Issuu on Google+

Norway

Home to Route 66 USA

St. Louis, Missouri A Look Back

The Wigwam Motel A Retro Fit for Route 66


2

November / December 2011


MISSION STATEMENT Our mission statement is actually pretty simple: If it’s good for the entire Road, do it! We are dedicated to helping business survive and thrive across the entire Route 66 Corridor. We take preservation, protection and enhancement of the historic highway seriously. The history is well documented. Our goal is to accept that history, and move forward in this 21st century and beyond, using the most vmodern technology available to ensure future generations carry the work forward.

Judy@66TheMotherRoad.com

John@66TheMotherRoad.com

Bev@66TheMotherRoad.com

We have made every attempt throughout this magazine to make links active to websites and emails for your convenience.

Please note: When submitting materials to this magazine for publication, it is understood and agreed you have full legal rights to its content. In the event any litigation ensues, advertiser agrees to indemnify, defend and hold harmless the Magazine from all claims (whether valid or invalid), sits, judgements, proceedings, losses, damages, costs and expenses, of any nature whatsoever (including reasonable attorneys’ fees) for which the Magazine may become liable by reason of Magazine’s publication of Advertiser’s advertising.

Please be advised that it is illegal to reproduce this magazine in part or in full without express, written consent from 66 The Mother Road, LLC.

November / December 2011

3


www.BeckysBarn.com “Jeg mener Route 66 er en av de mest unike opplevelsene i verden! Intet annet sted kan by på så mange opplevelser i løpet av kun to uker. Vi ser det ekte Amerika; de rike, de fattige, utrolige natur opplevelser or fantastiske mennesker. Om du skulle velge kun ett reisemål i din livstid, så er dette stedet!” Arve Stallvik

http://route66ironhog.vpweb.com/

4

November / December 2011


The Best Adventure in the World

Finding Dreams on The Mother Road with Arve Stallvik

By Beverly Maxfield Each year Route 66 is discovered by new friends from here and abroad. In fact, you can ask any store, restaurant or hotel owner along the Route and they will tell you how many new friends they have made from overseas. Arve Stallvik, a journalist from Oslo, Norway serves as President, founder and owner of the World’s Largest Route 66 Company / Tour Operator, Route 66 USA. Arve’s tour company brings in travelers from all over Europe to discover and enjoy our national treasure. His love of the Route has helped peak the curiosity of global travelers that infuse the road with new life, new hope and a new future. “As a journalist, I discovered US Route 66 nine years ago,” Arve began. “I had invited 20 friends one summer to ride the whole US Route 66 with me. Following that, I started the company, Route 66 USA. More and more friends from Norway signed up in the coming years, so excited to take the tour on a Harley. These past 4 years I have brought about 1,000 friends to Route 66 every summer! That makes us the largest Route 66 tour operator in the world. No other company brings more than 100-200 people to Route 66 each summer. We bring about 1,000 people. That is very funny since we are from one of the smallest countries in the world, Norway!” When asked what Europeans love the most about The Mother Road, Arve was quick to answer, “They love the Grand Canyon, Hollywood, Las Vegas, which we visit for two days since it is right next to Route 66, the Native American and cowboy camps, the open and picturesque desert, small Route

66 towns…more or less everything! We have read about Native Americans and cowboys since we were kids, and grew up with cowboy movies, books, etc. Thousands of Norwegians have grandparents, who moved to America, so the ‘American Dream’ supported by Easy Rider, Wild Hogs, CARS, etc. makes Route 66 ‘every man’s dream’ in Norway. If you add the miles our Norwegian Route 66 customers drive on a Harley-Davidson or in a convertible car, we drive around the world 100 times every summer—or to the moon 10 times every summer on a Harley-Davidson. It racks up a lot of miles when about 1,000 riders travel more than 2,500 miles each!” Arve’s company is the only authorized Harley-Davidson Route 66 Tour Operator in Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Russia and the Czech Republic. Route 66 USA offers a complete tour and stops to celebrate many of the special events taking place along the Road. Trips are refined each year to coordinate with these special events. Arve added: “I think Route 66 is the best adventure in the world!” No other place on this planet can give you that much adventure in two weeks! We see the real America, the rich, the poor, great nature, and the greatest people. If you only go on one trip in your lifetime, this should be the trip.” Contact Arve at post@route66usa.info for more information or visit www.Route66usa.info.

November / December 2011

5


One Sweet Story! By Judy Springs a brief internet start, in 2007 Marcia A fter Wilson opened a brick and mortar store front - Route 66 Fudge Shop - located in Cuba, Missouri. It was not only Route 66 that held a special place in her heart, but the fact that this was the same building in which her parents once had a business. She started out part time and soon found herself working full time to keep up with the demand for her delicious candy. In October, 2008, health problems forced Marcia to close her beloved shop and take the business back online. “I was so upset because my business was really starting to roll. I thought everything I worked for would be lost. I moved everything home while I recovered — and prayed!” Marcia says, ”It wasn’t long before I had people calling, asking if I’d sell wholesale. My business more than tripled!” She placed her products in more than a dozen stores locally and many stores across Route

6

November / December 2011

66. There was just one problem - “I really missed the interaction with the people,” she says. Marcia’s love for Route 66 and the people that travel it gave her an added incentive to find a way back to the Route. “Currently, we are in contract on the purchase of a building on Route 66 in Cuba. My business has outgrown my home operations and I had to have more room, so we are purchasing the old Dairy Creme Building located at 402 E. Washington - or Old 66!” We are hoping to close in the next few weeks and be open by December 1st.” Marcia says, “I’m so excited to be back on the route! This time I will be adding a couple employees to help me, though. I want to stay on the Route for a long time to come.” Now that’s what I call “sweet!”

Be sure to visit Marcia’s website to see all the wonderful confections she has to offer. You can also become a friend on Facebook.

www.route66fudgeshop.com candyldy@fidmail.com


www.66routepost.com mrc@66routepost.com

om

www.Polk-a-Dot.c

November / December 2011

7


St. Louis, Missouri,

A look back ...

In the 12th century, the cities of the Mississippian culture loosely known today as the mound builders sat at the present site of St. Louis, as well as the communities located on the east bank of the Mississippi River. The Cahokia Mounds State Historic Park1 near Washington Park in Illinois remains as one of the last “mounds’ that once dominated the area and that led to the initial settlement of St. Louis being dubbed “Mound City.” The period of European association with the site dates to the explorations of Louis Joliet2 and Jacques Marquette3 in 1673. In 1703, establishment of a small Catholic mission served as the cornerstone for establishment of the city of St. Louis. 2

A drainage channel named River Des Peres, formerly a river, at the southern boundary of the city is the site for this mission. Actual settlement commenced in 1765 and in that year St. Louis was designated the capital of Upper Louisiana. In 1768, the city became part of a Spanish colony and in 1800 reverted to French control. Transference to the United States occurred in 1804. From 1812 to 1821, the year Missouri obtained statehood, St. Louis served as the capital for the Missouri Territory. Its location as the northernmost navigable port on the Mississippi River for large steamboats resulted in the community becoming a center of wealth. 8

November / December 2011


4

A disastrous fire and a sweeping cholera epidemic in 1849 transformed the community. These disasters led to the establishment of a stringent building code that required extensive use of stone or brick, and the development of a public water and sewage system. By the mid 1860, St. Louis with a population of more than 160,000 was the largest city in the United States west of Pittsburgh and the second largest port in the nation. During the closing years of the 19th century, and the first years of the 20th century, St. Louis developed as the center of industry and innovation. Ralston-Purina, Anheuser Busch, the Desloge Consolidated Lead Company, International Shoe, and Brown Shoe Company all had headquarters here4. Indicative of this prosperity were the Wainwright Building5, a ten-story structure recognized as on of the earliest steel framed skyscraper that still stands at the corner of Chestnut and Seventh Streets, and the Jefferson Hotel6 built in 1904 at the Twelfth and Locust Streets. Additionally, in 1904 the city hosted the Louisiana Purchase Exposition World’s Fair7 at Forest Park and the Olympics. With the rise in personal ownership of automobiles that allowed for commuting to suburbs rather than living in the densely developed older neighborhoods built around factories, the city population began to decline. Between 1950 and 2000, the city lost almost one-half of its population. The dense urban center, and a street grid that reflected a November / December 2011

9


1

lack of mass transit development as well as lengthy history, played a primary role in the development of Route 66 through St. Louis. It was also a primary factor in the numerous realignments. As a result, the city presents the most complex challenges in regards to following that historic highway today. However, the city retains a wide array of landmarks associated with Route 66 and its earlier history.

5

After crossing the Mississippi River on the McKinley Bridge8, the initial alignment of Route 66 followed Ninth Street, Salisbury Street, Natural Bridge Avenue, Grand Avenue, Delmar Boulevard, Sarah Street, Lindell Boulevard, Boyle Avenue, Clayton Avenue, and McCauland before following Manchester Road from the city. In 1929, the river crossing shifted to the Municipal Bridge, now MacArthur Bridge, and the highway snaked through the city on Seventh Street, Clayton Avenue, McCausland Avenue, and Manchester Road. The original alignment continued to be signed as Optional 66 until 1937.

6

7

In 1933, a rerouting of the highway utilized Choteau Avenue to Twelfth Street and then Gravois Avenue, Chippewa Street, and Watson Road. In 1936, this route received designation as City 66 and the main river crossing shifted north to the Chain of Rocks Bridge. Further confusing issues during this period is another routing of City 66 during this period. This alignment utilized Riverview Drive from the Chain of Rocks Bridge to Broadway, and then Calvary Avenue, Florissant Avenue, Herbert Street, Thirteenth Street, Twelfth Street, and Tucker Boulevard. The 1955 realignment utilized the Veteran’s Memorial Bridge as the primary river crossing and the Third Street Expressway, later I-55, to City 66 at Gravois Avenue. The City 66 designation was eliminated in 1963, but with the realignment of Route 66

10

November / December 2011


to the Poplar Street Bridge in 1967, Gravois Avenue, Chippewa Street, and Watson Road became the main route for the highway.

8

In February of 1975, U.S. 66 and I-44 utilized the same corridor. Decertification in St. Louis occurred in 1977. Along the east borders of the city, the bridges spanning the Mississippi River are the first landmarks encountered by westbound travelers. The McKinley Bridge built in 1910 served as the initial river crossing for Route 66. The Municipal Bridge9 that opened in 1916 served as the river crossing for Route 66 from 1929 to 1935, and City 66 from 1936 to 1955.

9

From 1936 to 1955, the Chain of Rocks Bridge10 built in 1929 served as the primary river crossing. It also served as the crossing for Bypass 66 from 1955 to 1965. The Veteran’s Memorial Bridge11, now named the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Bridge that opened in 1951 carried route 66 traffic across the river from 1955 to 1967. The Poplar Street Bridge12, currently the river crossing for interstate highway 55, 70, and 64, served as the river crossing for Route 66 from 1967 to 1977.

10

The most noticeable initial landmark for westbound travelers on Route 66 today would be the Gateway Arch13 that towers over the Jefferson Expansion Memorial, visible from the Poplar Street Bridge. Completed in 1965 this engineering marvel has come to symbolize the city. One of the oldest landmarks to cast its shadow over Route 66, the former Third Street Expressway that is now the depressed lanes of I-70, is the Basilica of St. Louis14 built in 1834. All other buildings in this area were cleared for construction of the Jefferson Extension Memorial.

11

Other historic landmarks include the Jefferson Hotel15, 1904, transformed into the Jefferson Arms, a retirement community before Continued on Page 12 November / December 2011

11


15

17

24

12

November / December 2011

St .L


Louis

13

12

18

23

14

November / December 2011

13


25

abandonment, the Missouri Pacific Building16, 1 Hall18, 1904, and St. Frances De Sales Church1 These include Bauer’s Ranch House20 at 5805 C Mittino’s21 at 6600 Chippewa Street that opene 10143 Olive Street; and the Airport Motel23, 19 Other locations of note include the Big Chief, n Pierce-Pennant Petroleum Company at 17352 Saloon25 — the oldest continuously operated ta the iconic Ted Drewes Frozen Custard26 on Chi

If these don’t provide enough incentive for urba the small towns that became suburbs where th mirrors of the city left behind – Bellefontaine Ne Hazelwood and Bridgeton to name a few.

21

19

22

About the Author Jim Hinckley is a regular contributor to 66 The Mother Road, and writes about a different town along Route 66 for each edition. Jim has written many books including Ghost Towns of Route 66, Ghost Towns of the Southwest, Backroads of Arizona and Route 66 Backroads.

14

November / December 2011


1929, the Mart Building17, 1931, the St. Louis City 19, 1908. Route 66 landmarks are also plentiful. Chippewa, now a doctor’s office; Joseph ed in 1940; the Ivy Motel22, still operational, at 936, still operational, at 6221 Lindbergh Boulevard. now the Big Chief Roadhouse24, opened by the Manchester Road in 1929; and the Trainwreck avern in St. Louis at 9243 Manchester Road; and ippewa Street.

26

an safaris into the lost world of Route 66, there are he exodus tide from the city transformed them into eighbors, Webster Groves, Crestwood, Kirkwood,

Photo Credits

Postcards courtesy of Joe Sonderman Visit www.66PostCards.com. Purchase his book at http://www.anniversarybooks.it/en/route66

20

The Trainwreck Saloon courtesy of www.TrainwreckSaloon.com Cahokia Mounds State Historic Park photo courtesy of www.CornellPSSO.Tumbir.com. World’s Fair photo courtesy of http://CohabitationWithDesign.wordpress.com.

16

November / December 2011

15


By John Springs Cruzin’ with Kramden’s column is meant to be informative as well as entertaining. His trips, as well as insights, are presented as helpful guides to those who are planning to take a trip on Route 66. Send your inquiries to John@66TheMotherRoad.com and let him suggest interesting opportunities along the way, or help plan a trip whether it’s a long weekend or a 6 week extravaganza!

Our second night was in Laughlin, NV, where we spent a leisurely night recovering from our night at the Wigwam. After a breakfast stop in Oatman we headed to Seligman, where we were able to visit Frank and Lynn at Historic Seligman Sundries. We were also serenaded at The Snow Cap by Angel and his band — Angel still plays the sax! This was the first time I’ve ever seen

W

ell, it sure was nice to take one final trip of the year down Route 66. We had to stay on the freeway a little more than usual, but the opportunity to help Dale Butel (www.route66tours.com) drive 10 specialty vehicles from Los Angeles to Chicago was PRICELESS! We picked up our vehicles — mine was a 2011 Chrysler 200 Convertible — at LAX and headed to the Wigwam Motel in Rialto for a great get-together. After spending the night, we headed east. Dale brought along Daniel, Anthony, and David from Australia to be his tour guides on the trip. Deano also came all the way from Australia to drive with us. Croc Lile, Kumar Patel from the Wigwam, Jim Bush — the man with the greatest Route 66 tattoo — Big John, and yours truly rounded out the team.

16

November / December 2011

Angel play and it was a real thrill for me and the 50 or so people gathered around.


Onward we pushed with a stop at Two Guns to visit the now-accessible Apache Death Cave. It was a crazy place that was a true treat to be able to visit. I would recommend that everyone checks out this historic part of the Two Guns area. We then checked into the El Rancho and had an awesome dinner, followed by just a little more ‘socializing’! We stopped at Sierra Blanca Brewery and Tucumcari on our way to Croc’s house in Amarillo. I am happy to say that The Blue Swallow Motel is doing GREAT with the new owners — they GET what Route 66 and community is all about! After a great BBQ at Croc’s house, Kumar and I had a steak and eggs breakfast at the Big Texan the next morning and then headed to the Hard Rock Casino in Catoosa. On the way we stopped at The Sand Hills Curiosity shop and gave Harley and Annabelle a call with an update on their shop and home. Annabelle continues to improve in her fight against cancer but it’s going to be a long battle for her — keep the prayers and good thoughts headed her way! Another great stop was at Jim Ross’ unique home in Arcadia, OK. McJerry stopped in and we had a nice visit before heading east. Check out the new book these two fine Route 66 experts have just released. We have a schedule of some of their book signings listed in this issue! I have a HUGE stack of Route 66 books and I think this one might be the best one yet, so please, CHECK IT OUT!

The Catoosa to Cuba stretch was a leisurely day for me as I split from the group and just puttered along The Mother Road enjoying perfect fall weather. I left Catoosa at dawn and took ol’ 66 all the way to Gary Turner’s Gay Parita, stopping at the nearby Blue Whale — which looks fantastic after a real community effort to spruce up “Blue” big time! I also passed Afton Station, but I was a bit early and it had not opened yet (closed!). Into Miami I went and had a great breakfast at Woody’s before cruising to 4 Women on the Route and checking in with Melba, who will be closed for the season by the time you read this. I then headed into Joplin to check out the tornado damage. Although, Route 66 in Joplin was not affected, I was speachless — what a heart pull! I was prepared for destruction but I was not prepared for the sheer devastation that awaited me. It was beyond comprehension. It will be a long, hard road rebuilding Joplin. After a refueling stop at Starbucks, I headed up the road to see my buddy Gary Turner at the Gay Parita Sinclair station at Paris Springs. Gary was his usual self, talkative and friendly to all that stopped. I spent about 2 delightful hours with Gary and

November / December 2011

17


his daughter before getting on the freeway and heading to Lebanon, MO. Wrinks Market has been turned into D.C. Decker’s Cowboy Emporium, a really neat art gallery and museum with a coffee shop that has fried pie and Arbuckle’s coffee — both are to die for and well worth the stop. Here’s a link to Ron Warnick’s article on Deckers: http://route66news.com/2011/07/19/a-new-wrinkle-on-wrinksmarket/. After a brief drive I stopped to see Scott at Mr. C’s Route Post at exit 135 off Interstate 44. Scott is the distributor for Route 66 soda pop and carries a full line of soda pop as well as the largest selection of Route 66 souvenirs in the Ozarks. See the ‘Shout Out section’ for Scott’s contact info. Next stop for me was John’s Modern Cabins — one of my favorite reminders of days gone by. The weather was perfect so I walked around the cabins and took a plethora of pictures. I don’t know what it is about “John’s”, but it just brings back memories of our family outings to cottages at Gem Beach on Catawba Island in Ohio.Our overnight this night was at The Wagon Wheel Motel in Cuba, MO. Connie, Jane Reed, and about thirty townspeople turned out for a great party and treated us like royalty with an awesome steak BBQ and hors d’oeuvres that just blew us away! WOW –

18

November / December 2011

what a great reception after a long week on the road. Cuba is far and away my favorite Route 66 town and The Wagon Wheel is undoubtedly the cream of the crop as far as renovated motels on The Mother Road. If you’re planning a trip, I would suggest working your itinerary around AT LEAST one night, if not two, at Connie’s masterpiece. She has turned The Wagon Wheel back into to a ‘must stay at’ motel for travelers. Visit http://www. wagonwheel66cuba.com/ for more information. After leaving Cuba we headed to The Ariston Café in Litchfield, Il for pie and coffee. From there we made a stop at Jim Bush’s home to see his garage full of motorcycles and trophies and then we headed into Chicago for a three night stay.

I cannot thank Dale Butel enough for the opportunity to join this caravan from LAX to Chicago. Route 66 Tours of Australia is a first class operation and it was great spending 10 days with folks you usually see once or twice a year for short periods of time!

Don’t forget to keep Annabelle in your thoughts and prayers during her battle with cancer. Cards and donations can be sent to: Annabelle Russell, PO Box 121, Erick, OK 73645.


November / December 2011

19


www.Route66Tours.com.au

www.Route66usa.info

20

November / December 2011


www.BobWaldmire.com

www.FullCircleBooks.com

www.BestofBooksedmond.com

www.StevesSundryBooksMags.com

November / December 2011

21


The Wigwam Motel… a ‘Retro’ Fit for Route 66 By Beverly Maxfield Unique, nostalgic, ‘a true retro’ are a few descriptive words that come to mind when thinking of the historic Wigwam Motel. Located along Route 66 in San Bernardino, CA, the Wigwam’s fun ‘teepee’ rooms have offered road trippers a relaxing experience in a unique resortstyle setting. Today, it’s a trip back in time to an era when travelers stopped by for a good night’s sleep, a swim in the sun, or a stroll under the stars. It really feels like a resort when you check into the Wigwam Motel and let your everyday responsibilities melt away. There were seven Wigwam Motels constructed in all, and the San Bernardino location was the last one established in 1949. Only two others remain today: Cave City, Kentucky and Holbrook, Arizona. The property consists of a village-style arrangement of nineteen 30-foot-tall wood framed, concrete and stucco tepees complete with a grass area, an outdoor barbecue, and centerpiece swimming pool. The premise for the teepee theme started with visionary, Frank Redford, who had an affinity with Native American culture. In the 1930s he developed the first “teepee” village and patented the design.

22

November / December 2011

The decades of the 60s and 70s saw the advent of super highway systems that fast became the favored routes of transportation, leaving so many roadside treasures, including the Wigwam Motel soon forgotten. Today, many are re-discovering these fallen milestones along Route 66, and a renewed interest and appreciation has taken hold—especially with the younger generation searching for a lifestyle simplicity and the bygone innocence that got gridlocked somehow along the way. Kumar Patel, who bought the Wigwam in 2004 with his family, says he didn’t know a lot about Route 66, the significance of purchasing this historic Motel. “When we bought it we didn’t know what it was,” Kumar began. “People would say ‘you are buying a classic motel and it’s on Route 66!’ I had to ask, ‘what was Route 66?’ We didn’t know at the time.” As the Patel family, who are in the business of restoring properties, took


ownership in June, 2003, it didn’t take them long to discover exactly what they had. “That was the true beauty about this,” he said. “We didn’t go in knowing or having any expectation about this classic hotel on a famous roadway. We grew with it, and grew with the road. As the road changed, we changed right along with it. It was a beautiful thing.” “There are three of us that are always on site. Me, my mother and our night guy. The whole family is involved; I’m just one piece of the puzzle. It’s a continuous process keeping this property well updated and maintained. It’s a rare, rare, rare property.” When they purchased the Wigwam there was a lot of maintenance and updating to be done. “A lot of the work that had been done over time was really quite gruesome. Most of the utilities and fixtures were outdated and not up to standard code. There had been a lot of quick fixes. It was a challenge, but we slowly brought it up to be a place people can really enjoy, because, after all, in life that’s pretty much it. It’s the experiences you have; that’s what you take with you. We are glad to see people enjoying it, whether they come by to stay or if they just stop to take pictures.” Kumar says now that the exterior renovation is complete with painting and re-stuccoing, the next phase will be restoring the rooms to appear just as they did back in 1949. Kumar added: “We’re here to keep the zig-zag theme going on. We want everyone to enjoy their experience at The Wigwam Motel, and feel that it’s nothing but the best on Route 66. Come by and enjoy the nostalgia!”

November / December 2011

23


Tucumcari, New Mexico “A good painting to me has always been like a friend. It keeps me Heddy Lamarr company, comforts and inspires.”

There are 30 small communities along Route 66, from Pontiac, Illinois to Tucumcari, New Mexico, showcasing magnificent murals. Over 40 murals are located right in Tucumcari and painted by Doug and Sharon Quarles. Located on Historic Route 66, Quarles Art Gallery has amazing photo realism that depicts the many topics that inspire them: landscapes, animals, classic cars and much more. The Gallery houses an on-location studio and all are welcome to experience one of a kind pieces of art being produced, or join in one of the personalized classes for inspiration and tips on “how to” from both Doug and Sharon. Stop by and ask about the many Murals, or e-mail for an appointment for a guided tour by the artists. Self guided mural maps are available at the Chamber of Commerce and Quarles Art Gallery.

24

November / December 2011


515 East Route 66 Boulevard Tucumcari, New Mexico 575.461.8689 email: quarlesart@q.com http://gallery111fineart.yolasite.com Monday - Saturday, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Closed Sunday

November / December 2011

25


www.MissouriHick.com

26

November / December 2011


www.wagonwheel66cuba.com

www.Route66LastStopShop.com

endrt66@gmail.com

November / December 2011

27


www.CubaMoMurals.com www.CrawfordCountyMoHistory.com

www.Rt66FrameShoppe.com www.TheFrameShoppe.ArtThatFits.com Rt66FrameShoppe@yahoo.com

28

November / December 2011

www.Fanning66Outpost.com


Museums, Murals, Merchants & More!

Opening July, 2011! The Pontiac ~ Oakland Automobile Museum & Resource Center ~ Free Admission!

FREE Visitors Guide!

For information on attractions, tours, or retail space available in Downtown Pontiac, contact:

800-835-2055 • 815-844-5847 • www.VisitPontiac.org visitpontiac.org

cate.ervinconsulting@gmail.com

HaircarebySal51@aol.com

www.route66fudgeshop.com

candyldy@fidmail.com

www.HenrysRoute66.com November / December 2011

29


www.JoeandAggiesCafe.com

KGallegos@Cableone.net

GlobetrotterLodge2010@hotmail.com

www.DolphinEcho.com

30

November / December 2011


www.WigwamMotel.com WigwamMotel@GMail.com November / December 2011

31



November_December 66 The Mother Road