Sharing and learning - Sharing and learning are prerequisites to development. SRD commits to enabling an open environment for sharing

and learning, both within the organisation and amongst stakeholders. Results/impacts - Results are the ultimate indicators of an action’s success. All actions and activities undertaken by SRD and its staff aim to provide positive impacts on the lives of disadvantaged communities. Participation - Participation is the foundation for ensuring rights and sharing of responsibilities. SRD commits to facilitating meaningful participation of disadvantaged people in the decision-making process.

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LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR In response to the ever changing context of the economic, social and political environment, and aiming at improving organisational efficiency, SRD has undergone an organisational restructuring. The appointment of two new deputy directors and the establishment of a programme support unit are initiatives that affirm the strength of our human resource development, and demonstrate how leadership is encouraged amongst SRD staff. The procedures and policies have also been updated.

The second Strategic Plan (2008 – 2012) of SRD has been completed, with obtained achievements reaching far beyond the set objectives. The year 2012 has also marked several significant important events, including the completion of our second Strategic Plan and the development of a new Strategy, focussing on organisational restructuring that has facilitated the successful implementation of an increasing numbers of projects. Despite the impacts of the global economic crisis, SRD not only retained support from major donors but was also able to attract new funding partners. This success is mainly attributed to the very high level of accountability and credibility of the organisation, as well as the positive and visible impacts of our projects on all levels of society. Up to 2012, SRD has implemented fortyfive projects in twelve provinces, with eleven of these being ongoing. We are very pleased to witness an increase in the total number of beneficiaries from the projects we implemented, and the considerable improvement of the life of poor communities, and in particular disabled people, women, children and ethnic minorities. 6

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The successful completion of SRD’s second strategic plan gave us the confidence for developing our third Strategic Plan for the period 2013 – 2017. This third Strategic Plan does not only reaffirm SRD’s ambitions and objectives, but also expresses the collective commitment of all SRD’s staff to the fight against poverty, and contributing to a just and sustainable development of Vietnam. In 2013, SRD will direct all efforts towards putting the third Strategic Plan into practice. On behalf of all SRD’s staff, I would like to express our gratitude to our donors, partners, community members, and all those who have supported us over the last year – without your collaboration and support, SRD would have not been able to fulfil our commitments. Sincerely,

Vu Thi Bich Hop Executive Director, Centre for Sustainable Rural Development (SRD)


LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE VIETNAM UNION OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATIONS In recent years, Vietnam, like any other country in the world, has been observing remarkable changes, with increasing challenges both nationally and internationally. The global economic crisis has heavily impacted the level of interest in development programs from donors, and has consequently resulted in the availability of fewer financial resources provided through international aid. Limited government budget and decreased international aid made it difficult for NGOs to attract support and funding to maintain their operations. In this context, the Centre for Sustainable Rural Development (SRD) has demonstrated its capacity by continuously mobilising resources, committing ongoing efforts toward the development of a longterm organisational strategic plan, and at the same time ensuring a high level of quality and effectiveness of on-going projects. As the Chair of the Vietnamese NGO and Climate Change (VNGO&CC) network, Co-chair of the Climate Change Working Group (CCWG), Head of the Steering Committee of the VNGOFLEGT network, and core member of the CSO networks in country and region, SRD has taken on a leadership role in improving the capacity of CSOs and mobilising resources, with a particular emphasis on facilitating communication between CSOs and government agencies. Through these networks, SRD has contributed to improving the role of CSOs in Vietnam and encouraging their contribution to policy development and implementation processes. SRD’s contributions over the past year can be witnessed as positive changes within communities of the 12 provinces where SRD has been implementing projects. In 2012, SRD was awarded the Certificate of Merit by the Minister of the Ministry of Science and Technology, the Chairman of Yen Bai province and the Central Committee of the Vietnam Oriental Medicine Association.

In March 2013, the Vietnam Union of Science and Technology Association (VUSTA) held a ceremony to celebrate its thirty-year anniversary. Whilst in the past decade VUSTA has achieved remarkable success, we will face new developmental challenges in the future. In its development’s progress, VUSTA has recognised and highly valued the success and contribution of SRD - a member organisation of the Union. We hope that SRD will continue to develop sustainably, while helping to strengthen the network of VUSTA and contributing to the social-economic developmental progress of the country.

Prof. Dr. Dang Vu Minh President, Vietnam Union of Science and Technology Associations (VUSTA)

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SRD’S PROGRAMMES IN 2012


Sustainable Agriculture Sustainable agriculture is an integral component of SRD’s projects in poor and vulnerable communities across the Northern mountainous regions of Vietnam. The strategy provides capacity building for communities to enable them to manage their own livelihoods. SRD’s projects in 2012 continued to focus on increasing the incomes of communities, with a specific focus on the poor and women farmers, and by introducing sustainable livelihood models that meet their needs and are suitably adapted to their capacity. Furthermore, different activities have been designed to encourage and facilitate the participation of women and vulnerable groups, and to strengthen their decision-making capacity in local socioeconomic development. The introduction of farmer clubs and cooperatives has proved a successful method. Through connecting people and mobilising their collective actions, these models enhance and support the socioeconomic development of the community.

In the past year, SRD’s sustainable agriculture projects have achieved remarkable results. Not

only have the projects succeeded in raising the average income in the area, they have also led to increased confidence of the poor, especially women, enabling them to participate better in community activities and family life. These activities have empowered community members to speak their minds, voice their demands and make decisions according to their own choices. They also provide a good basis for SRD to design appropriate activities to meet the needs of the people. The success of SRD’s projects can be attributed to the participation and support of local stakeholders and authorities. The sustainability of the projects is further ensured by incorporating the project activities and models into community development programmes and local socio-economic development plans. Using the success and lessons learned from the projects, SRD has continued to improve the living standards of people living in rural communities, while acting as a strong advocator for policies for the poor and promoting the integration of effective models into national programmes.

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Climate Change and Community Based Disaster Risk Management In 2012, SRD continued to utilise participatory and community-based initiatives to improve livelihoods and strengthen the climate resilience of Vietnam’s most vulnerable communities. Projects included the use of community initiatives to develop disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation plans; implementing community warning systems for natural disasters and; working with ethnic minority communities and women to develop livelihood adaptation methods to increase resiliency to natural disasters and climate change. SRD has also currently integrated climate change into many capacity-strengthening-projects in Yen Bai, Thua Thien Hue, Ha Tinh, Quang Tri, etc. These projects have considerably increased the ability of vulnerable communities to deal with climate change.

Over the past year, SRD has also continued to work with all levels of government to ensure the success and sustainability of the interventions, and to take every opportunity to encourage dialogue between government and NGOs. In 2012, SRD hosted and coordinated three national high level sharing workshops on Climate Change Adaptation. The workshops 10

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were run in partnership with the Department of Hydro-meteorology and Climate Change (DMHCC) of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. Along with the role of co-founder and chair of the Vietnamese Non-Governmental Organisations and Climate Change network (VNGO&CC), and co-chair of the Climate Change Working Group (CCWG), SRD in co-ordination with three other organisations founded and now chairs the Vietnamese Non-Governmental Organisations and Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade Network (VNGO-FLEGT). The year 2012 also marked the beginning of a new project funded by USAID in collaboration with Winrock International (WI), Netherlands Development Organisation (SNV), American Red Cross (ARC), and Vietnamese Red Cross. This project helps to enrich SRD’s experience in climate change and forestry, and provides an opportunity to geographically expand SRD’s initiatives. SRD’s lessons have been shared with Vietnamese and international networks through publications such as ‘Practices in Responding to Climate Change – Experiences of NGOs in Vietnam’, participation in high level forums and workshops, and membership in national and international networks.


Research and Advocacy SRD realises that evidence-based advocacy is a powerful tool to achieve our goals as it allows us to present examples and facts of practices and policies that may benefit people living in rural communities. During 2012, SRD continued to enhance its research and advocacy capacity. Owing to the practical experience attained from grass-roots interventions, SRD has successfully conducted research projects in several areas such as sustainable agriculture, climate change, people living with disabilities, and value-chain analysis. These studies are instrumental in providing SRD with comprehensive information about the projects, and effectively assist SRD in designing suitable interventions to support local community. The findings and recommendations from these studies have also been paramount to SRD’s work with national and international advocacy.

Throughout the year, SRD has made significant efforts to improve the organisation’s internal and external communication channels and to establish a network with press channels that share similar interests in regards to the themes of our activities. SRD conducts its communicating activities through many different channels including publications, website, events and mass media communication. Examples of this development are the improvement of a brand guideline, a new website, and the establishment of our strategic plan and organisational communication strategy. Externally, SRD has been a strong force in establishing national as well as international networks with the purpose of sharing and learning. In 2012, SRD has further strengthened its presence in different media forums. News on SRD’s projects has been reported in magazines, television shows and radio broadcasts. SRD is recognised as a highly credible organisation and engaged in different policy making processes such as the New Agriculture and Rural Development Programme, the National Target Programme to Respond to Climate Change, the Sustainable Development Strategy in Vietnam, and the Development Effectiveness Forum. SRD has also actively contributed to advocacy processes at international level, such as the UN Summit on Sustainable Development Rio+20, the Sixth International Conference on Community Adaptation-CBA6, the FAO-Asia Pacific Regional Conference, the International Conference on Food, Agriculture and Climate change , and the ASEAN peoples’ forum.

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Project Portfolio Total approved budget (USD)

Period Code

Project Name

No

Finish

Main project

VM019

Development and conservation of traditional remedies and indigenous medicinal plants

07-2009

07-2012

205,072

VM021

Development of participatory land use management (PLUM) in Phu Tho province

10-2009

12-2012

238,819

VM028

The civil action for socioeconomic inclusion in sustainable development for the Northern ethnic minorities in Vietnam

01-2010

12-2012

165,678

4

VM031

Community-based disaster risk mitigation and climate change adaptation in Huong Tra town, Thua Thien Hue province

10-2010

09-2013

331,194

5

VM035

Support marginalised ethnic communities to adapt to changes in suburban in Dien Bien province

03-2011

06-2013

253,000

6

VM037

Vietnamese NGOs toward ethnic minority communities’ livelihoods in Northern mountainous areas

07-2011

06-2014

432,818

7

VM038

Taking a value chain approach to improve rural livelihoods in the context of natural disasters and climate change in Ha Tinh province

01-2012

12-2014

519,869

8

VM039

Farmers piloting the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) toward climate response in Bac Kan province

11-2011

11-2012

67,515

1

2

3

12

Start

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Total approved budget (USD)

Period Code

Project Name

No

Start

Finish

Main project

VM041

Supporting people with disabilities in Gio Linh district, Quang Tri province, Viet Nam

04-2012

03-2015

207,903

VM042

Putting lessons into practice: scaling up people’s biodiversity management for food security

06-2012

05-2013

109,125

11

VM043

Promoting community and Vietnam civil society organisations’ participation in VPA/FLEGT process

01-2012

12-2012

94,058

Total budget for main projects

Micro Projects

12

VM020

Building capacity of civil society organisations to work with climate change

01-2012

09-2012

10,551

13

VMMIC06

National CSOs Dialogue on Climate Change Adaptation

12-2012

12-2012

23,000

14

VMMIC07

Organisation of the CSO's Training Workshop on VPA/FLEGT and REDD+

09-2012

09-2012

7,470

15

VMMIC08

Research on Climate change and NGOs response in Mekong delta

12-2012

12-2012

7,640

Total budget for micro projects

48,661

Total budget

2,673,712

9

10

2,625,051

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STORIES FROM THE COMMUNITY


Sustaining community health and incomes through the conservation and development of Traditional Remedies For many years, Mrs. Nguyen Thi Ngat’s family has farmed traditional medicine plants in Cam An commune, Yen Binh district, Yen Bai province. Up to Mrs Nguyen, her families’ traditional remedy to cure kidney stones has been inherited for seven generations. In the past, traditional remedies were only widespread in Cam An commune. In 2012, with support of the project Development and Conservation of Traditional Remedies and Indigenous Medicinal Plants, Ms. Nguyen Thi Ngat’s remedy became recognised by the Yen Bai Department of Health and Oriental Medicine Association as a community asset. This remedy has the documented effect of dissolving kidney stones smaller than 2.5 cm, using the available and commonly used herbal plants for the remedy are include Kim Tien Thao, Ke Dau Ngua and Co Gianh. After official recognition, Mrs. Nguyen’s remedy has been promoted through the project’s intensive training courses, and has subsequently become very popular in the community. Thanks to these trainings, the capacity of local “oriental doctors” in the region has been improved. In fact, the number of patients who visited the Oriental Medicine Association to get their kidney stones treated has increased by 30 percent. Moreover, farmers who participated in the project have also gained skills in growing herbal plant species that are threatened by extinction and can be used as remedies. Thus the project has enabled people to grow and use traditional medicinal plants. The project has not only helped local people to gain the knowledge and skills of how to manage their household economy and develop their 16

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own businesses, but has also encouraged their participation in socio-economic development planning processes. Supporting the commune Oriental Medicine Association to register traditional remedies helps encourage local people to conserve and develop their traditional knowledge and experience in oriental medicine. The project not only respects the existing knowledge and heritage of these traditions but also strengthens the solidarity and economic development of the community. According to the Chairman of Cam An commune People’s Committee, in addition to promoting the production and use of herbal plants such as Gung, Hoai Son and Ba Kich, the project brings many benefits to farmers, in particular a 20% increase in income. As indicated in the socioeconomic development plan, local authorities will continue to invest in the production and use of medicinal plants in the commune in the coming five years.

Members of the Cam An communal Oriental Medicine Association


Project's name

Development and Conservation of Traditional Remedies and Indigenous Herbal Plants (VM019)

Project location

Cam An commune, Yen Binh district, Yen Bai province

Local partner(s)

Yen Bai province Oriental Medicine Association Cam An communal People’s Committee Cam An communal Oriental Medicine Association

Objective

Support poor farmers to sustain livelihoods and traditional health care through conservation and development of traditional remedies and indigenous medicinal plants.  

Identify and promote the use of traditional remedies; Improve application value of traditional remedies and indigenous herbal plants;  Improve capacity for community in conserving, sustainably harvesting and using indigenous herbal plants;  Develop manuals on traditional remedies and indigenous herbal plants, encourage local authorities’ participation. 

Key Activities in 2012

10 to 20 percent increase in poor household incomes thanks to growing herbal plants;   80% participants of the project have basic knowledge about the medicine made from traditional herbal plants;  One remedy certified and officially introduced for popular application;  Three rare herbal plants that have been regenerated and planted on 40 hectares of forested areas. 

Achievements

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RVT - a salt tolerant rice variety increases people’s income Hai Duong is a coastal commune in Huong Tra town, Thua Thien Hue province, located between Huong river and Tam Giang lagoon. This commune suffers from the effects of natural disasters, particularly rising tides and seawater flooding. In recent years, the complexity of natural disasters has increased, resulting in even more ruinous impacts on the farming and production activities of local people. According to Mr. Pham Quoc Su, a farmer in Hai Duong, all the three hectares of paddy fields of Hai Duong commune are periodically flooded throughout the year on an annual basis, and the salinity levels increases significantly due to the overflow of seawater from Tam Giang lagoon. In the past, Mr. Su’s family and other local farmers cultivated Xi 23 – a local rice variety and HT1- cross-bred rice variety that produced 2.5 quintals/sao (1 “sao” = 4000 square meter). However, as these fields are located in a region with high levels of salinity, he and the other farmers were only able to cultivate the fields in winter and harvest in spring, leaving the fields uncultivated through summer and autumn. In early 2012, through the project Community Based Disaster Risk Mitigation and Climate Change Adaptation funded by Caritas Australia, SRD introduced a new rice variety - RVT for locals to plant on an experimental field of two hectares. The project attracted the participation of 17 households and has subsequently expanded to 21 households.

The project furthermore organised technical training courses on how to plant the new rice variety. Mr. Su said: “The RVT-rice is tolerant to drought and high salinity levels which makes me feel more secure about the harvests. Moreover, the quality of the grain is better”. In the first attempt to grow RVT rice, the yield reached 3 quintals/ sao instead of the previous result of 2.5 quintals/ sao. As a result of this, his family's income has increased to over 10 million dong per rice harvest in 2012. In addition to the support farmers received to cultivate the new salinity tolerant rice variety, the project also supported other initiatives such as watermelon farming.

Piloting model of new rice varieties - RVT in Huong Tra town

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Project's name

Community Based Disaster Risk Mitigation and Climate Change Adaptation in Huong Tra Town, Thua Thien Hue province (VM031)

Project location

Huong Phong and Hai Duong communes, Huong Tra town, Thua Thien Hue province

Local partner(s)

The People's Committee of Huong Tra town, communal People’s Committees of Hai Duong and Huong Phong Bureau of Agriculture and Rural Development of Huong Tra town The Flood and Storm Control Committee of Huong Tra town

Objective

Local authority and community are capable of disaster mitigation and can respond better to climate change by applying community based disaster risk management techniques. 

 

Key Activities in 2012

 

 

Achievements

Organise training courses on disaster reduction and recovery, safe household plan; mock-up disaster prevention in commune level; Establish rapid response teams in communes; Organise communication on waste management and environmental protection; Support farmers to expand livelihood models (watermelon, rice); build road; Equip rescue team facilities, tools and communication devices for the rescue team; Integrate communication on disaster risk reduction and climate change; Develop disseminate materials on disaster recovery plans in households, handbook for trainees, and communication documents. The project directly benefited about 1,736 people and indirectly benefited over 3,500 people

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Confidence albeit rapid urbanisation Mrs. Quang Thi Oanh (45) is a Thai living in Chieng Khoang village, Tuan Giao district, Dien Bien province. Together with her husband and two sons, she cultivates rice on a 250 m2 field. This very small plot does not generate enough rice for the family’s daily meals, and Mrs. Oanh is consequently forced to sell goods to earn additional income. Due to a lack of capital for investment she could in the past only sell vegetables, and since the consumption of vegetables is rather unstable, she was often forced to sell at a loss. She has also been raising chickens and ducks, but without knowledge on appropriate techniques, she was unable to gain any profit from her ventures. During 2010-2011 her family was therefore listed on the poverty list.

as we are in much better situation than other households now. Before I felt impaired by my lack of confidence and fear of doing the things wrongly, now I feel empowered and eager to work to support my family.” Through the project, 11 women’s groups covering a total of 129 households (out of which 59 were included on poverty list) were established and received loans from the community’s established fund. According to the reports, 90 percent of those who borrowed money from the fund used it effectively to increase production and consequently improve their economic situation. After 12 months, the loans had circulated 145 times among the groups.

Through the project Support Thai Community in Adapting to Urbanisation Changes she has participated in an interest group and a women’s club where she was taught techniques that she could use for her chicken and duck farming. She has also received a loan from the livelihood support fund that was established by the project. With these newly gained financial means, she was able to breed three flocks of chickens, using the techniques she was taught (to keep the right temperature and administer vaccines to the chickens), the chicks grow very fast. Each flock can now be sold at a profit of two million Dong. From the profit made from chicken farming and the business knowledge she acquired through the trainings, Mrs. Oanh has managed to open her own grocery store in her home. The grocery store not only brought Ms. Oanh a stable income of 100,000 dong per day but also gave her an opportunity to look after her family and sons while working. According to Mrs. Oanh, her family’s living conditions have improved, and she told us: “Maybe next year our household will no longer be on the poverty list, Mrs. Quang Thi Oanh 20

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Project's name

Support Thai Community in Adapting to Urbanisation Changes (VM035)

Project location

Chieng Chung and Chieng Khoang Villages, Tuan Giao district, Dien Bien province

Local partner(s)

People’s Committee of Tuan Giao district, Village leaders of Chieng Chung and Chieng Khoang villages

Objectives

Improving life conditions and strengthening social capacity for ethnic minority groups in Chieng Khoang and Chieng Chung villages, Tuan Giao district, Dien Bien province. 

Key Activities in 2012

Achievements

Conduct training courses on HIV/AIDS, environment protection, grassroots democracy, group management skills, monitoring and evaluation project activities, market and agricultural production; Support activities of women’s clubs, and livelihood development credit fund; Build two cultural houses, sanitation systems, safe water and hygienic latrine, and roads inside the village; Conduct research on the changes of the life of ethnic minorities in the suburban environment; Communication of information in regards to safe water, hygienic latrine, HIV/ AIDS and project’s activities on the TV of Tuan Giao district; develop and disseminate communication documents. Number of direct beneficiaries: 220 poor households (100 percent ethnic minorities) in Chieng Chung and Chieng Khoang; Average income of farmers receiving a loan from the established fund increased by 15 to 20 percent.

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Decreasing production costs through using organic fertiliser In 2012, the agricultural production activities of Tam Thanh community livelihood club in Tam Thanh commune, Tan Son district, Phu Tho province, changed substantially. In the community livelihood club, local farmers gather to share their experiences, work together and implement different cultivation models or other livelihood development schemes. In 2012 the club was specifically successful in implementing and promoting a model where farmers utilised their waste to produce organic fertiliser, saving them a lot of money. In the livelihood club, members were introduced to different techniques such as using EMIC to produce fertiliser from manure and organic waste. The

club also serves as a very efficient apparatus for implementing the models, sharing knowledge and monitoring the implementation processes. After two months the model was applied by 47 households and the amount of organic fertiliser produced was estimated to be 40 tons. The organic fertilizer is now commonly used in rice and vegetable cultivation. Ms. Ly, a 44 year old Muong ethnic and a member of the club said: “I only use organic fertiliser and water in my garden, no chemicals, and my vegetables grow very well! Before I used the organic fertiliser my vegetables were often destroyed but now my family can eat fresh vegetables every day. I never buy vegetables anymore, the only little money I have to spend goes to seeds and yeast for the compost.” The feedback from the project has been very positive because local people could clearly see the advantage of producing fertiliser using manure and organic waste. Firstly, the process of making the fertiliser is quite easy and the materials for producing it appear to be easily accessible – which in turn ensures a low production cost. Ms. Son, 47-year old head of Tam Thanh Club said that “making organic fertiliser is so easy, anyone can do it and it only cost very little amount of money to buy the yeast.”

Thang - member of Tam Thanh club is conducting to mix microbiological organic fertiliser

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This group activity where households help each other to make and use organic fertiliser in agricultural production is a key activity of the project Vietnamese NGOs towards ethnic minority communities’ livelihoods in northern mountainous areas. The project has benefited nearly 600 households, specifically ethnic minorities, to sustain their production and livelihoods. The participation in the project activities has led to both empowerment and improved decisionmaking capacity for minority people.


Project's name

Vietnamese NGOs towards ethnic minority communities' livelihoods in northern mountains areas (VM037)

Project location

Three provinces of Hoa Binh, Phu Tho and Thai Nguyen

Local partner(s)

Centre of Research and Development in Upland Areas (CERDA) Centre for Sustainable Development in Mountainous Areas (CSDM) People Committee and Community Livelihood Club of Vo Mieu commune, Thanh Son district; Tam Thanh commune, Tan Son district, Phu Tho province; Phu Cuong commune, Dai Tu district, Thai Nguyen province; Na Meo commune, Mai Chau district, Hoa Binh province.

Objective

Support the development of Community-Based Organisations facilitate livelihoods improvement and increased participation in grassroots decision-making within six communes, four districts, three provinces in the Northern mountainous areas of Vietnam. 

Key Activities in 2012

  

Identify and provide technical support to implement sustainable livelihood models that lead to higher incomes and are environmental friendly; O  rganise networking activities for families applying different livelihood models from different projects; Promote market access, support farmers in marketing their products; Support development of village regulations; Promote grassroots democracy.

Phu Tho: 161 households have benefited directly from the project, average income increased by 20 to 25 percent;  Hoa Binh: 90 households, average income of community members increased by 15 to 20 percent;  Thai Nguyen: 296 households; average income of community members increased by 18 to 20 percent. 

Achievements

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An example of a good leader When the project Taking a value chain approach to improving rural livelihoods in the context of climate change and natural disasters in Can Loc district, Ha Tinh province was implemented in Luong Hoi commune, the Luong Hoi communal livelihood development group was established. With its 40 members, the aim of the group is to share their experiences, make their production more effective and mobilise saved capital to establish a fund that could be used to support community projects and to invest in smallscale businesses. With her enthusiasm and experience, Ms. Tran Thi Cuong was selected by the communal members to become the head of the livelihood development group. Not only efficient in her farming, Ms. Cuong is also very active in maintaining and promoting better activities for the livelihood development group. Aware of the role of a group leader, she is very active in participating in the project’s training courses and workshops on livelihood development models and flood prevention. Her possibly most significant achievement to date is the fund that she established within the livelihood development group. This fund can be assessed by members who need to borrow money to invest in their livelihoods. At present the fund contains 28 million dong and 14 households already received loans from the fund to invest in cattle. At occasions when borrowers have been unable to pay their interest at the deadline, Ms Cuong even lent money to them to enable them to pay their respective interests. This really helped strengthen the belief of members in the group and encouraged them to participate more actively. Ms. Cuong also participated very actively in the flood prevention activities of the hamlet.

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Ms. Cuong said that since the implementation of the project, she has been able to take on her role as the head of the communal women’s association more effectively thanks to her newly gained skills in facilitating group meetings to mobilise villagers’ participation, and improved abilities in presenting and communicating, including the writing of case studies. When talking about Ms. Cuong, all members were praising her initiatives and her contribution to the group’s activities. “Our leader is an example of successful small-scale farm business development, and also a good leader who can maintain and promote the group’s activities”, Ms. Xanh, a member of Luong Hoi communal livelihood development group said.

Cuong is in communication on preventing flood and adapting to climate change for people in Luong Hoi Commune


Project's name

Taking a value chain approach to improving rural livelihoods in the context of natural disasters and climate change in Ha Tinh province (VM038)

Project location

Three communes of Can Loc district, Ha Tinh province: Khanh Loc, Vuong Loc and Vinh Loc communes

Local partner(s)

People's Committee of Can Loc district; Bureau of Agriculture and Rural Development of Can Loc district; Centre for Applying Science and Technology into Plant and Animal Protection, Can Loc District; The People's Committee of three project communes.

Goal

Improve the sustainability of poor farmers’ livelihoods in the face of climate change and natural disasters. 

Key activities in 2012

Organise training courses on breeding techniques and sustainable livelihood development; market development, disaster risk reduction and climate change adaption; flood prevention planning; Support community organisations such as a business development support group, a sustainable livelihood development group, a flood prevention team, the network of communities collaborators; Research on potential agricultural products; implement agricultural production models to adapt to climate change; Supply equipments and tools to local people affected by floods and to the rescue team; Document and organise communication events in climate change related issues.

Direct beneficiaries: 226 households including 38.5 percent poor households; 150 members in flood prevention team at district and communal level;  Indirect beneficiaries: 774 households including 33.4 percent poor households. 

Achievements

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Farmers conduct research on the system of rice intensification Nong Thinh is a mountainous commune in the north of Vietnam, located along the national road # 3 and part of the Cho Moi district, Bac Kan province. In recent years, climate change has affected the infrastructure and agricultural production of the commune. The increased frequency and duration of droughts and decreased level of rainfall have reduced the quality and availability of arable land, resulting in negative impacts on the living conditions of the commune. With the support of the project Farmers piloting the system of rice intensification toward climate change response in Bac Kan province, a group comprising eight female farmers from Cam Leng village in Nong Thinh commune was established in 2012. The purpose of this group was to carry out research on SRI in their community. While SRI has been implemented in Bac Kan province in the past, this SRI applications research is innovative since it focuses on drought-resistant varieties in non-irrigated fields. Initially, members were guided by technicians on techniques in relation to seedling nursery, planting, drainage and effective fertiliser application that minimizes the risk of pests and diseases. After understanding the use of these techniques, the group designed the experimental plots, conducted monitoring and selected measurements, and also applied suitable treatments at each stage of the rice development in line with SRI principles. This pilot project demonstrated that SRI’s practices were suitable for the local conditions. Ms. Nguyen Thi Dien, one farmer of the research group said: “In 2012, I and seven others were registered into an experimental group to apply SRI techniques on our fields. Actually, SRI techniques 26

Annual Report 2012

are not difficult to apply and require less investment compared to traditional methods. Specifically, the sparse planting technique in the SRI method can lead to the reduction of 70% amount of seeds and 50% of the pesticide spraying work. Furthermore, the SRI method also led to a considerable yield increase, in comparison to the traditional method, the income of farmers has increased by 8-12%.” From the research findings, the farmers’ groups also recommended that applying SRI principles into the cultivation of the salt tolerant rice variety can produce better results on dry fields. During the prolonged drought events of 2012, the research groups have found the DTL2 rice variety -commonly referred to as Red rice, to have a potentially high yield (62 quintal/hectare) when applying SRI under dry conditions. This result has been shared with others farmers in field workshops as well as in group meetings of the Women’s association or Farmer’s group.

Visiting rice field in Cho Moi District


Project's name

Farmers piloting the system of rice intensification (SRI) toward climate change response in Bac Kan province (VM039)

Project location

Three districts: Na Ri, Cho Moi and Ba Be in Bac Kan province

Local partner(s)

Plant Protection Sub-Department of Bac Kan province

Objective

Conduct research on the suitable application of SRI to cope with climate change in Bac Kan in three typical geographical and hydro meteorological sub-regions, and to provide recommendations to the local authorities. 

Key activities in 2012

   

Study to identify three pilot sites and set up experiments on SRI; Build up database with information and analysis of the models; Provide technical guidelines on SRI to farmers; Facilitate interactions and exchanges among three SRI farmer groups; Final evaluation of the project.

210 farmers and 20 local staff (of which 75% are women) gained technical knowledge and skills on SRI and are now able to support application of SRI in other locations;  SRI has been recognised as a good practice in the province’s action plan responding to climate change. 

Achievements

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27


A common home brings us closer together I was a soldier fighting in the Cambodian war. When the war came to an end, I returned to my country as a broken man: missing one of my arms. This was a dark time for me, I couldn’t see a future for myself. However, since I joined the club for people with disabilities supported by SRD’s project “Supporting people with disabilities” my life has changed. To be able to share my story with others in similar situations has awakened dreams and hopes in me and made me more optimistic about my future. Participating in the activities of the people with disabilities’ (PwD) club is very meaningful to us. It helps us overcome difficulties, remove our feelings of inferiority, and restore confidence in ourselves and in our lives. When taking part in the activities of the club, we feel more connected and integrated - like we are a part of the community. I specifically enjoy events such as the international day for people with disabilities (on December 3rd). It gives us a chance to share our experiences and feelings with others in the communities; it is very encouraging for us. The club has also organised training courses for us and our relatives on physical rehabilitation therapy – which we can apply to improve our health. Besides, our family members can also participate in the training, therefore, they can take care of us at home; this minimises the costs and risks. Another support from the project is the livelihood-development fund managed by the club. We were provided with 60 million VND to distribute among the members, and those who borrow from the fund pay an interest rate of only 0.3 percent. This interest will be used as the fund to maintain the club in the long run. The fund has so far supported setting up a number of agricultural models such as

28

Annual Report 2012

pig-breeding, poultry culture and some other suitable livelihood components for the PwD. Even though the club has only existed half a year, the activities have become organised and stable. The club is a second home where we work together to build a happy life, remove barriers and ensure economic development. We all believe in solidarity and a bright future – this is our club, by us, for us. We now hope that it would be recognised as an official union and operate under such regulations, as this would enable us to increase our funds and reach out to more people living with disabilities in our province.” (By Mr. Vo Ngoc Lan a veteran living in Gio Hai Commune, Gio Linh District, Quang Tri Province)

Mr. Vo Ngoc Lan


Project's name

Supporting People with Disabilities in Gio Linh district, Quang Tri province (VM041)

Project location

Gio Linh, Gio My and Gio Hai Communes, Gio Linh district of Quang Tri province

Local partner(s)

People ‘s Committee of Gio Linh district; Department of Labour, Invalids and Social Affairs of Quang Tri province; Department of Labour, Invalids and Social Affairs of Gio Linh district; People ‘s Committee of Gio My, Gio Hai communes and Gio Linh town.

Objective

People with disabilities in three communes of Gio Linh district receive opportunities to overcome their difficulties, to integrate into the community and to have a brighter and more independent life in 2015. 

    

Organise training courses on livelihood management and techniques; Conduct house visits; Organise meetings and workshops for people with disabilities; Organise social activities for children with disabilities; Establish clubs for people with disabilities; Support in building agricultural production models for PwD; Develop and disseminate communications material.

Key Activities in 2012

Achievements

More than 1,000 direct beneficiaries and over 3,000 indirect beneficiaries.

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29


Putting theories into practice for the conservation of plant genetic resources From July to October 2012, twenty technicians from Plant Protection Departments from the six provinces Thanh Hoa, Hoa Binh, Yen Bai, Son la, Bac Kan, and Lao Cai participated in a Training of Trainers (TOT) course on plant genetic resources conservation to adapt to climate change in Hoa Binh City. This training course was part of the project Putting Lessons into Practice - Scaling up Peoples’ Biodiversity Management for Food Security. The aim of the training is to equip technicians with not only technical knowledge, but also practical experience that will expand their expertise will be conveyed to local farmers. For that purpose, each technician will act like a real farmer in the TOT. The trainees participating in the project were trained on designing field experiments on varieties selection and others techniques on SRI, IPM... The participants were divided into different groups, and took part in various research experiments during the life cycle of the paddy (three months). Furthermore, the trainees also had a chance to put their skills and knowledge into practice by becoming trainers themselves. This was performed by conducting weekly FFS classes for 60 farmers in Da Bac district and Hoa Binh Town. Ms. Thuong – a farmer of the FFS from Tu Ly commune, Da Bac district said: “Thanks to the teachers we overcame many difficulties. Before the training we did not know the impact that pesticides have on the environment, we just did what we’ve always done. The participants in my class are all happy to apply the system of rice intensification as this not only saves them 50 per cent of the cost but also takes less time due to the planting techniques.

30

Annual Report 2012

I feel confident in training others and spreading the knowledge of how to apply SRI. In the future I intend to restore the rice variety BC15 and the sticky rice variety - Nep 87, and for the summer-autumn crop I will conduct trials with glutinous sticky rice.” When being asked how they felt, participants of the training course responded that this was an opportunity to practice, learn new skills and actively engage in the Training of Trainer process. After the training course technicians and trainees continued to implement the FFS in all the six provinces.

TOT Trainers are guiding for farmers in Tu Ly Commune, Da Bac, Hoa Binh Province in lessons on surveying biodiversity in research’s field


Project's name

Putting Lessons into Practice – Scaling up Peoples’ biodiversity Management for Food Security (VM042)

Project location

Four provinces of Hoa Binh, Yen Bai, Son La and Thanh Hoa

Local partner(s)

Plant Protection Department, MARD Field Crops Research Institute Plant Protection Sub-Departments of Hoa Binh, Thanh Hoa, Yen Bai and Son La provinces

Objective

Strengthen capacity for poor people and ethnic minority communities by improving their knowledge and skills in cultivating while integrating them into the national and international policy dialogue. O  rganise training courses for technicians in six provinces: Thanh Hoa , Hoa Binh, Bac Kan, Son La, Yen Bai and Lao Cai;  Conduct farmers field classes for key farmers in four provinces: Thanh Hoa, Hoa Binh, Son La and Yen Bai. 

Key Activities in 2012

20 technicians become masters in the selection and restoration of rice varieties and in designing field experiments;  120 key farmers have gained knowledge and skills on the selection of adaptive rice varieties;  Elite lines of rice with high potential yield and strong tolerance have been initially selected. 

Achievements

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31


Obtaining legal land ownership after 20 years of living on the same plot of land Ms. Le Thi Bao has lived in Tram Than commune, Phu Ninh district, Phu Tho province for 20 years, on the land inherited from her parents. However, up to 2010, she did not possess a certificate of her right to use the land. In her region this is not an uncommon situation. In recent years, many people of Phu Ninh District have found themselves in similar predicaments as they are not aware of their rights and/or obligations concerning land use. However, these problems were addressed in the project Participatory Land Use and Management (PLUM). The project was implemented in three communes of Phu Ninh district: Bao Thanh, Tram Than and Vinh Phu. The project was designed to facilitate the participation of local people in many training activities regarding land laws. Besides, dialogues were organised between local people and land management officers to improve the people’s understanding on their rights and obligations concerning land use, and to clarify the role and responsibilities of the authorities in land management. Thanks to the active participation in training activities, Ms. Bao now knows how to apply for a land use right certificate. She has been able to complete all the procedures and recently received a land use certificate issued by the district’s Bureau of Natural Resource and Environment. Not only the family of Ms. Bao but many other households also have directly benefited from the project. The PLUM project not only addressed the issue of land ownership, but also introduced effective livelihood models such as a chicken model and a biological fertiliser 32

Annual Report 2012

model that remarkably increased household’s incomes and improved rural livelihoods. Most people who applied these models reported an income increase and a decrease in production costs in regards to seeds, fertilisers, pesticides and other factors. Reviewing the outcomes from this project, the methods applied in PLUM have been evaluated by local people and Phu Ninh district’s authorities as a suitable solution to support sustainable poverty reduction and improving local governance. The implementation of this model has helped people become more aware of land use management and employ more effective farming techniques that contribute to increasing their income and reducing their input costs for agricultural production activities.

Bao is very happy when holding certificated of land use right


Project's name

Participatory Land Use and Management - PLUM (VM021)

Project location

Tram Than Vinh Phu and Bao Thanh communes, Phu Ninh district, Phu Tho province

Local partner(s)

Phu Tho Union of Science and Technology

Objective

Effective land use and management to sustainably reduce poverty, strengthen the community by focusing on improving the right to use land amongst vulnerable groups, particularly poor farmer households and women. Support farmers improve their livelihoods, and land use efficiency; Improve people‘s knowledge about Land Law;  Organize dialogues on land-related-problems between people and local authorities;  Enhance capacity for region development Board;  Strengthen the interest groups;  Document experience about establishing and operating interest groups and lessons learnt on method for mobilising people’s participation  

Key Activities in 2012

Achievements

Many households in the three communes have improved their livelihoods through applying a range of effective land use models. 25 interest groups were established which included 523 households in total.

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33


Integrating climate change into local Socio-Economic Development Planning In the recent years, socio-economic development in Gia Hoi and Nam Bung commune in Van Chan district, Yen Bai province has been remarkably progressing. The local government has paid special attention to the effects of climate change and natural disasters, and suitable measures have been deployed in order to deal with this changing context. The experiences and initiatives of the community have been highly appreciated and applied widely by the local authority. For example, the local people had a valuable experience of arranging stones in order to protect the rice fields from flood. This technique of arranging stones has

subsequently been included in the flood and storm control plan of the commune. This stone wall helped prevent the destruction of over 20 hectares of rice fields that would otherwise have been imminent in the fourth storm of 2012. Mr. Lo Van To, a farmer in Nam Vai village, Gia Hoi commune said: “Before, only some households used this technique (to arrange stones), but since the local government included this in its strategy, many people started to apply it. Creating stone embankment is so easy that my family and I can do it ourselves! The embankment not only protects against rising water levels, but also helps prevent animals from damaging the crops.� Both communes now have socio-economic development plans in place that include strategies designed to mitigate risks associated with climate change. Integrating climate change in the two commune plans is perceived as a success of the project Strengthen climate change adaption capacity for people and authorities in Gia Hoi and Nam Bung communes, Van Chan district, Yen Bai province. The climate change adaptation and disaster prevention activities are integrated as a significant part of the socio-economic development plan. This helps to induce change for the development of natural disaster prevention plans and their implementation methods.

Embanking stones to protect rice from sand, garbage and cattle damaging field

34

Annual Report 2012


Project's name

The civil action for socio-economic inclusion in sustainable development for the Northern ethnic minorities in Vietnam(VM028)

Project location

Gia Hoi and Nam Bung communes, Van Chan district, Yen Bai province

Local partner(s)

Yen Bai Union of Science and Technology Associations

Objective

Support poverty reduction, sustainable development and participation in decision making among northern ethnic minority groups in the Northern Mountains of Vietnam. 

Key Activities in 2012

 

Organise training courses on market analysis skills, livelihoods models, and disaster prevention for local citizen; Support local authority in building development plans for agriculture and forests; Organise activities on promoting cultural values, and indigenous knowledge; Introduce loan programs and processes for the Bank for Social Policies; Document the progress and lessons learned from the project.

60 households in interest groups developed optimal production plan; About 1.200 people gained access to production support services and information;  13 interest groups in relation to the production of agricultural goods were established and operated;  Nine village saving and loan associations (VSLA) with over 200 members mobilised over 500 million dong;  Integrated project’s activities into six programs on forest and agriculture development of Van Chan district.  

Achievements

Annual Report 2012

35


A voice for 25 million people An estimated twenty-five million Vietnamese citizens are dependent on forests for at least twenty percent of their income. These citizens are often among the poorest of the nation and live in the most isolated rural areas. This is becoming increasingly important as Vietnam is in the process of entering a Voluntary Partnership Agreement (VPA) with the European Union which would establish a new agreement known as Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade (FLEGT). This agreement mainly aims at establishing a necessary system and structure to ensure that the wooden products imported into Europe are legal. Furthermore, it will help limit the illegal exploitation of forest in the countries which are exporting woods and wooden products.

gain an understanding on the level of community awareness and consideration of Forest Law and the implementation of the Law, and reflected the community perceptions on issues related to the protection and harvest of timber from forest. With the improved capacity and knowledge about the issues faced by the community, the network has contributed considerably to the VPA negotiation processes on both the Vietnam and the EU side. Furthermore, thanks to the active engagement, the network has brought the voice of the forest-dependent communities to the policy makers in order to ensure that the execution of VPA/ FLEGT will be beneficial to poor people.

The establishment of FLEGT would drastically alter the ability of people and communities to access the very forests that they are reliant upon for income and subsistence. As these populations are rural and marginalised, they are excluded from decision making processes and negotiations. With financial support of the British Department for International Development (DFID) through FERN, SRD and three other organisations initiated a VNGO-FLEGT network. In the last year, the network has operated very actively in order to improve the capacity for civil society organisations to participate more effectively in the VPA negotiation process. The network also undertook a community consultation on timber legality definition in six provinces namely: Yen Bai, Bac Kan, Thanh Hoa, Thua Thien Hue, Lam Dong and Ba Ria - Vung Tau. The consultation results enabled the network to

36

Annual Report 2012

Community consultation on the legality of timber in Na Ri district, Bac Kan province


Project's name

Promoting community and Vietnamese CSOs engagement in VPA/ FLEGT (VM043)

Project location

All the countries undergoing VPA negotiation

Local partner(s)

FERN, FAO, Forest Trends and VNGO-FLEGT members

Objective

Strengthen the role and voice of CSOs, VNGOs as a representative of forestdependent communities to participate effectively in the negotiation process as well as implementation of VPA on FLEGT; thereby contribute to improve forest governance and strengthen land use right for community. Establish and maintain VNGO-FLEGT network with almost 30 member organisations which have experience in forest and community development;  Organise training to improve the capacity of VPA/FLEGT for organisations in VNGO-FLEGT network and other VNGOs in Vietnam;  Conduct community consultation on timber legality definition and its significance toward negotiation of VPA/FLEGT in Vietnam;  Facilitate participation of VNGO-FLEGT members in international workshops on VPA/FLEGT. 

Key Activities in 2012

VNGO – FLEGT network is established and consists of 28 organisation members with a lot of experience in the forest and community development fields;  VNGO-FLEGT has started to contribute through research, community consultations, recommendations for negotiation teams of Vietnam and EU. 

Achievements

Annual Report 2012

37


ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN 2012


Internal capacity building In line with our new strategy and vision of becoming a leading Vietnamese NGO, SRD has paid special attention to our human resource development. In 2012, SRD promoted two more Deputy Directors; the three Deputy Directors are currently sharing strategic roles to support SRD’s Executive Director and are responsible for managing different sectors of SRD. These positions were developed to support the new Strategic Plan 2013-2017 and to empower the Deputy Directors to have stronger voices when working with relevant stakeholders. In this new structure, the Program Support Department is established with the responsibility to conduct capacity building, and to monitor and evaluate SRD’s programs. As SRD works under the premise that staff is our greatest asset, we have devoted to strengthening and increasing the knowledge of our staff members. As a young and dynamic team we seek to maximise our potential for growth by investing in our people through training and team building. In 2012, to ensure that the expertise of staff members remained at the level of excellence associated with the organisation, SRD sent its staff to numerous workshops and training courses in Vietnam and abroad. Besides, SRD always encourages staff members to work as trainers and facilitators of training courses held for partners, local beneficiaries, and local communities. Through these activities, SRD staff confidently represents SRD in their areas of expertise and demonstrates excellent communicative skills. Along with its professional staff, SRD is very fortunate to receive support from its advisory board constituting of members who are experienced specialists in different areas of

expertise. Advisory Board members have provided SRD with their invaluable inputs and advices, not only for SRD’s operational work but also with regards to SRD’s new comprehensive strategic plan. All of them are committed to contributing to the further development of SRD. In 2012, SRD also hosted a number of international volunteers from organisations such as the Australian Youth Ambassadors for Development (AYAD), VIDA Volunteer Travel, Volunteers for Peace Vietnam (VPV) and World University Service of Canada (WUSC), all with a wide range of specialties. This arrangement not only benefits the volunteers, but also allows SRD to draw valuable lessons from their international experience and novel suggestions. It also provided SRD employees with a great opportunity to practice their English and to benefit from the cultural exchange. The volunteers have been a great asset to SRD’s work; they have instigated and completed projects such as development of the new website, SRD’s brand guideline, and the Green Office Programme.

SRD’s Advisory Board, partners and staffs

Annual Report 2012

39


Review of SRD’s 2nd Strategic Plan and development of the 3rd Strategic Plan SRD successfully implemented and completed its second Strategic Plan from 2008 to 2012 (SPII). At the end of 2011, SRD conducted an external evaluation of the SPII as well as development of the SPIII. The Strategic Plan is designed with the main purpose of maximising the capacity of the organisation while adapting to the changing environment. Besides, it must be designed in a way that every member of staff can understand and execute the objectives that are set in the document. With that purpose, a wide range of activities have been carried out such as: • Independent evaluation of the program of SPII; • Online consultation with donors and partners using questionnaires; • Internal review of the human resource development strategy;

• The focus of SRD’s programmes has also expanded in response to emerging issues; from a topic for advocacy, Climate change has become a major theme in SRD’s interventions. The geographical coverage of SRD’s programs has also further expanded beyond historical locations spanning from the northern mountainous provinces to the central coastal regions of Ha Tinh, Thua Thien Hue and Quang Tri. • The size and organisational capacity of SRD has also been improved. From only 10 staff members in the past, SRD currently has more than 30 staff with rich experiences and expertise in different fields. The organisational structure and policies have also been developed and applied more effectively.

• Internal review of all the sections including Sustainable Agriculture, Climate Change Hue’s programs, Communication, Research and Advocacy; • Consultation workshops with all the staff, advisory board, donors and key partners. The results of the evaluation and reviews proved that SRD has successfully realised the second Strategic Plan. SRD has achieved much more results than the pre-set objectives. Some prominent achievements include: • The SPII targeted an annual program budget of 600,000 USD, mainly focusing on sustainable agriculture and rural livelihoods. In fact, SRD’s budget reached nearly one million USD in 2011 which is fifty percent higher than the targeted budget. 40

Annual Report 2012

Representative of SRD receives Certificate of Merit from the Ministry of Science and Technology


Building up from the success and valuable experiences from the second Strategic Plan, SRD has set the objectives for the third Strategic Plan (2013-2017). In this Strategic Plan, SRD continues to focus on two major themes which are: Sustainable agriculture and livelihood and Climate change. At the same time, SRD will further strengthen its capacity and policy

influence power in research, networking and advocacy. The detailed objectives and plan are also built in order to make the organisation more professional and maintain the status of a leading organisation among the NGOs in Vietnam. The third Strategic Plan of SRD is officially executed from January of 2013.

Donors Donor

Country

Manos Unidas

Spain

Caritas Australia

Australia

Cordaid

Netherlands

Finland Embassy in Vietnam

Finland

Care International

Denmark

Reality of Aid network

Global Network

FERN

United Kingdom

Southeast Asia Regional Initiatives for Community Empowerment (SEARICE)

Philippines

AusAID

Australia

Australian Foundation for the Peoples of Asia and the Pacific (AFAP)

Australia

Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO)

United Nations

USAID USA

Annual Report 2012

41


Local partners

42

Local partners

Province/City

Bac Kan Plant Protection Sub – Department

Bac Kan

People's Committee of Tuan Giao district

Dien Bien

Plant Protection Department, MARD

Ha Noi

Centre for Sustainable Development in Mountainous Areas (CSDM)

Ha Noi - Hoa Binh

Centre of Research and Development in Upland Areas (CERDA)

Ha Noi - Thai Nguyen

People's Committee of Can Loc district

Ha Tinh

People's Committee of Khanh Loc commune, Can Loc district

Ha Tinh

People's Committee of Vinh Loc commune, Can Loc district

Ha Tinh

People's Committee of Vuong Loc commune, Can Loc district

Ha Tinh

Bureau of Agricultural and Rural Development of Can Loc district

Ha Tinh

Centre for Applying Science and Technology into Plant and Animal Protection, Can Loc District

Ha Tinh

Field Crops Research Institute

Hai Duong

Plant Protection Sub – Department

Hoa Binh

People's Committee of Na Meo commune, Mai Chau district

Hoa Binh

People's Committee of Tan Son commune, Mai Chau district

Hoa Binh

Community Livelihood Club of Tam Thanh commune, Tan Son district

Phu Tho

Community Livelihood Club of Vo Mieu commune, Thanh Son district

Phu Tho

Phu Tho Union of Science and Technology Associations

Phu Tho

People's Committee of Tam Thanh commune, Tan Son district

Phu Tho

People's Committee of Vo Mieu commune, Thanh Son district

Phu Tho

Annual Report 2012


Local partners

Province/City

People's Committee of Gio Linh district

Quang Tri

People's Committee of Gio Hai commune, Gio Linh district

Quang Tri

People's Committee of Gio My commune, Gio Linh district

Quang Tri

People's Committee of Gio Linh town, Gio Linh district

Quang Tri

Bureau of Labour, Invalids and Social Affairs of Gio Linh district

Quang Tri

Department of Labour, Invalids and Social Affairs of Quang Tri province

Quang Tri

Son La Plant Protection Sub – Department

Son La

People's Committee of Duc Luong commune, Dai Tu district

Thai Nguyen

People's Committee of Phu Cuong commune, Dai Tu district

Thai Nguyen

Thanh Hoa Plant Protection Sub – Department

Thanh Hoa

People's Committee of Huong Tra town

Thua Thien Hue

People's Committee of Hai Duong commune, Huong Tra town

Thua Thien Hue

People's Committee of Huong Phong commune, Huong Tra town

Thua Thien Hue

The Committee for Storm and Flood Control of Huong Tra town

Thua Thien Hue

Economic Department of Huong Tra town

Yen Bai

Yen Bai Plant Protection Sub – Department

Yen Bai

Yen Bai Union of Science and Technology Associations

Yen Bai

Yen Bai Traditional Medicine Association

Yen Bai

Communal Traditional Medicine Association of Cam An commune

Yen Bai

People's Committee of Cam An commune, Yen Binh district

Yen Bai

Annual Report 2012

43


44

Annual Report 2012

CENTRE VIETNAM PROGRAM MANAGER

PROGRAM OFFICERS VOLUNTEERS INTERNS

PROGRAM OFFICERS

VOLUNTEERS INTERNS

VOLUNTEERS INTERNS

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICERS

COMMUNICATIONS, RESEARCH & ADVOCACY MANAGER

DEPUTY DIRECTOR

CLIMATE CHANGE MANAGER

ADVISORY BOARD

VOLUNTEERS INTERNS

PROGRAM OFFICERS

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE MANAGER

DEPUTY DIRECTOR

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

VUSTA

VOLUNTEERS INTERNS

PROGRAM SUPPORT OFFICERS

PROGRAM SUPPORT MANAGER

DRIVER/COOK/GUARDS

VOLUNTEERS INTERNS

ACCOUNTANT, HR & ADMIN OFFICERS

DEPUTY DIRECTOR/ CHIEF ACCOUNTANT

CENTRE COMMITTEE

Organisational chart


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Annual Report 2012

45


Finance overview In 2012, SRD effectively managed and implemented 11 main projects and four micro projects with the total budget of 1,065,615 USD. Thanks to the quality of our projects and the professionalism of our organisation, SRD has become a reliable partner of many donors such as Caritas Australia, Cordaid, Manos Unidas and Care International who all provide SRD with continuous support. Recently, SRD in collaboration with Winrock, won a project funded by USAID, which will provide SRD with $702,000 over the span of five years. This gives SRD flexibility and hopefully leads to the accomplishment of one of SRD’s major goals of being more financially stable. Other donors, particularly FERN and SEARICE have also confirmed their intention to continue to support SRD to accomplish the objectives that were outlined in the ‘Strategic Plan 2013-2017’. In the new plan, SRD estimates the budget to be between $1.1 million and $1.4 million. Specific annual budget will also be determined by the general ethos of SRD to create and sustain a strong financial system. SRD believes that the suitable and effective management plus the long-term partnership agreement with the partners are significant factors contributing to the sustainable development of SRD. It also helps guarantee the agreement to improve the living conditions for poor people in Vietnam in the context of the current global financial crisis.

Income and expenditure For the year ended 31 December 2012 Unit USD Items I

1,085,750

906,221

Interest income

23,445

38,625

Exchange gain

(12,555)

36,204

Sundry income

161

96

55,403

67,687

1,152,205

1,048,833

Programme Expenditure

993,902

733,384

Indirect Overhead Costs

71,713

75,817

1,065,615

809,201

86,590

239,633

Administration cost from projects Total Income

Expenditure

Total expenditure

III

46

2011

Income Donors funding during the year

II

2012

Surplus(deficit) for the year

Annual Report 2012


Balance sheet As of 31 December 2012

Unit USD 31-12-2012

31-12-2011

932,680 8,539

753,962 7,187

395

843

8,144

6,344

Cash in bank

924,141

746,775

Vietnam dong

517,810

493,603

Foreign currency

406,331

253,172

Items ASSETS I. 1

Cash Cash on hand Vietnam dong Foreign currency

2

II.

Short-term investments

III.

Receivables

3,496

7,656

1

Receivables from donor

1,970

1,335

2

Other receivables

1,526

6,321

IV. 1

Inventories Tools, Equipment

V.

Other current assets

1

Short-term prepaid expenses

2

Advance

VI. 1

52,835

13,847

Tangible fixed assets

45,990

13,847

Original cost

71,581

38,139

(25,591)

(24,292)

Intangible fixed assets Original cost Accumulated depreciation (*)

VII.

23,173

Fixed assets

Accumulated depreciation (*) 2

23,173

6,844 8,555 (1,711)

Long-term investments

Total assets

989,011

798,637

126,263

98,287

LIABILITIES I.

Short term borrowings

1

Sundry payable

16,657

14,224

2

Payable to employees

95,771

77,493 Annual Report 2012

3 4

Other payable taxes

(13)

1,094

47


2

Intangible fixed assets

6,844

Original cost

8,555

Accumulated depreciation (*) VII.

(1,711)

Long-term investments

Total assets

989,011

798,637

126,263

98,287

LIABILITIES I.

Short term borrowings

1

Sundry payable

16,657

14,224

2

Payable to employees

95,771

77,493

3 1,094

Other payable taxes

5

Other payable

13,848

5,476

II.

Budget sources

862,748

700,351

1

Advanced budget

-

-

2

Realisation of exchange rate

-

-

3

Reserves fund

185,922

182,991

4

Administrative funds

43,172

49,767

5

Projects funds

580,820

453,745

6

Resources of fixed asset

52,835

13,847

989,011

798,637

Total liabilities

48

(13)

4

Annual Report 2012


SRD Annual Report 2012_EN version  
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