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Carving out a dream Woodworking teacher turns

soccer recap Men’s soccer team

guitar-making hobby into business.

short

falls

soccer championship in Vaughan.

at provincial

Monday,

April 2,

2007

The commercialization His image

A

learning

newsroom

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

for

journalism students

of

Jesus

everywhere,

is

including on T-shirts

and bumper

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

39th Year

stickers.

— No. 12

Longer LRC hours means less stress By VANESSA BUTLER

ed list of services extended hours.

The Learning Resource Centre

is

giving students a chance to breathe a

little

easier with

exam time

around the corner. The LRC is extending

right

hours

its

On

LRC

10 a.m. until

open from 4 p.m. and on Sunday,

April 22, the

LRC will

ular hours of

“The

1

will

offer

its

reg-

p.m. until 4 p.m.

staff

here

LRC has been

the

in

very

LRC

Starting April 23 through April will open at 7 a.m. 27, the “That is an extra half hour each morning for students to study,” said Linda Schneider, manager of the

LRC

Learning Resource Centre. The LRC will also be open until 9:30 p.m. from April 23 until April 26, giving students an extra two hours of study time every evening.

LRC

additional

will

13.5

In

be open for an

hours

remainder of the year. “The staff here in the

for

the

LRC

has

shadow boxes in the ring at the Waterloo Boxing Jecond-year business student, Mandy Bujold, 19, boxing team, andw.ll place on the national senior women's ;iub Bujold recently claimed her 16 for more photos. Page See year. this Hungary and ravelling with them to Russia, Turkey

Schneider.

“They’ve changed shifts have been very flexible.”

The

LRC will

desk

be offering a

will still

be

closed.

be able to sign

out books, rent resource materials

and be able to access all computers and study hall areas. Last year during exam week, the LRC conducted a survey of 125 students asking them what they wanted to see the LRC provide. Twenty-five per cent of students said they were satisfied with the hours and services, but 75 per cent

Sunday or Friday night service. “We want to provide the students with every opportunity to do well and use

and limit-

their

time effectively,” said

Schneider. In September 2007, the LRC will have made changes to their website, which will have easier navigation for students to use the site's

The LRC also wants promote the policies the centre

research tools. to

has when it comes to beverages and food being allowed. The LRC allows students to

now

bring

been very accommodating," said

Here comes the pain

mation

extended hours during exams, although students unanimously agreed that they wouldn't want

Linda Schneider,

total, the

be

will

of students said they would like

accommodating.” manager of die

desk

circulation

the

available to students, but the infor-

Students will

for students starting April 21.

Saturday, the

The

during

in

any

capped, such as

beverage

that

Tim Hortons’

is

cof-

fees or teas, and snacks such as chocolate bars and chips.

“We trust students to use common sense and act as responsible adults,” said Schneider.

Students sweep graphic design awards By AARON First-year

from program

students

the

at design more out beat College Conestoga than 100 other competitors to take

graphic

second and third place in Mars annual Aquarell Karat and ^mmograph

“There were entries from students in

Viedtler’s

schools as well as regular, every-

day people and professional and semi-professional artists,” said Vince

The Mars design competitions. Lumograph competition was open line

drawings

and the Karat Aquarell competition focused on coloured pencil. First-place winners received a advertisement in Fine Arts and Graphica magazines featuring their winning pieces of art-

full-page

work and $500 put toward

in gift certificates to

art

supplies;

second-

and third-place and award of merit winners received $300, $200 and

$50

in gift certificates respectively.

Sowa, a professor program.

design

in

the

graphic

“Anybody who

bought a Staedtler product could enter.”

Sowa

said

it

was

the quality of

Conestoga students’ entries that enabled them to make a clean sweep of the awards. “Quality and detail are No. 1,” he said. “There were some other nice drawings (at the competi-

the

tion), but they

weren’t necessarily

mounted properly, or some

of the

detailing wasn't quite right, or the line

quality

should be.

wasn’t

where

comes back

details that

olution digital copies and laminated posters of their artwork.

first,

to entries of pencil

“It all

All winners also received high-res-

SCHWAB

it

make

to the designs’

the difference.”

Sowa said Conestoga’s graphic design program stands out among other schools’ because of the focus on detail that is taught. “We’re detail-oriented, and it comes back to having one instrucon tor per year, so they can focus everything,” he said. “The project started out as a photography projin ect; a lot of the shots were done Elora, and then the students had to the photographs then take them and convert them over to line

print

drawings. “Part of the job of an illustrator is and to take all the design elements put them together into what the client wants, so that’s why these drawings may not be exact to the photograph, but they will be similar.”

profes-

awards with their Graphic design students pose with their from back left, Kevin clockwise are, photo In Sowa. sor Vince Trong, Melanie Peters, Kevin White, Vince Sowa, Jessica Henkel, and Jennifer Hoch. Hehn Jessica Jenny May, Darcy Vermacck,


_

l

Fast upgrade for students

Now ...with Random

deep thoughts Conestoga College

By TIFFANY MCCORMICK Turning your diploma

questions answered

by random students

degree

just-

got a

little

into

a

faster with

Northwood University’s one-year conversion process for Conestoga's

What do you look for in

three -year

diploma programs. Daniel Toland, the dean of admissions for Northwood, spoke to a room of almost 30 students on March 20 to provide information about the application process,

a significant

other?

finances and general about the university.

inquiries

Toland used handouts, overheads and a video to explain to students what they can expect if they choose “I

look at

women,

to attend either of the three

I

puses located Michigan.

don’t look for things.”

cam-

Texas and

in Florida.

Approximately 40 to 50 stufrom Ontario apply to Northwood each year with Georgian College supplying the most students.

Kyle Boehm,

dents

first-year too erne/ e/ie

(Photo by Tiffany McCormick)

Daniel Toland, dean of admissions for Northwood University, speaks to students about upgrading their diplomas to degrees

In figures, 18 per cent of the 2.000 students are from outside the U.S., mainly from the Middle East, Europe and Canada.

“Northwood tion

as

like a continua-

is

or capstone

for what you have done here,” Toland said to the group. “We’re more like

and someone who can “Intelligence

business program diploma, they can obtain their degree in as little

than U of T (University of Toronto) or York (University),” he added and

Conestoga

carry a conversation.”

second-year

skills as

nursing

opposed

tions.

enough money agreement

with

and we’re going to admit you.” Students who enter with a marketing diploma from their college

graduate with a bachelor of business administration (BBA) degree with a major in marketing will

“Transfer students are a very important part of our fabric. They provide bal-

ance and bring a Canadian point of view.”

“They have to have a sense of humour.”

second-year

take

BBA

with a major

in

automatically

receive a major in marketing.

Northwood University

Tuition was an area most students were concerned about espe-

Northwood is a private university. Toland explained that instate and out-of-state stu-

the

In

introductory video he showed, a student commented that “if business is what you’re looking

for

Northwood is for commentator added

then

you." The

that the school “will teach

do business, not

you

just think about

Toland broke down some of the conversion credits and explained

Steph Dace,

if

$4,000.

Two

to

it.”

that

pay the same amount, $16,455 US, but Canadian students receive a “discount” of dents

scholarships are available

but only one

is

for students across

the country during the up, the other is for

fall

start

Georgian

College students.

OSAP

students have a three-year

is

for the

cannot be employed

in

off-campus

institutions. In terms of failing or repeating courses, the cost per credit is $330. To make up a four credit class, the

additional

cost

would then be

$1,320.

“You don’t want

to

do

that,”

Toland said which had the class laughing. He added currently there a zero per cent failure rate of

Canadian students. Northwood has had a relationship with Conestoga for the past 15 years, about as long as Toland has

been recruiting students from Canada. “We’re strong advocates of the Canadian system,” he said, adding that he feels it is essential to have

Canadian Northwood.

students

attend

"Transfer students are a very important part of our fabric,” he

“They provide balance and bring a Canadian point of view.” said.

accepted

by

Security services

first-year

make up

To work during the school year, the FI visa students receive allows them to work on-campus but they

is

cially since

to

of the tuition amount for the student to attend. rest

management

materials

dean of admissionsfor

broadcasting

honest.”

who

management and

,.

Carrie Gibson,

“Good personality and

and whatever other field they study Northwood. For example, marketing students

at

will earn a

Daniel Toland

REDUCE

accounting

busy By

at rec centre

ADAM HANNON

The

vehicle's

airbag

and the vehicle had “It’s

easier to get along

when

everything

is laid

back.”

Dan Brewer,

College security services had their hands full at the recreation centre on the morning of March

said

16.

ty

At around 10 a.m. that day, a vehicle ran off the road behind the

Doon campus first -year

driver, a student at the college,

lege.

On

the

centre.

charges

to her crashing her

who was

into a light standard.

same day

at

around

10:30 a.m., there was a false fire alarm pulled in the recreation

said the accident occurred while she

Fe

RECYCLE

John Tribe, supervisor of safeand security services at the col-

was turning a comer, and had to swerve to avoid another vehicle coming around the bend. This lead Hyundai Same

deployed, be towed,

was unharmed. “Some hydro had to be moved,"

and opera-

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

to

but the driver

management

materials tions

The

centre.

stu-

as six months at the Michigan campus, or a year at all three loca-

Conestoga, Toland said, is quite simple. “Finish up your diploma

theoretical.

Northwood from Canadian

dents, but in order to obtain the visa needed to attend the school, the bank must confirm there is

Northwood’s

explained that like the college system, Northwood is very practical and focuses on pragmatic

Jolene Brenner,

in

as one year. Northwood has articulation agreements with some of Conestoga’s business programs. If a student obtains a three-year diploma, preferably in business, they can graduate in one year with a bachelor of business administration degree. little

There

be no mischief however, since the alarm was pulled by a small child will

laid,

attending one of the college’s March break day camps.-

PITCH-IN

CANADA

vvww. pitch-in. ca


News

SPOKE,

April 2,

2007

— Page 3

(Photo by Meghan Kreller)

Judy Bates, co-ordinator

of disability services,

left

and second-year woodworking technician students, Rosie Williamson and Alex Roebuck, gather around a credenza which they proudly restored.

to right, Kelly Nixon, counsellor in disability services,

Schappert, Danny Brinker, Ed Ayre, Aleisha Searle,

Jill

Working together MEGHAN KRELLER

By One

department’s trash

is

some

to a vision

second-year

see

by one department

Professor

now

another

department’s treasure.

Thanks

credenza that was being thrown out

students,

polished and as good as new.

When

and the help of

disability services counsel-

lor Kelly

a

services

in the disability

sits

office,

Conestoga

at

Nixon saw

the piece being

thrown out she made a few

scratched, chipped, water-damaged

calls to

to preserve history

anyone could look at Mark Bramer agreed

if

it.

to

students to learn,” said Bramer.

The

area of the college

students dismantled the cre-

take the project to his second-year

denza, removed

woodworking technician

formed quite a bit of repair work and then stained it, he said.

“We

students.

don’t usually have furniture

refinishing in our curriculum but

thought

it

would be good

I

for the

its

“It’s really

was

really special.

about people helping

people,” she said.

old finish, per-

“One

area had the

skill

and the

other had the need. Together,

we

preserved a piece of Conestoga his-

Nixon, thrilled with the results, said working together with another

tory.”

(Photos by Leanne Mountford)

fair hits Conestoga Doon campus on March 21 and 22 was a great graduate and summer employment.

Job The

job

held

fair

in

the E-wing at Conestoga’s

opportunity for students looking for

Conestoga’s career services helps students By LEANNE MOUNTFORD graduation can be a stressful *wne for many students. While con-

advantage of. These are employers that are specifically targeting Conestoga College students and graduates, she

centrating on

added.

ies,

students

finishing their stud-

graduating students are also

starting

look

to

for

full-time

The career services

office

at

Conestoga College offers services

make

the transition easier.

Career services offers job postings online to help students find

kinds of job

Wright, career

placements, said

all

Mary

manager of co-op and Conestoga at services

College. It's

take

There are so many great opportunow that employers are

nities right

even though they know graduate students won’t be available for another month or so, she posting

employment.

to help

to

a really valuable resource for

said.

Job postings include

full-time

as

many

ment such

said Wright.

college’s website, click on current

students and then go to career serv-

thing of that nature, said Wright.

dents need to

and click on job postings. Enter careerservices under username and usearchdjobs under password.

There has also been a big demand from the employer community to

with Tao Cruikshank. career service officer at the college, to review

come on-campus

their

over the

To

last

few

years.

access job postings, go to the

ices

Job postings change daily, said Wright. Students should check the website daily or weekly.’ Primarily the jobs are local but there are inquiries or postings from

summer and

part-time, said Wright.

From

ating a need for

and career fairs, she said. At this year’s job fair, 240 employer organizations were represented. Usually it’s around 180 or some-

as well

as contract,

September

2006

to

a

healthy job

market out

there, said Wright.

There has been a

at

job

fairs

really

strong

to host informa-

where they are targeting specific program areas, she added. For the job fair held on March 21 and 22. both days’ booths were sold tion centres

Another job search

tool that stu-

dents can take advantage of

resume

is

the

referral service. First, stu-

make an appointment

resume and then they can regservice. The resume

ister for the

will automatically

be forwarded to

are excellent organizations in this

employers posting in the students' program of study, she said. This service is free for three months following graduation. Alumni of Conestoga College can use the service at any time for

region that are doing well and cre-

an annual fee of $25.

out.

This

outside of the region. It’s

February 2007, there have been

more employees,

increase in employers wanting to be

1,820 postings with 10,348 positions available, a dramatic increase

other kinds of employ-

employment opportunities

find jobs

is

the local

a fast-growing re_

economy

is

:

good. There


— SPOKE,

Page 4

April 2,

Commentary

2007

Almost there,

you can do it! Since the end of the school year is near, you’re probably mixed emotions. If you're in your last year, you’re probably thinking about all the friends you might not ever see again and where you’re going to work in the “real world.” If you’re not-in your last year, you might be questioning whether you should come back next year or if you should drop out altogether; with less than a month left of the school year, it doesn’t make sense not to finish it, even if you don’t intend to return. Look at it this way. You’ve already paid your tuition, so if you do the best you can for the remaining weeks, Talk to someone in counyou’ve got the whole sumselling services before mer to try to figure out feeling

dropping out due to stress or confusion about

your future.

you can head

what you want to do for the rest of your life. You can return to Conestoga in September if that’s what you decide or

in a different direction.

Focus on the task at hand, otherwise the big picture can be overwhelming.

Salary hike for greedy politicians As

the saying goes,

trust a politician.

flawed the system

December

In

very sick

the Ontario Liberals

and Conservatives voted a 25-per-

hike

means

the average

wait in emergency," she said.

and the premier would receive an

forgotten in politics

you also throw away your chances of graduating with the classmates you started with if you change your mind and want to come back next year. Also, dropping out with only a month left can leave a mark on your transcripts. If you’re lucky it will only show up as a few failed grades, if you're unlucky it will show up as an incomplete and that looks a lot worse. An incomplete basically makes it look like you’ve quit and makes any of the work you’ve done this semester null and void. Although exams are stressful and assignments can be even more so, with even a minimal amount of effort, you

extra $39,000. In an election year,

the voters.

The

find this interesting as this govern-

who

these

ment hasn't

office

can get through

it,

but don’t be afraid to put

some

effort

in.

Sometimes students get so final

try.

Some

afraid of

making a mistake,

perfect.

Talk

someone

counselling services before dropping out due to stress or confusion about your future. That’s what they’re here for. to

in

its

When

toward the

in

four years ago, his

election platform

was bised on

be paid

which needed

they're giving themselves a

politicians

into

is

with

crohn’s

gastrointestinal tract.

It

the small

gap

with their federal counterparts and to

keep provincial politicians from to federal politics

she

felt

MPPs

gave themselves, she said

improve

to

system but they give them-

and nurses aren't

Doctors

blame

waiting

long

for

to

times.

They're probably the hardest work-

most com-

ing people in the province.

intestine

up

It’s

to

our greedy politicians to

and/or colon. She has had numer-

put our tax dollars back into servic-

ous surgeries over the years, and

es to help voters instead of lining

has almost no intestine

their

left.

She

anyone how

Ontario’s health-care system works.

to help close the salary

is

how

which Ontario

raise

selves a raise," she said.

disease

a chronic disorder that caus-

affects

asked about the

the

es inflammation of the digestive or

monly

When

about

"They say they want

retire.

about seven years ago. Crohn’s disease

all

she was disgusted.

childhood friend of mine was

promises? McGuinty states the raise

.

and they are well looked after

diagnosed

an ambu-

in

beds.”

politicians ensure their pockets are

A

call

and spend more because they need

go back

time there

are

have been overlooked as

once they

“I

the hospital for

in

My name

better

friend,

than

who

cians.

not be used because she’s list

come

1

It’s

also up to

election time to

think Liberal

Patten said

it

best in

view when he

for fur-

me how

ther surgery, explained to

pockets.

stand up against these greedy

asked that her

currently on a waiting

own

Ontario voters

(like

it),

politi-

MPP Richard a CTV inter-

said, “If they don’t

then they can boot us out."

Spoke published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be contacted

nowadays

lance to

issues of the people

knows

Editor:

editor. Letters

No unsigned

are constantly

raise? For what, not keeping their

is

letters to

to

off.

Now

welcome

Spoke welcomes

giv-

more money to health care. Once he got elected, he began to cut programs. The reason he gave for the broken promises were the previous Conservative government ing

a large deficit

put

filled

Premier Dalton McGuinty

was voted

moving

Letters are

election

health-care system.

perfectionists don’t complete their

assignments or take their exams for fear of not being

to

promises, especially

left

they don’t

up

through the eight-hour

door only to have to

The people who

am

abscesses and rushed back out the

Opinion

members

lived

me

push

have been put

MPP gets a

I

1

doctor

to

the other hand, if you drop out now, you not only risk failing everything you’ve worked so hard for this semester,

my

Black

of $22,000 per year, cabinet receive an extra $31,000

when

can’t just call

I

Adam

MPPs. This

cent salary hike for

is.

sad that

“I think it’s

this is truer

than ever before.

raise

On

you can never

Today

for verification.

d

.

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534

for publication.

N2G 4M4

Kreller

Photo Editors: Jessica Blumenthal, Nick Casselli, Jon Molson, Eric Murphy and Tara Ricker Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont,

Meghan

Advertising Managers: Adam Hannon, Tiffany McCormick Spoke Online Editor: Brandon Walker m Production Managers: Adam Black, BJ Richmond Circulation Manager: Kristin Grifferty

E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke Dr.,

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors to the editor are subject to

Letters

not necessarily reflect the views of

Conestoga College.

beyond the amount paid

for the space. Letters

in

advertising

acceptance or rejection and should be must not contain any libellous statements.

clearly written or typed; a

MS Word

file

would be

helpful.


!

.

News

There’s

SPOKE,

And

came around

a long

bend

in

the

road while driving to work, to

my

dismay

my

sent

some black

hit

I

vehicle sliding in every

direction except the one

go

to

which

ice

Marisa Havens, fourth-year bachelor of applied technology architecture project

knew

I

it

was

accident-free

come

inevitable that

my

was going

past

to

screeching and abrupt

to a

happened. The innocent little look reminded me I could have very well not been around to see the birth of my unborn niece or

nephew.

stop.

It

My

door introduced

driver’s side

with a powerful

itself to the post

like

may I

all

said,

I

Shield.

accident up to this point. else

flipped into the ditch.

dent did help with the realization of

Now

despite

noises that

obvious

the

all

may come

with such an

accident such as spinning

some

things that

There

much

so

is

going on

when,

while strapped into your seatbelt,

your brain is trying to figure which way is up while it also confirms there are no injuries and you spit shattered glass from your mouth. But the silence was broken as a kind gentleman knocked on my window asking me if I was OK and advising me not to move. Eventually, after climbing

out of

my way

my

toppled van and being helped down by a few very kind passersby, I got the chance to stand

first

thing to cross

my

eyes viewed the metal carnage was that I was very lucky to have come out with only a few notas

I

sat in the

gentleman’s car

waiting for the ambulance, the couple’s

the

struggle for peace and in Iraq tle

in the

democracy

and Afghanistan or the bat-

against

terrorism

parts of the world.

in

various

The high

rate

of

homelessness, the constant fear of global warming, continuous cases of child abuse, disgusting attacks

on the elderly; the list seems to go on and on. However, as a few kind people proved just by taking some time out of their lives to stop and see if a total stranger

good out

was OK,

there

is

there.

stared up at

we have

baby face a reminder

little

me

is

that that

a lot to be thankful for

despite hardships,

low points

in

our

ill

feelings and

lives.

life is too short and concerned few who stopped to help me, thank you. To those who didn’t, perhaps you should slow down and take a look before life passes you by.

Cliche or not,

so-serious injuries.

As

in

constantly

are

bad things the world such as the

That cute

my mind

Inc.

negativity in the

countless deaths of soldiers

back and see the damage.

The

Automation Tooling Systems

taken

for granted.

unmistakable silence that comes the point

may have

I

media and we reminded of all

It's

award

bruises, the acci-

revving engine or the creaking of twisted metal, there is a point of across you.

presents the Employer of the Year 2006 to a representative from

involved and despite only a

few bumps and

a

tires,

Below; John Tibbits, college president,

was no one

smash, spraying shattered glass all over me and then in an instant I was head-over-heels as my van

there

student,

Hennessy, a business administration marketing co-op student, with a Guild

sound so dramatic but had never been in a car

Thank goodness

management co-op

engineering and technology. Havens was also the recipient of the Education at Work Ontario Co-op Student of the Year Award 2006. Bottom left: Wright presents Heather

I

ditch perpendicular to a steel post,

facility

with a Guild Shield for the school of

Opinion

had never been in a car accident before, but as I headed toward the

...

Murphy

and

in.

the award goes to

Eric

wanted

I

— Page 5

The Co-op Student and Employer of the Year 2006 awards ceremony was held in the blue room on March 21 Left: Mary Wright, right, manager of coop and career services, presents

Recently I was in a car accident. was a stormy winter day and as I

It

2007

some

still

good out there

>

April 2,

young baby looked up

at

me

with big blue eyes not knowing

what was going on or what had just

to

those

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Reading the off? in the

the

article titled

March

Reunion tour

rip-

19 issue of Spoke, about

summer tour of The

Police,

I

felt

obliged

few wrongs. Ticket the high price of $225

to write in to correct a

prices are indeed at

summer understand why the

for the floor seats of the

you need

to

concert but

would remember is cost

Conestoga students were

bom

in.

favourite Police song on the .radio. This age

group

is

may

tinue once this tour concludes.

mately the same. That’s not to justify it as, “they did it, so I can too,” but rather to show they are not going beyond any limits not

in

the

1980s, a decade most

already

this

hurt, but

We are in an age of concerts where $60 $225 for tickets for a concert is common. If you look at other concerts coming to Toronto such as Roger Waters of Genesis you will find they are charging approxi-

band came

was done in their short nine years It was not researched, but evident by the use of “probably,” Iron Maiden does not have more records sold than The Police. They do have, a longer career and more releases. But do releases justify them being greater than The Police? To even compare a metal band to a reggae rock band is an outrageous attempt to discredit a band that

financially settled, and thus, the

purchase of a pair of tickets will not break the bank.

be this high. The first thing to that The Police have not been together for a tour in over 20 years. People could not have counted on seeing this band perform again and there is no promise that they will conLet us not forget though, the age group that listens to The Police. Success for the

The Police have a prestigious career; they have five studio albums, all platinum, they have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, have six Grammies and all of

The Police

appeal to a very large audience including an older group who remember hearing their

KYMCO

dealer

together.

DJ pointed out that in the 1980s The Police were played on almost every station in Toronto, showing how the band appealed to the masses. It is no wonder why they sold out two shows at the Air Canada Centre. My friends and I cannot wait for The Police in July, and I cannot wait to hear Andy Summers wail on his

rocked the music industry for their entire But how can you write an article on The Police when you cannot even get the

GUITAR.

-

just minutes from the 401

SCOOTERS-CANADA 55 Raglin Place, Unit #4, Cambridge 519 - 621 -0736

www. Scooters-Canada.ca

school a radio

careers.

set.

tri-city

band members right? Andy $ummer playing the drums, that would be interesting, but I hope for the $100 I paid for my ticket he sticks to his Fender Telecaster. Listening to the radio on my way to

www.kymco.ca

Ian

Evans


Page 6

— SPOKE,

News

2007

April 2,

Entrepreneur takes guitar dreams By SARAH JAYNES

own hands

into

30-member garage band,” he

a

says.

As St.Cyr continued teaching he never gave up his hobby of building

The feeling of strings and the smooth neck of a classical guitar has always sent chills up Bob

and repairing instruments. He began repairing and re-finishing violins and pianos, and kept working on making his handmade

St.Cyr's spine as he strums a classi-

oh one of

cal tune

At the age of guitar in

first

handmade

his

own

guitars built in his

garage.

St.Cyr built his

18,

guitars.

didn't sound that great, but

felt

amazing

building professional

it

something

to play

could be sold

1

music

in a

“Not a day goes by that

ing

the

all in it

my

is

Bob

and

same

tar

decided

he

St.Cyr

register

to

which he operates out of

night,

his

two-

car garage.

"The garage was always a workshop for different woodworking projects 1 have done, but 1 bought new professional tools and it

Cyr,

became more

who was

his gui-

building profitable, so in 2000

Guitars as a legitimate business

guitar builder

St.Cyr,

he

I

play-

world.”

Sr.

that

store,”

make

St.Cyr wanted to

not building

started

guitars

says.

handcrafted,” he says.

am

and

people

various

for

ment. “It-

repaired over 50 instruments

“1

base-

parent's

his

most of his life, decided to go back to university and change career paths. He completed his degree at a university in Kingston and went on to become a high school wood shop teacher at Kitchener- Waterloo Collegiate and

serious,” he says.

St.Cyr says the process of building a guitar starts with the design

a cabinetmaker

for

and continues from

“Once

there.

the desired design

is

com-

pleted, than the desired materials

can be chosen depending on the type of wood you want to work with,” he says.

(Photo

“1

taught

woodworking

high

to

see Bob’s knowledge, he has “It’s

school kids, but never gave up the side project of guitar building,” he

many

After

shop,

wood

years teaching

St.Cyr's

love

course

he at

full-time guitar builder to finish a

beautiful

work.”

turned from a hobby to a career, after

part-time,

months

Chris Purcell,

transformed the guitar KCI.

friend of Bob

St.

until

After the material

he took the class to a

whole new level, letting the kids be creative and play more contemporary music that they would enjoy. “Before we knew it the whole class was one big jam session, like

is

it

me

takes

“I

three or four

and

to finish one,” he says.

chosen there

am

“I

still

refining

my

skill,

it

easy giving up something you

isn’t

go into building the guitar from its raw material all the way to the fin-

have worked so hard on,” he says. St.Cyr has had many friends and

“It

become interested in many of whom have been

colleagues

takes approxi-

mately three or four weeks for a

building,

my own

acoustic,” says

who

Chris Purcell, a close friend

got interested in building after he heard St.Cyr had started the business in his garage. incredible

“It’s

knowledge,

he

to

has

see Bob’s done some

beautiful work,” he says.

So

far St.Cyr has

tric, steel

completed elecand classi-

string acoustic

to panic or to prepare.

enlightened or to remain

and energy

is

up

to

in

Whether to

sulk or to study.

the dark, hoping for the best.

you and

will

Whether

• •

to

How you use

determine your level of success or

To go into the exam period with your eyes wide open, you need • how many exams you have and in which subjects; • when, where and for how long they are scheduled; •

to

your time

failure.

know:

Up, up, up and away! Students in first-year revenue generation program and its co-ordinator, Greg Burns, are planning a new event at Conestoga called Plane REC as a

Make

a

Wish

Foundation of Canada.

event

who

will

go

in this

to children

are at a high risk of

life-threatening illnesses."

mistakes: first

student involved in Make, a

eases, granting a child’s wish that

others;

meeting someone, going somewhere or having a desired item. By sponsoring the Make aAVish Foundation you can

exam week.

help

running out of time and

energy for the

others;

you

working hard

not starting early enough, leaving too

for the course(s)

like

and neglecting

little

time during

include

make a

child’s

dream come

If

you would

like

assistance

in

preparing for

final

exams, come

to the

Student

Students will have a chance to

make

office.

a paper airplane of their

design and

A Message from Visit

“Your average price for a handcustom steel string acousticcan range anywhere from $800 to $5,000 for material and labour,” built

he says.

flight

Counselling Services our website httpd/www. conestogac. on cahsp/stscrv/indcx. jsp .

his or

win a prize

that will be

donated by

local sponsors of the event. It

will take place

start at

on April 10 and

:30 a.m. and end at

1

1

1

p.m.

The revenue generation program hopes to raise $ ,000. To help with the Plane REC. a committee, marketing 1

site committee, committee and supplies committee, all made up ol students, have been organized.

preparation

are in the process of estab-

They

with

connection

a

lishing

paper and ink for the posters, flyers and any other needed advertising. Mark Blackwood, one of the stu-

hopes

in the

event

the

event, says he

group of students

diverse

everyone will have fun. “We’re hoping for a dents.

goal,”

come

We

would it

a

anti y

lot

of

stu-’

our

like to reach

he says. “Anyone to give

a

attract

will

is

wel-

try.”

Blackwood says

that

no revenue

fly

it

own

off the balcony of

make sure it “Any funds raised in this go to children who are at

pating in this event to stays

fair.

event will

the Student Life Centre onto a tar-

a high risk of life-threatening

on the first floor. Each throw will cost students $2 or you can pay $5 for three tosses.

nesses,”

get

a

generation students will be partici-

true.

Services

world,” he

St.Cyr recognizes that his hobby is not only unusual but it's a very expensive pastime as well. says.

dents involved

They support children with illnesses and life-threatening discould

exam and

not

same

paper/print corporation to donate

Mark Blackwood, Wish Foundation event

exams, classmates, study groups, Use ail sources class review time, text notes or highlighted sections, text summaries and chapter questions. Ask your faculty for help and information about the exam. over-studying for the

my whole

is

it

am

I

the

officials/rules

“Any funds raised

of help available to you: old

night,

that

all in

The student who throws

the

fundraiser for the

About three weeks before exams start, mark the times and locations of each exam on a calendar. For each course, list what you need to study and the sources you will use (textbook, class notes, lab. assignments). Estimate the amount of study time you will need and indicate study periods on the calendar. By planning ahead, you know you will have time for each subject.

common

“Not a day goes by building and playing

her plane closest to the target will

become

what material will be covered with emphasis on which areas; what format the exam will have (multiple choice, essay, short answer); what percentage of your final mark the exam covers.

Avoid

to play.

Exams

Final

By BECKY SHARPE

Whether

cal guitars that he absolutely loves

Wish Foundation takes

*

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

come over

together

are multiple building processes that

ished product.

from St.Cyr. a few times a week have been slowly putting

getting tips

only build

I

Since St.Cyr has started building he has completed just over 50 guitars, but has yet to sell any.

Cyr

St.Cyr says the course wasn't very

popular

two months.

ticular guitar for

single guitar; because

music

for

it

incredible to

done some

says.

by Sarah Jaynes)

Bob St.Cyr is busy working on a new steel string acoustic guitar. He says the process can be very could cost you the whole guitar.” St.Cyr has been working on this partedious. “One mistake and

Vocational School.

he says. “This

make

hope

to

come

true.”

a

child’s

ill-

way we wishes


.

Feature

By BJ RICHMOND

posters to Jesus

is

My Homeboy

apparel (This

Pop

the last of a three -port

is

series on

the history

and

life

of

Jesus Christ.)

experienced a fad

culture

ago with

exclaiming “Jesus

shirts

is

way come

negative way, especially as a to

with the Jesus apparel about a year

SPOKE,

make money. “Jesus

to Earth for the

didn’t

purpose of being a

profitable image.

He came

for the

sole purpose of being the messiah

my homeboy!”

of redemption."

and even on car dashboards. However, Jesus Christ can now be seen like he has never been seen

A Los Angeles company called Teenage Millionaire began manu-

Images and depictions of Jesus have changed drastically over

ago, and has recently released a

Campbell said nobody has ever complained about any moral problems related to the depiction of Jesus in the merchan- J dise. “Nope, no complaints I

He can

be seen

church,

in

in art

before.

the past 2,000 years,

in

both posi-

facturing the shirt about three years

“Mary

labelled

shirt

is

Teenage Millionaire, said

homeboy

icons

Chris

downright degener-

Hoy,

a

company looked of the

partner at the

Jesus definitely topped the

ate.

As seen in T-shirts, posters, bumper stickers and on television, Jesus has recently taken on many forms, fashions and attitudes. One

The “Homeboy" sell

tions of Jesus

came

last

year

when

T-shirts featuring the slogan “Jesus

Hates

Me" were

If the

slogan was not hard enough

being sold online.

i%

“We had no be

idea

this big,” said

was going

it

Mtm

versial

sjMi.

non-contro-

is

My Homeboy

apparel,

beWild.com, based out N.Y. The website

and have made their voices heard on the controversial clothing. Pastor

Bob

chandise.”

He added apparel

is

world-

wide, as a

the

well

blasphe-

is

it

buy merchandise that depicts anyone holy in a negative

way."

Hoy

said that despite

some

people's disgust in the prod-

§y

Christians like- the apparel.

being sold

both

uct.

and

hipsters

Canon

William and chaplain at

Huron University College in London, said although he does not condone negative depictions

of Jesus Christ, he does think

way

to spread faith

general public. “I

amongst the population.

anyone takes an

am

thrilled

interest

when

in

gious topics.”

Parks, senior pastor at

Benton Street Baptist Church in Kitchener, said he does not believe anyone should depict Jesus in a C/Jt-t.

compassion

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you see yourself to her. which, the world a better place? Maybe P Excellence Award. Its a dOioUr a o-reat candidate for the Millennium opportunities for students who worth up to $10,000 plus unique learning tfce« but also leaders and innovators are not only academic achieve®, let us hnow lead as you are to learn, communities. So if you’re as driven to

m

(Internet photo)

Jesus is my homeboy apparel, which has been purchased by thousands of people. The shirt is manufactured by Teenage Millionaire, which

Pop

culture has recently experienced a fad with

sells the shirt online for

about $25 US.

UxtalflMS du mlUfwii* CAttADA A)LL>flltIBfl SCHOUtSMI!1 F»UNIATI»N ION RATION CAHASICtfNB Oil HfWtl i’frBIU »U

it

sparks religious interest within the

are

/bvyteic.

a

Ipfc

W pur

n

sell

Cliff, rector

to

for people to

Reverend

Despite the steady sales for the Christians

think

“I

mous

or

mm

apparel line has

P r °d ucts

t ^ie

positive way.

M*

Jesus are also

quite popular over the past

some

use

images of

Hoy.

offended by the images of Jesus

and from Happy Bunny

U

Jeremy Campbell, product manager for beWild.com, said the Jesus

website that distributes Jesus mer-

lenses

Other, |

Jjl

to

shops throughout North America. One successful retail

more than 10,000

being

is

no

j§||

chase the mer-

sell

purpose of celebrating one's faith and she hopes people

mt,

hundred items a month, with obvious higher sales around the Christmas period.”

items, including everything from rudo T-shirts to colourful contact

that

Ausburg Ausburg

for

items for the sole

religious

sells

which $25 US, are pur-

for about

several

claims to

to lie or stay

under threats of harm."

silent

jj

traditional

Fortress Publishers, said

list.

God flipping the bird. Much of this Jesus merchandise

is

them

ing

representative

ice

shirts,

forced

of Bellmore,

them-

express

selves, instead of forc-

Iff

three years. “Sales for the line are

chandise

we are to live as free men who permit others to hon-

if

estly

more

a in

image of Jesus on church supplies, religious books and gifts. Mary Gragton, a customer serv-

and

become

novelty

mitted

bookstore

Kitchener, sells a

to

have. “All choices should be per-

j||P^’

to morally digest, the clothing also

in

probably well

one

featured a drawing of the Son of

can be ordered online or found

Jews and Christians allow others

Publishers,

Lutheran-based

chased by thousands of people each month.

most controversial depic-

of the

f|§£

It's

understood

jj

the

Ausburg Fortress

have

to

popular

century

20th

yet.

ttl r

at

fine

is

it

society other than what

in

|

jAgg

and negative ways. In modern merchandise, the Son of God has transformed from a Messiah to a tive

to a

my

homegirl!"

and

received

choices

— Page 7

2007

April 2,

reli-


Page 8

— SPOKE,

April 2,

Sports

2007

Men’s soccer team places fourth By JESSICA BLUMENTHAL The Conestoga Condors gave their all at the

it

OCAA provincial soc-

ment.

contributes their win to the

Geoff Johnstone, Condor's head men had great teamwork and held each other responsi-

team played the system. “We dug deep and played with character and heart.”

ble on the field, however, first

time

in

four

OCAA

championships and you they wanted the gold by the look on their faces. However, Humber shut out Conestoga during the semi-finals, could

tell

In the

bronze medal game

against

the Sheridan Bruins they played like

a team possessed. Despite their great performance they lost to the Bruins 2 -0

.

Sheridan players peppered the net during the last five minutes of the first

half and got a clean shot

in,

it’s

Tony

tournament’s

Shane

Joe Persia, Sheridan’s goalkeeper,

Conestoga not scoring goals

in

The OCAA showcases talented and skilled athletes, said Silvestri. Alex Barbier, a spectator who

Ditchfield, Condor’s

made

played

in the

OCAA

all

said

making

the finals.

other, he added.

“Being in the OCAA championships and playing for a medal is

make

popped

another goal.

it

to that level of

themselves competitively but the players also showed they have a

encouraging their teammates. At the 12-minute mark, Sheridan in

first

competition means they have proven

strong spirit of friendship, respect

and camaraderie in their treatment of each other. Most importantly, they have a lot more appreciation for each

budgets, which could be a con-

tributing factor in the loss.

moments

it

proud of

the athletes.

He

Toronto area. Their schools are three times bigger and have higher athlet-

lives for

when

started in the '60s, said he’s

team captain, stood out with his amazing skills and getting to balls that appeared beyond his reach. The other schools competing in the championships were all from the

Johnstone

in the

finals.

many good saves during the tournament. As well, Victor Nobre, the

ic

the

all-stars.

making the score -0. During the second half, the Condors on the sideline paced up and down the field and sat on the edge of their seats, yelling and 1

the

was named the tournament’s top keeper, which could also be a factor

players really stood out on

keeper, had great reflexes and

coach.>

way them

Bruins and was

lead to their downfall.

Some

Silvestri. the Bruins'

Mario Kulis played well for named one of

goals

win games. Johnstone was raised in the old style of playing where the players constantly talk to each other and he believes a lack of communication

that

the field.

with a score of 3-0.

at the

better than oxygen,’’ he said.

and 23. years Conestoga had been to the

(Photo by Adam

The Condors wings were clipped and they placed fourth in the tourna-

coach, said the

This was the

Defenceman Victor Nobre roughs up a Humber player OCAA indoor soccer championships in Vaughan.

championship

championships at the OSA Soccer Centre in Vaughan March 22

cer

Black)

OCAA

in

like

“It’s

very exciting for athletes to it

to

such a

level.”

V.v

(Photo by Adam Black) (Photo by Jessica Blumenthal)

Nathan Drury chases a Humber Hawk. The Condors ended up losing the match

3-0.

front of a

Nick Pandeirads steps

in

to take the intercepted

pass

in

Humber

player

and prepares

the chest.

-..** «..«,****..

(Photo by Adam Black) Nobre fights to intercept the ball from a Sheridan forward. Conestoga lost the match 2-0 and placed fourth in the OCAA '

Victor

championship.

Rich Parsons and Nathan Drury attempt to strip the Shane Ditchfield prepares for a shot on net.

ball

(Photo by Adam Black) from a Sheridan forward, while goalkeeper


SPOKE,

mniii

April 2,

2007

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 9


— SPOKE,

Page 10

April 2,

News

2007

Ladies night at

Army

Salvation By JENN CURTIS

“We always Wednesday

The Salvation Army holds

Wednesday for

women

Guelph

in

evening

special

a

come

was

“It

“And

plus

dessert,”

was low

it

in fat.”

com-

pany and food.

Myra

“It’s

Pritchett, a pastor with the

women have a

Myra

lots of fun.”

Pritchett, (Photo by Becky Sharpe)

to get together.

a great

“It’s

we

a great night,

always have

Army's church, Guelph said it is a good way for

Salvation Citadel,

fun on

the best part

delicious

a

Pritchett said.

out and enjoy

prayer, activities, each other's

much

It's

of the week.

every

night at their church to

have so

nights.

night,

a 'pastor

we always

of fun,” she said.

lot

with the Salvation

Enjoying the

Army’s church

After a long cold winter our singing red-breasted friend, the Canadian robin, temperature will be cooler this week, with scattered showers and a high of 7

Every week they do something

On March

different.

show was held with clothing

store

The models for the fashion show were all women who attend the weekly gill’s night out.

from the

styles

located

Julies,

in

also

featured

a

love

“I

which was made by volunand beverages.

Wednesday

dessert, teers,

Cooley.

and

great to

just girls

come

coming

said

Laurie

“It’s great to

come

out and

girls

By ANNELISE THOMPSON

once a

out

Cooley was one of the models for

was

“It

“We

a lot of fun,” she said.

about the

got to go to the store and pick

esterex,

we wanted

The

fashion show

job

at

did a really

good

modelling, Pritchett said.

quit their

new

is

staff

and

stu-

date rape drug, prog-

a hoax.

day jobs and

start

tests

model-

The learning Commons would like

lo

It

said that doctors'

confirmed that she had been

date raped, as well as given a sterilization pill called progesterex.

thank

all

also

said,

which dissolves

drinks just as easily,

is

in

such that the

victim doesn’t conceive from the

rape and the rapist needn't worry

about having a paternity

basics of the e-mail claim

a group of men.

ling,” she joked.

said.

female

fying

that a

women

“Maybe some of them should the clothes and

all

woman who was out at a bar with her friends was gang-raped by

to wear.”

All the

Attention

dents, the recent e-mail circulating

out the different outfits

one ofthe modelsfor the

e-mail

“Progesterex,

the fashion show.

Laurie Cooley,

had a great time, Pritchett

The

week.”

hang out with the once a week.”

The women loved

back. However, the

C and

a low of 4 C.

E-mail hoax exposed

on

out

nights,”

hang out with the

just “It’s

is

21 a fashion

Stone Road Mall.

The evening

warm weather

him months

there any drug with those properties.”

Wikipedia has also created a page their encyclopedia with more details about the hoax drug. in

test identi-

later.”

Dr. Sarah Kolk, of Health Link,

Cambridge, said she has never seen documentation or confirmation that the drug exists. She also said, “There is no drug in existence by that name, nor is

Interested

students should

visit

www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progester ex

Waterloo

Regional

Police

Inspector Bryan Larkin cautioned that

people (especially -women)

should always exercise caution and

watch

their drinks.

for their hard wotik and dedication to tutoring, conversation partners during the 2006-2007 academic year.

Conestoga Peer Helpers

poops

and, learning

Conestoga Peer Helpers 2006-2007 Amber Abbott Lamis Abdetrehim Tracy-lynne Ahter Mick AJeksicb James Alger

Sana

Stefan Chery Jason Choquete Zaeh Clement

Jennifer Fulton

Moharned

Ryan Funduk McKye Gadke

Pi ofr Kostecki

Jenny Meredith Katie Richardson Slobodan Misljenovic Kyle Rickert

Melina Cormier

Rafael Garcia Greg Garrrtsen

Hedvig Krai Avert Knfczer Ashley la belle

Micheal Mooney Roberta Moorfey Kraten Morrison

Hebah Rizk Angus Rogers on James Robrer

Nicole Laurin Lesley Leach man

BahrijaMuNc Lyndsay Neate

Jordan Royal Nicole Savory

Angela Letter Denise Levetle Lindsay Love Brandon Lovegrove Melanie Lowei Emily Maloney Lindsay Martin

Amber Nelson

Sue Schmitt James Smith Michelle Siam

Susan May Rasa Mazeika

Melissa Poechman David Poidevin

Mike McGinnis Jesse McKmght

Laura Purdy David Raude Samuel Toma Bharani Ravishankar Justin Toth AJUson Rawlings Angelica Turcot!©

Nathan Crawford Srdjan Damjanovic

Ait

Ben Good

Good

Jarmfted AMzi

Nicole Davis

Maria

Baley Sorina Balanean David Balmer

Lisa

DeGiaaf Ross Ditner

Anthony Greene Tyler Gross

Jennifer Dixon

Marta Barakonski Holy Bee? David Bodnar Amanda Bradley Veronica Brown David Budimfrc Nicole Bruder Pamela Burns Scott Burton

Ruth

Meghan Hansplant Reed Hansuld

James Campbell Stephen Campbell

Feng Fu

Erin

EWiott

Christy

Emets

Claire Hariick

Harwood

Emrich Alex Entz Kyle Erb Elena Eun Holly Featherstone

Tristan

Pamela Felbaum

Paul

Mrke Floyd

Nabil Kanji

Elaine

Brent Fraser

Matthew Kamowski Courtney Kennedy

Chris

Mite e

Heather Huff

Rose lachetta Shannon Jodoin Heather Johnson

K atoms

Khalil

McLaren

Meadows

Stephen Mercer

Victor

Nobre

Ryan Parry Steven Penner Rachel Pepping Liz Pere 2 Monica Pet/

Anne Renner

Peer Hosting and Tutoring They Gave Ale a :

New Direction By David Poidevin (TESL program)

A professor once said,

‘teaming

is

not

compulsory neither is survival We have chosen both survival and learning; a path of our choosing is before us. My first day of class was ’

a milestone on my path of learning. panted myself down a path which thought would teach I

I

me what needed

know about electronics was wrong, it taught me much more I

but

I

to

second week of school met a Korean man named Ji-Ho whose influence greatly changed my direction. teamed that he was in the English as a Second Language {ESI) program at Conestoga We decided to meet weekly so he could practice his English and teach me a bd of Korean. In die

I

I

^

While

my friend and were engaged in this

cross cultural sharing, was introduced to the Peer Host service; a service set up by Peer Services to connect fluent English speakers with those desiring language practice and integration I

into

life in

Canada. As a Canadian born and

raised in Africa, I saw that the Peer Host service met many of the needs of International students learning English. During this time the staff at

Peer Services also asked me to tutor courses in my program, Electronics Engineering Technology Telecom, which did To my amazement. found a unique enjoyment in tutoring The good training and support Peer Services provided gave me a base for efficiently I

I

and effectively helping my peers, in either Telecom or ESL programs In my third year of Telecom. decided to act upon the interest that I

Brigitta

Brenda Water Sonya Wasted Brandon Wells Jeff

Wemp

Nicole

Wldeboer

Angela White Jason Wiggfesworth Eric

Zomer

Vaittancou

had fostered through set a new path, one of ESL and Physics.

tutoring

and peer hosting.

directed at befog a teacher

Bw w

Four years have passed. have finished my Physics degree and am back at Conestoga fo the Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) program while also volunteering in the Peer Conversation Partner service, a revised version of the Peer Host service As took back over Ihe many milestones that have passed along this path to becoming a teacher. thank God tor the skill building and kfe changing opportunities have had to peer host and tutor. Although chose one path when first came to Conestoga, further experiences and guidance have helped me choose another, one more I

I

I

I

I

I

suited to I

Adam Vranic

Wojciech Staszak Daniel Stauch Tara Strong An dree a Tasedan Nicole Taves Aaron Thorpe Lauren Tippin

I

I

len Vaness Reg Vidmar Jennifer Volmer

my

I

interests, personality

and

life

goals.


News

SPOKE,

— Page 11

2007

April 2,

Local

show

arts

promotes young artists By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE The

region’s

identity

is

cultural

artistic

dispersed throughout the

grams, which are generally underfunded and on the wane.

“Through ten

all

we've got-

the contest,

these (students) engaged and

greater community, but a myriad of

tried to get

and artisans were conveniently congregated at the local Artworks show, namely young artists seeking to promote then-

arts

pieces.

$100 for second-place winners and $50 for third-place winners. In addi-

local artists

The Artworks Show and Sale, held March 24-25 at Bingemans, provided a captivating and

where

atmosphere

nal

entrepreneurs could inspirations

the

commu-

sell

artistic

and share

of their jewelry,

metal, sculptural and painted mas-

Even young

terpieces.

adults were

granted the opportunity to exhibit

work through

their

the Catch 21

organized and sponsored by The Record.

contest,

The

launched as part Record's youth advisory

arts contest,

of The

board to help familiarize young people with the newspaper, was pitched to

all

regional high schools

December, encouraging

last

stu-

become involved in the community and showcase their work publicly in a subsidized space

dents to

“It

made sense

space and

this

since

show, to

track with

in this region,”

he

said.

The

contest provided a cash incenof $200 for first-place winners,

tive

tion, the

played

contending pieces were disa subsidized space at the

in

show, compliments of The Record’s bursary fund.

Catch 21 garnered more than 80 and a total of 35 finalists, whose pieces were judged using

entries

various criterion including artistic

technique and ingenuity.

Two

categories, artist of the year

“There are a

of talent-

lot

ed people that make

some

beautiful products,

but they don’t have a place to sell it or show it.”

tie in

and

artisan of the year,

were estab-

lished this year, therefore allowing

Simon Dowrick, projects specialist for The Record and show

for a total of three winners in each

manager.

Dowrick said allowing students to become involved in local arts, via Catch 2 helps to hone their personal skills in an attempt to cultivate and broaden the ever-important gamut of 1 ,

next-generation arts and crafts.

aims to increase awareness of the imporIn addition, the contest

of arts-related school

tance

pro-

high school student

favourite

medium.”

in

a result of imported products.

important to use the manual techniques wielded

thing that can relate to students,” said

my

is

McEwen

this

some-

the region, proudly displays his award-winning painting which earned him second place in the Catch 21 ’s Artist of the Year Contest. painting

show manager we have

(Photo by Holly Featherstone)

Duncan McEwen, a

said

is

it

by the pre-eminent centuries ago.

good

all

to preserve the old

gy,

Second-place winner of the artist Duncan the year award, McEwen of Bluevale Collegiate Institute, said his winning piece

(techniques),” he said.

was inspired by

test

his favourite artist,

it’s

The

the technolo-

Artist of the Year

was not

present at the show.

Dowrick

said

it

translates

to

is

its

winners the

small but distinct opportunity for'

recruiting student submissions.

nesses

“I like painting

...

sonal pieces,” said

for fun, (as) per-

McEwen.

“Oil

develop their

to

to

own

market their products

after graduating, particularly

local

busi-

shows

are

when

becoming scarce

as

it or show it,” he said. Dowrick said the objectives of the Artworks Show are to strengthen community arts and culture, help small artisans grow and increase

the involvement of local colleges

“We move

Catch 21 its

technology and

we have

to

The problem with our health icy

is

that

pol-

we’re currently focusing

on treating problems versus preventing analysis

problems,

said

co-ordinator

the

data

for

the

Ontario Early Years Centre.

“Despite the fact that

we know

programs prevent problems ur medical care funding has rown rapidly,” said Sandy Hoy, who spoke about the social deter-

social

Q

tion,

food security, health-care services, housing, income and its distribution, social safety net, social

exclusion,

unemployment

employment

security.

Hoy

said social determinants are

equal to or more important than

medical care and personal health behaviours.

“We

hear a

lot

about health care

behaviours or smoking,”

determents of health.” She added although

social determinants of health

and

health

such as eating a

lot

she said. “These issues aren’t as

important as things like the social in

every

are the

economic and social condiunder which people live which determine their health and

country the social determinants of

tions

health are different, early

are generally related to social, eco-

happening in the first six years. All these connections being made are stimulated by

nomic, political and environmental circumstances.

every

life is

on

is

happening outside

in

the

Hoy

said these connections are

Your World Right

us

part of

is

human

Top 10

nature and part

of the community,” he said.

Consequently, young

artists

and

RealTrax™ ring tunes

artisans are integral to the preserva-

lot

are

Don't Matter

2.

ing

chronically aggressive

said this

in early brain

is

a sensitive period

development

affect-

guage and emotional control. “Nourishing those areas in our brain will have the biggest impact on what happens in the future.” Hoy said research has been done where the lives of children were followed from toddlers through

two,

we

age of

opportunity for intervention,” said

Hoy. Robert Novosel,

who

group. They were more likely to live

in

poverty,

live

with

single

mothers or have higher levels of

-

programs are important comes to the development

it

of children. in

into less fortunate situations.

“We

should want to help people

become productive members of society,” said Novosel.

Crime

This -

10.

to

Mob

Why

I'm Hot (Chorus)

MIMS Lloyd

Text "PLAY" to

phone

Is

You -

feels social

much of a chance to succeed.” He said if we place more money into social programs we will be helping out those who were born

the social determi-

(feat. T-Pain)

Rock Yo Hips

8.

attended

the political coffee house, said he

when

My System

Bow Wow

Poppin' Chris Brown

9.

chronically aggressive as a toddler

“They found

-

Hotline

Pretty Ricky

Outta

6.

six years are a great

society and are not always given as

high school.

On The

-

first

She said of those who were only 3.3 per cent graduated from

5.

7.

“The

“People are not born equal

high school.

Irreplaceable - Beyonce

should be doing something

then.

Fergie

4.

-

at the

Akon

Glamorous

doomed, but

see that these children are

March 26

-

-

children

these

of

Cupid's Chokehold Gym Class Heroes

1.

stress.”

when we

She

Now

into people that the creative side of

important and

we need to be makthem before we lose them.

next

drill

She said the studies are not saying

world.”

nants of health playing out in that

list.

“There’s a

what

ing hearing, visual responding, lan-

Laurier University.

The

are

educa-

employment and working con-

and personal

in

life

ditions,

Canada at a political coffee house on March 19. The session, which was open to the community, was held at Wilfrid minants of health

Canada

expand

including

ROGERS

-

Social determinants in

potentially

and universities, for the Artworks show in October.

3.

Aboriginal status, early

will continue to

contests,

very quickly through

Social programs important for a better future SUMMER MCPHEE

local cul-

tural essence.

publicity to the arts as a result.

hoped the con-

Frank Frazetta, and was almost complete by the time Catch 21 was

artists

and evolution of the

tion

of talented people that make some beautiful products, but they don’t have a place to lot

sell

“Especially with

category.

of

from

artists

“There are a

Week

By

oil

Simon Dowrick,

Artworks Show.

at the

them back on

and culture

4800 on your Rogers wireless

download your favourite

ring tunes today.


1

Page 12

— SPOKE,

April 2,

News

2007

Self-defence program

promotes science

Libra September 23 October 22

-

By PEGGY O’NEILL You were bom a leader but often shy away from the position as you are afraid to

whoever follows

fail

you. Don't be afraid to take the

keep going. quit

your mistake and

correct

lead,

when

A

true leader doesn't

things

go wrong.

You enjoy balance and thus are happiest when you have someone in your life. You are independent appreciate having another person to keep you grounded when you need it. Life is often a balancing act. but

Region, In

the

October 23

November

five

last

studies

years,

throughout Canada and the United States have shown that girls begin

21

feel

Materials are just

yours.

is

objects and people are not property,

fight

only for things that are

When you want nothing gets

something, your way. You

in

have a subtlety about you that don't expect and your

others

intensity catches

Use these

them off-guard. wisely, you

self-defence class.

because of a lack of interbecause of a lack of expoA recent University of

Sagittarius

PIESI May2l

Junc21

November 22 December 2

fill and are torn when it comes to choosing sides. You want to make others happy but by doing so leave yourself

and

When

not easily persuaded

unhappy.

overwhelmed

Stop

please everyone,

it

trying

to

won't happen.

it

comes

of

technol-

among

girls

CAGIS

aged seven

many

has

by giving the and background behind what typically happens when someone pushes you and then went on to show how to fall properly started off

Moon, all

Chapter members

over Ontario.

meet regularly to explore science with women and men who have chosen careers in the science and

One

fields.

part of

CAGIS

is

Ajung Moon,

at

Waterloo

who

mem-

University

the

has her blue

how she CAGIS.

of

has been doing judo

“We tion

know

that

parties,” she said.

who

aware of

of hands-

thing that teenage girls would be

get

they're with and to be

their surroundings.”

Kris McGee of St. Jacobs brought her two seven-year-old girls to the class mostly because she wanted her children to socialize with other girls as well as

I

fun and some-

“We

about what they're

to think

defence.

is full

it

at

house

belt, said that this is

it’s

when

and sex

sense

to drugs, alcohol

got into the science side of

"This workshop

common

comes

exposed

on experience,

self-

also talk a lot about preven-

and

and now

for three and half years

teaching

a volunteer

a mechanical engineering

student

girls’

would boost

tricky situation.

science

to 16.

chapters

is

it

tool in

they can defend themselves in a

doing,

in science,

it

their confidence levels to

She also gave demonstrations on to break someone’s grip on your arm or to break free if grabbed from behind.

support interest

elevating

esteem. She said

how

ogy, engineering and mathematics

self-defence

that

and

science

to

be

self-

“CAGIS offers many courses that my girls to, but I like this one

take

because

it

young

teaches

girls

about the pressures of high school,” she said.

to matters of the

you are often

heart

terms

helping to promote, educate and

it.

are

Moon

thinks

more of an empowerment

them

self-defence and the science behind

You

Moon

classes are important because

without sustaining serious injury.

technology

-

interested in,” she said.

The Canadian Association for Girls in Science (CAGIS) is a club

talents

don't want to scare people away.

irreplaceable.

March

teach a self-defence class on

tage, not

gap-

Whether it's for love or money, you may find yourself in verbal or physical tiffs vying for what you

Waterloo

the

est, but

science education at a disadvan-

Michigan study found that giving girls hands-on science exposure and experience helps close that

-

for

helped to organize and

22 at the University of Waterloo. Approximately 15-20 girls ranging from five to 16 years old attended and participated in the

sure.

Scorpio

CAGIS

ber of

(Photo by Peggy O'Neill)

between “more

torn

the “friends” zone and the

than" area. Don't be afraid to

forward

in relationships,

how you

will truly tell

move

Ajung Moon, an instructor

only time

the Canadian

for

will feel in

Association

the future.

for Girls in

Science demonstrates

how to fall properly without sustaining an

Capricorn

U

December 22

a women’s defence class.

injury to

-

self-

January 19

You're a personal person

who

No

determ ined to make the best of

family and friends. Take advan-

things.

tage of the time you can spend

lining often puzzles people

with these people, as situations

the point of complete frustration.

in

life pick up speed, time with them may become sparse.

your

Your

all

pay off

By NATALIE

ability to see the silver

it

years to come.

in

ANDERSON

Aquarius January 20

-

They may not be knocking on

your aim is Your words are

daggers when someone upsets you and your opponent is barely left standing. Getting your point made is good, but don't like

dehumanize others takes.

You

like a sniper,

It's

for their mis-

natural to be wrong.

with

all

befriending

groups

for

strive

is

March 20

self-

impossi-

ble; don't set the bar too high,

you'll

-

only end up disappointed.

Some

you a pushover, others a do-gooder. Whatever the term, you are too nice by half. You call

usually can't

say

when people

no,

play

programs for the

sions to art galleries or

May,” said Kris McGee, of Girl Guides of Canada. “We have a time period that is set by our producers. Dare. We have about a six-month window where we are allowed to sell them. But we are always sold out by then.” McGee said the Girl Guides have been selling cookies for about 85

a third-year

journalism student holding

By ROSS

ALDWORTH

palm of her hand.

said

the organization

always looking for volunteers

is

to

join

the

Girl

Guides

“We

vanilla cookies,

particularly target female

she

said.

“They’re welcome to work with any age group. We have volunteers that

work

directly with the

and we have volunteers who work in an administrative role who help ensure that we have

age,” said

more

specifically,

do

said the girls don’t

door-to-door sales anymore for safety reasons.

“We do makes

volunteers,”

adult

young

the chocolate ones.

of

Canada.

important for kids to

Allman. “It's good for them to be around other kids their age and have fun outside of school.” Allman said his favourite cookies are the traditional chocolate and

McGee

McGee

encourage the children to

sales through family, friends

and neighbours,” she said. “We do have units that go out on what we call a

‘cookie

door

to

blitz’

door

and they

will

accompanied

go by

adults.”

girls.”

She said the Girl Guides try to let neighbourhoods know that they are coming in advance by putting signs up at local schools. “You can always look up Girl

Allman, of Cambridge, said buys Girl Guide cookies because he feels the money is going to a good cause.

Guides in the phone book or call -800-565-8 111,” she said. “And somebody would gladjf sell you cookies.”

girls

programming available

for

the

Jeff

he

According

to the city’s website, a

random sample of Waterloo

1

^

alike

is

For more in-depth, expert opin-

vey on key issues and personal

ions, a

feelings about the city.

held on April 13

at

9 a.m.

During the morn-

Mayor Brenda

will be asking residents

what

it

about Waterloo that appeals to

them along with what they would like to see

the city's future.

teaming up to

are

Starting April 10,

cil

short and long-term planning for

dents will receive a telephone sur-

plan the City of Waterloo's future.

fate

resi-

leaders and regular

Halloran and Waterloo's city coun-

in the

excur-

camping

it’s

Waterloo leaders appeal to the community

victim.

citizens is

girls, like

“I think

get socialized at a

trips.

to

“The first cookies were made in Saskatchewan,” she said. “There is a unit in Saskatchewan where the grandmother, the mother and the daughter were the first family to sell the cookies as a fundraiser.” Cookie sales twice a year are the

Being kind is good, but you can't always say yes. Sometimes no is what others need to hear.

McCormick

The cookies are $4 per box or $48 for a case of 12 boxes and all

available.

Community Tiffany

mint

sell

the proceeds are used to support

especially

the

Guides

means those delicious chocolate

years.

Pisces February 19

your improvement, erasing weaknesses. Don't overwork yourself. Keeping your skills sharp and updated is a good habit, but perfection

yet

you retain your individuality and keep your values intact. Hold strong to your attributes. When others become lost in society, you remain standing.

Virgo

often

people,

many you meet;

August 23 September 22

You

of

members

all

and vanilla cookies are currently “Traditionally cookies are on sale

are able to blend in well

Girl

chocolate cookies.

from April through

Much

the

fall

your door, but they’re out there. The Girl Guides of Canada are running their spring fundraiser, which

February 18

rarely off target.

major fundraiser for

of Girl Guides of Canada. In the

even to

Don't lose your positive outlook, will

way

Delicious donations guide the

matter the situation, you are

does well when surrounded by

change.

An

online version of the survey

will also city’s

be available through the

website and hard copies of

most responses

the survey will be available at

city

facilities.

The

received will be considered

in

both

community forum to 3 p.m.

ing, a panel

RIM

will

be

Park from

of community leaders

moderated by CTV’s Daiene Vemile will talk

about their vision and

orities for the city,

public

workshop

pri-

followed by a

in the afternoon.


§

News

SPOKE,

April 2,

2007

— Page 13

Malls spring into the season’s fashion The

SAMANTHA SAECHAO

By

Some people may

be wondering

mall.

“Soft tones of pink, blue, green and yellow are the most essential

woman’s

a

wardrobe

resentative

Bluenotes.

at

both thick and thin horimix of white and

wrapped around waists of women. Wondering why a belt of

yellow.”

that

“And

either dark or light green or blue,

along with brown and black are the masculine fashion colours for

men.”

now

Accessories are also

demand, and are

in

representative

able

bright colours, var-

in

shapes and sizes and even feature cartoon characters such as Tinkerbell and the sex ious

both, and even undergarments for

low, baby blue, pink and green,

women.

which are sure

These and many more trends are appearing in Kitchener’s Fairview Mall and Waterloo’s Conestoga Mall, in such stores as Bluenotes, Foot Locker, Xcetera, American Eagle, Aldo Accessories and Bootlegger. Most popular for the guys are the ever-so fashionable polos, soft blue, green or orange, along with black and brown, says

spring rainy days.

also

come

in

are

bright colours of yelto brighten

up any

have quickly become hot this new season for

“Plaids really

both

men and women,”

said

Charlie.

Clothes are not the only trendy items right now. Accessories are also in

demand, and

are available

in bright colours, various shapes and sizes and even feature car-

probably

hot item to dangle around your neck, including ones with a circular-shape pendant or ornament.

such

and even Playboy which is stamped onto belts, earrings and necklaces, have all become the hottest accessory items to be paraded on women this the

Tinkerbell,

as

sex

icon

spring.

For men, a man’s best accessory would be a nice pair of shades, preferably copper tone this spring

for

look or the shade for the dark affect. the

And

soft

seen

them

black

a nice silver chain around

footwear

“We had More than 3,500 people went to Oshawa to celebrate the first-ever Stephen Colbert Day.

The American comedian was celebrated in the central Ontario as

city

March

He

also said

e o p

e

1

came

putting

together

a

wardrobe, don’t forget about your

to 1

e

-

For more of a laidback casual is also athletic, choose Pumas to give you the feeling of walking on air.

game

down

Ladies, looking casual while

valiant efforts the Spirit lost the

the

Gray said he would have never believed a

ager.

would draw

nities for

Whatever

of

rea-

who

attended.

Gray said there were no hard

I

just

Air

Force

l’s

Jordan’s

Attention Students!!

Welcome home to TramGfobe Affordable Stuc Variety of rental units to living

d

Safe, affordable

of

accommodate diff

-

nt

arrangements apartments that provide ypjj

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Conveniently located close to universities

&

colleges

emergency contact number (peace of mind for the parents)

'6

24

*f

Steps to shopping

hr.

.

& restaurant^!:®

_

mz

Comedy

Colbert Report,

tion of the

a bunch of events and had Colbert-themed snacks for all

is

around the corner, bringing a whole new style and wardrobe.

him.”

was unable make a trip Oshawa to

good reputa-

not only made good on of the bet, they planned

choose,

Central’s

he sullied the

Oshawa

you

Stephen Colbert

because

their side

style

(Internet photo)

responded

Genny’s so I had to send words back to protect our boys,” he said.

I Sunglasses either in a copper shade or black tone

style.

Cobeagle the

and

Mr. Colbert

was

stripes

She says for men it’s the high top Converse and bowling shoes

“There were a lot of photo opportu-

has received.

to

I Polos in solids and thick and thin horizontal

great

media coverage

I

blacks

“The best part was the warm welcome of the Oshawa community to Eagle,” said Konesko.

The only

I Dark greens and blues along with browns and

in

styles

to

Steagle

bet

Men

attend the event next year.

declared.

the attention

Tips for

of 3-on-3 hockey,”

Day was

all

come

flats,

stilettos

and colours, Woodstock wedges and stilettos, and the soft feel slip-on clogs are most popular for women this spring,” says Jill, assistant mandifferent

Pumas, ballerina

Konesko. “Despite his

game, and thus Colbert

silly

I

is the key this season and what better pair of shoes to do it in than Pumas which have a sleek look and soft feel. Over at Payless, the more casu-

look is in this season. “Ballerina flats that

necklaces

belts,

Woodstock wedges and

in

style

al

Wide

the net in a

game by a large margin.” He also said the Spirit hope

his show.

won

said Bill

I

and coloured bangles

the

quirky

for an entire episode of

Spirit

friendly

I Capris, tank tops and plaid patterns

Foot

at

look that

Saginaw Oshawa win was

“Steagle held

I Soft tones of pink, blue, green and yellow

Locker.

hockey

comedi-

Colbert would have to wear a Generals jersey

representative

sales

Saginaw’s Colbert-inspired Steagle Cobeagle the Eagle as the goaltenders competing for the Colbert Cup. The Generals won the cup by a landslide, but the media relations for

Women

The following are in this season:

Jordan’s are also a hot style for basketballers,” says Victor, a

Oshawa General’s mascot and

co-ordinator

Tips for

and athletic for the active. Guys, you’re probably wondering what there is out there. For street wear, the Air Force l’s are the top pick of the bunch, where

Shooter the

as

Spirit said the

er,

The

well

planned from the get go.

brate the

howev-

as

near and c e

20, as

players

local

from far

Stephen Colbert Day. If the Spirit lost,

It’s

the way,” he said.

hockey bet made between Colbert and Oshawa Mayor John Gray. The stakes were if Colbert’s team, the Saginaw Spirit, won a hockey game against the Oshawa Generals, Gray would have to celebrate his birthday,

ball.

one of those things where you lose the bet and still win. We had, a few laughs and were able to raise awareness for Oshawa along

of a trash-talk

result

a

an absolute

this

remember summertime

style.

The game featured

feelings on his part.

and most populai spring season are

hottest

fashionable for the casual dresser

Stephen Colbert Day a success By ANNELISE THOMPSON

the rage in area stores

The

feet.

the neck can never hurt anyone’s

When

toon characters.

You’ve

string necklaces are also a

says large clustered pearls, thick silk headbands, thick plain or coloured bangles, necklaces with cartoon characters

Capris and tank tops are the in

Long

Kristen, a sales representative at

hottest trend for

featured

Aldo

at

all

Xcetera,

icon Playboy.

women and

quite

Accessories.

avail-

They are fashionable in polo men and women, tank tops for women, thin sweaters for

"They

the

popular,” said Shannon, a sales

men and women.

Charlie.

It’s

become

returned and have

trendy items right now.

for both

shirts for

so popular?

is

“Wide-style belts that go over a female’s shirt or dress have

Clothes are not the only

Charlie says that bright colours are the in trend right

size

size that matters, literally.

this

spring,” says Charlie, a sales rep-

comebacks are

classic

zontal lines, a

stripes,

what the latest, trendiest and most popular fashions are right now? If you are one of the people who need to know, head to your local

to

and

latest trends

to

sGlo

to

a

celebrate his

“We had students come from New York University, as well as people from Saskatchewan and Manitoba,” said Gray. The big attraction of the night was a mock rematch between the Generals and the Oshawa

Saginaw

Spirit.

-

first-ever I

Stephen Colbert Day.

Currently Colbert to travel

due

restrictions.

is

unable

to contract

OOO - 3 04A "TAAA 10-7000 000

www.GOtransgIobe.com

121 TransGlobe r

2B

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or


.

Page 14

— SPOKE,

April 2,

News

2007

do

Oilers By JON Well,

MOLSON

finally

it

this year's

happened. The

Edmonton Oilers, after going an entire month without a victory, managed to win a game without the help of Ryan Smyth. The Oilers’ 12-game winless

post-season as well as

dropping the team to 1 1th place (as of March 25) in the Western Conference. But despite the disappointment of trading away a player who has been referred to by many as the “heart and soul of the organization” and losing the

February after general manager Kevin Lowe

opportunity to play for the

Smyth to the New York Islanders in exchange for Ryan O’Marra, Robert Nilsson and

one game away from winning it last

drought began

in

late

dealt the coveted

the

Islanders’

first-round

pick in

2007.

it

Stanley Cup, after

new NHL

right in new

salary cap driven

traded

for

the

ended up getting prospects

future.

NHL, What

in return

he

another

he

upcoming

was two

who

er

who

first

I

made

the

right

decision

ir

undeniably

com

Despite the disappoint-

traded

ment

away a who has been

of trading

player

referred to by

the “heart

many as

and soul

organization”:..

Kevin

I

believe

Lowe made

right decision in

of the

the

dealing

Smyth.

to

make

ing about

even

they

weren’t,

fact that

Smyth

the

unrestricted

agent as of placed Lowe

an free

July in

a diffi-

freefall

after

this

them being mathematically eliminated from trade has resulted in

pressure

Smyth’s cur rent, two-year deal, worth $7 million US, is sure to increase

negotiate

value,

stand

throughout the

2006-07 season. And to

if

has

goals.

the

after failing

an extension,

Lowe

did the only reasonable thing in the

to

resign

be

both first

round plus

Lowe his

in

made

has

referred

to

as

a

he has, however,

but

never been

an

player and

elite

should not be paid as one. And while it is difficult for fans of a small market organization to get

used to their team continuing the tradition of being sellers at the trade deadline, it is a necessary part of building a winner in a league where it has become

a

a firm

unwillingness to

overpay for the services of any player, even if that particular player has been with the organization since 1994 and has scored more

Turtle

legitimately

great one,

team member of Smyth’s

cult position.

after his stellar play

Edmonton’s

even

player,

been with the organiza1994 and has scored more than 265

system works. While other general managers, such as the one in Toronto, might have buckled under the

if

is

any

tion since

has a

how

of

unwillingness for the servic-

NHL’s economic

the play-

but

es

firm

that particular player

clear understand-

were a long shot offs,

Lowe

in his

overpay

to

than a

player, while at best he could

stand

about the organization’s future. This optimism should come from the fact that

worst of

Very

the

at

may be nothing more

Lowe has made a

the

sons to be optimistic

Oilers

the

sacrificed

good

Oiler fans plenty of rea-

was

he

Smyth, times,

season, but he has given

dealing Smyth.

When

than 265 goals.

the

anywhere he pleases come July 1, which could still include Edmonton. By trading Smyth, Lowe has

believe Kevin

Lowe

in

has the luxury of signing

ing

year,

round pick

draft. All that for a play-

increasing difficult to differentiate the

good teams from

the mediocre

ones.

power

max

to the By BECKY SHARPE Warner

Brothers

Studios

knocked fans off their feet this weekend with the new computeranimated movie. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

(TMNT).

According to www.deadlineholthe movie lywooddaily.com, brought first

in

$24.5 million during

its

The genius mind and

three days of release.

James Arnold Taylor. Nolan North. Mikey Kelley and Mitchell Whitfield

are the voices of Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo and Donatello, the four famous crime-fighting sewer turtles. Sarah Michelle Gellar and Chris Evans are the voices of archeologist and former reporter April O'Neil and nighttime crime fighter Casey Jones. Mako is the voice of Splinter, the turtles' father figure and sensei (a marital arts

TMNT

classic characters

questions.

Michelangelo, the simple-minded and most playful of the

spends his free

of the

travelled to a jungle region as rec-

ommended by his sensei Splinter, to learn how to be a true leader. During his spiritual learning Leonardo becomes the mysterious Ghost of the jungle and helps poor communities. Raphael, most commonly known for his hot head, takes

on

a

new and

exciting role as the Night watcher.

new role Raphael is a heavarmed metal turtle defeating the

In this

crime of

New

York without the

help of his brothers.

befitting

personalities,

turtles’

it

is

clear to the audience that each turtle

is

craving for his old crime

turtles

still

The

three

New

York also eldest brother and group

leader Leo.

under the city of New York. Leonardo, leader of the four, has

turtles,

as a party enter-

young children. While the new lives are

miss their

ily

life

tainer for

by the defeated Shredder, also play an unexpected role during the movie. With Shredder defeated the turtles are free to live a normal life ruled

techni-

computer support for residents of the city and finds himself constantly bombarded with boring cally

such as the Foot lead by Karai, originally

creative

own

lighting days to return.

teacher).

Other

Donatello sets up his

living in

O'Neil and Jones are comfortably living together while collecting statues

which

plot of the

movie.

The movie

link to the

features a

main

new

Maximillian J. Wintei^ voiced by Patrick Stewart. His historical brethren Colonel Santino, General Serpiente. General Aguila and General Gato (voices of John DiMaggio, Paula Mattioli, Kevin Michael Richardson and Fred lain,

Tatasciore

II)

create a

new

chal-

lenge for the turtles.

The movie excitement,

is

full

of action and

leaving

turtle

fans

wanting more. The satisfying and classic turtle ending includes a surprise and promise of an old and classic face to return.


Sports

SPOKE,

April 2,

2007

— Page 15

Kitchener boys face Japanese all-star team Exchange brings Japan’s Tomakomai All-Stars to Canada for a cultural faceoff and hockey game By

A

AMY MEADOWS

meeting

Aud between

the

at

Charlie Ward, president of Alliance Hockey, an Ontario minor

Minor Bantam and Tomakomai All-Stars marked

the Kitchener the

the

1

0th anniversary of the Toyota

Canada.

tures.”

to

cultural differences, this

wonderful and life-chang-

year.

to

Before

common

tural differences

and find

the

relations

hosting

team’s country to learn about cul-

common

game of hockey. The Tomakomai All-Star players spent a week prior to the game in ground

game

the City of

began

the

Tomakomai,

Hirofumi Iwakura, said the hockey challenge was started to commemorate

the

the

Mayor of

Hirofitmi Ih ’akurci,

to

Tomakomai

out on top with a 5-

3 victory.

mayor of Tomakomai, Japan boys

came

All-Stars

love for hockey.”

14-year-old

treated with end-

to-end action, but the

create lasting friendships

through their

Tickets were free to the game,

although everyone was encouraged to bring a donation to the food bank.

The crowd was

ing experience allows

young hockey players

Mayor Carl Zehr encouraged the players on both teams to enjoy a

Last year 2,854 pounds of food was donated, which event organizers hoped would be exceeded this

“Despite language and

a

al.”

“unique opportunity to compete and appreciate each other’s cul-

exchange sends and receives 13-

is

organizers, described the experience as “fantastic and cultur-

Hockey Challenge. The game, which took place on March 25, represents a cultural exchange between Japan and

Through the support of both Toyota Canada and Japan the

The ceremonial puck drop takes place at this year’s 10th Toyota Hockey Challenge. The game cultural exchange between Japan and Canada.

hockey association and one of the event’s

in the

beginning of business

between Toyota Japan

and Canada. Iwakura also emphasized the cultural importance of the Toyota

Hockey Challenge. “Despite language and cultural this wonderful and life-changing experience allows

differences,

Kitchener, sightseeing and staying with the families of Kitchener’s

young hockey players

players.

common

lasting

friendships

to

through

create their

love for hockey,” he said.

CLASSIFIED Support person needed for 13-year-old boy with autism. Support required for outings in the community, summer camps, and within the home during the school year and summer holidays. Must be creative with activity planning, altruistic in your desire to work with a special needs child, and must have own vehicle. Laurelwood subdivision. $10-

The Tomakomai All-Stars storm the Kitchener Minor Bantam’s net during the 10th anniversary Toyota Hockey Challenge held at the Aud on March 25.

$ 12/hr depending on experience plus .37/km. Call Deborah 519-746of the

1584.

Offers

EXCLUSIVE

GROUP BUYING POWER

Conestoga College

c (

;rr

judy at Ext.214

519-743-5221 1-300-321-9187 jwestman@staebier.com local

mascot for the Kitchener Rangers, meets and greets Japanese and Canadian fans at this year’s Toyota Hockey

Email

,

Challenge. Tickets to the food bank.

game were

Photos by

free with a donation to the

Amy Meadows

Greets


Page 16

— SPOKE,

Sports

2007

April 2,

Student an Olympian By STEPHANIE IRVINE

seems

children,

to

the making

in

be handling the

somewhat self-imposed pressure

A

cinderblock

non-descript,

building at

1253 King

Kitchener

home

is

A

Boxing Club.

to the

remarkably well.

ing though, considering the sheer

Waterloo

determination and dedication she’s shown since the beginning of her

E.

single, steep flight

stairs carries you up to the second floor gym where the whipping and snapping of skipping ropes and the sharp thump of gloves on heavy

career.

practice bags can be heard.

for a year

of

bright yellow and red walls

The

covered

boxing paraphernalia

in

not surpris-

It's

in

St.

“When

first started,

1

say

and the coach won’t even

you, won't teach you any-

hi to

ing

they don't really teach you

anything.

thick with perspiration.

they spend time trying to

of the club's

in the centre

single ring, a star

Mandy

Bujold

take her

I

somewhere

“When

she’s out-

side the ring she’s just this

little

when

they

petite

and then

girl,

actually see her train,

like she's

it’s

become

has

to help

Waterloo Boxing

me

everything, pret-

much everything,” says Taveena Kum, 21 of Kitchener. “If she ever ,

doing anything wrong or awkward, she comes over and helps

me

sees

Shows me some

out.

me

teaches

pointers,

different skills.”

In the ring, though,

it’s

a different

story.

you can’t see the punch,

“It's like

you just

feel it”

Kum. “She's

laughs

And

very quick.

a

Kum

if

you

hit

her hard,

you twice as hard.” is quick to add that Bujold

careful to fight at

is

same

force to be reckoned with in the

the

world of boxing. Bujold recently secured her spot on the national sen

her

as

level

sparring'

partner.

team

women’s

ior

more willing

to the

“She’s taught

In just three short years, this pint-

dynamo

show you

Mandy

warms up in the ring at the Waterloo Boxing Club. has her sights set on the 2010 Commonwealth Games

Bujold, a second-year business student,

After boxing for three years, Bujold already

and the 2012 Olympics.

she’ll hit

different personalities.”

sized local

if

ty

(for boxing), they’re pleasantly sur-

prised,” he says.

to, see

Club, however.

me

“Whenever

far

is

newcomers

isn’t the typical pic-

erful.

They want

something.”

Bujold

ture of a boxing champ. Her coach, Rick Cadilha, says most people think of boxers as athletes who are big, brawny and pow-

two

is,

you’re going to stick around before

being born.

is

At a slight five feet, 2 1/2 inches 19-year-old and 110 pounds,

how box-

“That’s

thing,” she said.

and large mirrors attempt to brighten up an otherwise dingy room. The air is heavy with humidity and

And

was kind

it

of like the old-school style where you walk in and you could be there

with a decisive

them, and maybe one will stay. At our club we have a lot of turnover." She adds you need to have the motivation and drive to be there, especially as a female - it can be intimidating working out with 20 guys, Despite that, she says she’s never encountered any discrimination.

All those

when

“Especially now, like

go

I

“They know who

says.

I

am

so

girl

ferent personalities.”

because

I

and they

all

train

intense

really

see that,” she says.

“They make little jokes, ‘don’t mess with her,’

like little

things, but they’re just having

fun with

since Bujold started boxing

“We always had bag

in

we’d play

in

early will

be travelling the globe for tournaments this year, including stops in Russia, Turkey and Hungary.

Both she and Cadilha these

fights

with

confidence they

talk

about

same easy when dis-

the

have

it

will be.

considered for international events, will

be

at

the

Commonwealth Games

in 2010 which Cadilha calls a walk in the park - and then she’ll go on to the 2012 Olympics. “She’ll win,” he says. “These next four years will give her enough

experience so

I

at the international level,

see nothing but a medal.”

Bujold,

the

from

with the guys, and

like

youngest of three

with

(at

practice.

the

same

my 1

club),

know

it’s

like target

that they're not at

think girls might be a

little

come up to the club,” she “When first did it, had to

shyer to

bring a friend.

I

I

You see

a lot of that,

younger girls will come up and there will always be two or three of

the

time to improve.

She’s

the

some-

never satisfied." That attitude can be a downfall sometimes, he says. “She’s hard on herself,” he says. “She puts a lot of pressure on herself.

I

don’t think I’ve ever seen

day she wanted to be like that, wanted to look like that when she

her 100 per cent satisfied.”

was

ly

fighting.

I’m the one on the national

team, and the younger girls are

looking

at

me

something

like that,” she says. good, finally finding

that’s

my

passion.

It

feels good.”

Gruelling workouts and hours of

Maybe one day Bujold be satisfied with

won

success

...

all

but

until she hears the

will final-

of her hard-

it’s

not likely

words “Canada

wins the gold.”

Photos by Stephanie Irvine

and

we knew

got

really

though.

New

her

When

the

into

sport,

- origimoved from

the family

from Port Hope Brunswick to Kitchener

in

2001, her 20-year-old brother Eric

going Boxing Club.

started

to

the

Waterloo

Bujold says she just remembers excited-he was about everything

he was learning and doing there. His

enthusiasm was contagious. After several months, right before

here.

says.

herselt

how

level.”

And there aren’t many female opponents to pick from around “I

just

who was on

the

starts

She pushes

it.

what we were doing,” she says. hit the bag just for fun, ahd I used to always like it.” It was one of her brothers who

nally

it.

“I like sparring

always around

all

started at the club,

national team and thinking

to stay

“We’d

I

With female boxing now being Bujold

did-

with me.”

Bujold says she enjoys coaching and helping others improve, but she loves to spar with people who are better than she is so she can learn

I

a future

wow. I'm so glad she

n’t fight like that

when they make me work,” spar she says. “A lot of the girls

cussing her future.

And what

oh,

like,

a boxing

our house so

pretend

1

Que.,

girl

“It feels really

as a child.

means Bujold

first

a

“Now

it.”

Fun has been the name of the

game

she

work hard

is.

she automatically

changing

She remembers with a smile seeing

his first fight, Eric

finger and that

was

broke his pinky the end of box-

ing for him.

"He

got a job and once his finger

healed, he didn't have time for box-

ing anymore,” she says.

to

much. “She works hard and she sees what her weaknesses are," he says. “I can point out her weakness and she doesn’t take it personally,

Mandy Bujold’s coach

when

good

Cadilha says that’s one of the key reasons he likes coaching her so

little

Rick Cadilha,

"They'll say things like ‘she

Hyacinthe,

a

and then when they actually see her train, it’s like she’s two dif-

She laughs and adds she has heard a lot of the guys talking about her, though.

February. This

she’s outside the

ring she’s just

feel

Despite her coach's claims to the

where she

“When

ever.”

trains harder than all the guys,’

to

Bujold. too.

natural and has to

respect me. Guys, girls, what-

ly

seem

training

contrary. Bujold insists she’s not a

sport for good, however.

they don’t judge me, they actual-

St.

listening to

youngest Bujold on the

to sell the

petite

to different clubs for sparring,” she

months of

her brother’s stories were enough

Mandy Bujold, 19, lines up a right hook while sparring at the Waterloo Boxing Club on King Street in Kitchener.

^


Digital Edition - April 02, 2007