Issuu on Google+

Science centre simply amazing

Black history month

One man

achieves his dreams,

including a

Visitors treated to

Grey Cup

ring.

fascinating facts,

and

statistics

innovations

Dealing with vision loss

in all

Two students

areas of science.

2007

19,

learning

Students showed off their creativity for a

good cause- at

the col-

second annual clothesline project held in the cafeteria on Feb. 8

Mary's Place, which

healthy relationships and

it

fea-

that aren't sold will be kept

with

line project. Last year

of

variety

fabric

sold afterward.

The finished T-shirts were then hung across the atrium, in the new

pleased with the

Student Life Centre, from Feb. 13

at the event.

were

and

“I

am

total participation

pleased anytime students

get involved in whatever capacity

event was successLeanne Holland Brown,

and the

“I think the

are

There

shirts are fantastic.

some

truly creative souls at

of the

the student life co-ordinator at the

this college,” she said. “All

college. “It can be called a success

and they really have such a wide range of messages and pictures and artistic

when

students to messages which help them think about what healthy relationships are to them and in their lives.” The Women’s Resource Group

connects

ability.”

She said next year the event might be held

“Now

organized the clothesline project

women

began

we

have the Student is

is wanting to attract students and wanting to be where there is the most traffic and at this point it

also

in

seems students are

colleges and universities around the world. The messages at these

familiar

events usually involve healthy relationships or raising awareagainst ness about violence

traffic as there will

just

getting

Student

Life

Centre, so there’s not quite as

much

with

we might

the

be next year, so

reconsider the location

at

Ross

that point.”

Continued on Page 2

women.

Say A new

in at

age as a full-time student, pay the student union fees and be in a graduation year or be willing to

monthly board

take a year off from college stud-

president for Conestoga

1

the nomination

begin her term as president role of president

natural step for

me

in

is

my

and in

will

May.

the next

progres-

sion,” she said in her speech to the

board. “I understand that this role

Aies with a tremendous amount ^^responsibilities and is not just a title, all of which lam 100 per cent ready and capable to fulfill and succeed

in.

T-shirt for the first time at the col-

project.

new CSI

president

and the role it plays at Conestoga. He also hopes the negotiations with the college about the opening of the bar/bistro are resolved before his

term

is

lenges of being president. “I think every year there

bar/bistro, last year

up on April 30.

I

believe through

Stanciu has been a part of CSI for She began her associa-

feel like

“I

I

am

ready

for

three years.

the job and ready to take

tion with the organization as the self-serve manager during her first

on any challenge that may be thrown at me.”

Conestoga. During at the college she became a member of the board and after serving the one-year board requirement, Stanciu was appointed to the

Roxy Stanciu,

position of vice-president.

vice-president,

year

her sec-

at

ond year

Some

of Stanciu’s main objeccomplet-

ful-

tives as president include

can

ing the negotiations with the col-

Roxy Stanciu, (Photo by Jon Mo/son)

currently will

term as president

CSI

CSI

vice-president

Jackson said he

May.

past,

but there are always chal-

lenges and

feel like

I

is

just a

phone

away if Stanciu needs advice after she becomes president.

call

year, seeing the challenges

by the students, but voted in by the seven CSI board directors, an alumni representative, the vicepresident, the current president and

lege and increasing student awareness for the provincial election

having an understanding of that, but she also has a fresh new look on

that

things and she truly believes in the

back on and

work of the student union.”

Roxy

Jackson thinks her biggest challenge will be getting the students more in touch with what CSI does

Stanciu said in an interview a day after being voted in, that she is con-

of directors

fident she can deal with the chal-

on.ca

The CSI

president

is

a past president of the organization.

Candidates have to be either a

director on the board or the vice-

bar/bistro

in

the

November.

being held this Matt Jackson, the current CSI president, thinks Stanciu will have a successful tenure. “I think Roxy has a very good

we

face,

on

decided that night. Sheena Sonser, a board of director, will assume the position in September. An election will be held March 19-23 for the seven board of director positions. Students will be able

other departments around the col-

tion.”

get the

ready

The CSI vice-president for the coming school year was also

not elected

our organization

to

am

any challenge that may be thrown at me.” She plans on staying in touch with Jackson and thinks her threeyear association with CSI will

Student Life Centre opened, building stronger relationships with

achieve the necessary goals to lead

lege

I

for the job and ready to take

in the right direc-

I

the strike,

more

understanding of the landscape here at the college of how things work,” he said. “She has worked very closely with me through this

filling these responsibilities

was

don't want to say this is a challenging year than in the

I

assist her as president.

begin her in

are

challenges every president faces," she said. “This year it was the

ies.

2.

Stanciu, CSI's vice-presi-

won

a third-year financial planning student, decorates a

second annual clothesline

so

meeting Feb.

Roxy

Ditner,

president, maintain a passing aver-

Students Inc. (CSI) was voted the organization’s

lege’s

hello to your

MOLSON

By JON

“The

the question

this

the 1990s and have been held in

dent,

Student Life

new space for these programming initiatives,” Holland Brown said. “The question

around using

related-issues at the col-

projects

that

Life Centre, there

lege.

Clothesline

in the

Centre.

and CSI donated the T-shirts. The group is an assembly of women at Conestoga who look at women’s issues and how to raise the profile of

nice

are

shirts

promotes education and

it

a good cause

for

Holland Brown said she was

decorated.

ful,” said

— No. 7

next year’s clothes-

at

paints.

to Feb. 15. In tota, 18 shirts

39th Year

25 shirts were decorated, but none were

materials,

and

markers

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

a women’s The T-shirts

displayed

a

the fullest

is

shelter in Kitchener.

tured students decorating T-shirts

including

live life to

disability.

life office.

was

event

the

despite their

All proceeds will be donated to

.

The theme of

journalism students

This year CSI covered the expenses for the shirts. Students also have the option of purchasing one of the T-shirts for $5 after Feb. 15 at the student

lege's

for

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

Being creative By JON MOLSON

newsroom

10

Feature

Monday, February

A

“I definitely plan to

be very

much

involved behind the scenes and help her out whenever she needs it,” he said. “One of my biggest dis-

advantages when I came in was I didn’t have that mentor to fall has

I

want

to

make

sure

that.”

to vote online

their

student

when

they log into

account.

Students

interested in running for the board

Bender

at

can contact Caleb cbender@conestogac.


Page 2

— SPOKE, February

Now ...with Random

19,

News

2007

deep thoughts

Conestoga College

questions answered by

How do you

random students

cure the winter blues?

Nursing students left bookless # for more than a month By BJ RICHMOND With mid-term exams right around the corner, Conestoga students will be cramming their heads full of useful information next week.

Although plenty of rest, wellorganized notes and an insightful

mind all help with studying, one main item that is essential “I

drink a

the for

long-endured scholastic pasttime is the course textbook. For this

lot in

preparation for spring

many

break.”

first

Mike Popovic, second-year materials

and operations management

Mary Andraza, manager of

retail

the bookstore,

said

operations

at

she admits the campus store was short about 10 books in their order for

textbook.

nursing

the

made

a

determination

that

“We we

week has become

study

their profit margin, the

program,

nursing

practical

the

far

stressful than usual, as there

more was a

bookstore

dents.

delay in getting their course text-

took nearly five weeks

It

Amy Webb is

who

second-year

general business

and

for ship-

started our

is still

6.

the entire

first-

gram. “Everything we're learning is referenced to the book, and without it, it makes it hard to study.” Webb added she believed the bookstore was being unhelpful and that they

made her

feel like

it

was

her job to find the book, which

me to the webwhich in the end would lead me back to the store. They should order enough books to begin with bookstore) referred site,

ing

fire,

roast-

marshmallows and

drinking hot chocolate.”

Rachel

Healthy

Gillespie,

first-year

human

.

for students.”

Andraza said she cannot fault the nursing faculty for the book short.age because they are punctual about getting their orders submitted

in

timely

a

“They

fashion.

always have their orders well in advance, which usually gives us plenty of time to get the books.”

as used books.

year, second-semester nursing stu-

dents, needs the crucial textbook for multiple courses in the pro-

costs

we can

fast as

The bookstore also offers a textbook buyback service for people to sell their books back to the store, which are then sold to the students

out of the book,”

Webb, along with

it

orders to get those books in as

cial

ping,” said Andraza.

in January,

they run out of a

when we’re at our peak customer sales, we take spe-

book. “Even

bookstore) don’t business,

when

students

100 per cent (of

we are in us money

right off the

Andraza added the bookstore makes every effort it can to help

the

books) because

homework Andraza.

bat,” said

the bookstore will

(the

tend to order

Positive

for

could take a long time. “They (the

by a

is

Management Outcomes. “We

bookstore

Lindsay Speer,

“We

assigning

80 per

order.

she said on Feb.

“Sitting

number of books

has

second and it’s now the second month back and the

Mexico for spring break so I’m looking forward to the warm weather and relaxing in the sun.”

sells to

cent of the program size, that

one of the first-year

had to do without the textbook, Medical Surgical Nursing Clinical

semester

to

relieved to get

does not typically order the full percentage of books that is needed to supply the entire program of stu-

practical nursing students

away

was

for about 10 students in

However,

order to maintain

in

textbook typically

“I’m going

said she

however, she wishes she could have had it five weeks ago when her assignments were piling up. “I realize this does disadvantage students because I know in some of these programs, especially the programs, they start nursing

However,

the bookstore.

work

Webb

bers given to them from the faculty.

blanket with a hot

personal support

arrived

time their textbook will even get to breathe the fresh air outside of its original laminate wrapping.

the start of their second semester for the book to arrive at

first-year

The books

Feb. 7.

usually builds a textbook purchase

order based on the enrolment

the

after

Danielle Dyce,

lisher, Elsevier.

her textbook in time for exams,

is

“Snuggling under a big

cute boyfriend.”

took about two to three business days to come in from the local pub-

thought we could get a small percentage of books back used.” When ordering books for the programs at the college, the bookstore

The bookstore does an analysis, based on historical sales, to determine the amount of books they will buy each year. For example, if a

my

a used format.” Following the book shortage, the bookstore placed two subsequent reorders for 1 1 new books, which in

num-

exam week

students,

books.

chocolate, Kahlua and

high and we neglected to increase our new book order to reflect the fact that we didn't get those books

in the first place.”

Andraza said the bookstore’s estimated number of used book returns where the miscalculation was is

Andraza added the available stock of the textbooks depends on

made with

“Sometimes we sell through 100 per cent of the books we order, but

“We

the

were going

(the bookstore)

to

books we estimated to get back.” However, the bookstore did not receive as many used books back as they thought they would. to

shown

the

semester.

might not be a demand for it.” However, she said some students only buy the book for the mid-term

and

hold

final

exams, and

that

is

when

students could find that the bdok

onto their textbooks because they perceive the value of the book is

lifestyles

of

by the fifth week of the semester we wouldn’t necessarily rush to reorder more copies because their

order a certain percentage of new books based on the amount of used

“Nursing students tend

time

the

nursing textbook.

is

not available.

in T-shirt

designs

Continued from Page 1 Monica Himmelman, a member of the Women’s Resource Group,

sen 'ices foundations

helped run the event.

She thinks there

is

a reason

why

clothesline projects are so successful at

go out and hit jumps and rails in the snow

“I

park.”

Brandon

Plazzotta,

first-year

general business

colleges and universities.

kind of breaks up a cold February week, but also we are “It

asking students to depict healthy lifestyles on their T-shirts and then

we hang them

up, so

tisement

healthy

for

Himmelman ate that

it’s

it

is

an adver-

lifestyles,"

“People appreci-

said.

important, certainly the

administration appreciates that

it

is

important to create an environment that is safe

and healthy.”

Himmelman love to go snowboarding a lot at Chicopee or wherever else can get.”

“I

I

Raymond Duhaime, first-year electrical engineering

said there

appeal for students

who

is

a real

take part.

it is a fun event, you can teams and you can make a

“I think

do

it

in

statement,” she said.

“We

are just

hoping the awareness catches on.” Ross Ditner, a third-year financial at

in

the atrium

clothesline project.

said he never decorated a T-

shirt

before and that was one of the

why

he

wanted

to

get

involved.

think

it

myself by doing

stretching

the event.

He

“I

were on display

in the Student Life Centre from Feb. 13 to 15, displaying students’ designs from the

of shirts

planning student, participated

reasons

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

(Photo by Holly Featherstone)

Rows

is

good to try new “I’m actually

things,” Ditner said.

because

I

am

this

not usually this out-

line

project

at Conestoga. probably the most meaning-

good to challenge yourself sometimes and do things that you are not really com-

ful

fortable with right away.”

but he said he

going, but

I

think

it

is

Ditner said he hopes the clothes-

continues to be an

annual tradition “It is

because words are powerful.”

Ditner plans on buying his T-shirt,

someone

else

would give the shirt they wanted it.

if

to


.

News

SPOKE, February

Jackson says no bar/bistro BRANDON WALKER

By

The e-mail from

The

bar/bistro in the Student Life Centre

probably won’t open

meeting to

September, says the president of Conestoga Students Inc. Matt Jackson said the facility won’t be up and running any time soon and it wouldn’t be worth opening it right at the end of the until

wouldn’t be financially feasible to open and then have the slow summer months.” The Student Life Centre was slated to open to

The

of

18, but the student

bar/bistro and convenience have both been held up due to a disagreement with the college. Jackson said the college sent an e-mail to

association’s

months

Feb.

someone

is

there to take very

what it believes the relajionship two groups.

is

how

to

proposals)

move

the

in

last

six

this

taking the student association

starts

between

to start fresh

more

seriously.

president, but

He wouldn’t wager

a guess as to

these

(all

when

“I feel that if

on oversight

it

we can come

to a conclusion

also said

there

dictable elements that need to be ironed out, it

would be tough

to

when

say

the bar/bistro

or the convenience store will open.

“We’ve done a

lot

the service should be available. If not,

of work on what’s nec-

it

leave as president, but

stand and remain supportive of the student

policy, bar/bistro

(the

alcohol

agreement and the

retail

the next presi-

if not,

dent will be as updated about

it

as

I

am.”

students don’t care

if

we

for that.”

the bar

opens

at

all.

matter of ordering the equipment and getting it all installed, plus the student association

three outstanding agreements

going to be

somehow be compensated

Some

would be a

has to decide the kind of food they want.”

in there that’s

should

essary to put in there (the bar/bistro). (After the negotiations are complete)

the

at least for

Third-year robotics and automation student Mustafa Aram said students should get some of their money back if the bar doesn’t open before the summer. “Regardless of whether I use the bar or not,

so .many unpre-

are

my money,

back

pay for a

to

this year.”

will facilitate the rest (of the

negotiations).”

He

have

They should open

rich here.

me

bar or give

progressive to bringing a resolution to the

“There’s nothing

"Nobody’s

the

“We’ve been asking them to respond in writing and until a month ago they haven’t even done that. I want to settle this before I

the

their final year shouldn’t

bar/bistro will open.

long

forward and if we don’t see anything it’s going to be a long battle.” Jackson said he really hopes the college

2 describing

new

bar they will never get to use.

sure

store

student association

“They have an opportunity

with the student association.

make

association’s

the

are.

student Andy Ramcharan said students have enough trouble with debt. He felt students in

would take. “It depends on how willing they (the college) are to work with us. We’ve seen nothing in writing from them (responding to the

services portion of the Student Life

Centre opened on Jan.

“I’m as frustrated with the issues as they I know (students) probably feel caught in the middle, but I hope they understand we’re working toward getting it resolved.” Second-year general machinist tool and die

college

the

that

problems) might carry forward to the next president, and I don’t want that to happen.” Vice-president of student affairs Mike Dinning said the college is willing to meet

negotiations

problems with construction.

frustrated

stalling.

“We’re becoming more and more frustrated that they (the college) won’t respond to any of our proposals in writing. We might just have

Jackson said he wasn’t sure

was delayed

semester, but

last

said he’s

semester

this

next year with a

minutes of the meeting,” Jackson said. He said he planned on responding to the email by the end of last week.

“It

keeps

discuss the relationship and

strict

it ...

due

first

the college requested a

— Page 3

then begin the negotiating process.

to

school year.

at the start

He

space agreement).”

2007

19,

Second-year nursing student Danielle Shantz wouldn’t use the bar even if it were open because she tends to socialize more outside of school. “Although I do use some of the other features in the Student Life Centre.”

Jackson said he hopes students underassociation.

Conestoga applicants kept more informed By STEPHANIE IRVINE The manager of admissions and client services - a new position at Conestoga College - will start work on Feb. 19, with their princi-K pie focus being improving conver-

sion rates using technology.

“An area that didn’t have a lot of is what I’d call the conversion - from the moment you're

focus

offered got the

(admission)

bum

you’ve

until

in the seat,

what hap-

student affairs, in a recent inter-

visits

view.

he said. said

new position has by someone whose

this

systems, not nec-

is in

essarily admissions.

“A

lot

we need

of people can tell you what to do in the sense of busi-

“You need somebody who understands the technology who can say we can do

ness process,” he said.

it

this

way, and

it’s

consistent with

technology.”

Dinning said the college started at ways to improve conversion rates and grow enrolment

looking

Not just another project

about a year and a half ago. The Ontario College Application Service

new

facility to

open

at

Waterloo campus

classroom and lab shop should be unveiled September 2007, according to current plans

mini-lecture theatre, in

By LEANNE

MOUNTFORD

White, chair of trades and appren-

Conestoga College. White said they are 95 per cent

ticeship at

of a

new

Along with the start school year, September 2007 will bring a

new

facility to

the Waterloo

certain that

it

The college

will is

become

a reality.

excited about this

campus. Conestoga College has been working diligently with the Ontario

opportunity to meet the local need for bricklayers and shortages in

Masonry Training Centre (OMTC) Masonry Ontario the and

adding

Contractors’ Association to

open the

facility,

(OMCA)

said

Greg

that area of the industry, it

he said,

complement the the Waterloo cam-

will also

other trades at pus.

“We

truly are

moving forward

to

(OCAS)

addresses from

collected e-mail

“We were don’t

we

we

thought,

be located in the northeast corner of the Waterloo campus, will

fronting on Marsland Drive.

“We hope to make formal announcements within a couple of weeks,” said White.

1

we have

believe that

to cre-

and continue to create a relationship with (prospective students) over that three-month period,” he said. “If you accept today, ate

you’re not coming here for another five or six

make

We

months.

sure that

when we

want

to

seal the

deal that you continue to feel part

of the college.”

He

said since this year,

last

program

start-

applications are up

eight per cent and first-year enrol-

ment

is

up 13 per

cent.

say by doing happened, but these things happening,” said Dinning.

“I can’t absolutely

lege to keep prospective students

“Even if it’s by guess and by golly and merely a coincidence, things seem to have improved.” He said Conestoga is trying to use a format that most students are

up

to date

with what’s going on

with their application and it let the students contact the college much

applied to us has already received

It

May

“We

X

Although in the design phase, White said they anticipate a mini lecture theatre, a classroom and a facility.

on-site

those kinds of things,”

all

these people?” he said. Dinning said this enabled the col-

more readily. “Every single

new

until

get in touch with

being a full-service centre of excellence for construction,” he said.

lab shop in the

and

— we’re

number of

Dinning said there was a wrench thrown into the works this year All offers of admission though. could be sent out as early as Feb. 1, two months earlier than last year, and students don’t have to confirm

ed

then able to extract

those addresses and

interaction

increasing the

applicants for

all

the first time last year.

why

lew

human

the

been filled background

woodworking technician students pose along with their professor and a catapult which they constructed. The team competed against 24 colleges and universities in Ottawa for the annual Canadian Engineering Competition held by the Canadian Wood Council. Back row from left: Bree Ralph, Mark Bramer, professor, Richard Freeman, James Goerzen and Dan Jessel; front row from left: David Sture, Sean Murphy and Greg Gougeon.

two months there will be at least three or four more e-mails sent to students that will become more and more specific. One would be from the school to which they applied; the next would be from their specific program and include messages from faculty and/or students, and so on. “All of that is much more focused on trying to be electronic about it, but that does not take away from

pens during that process,” said Mike Dinning, vice-president of

He

First-year

plan in place where over the next

student

who’s

two e-mails from us,” he said. That’s more than 2,000 students and 24,000 e-mails. “We’ve thanked them for applying, told them what we’re doing, hyperlinked them to our webpage that shows the admission process and so on,” he said. Dinning added they now have a 1

this

are

comfortable with,

utilize different

methodologies to create more of a link with them and make them more a part of who we are as a community while they decide

where

to go.

“People don’t want stale, old, antiquated things,” he said. “They want to think they’re at the front of the bus and

I

think

we have

gation to try and do that.”

an obli-


Page 4

saying sorry

Is

enough?

truly I’m

Commentary

— SPOKE, February 19, 2007

sorry,

it

was

An

a mistake.

accident. Really, truly,

won’t happen again. These words are, unfortunately, quite common in the English language. Sometimes they can mean something, other times they are just an endless stream of words that are sorry.

It

meaningless.

When someone

has been wrongfully accused, tortured or

accidentally imprisoned, a couple of “I’m sorrys” and a pat

on the back just don’t cut it. Steven Truscott was convicted at age 14 in 1959 of raping and murdering his classmate, 12-year-old Lynne Harper. Now, in 2007, lawyers are working around the clock to try and clear Truscott's name, and prove him innocent, something he has claimed since his conviction. But what then? Truscott spent most of his life in prison, for a murder that he may not have committed. What words do you use to apologize to someone for taking away their youth accusing innocence, and them of a heinous crime that someone else should have taken the

Maher

fall

.

~

When someone has been

,

;

wrongly accused, tortured

for?

or accidentally

Arar, a Syrian-born

was

Canadian,

recently

Everyone has preferences but

a belated apology m sorrys and a pat on from the Canadian governdQgsn’t cu t jt. the ment for allowing the U.S. to deport him to Syria where he was imprisoned and tortured because authorities susoffered

|’

pected him of terrorist activities. After a lengthy public inquiry, the conclusion was announced that “there is nothing to indicate that Mr. Arar

committed an offence or

that his activities constitute a

threat to the security of Canada.’’

Not much of an apology. Canada needs to re-examine

justice system to ensure

its

or

Fit

Big boned, heavy call

it

men

it

what you all

set,

the

same

have served 10 years behind

themselves, are magazine cover material, which, according to the

McCormick

media, most

women

Opinion

and teenage

Where do

girls starving

in

women, For some

at

an attempt to obtain a

ity to

men to have the audacwoman off as lazy or

write a

an excessive eater simply because

Photoshopped body image. their “thin bar” at

a ridiculous weight and stars such

she doesn’t

fit

the term “skinny”

of magazines with reports of their

are bigger have to face these

facing death for something that they didn’t do.

sickly sizes.

ments and situations simply

it

believe the Canadian rock band

best in their song

The Tragically Hip sang

Wheat Kings, about

a

man accused

of

a crime that he did not commit.

maybe

it’s

20 years for nothing, well that’s nothing new, besides, and no one’s interested in something you didn't do.” in a killer’s place,

It

that

me immensely to know some women fall victim to

upsets

feel that if they aren’t a size

then they’re

Some men

It

annoys

me

because of their to feel sorry for

don’t help the situa-

tion either, with their expectations

really bothers

women

this

To

is

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

for verification.

be published. be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

that

like that?

to

some men

bodies are not meant

stick figures, nor mari-

be

onettes, so flimsy they cannot hold

To this,

the girlfriends of I

some

size or

is

bigger,

do, doesn't

men

like

hope for their sakes that

they’ll either

come

remain their current to their senses.

Sexist, arrogant, disgusting; call

time of day because she

who they deem own ? Why do

they feel they have the right to be

pity, but

not even give the person the

as I’ve seen

rest,

be on their

them what you may, but

when it comes to full-figured women, some men are just those things.

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

for publication.

Dr.,

Meghan

Kreller

M ^

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Letters should

N2G 4M4

leaving the fat, to

Spoke Online Editor: Brandon Walker Advertising Managers: Adam Hannon, Tiffany McCormick Production Managers: Adam Black, BJ Richmond Circulation Manager: Kristin Grifferty Photo Editors: Jessica Blumenthal, Nick Casselli, Jon Molson, Eric Murphy and Tara Ricker Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

letters will

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

me

my

gift to

themselves up.

mean

way.

Editor:

No unsigned

don’t

them, as they

probably don’t want it

I

com-

get off

Spoke

welcome

Spoke welcomes

women who

size.

men

able to judge our size and

Women’s that

aren’t.

pick and choose the “skinniest,”

human mind.

people feel they can treat others

should look.

Letters are

zero

fat.

and standards of how

Let’s get interested.

a

Olsen have often made the covers

these unreachable standards and

“In his Zippo lighter, he sees the killer’s face,

someone standing

and Mary-Kate

is

appalling and a complete waste of

as Nicole Ritchie

These are

men these

thinking they 're God’s

themselves, throwing up what they

blame for another person’s actions. just two recent cases in the media. All over the world, innocent people are serving time, and perhaps even

bars, taking the

it

As simple as that three letter word may seem, it has young

The media has

innocent.

fact,

Tiffany

gym

is

on men. In

FAT.

and wearing themselves out

I

to yourself.

gives the impression that they,

thing,

the

majority of citizens believe he

reflect well

some

will, but to

means

eat

he

it

matter?

it

bigger;

Although Truscott has yet to be officially exonerated for his involvement in the case of Lynne Harper, critics and the will

you can't be respectful, keep

should

fat,

similar atrocities don’t take place.

If this is the case,

if

imprisoned, a couple of

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


Opinions

SPOKE, February

can be upsetting

bleed with greed The majority of professional hard

it

many

blessed they are to be play-

ing

on a world-class stage of

fare of the team.

of con-

reality

temporary sports often suggests

Benjamin outweighs the love of the game. the

for the

lust

When

the

right

table, players will

offer hits the

always cash-in.

signing

multi-year

a

contract allows them to get a

money

too comfortable; once the

balloons

into

the

little

heavyweight

a

preoccupied

self-destructive,

most players develop an inflated self-esteem, and playing with everyday passion becomes

equivalent to their calibre

scarce.

more favourable than

Let’s rewind a few years and examine a player who fills the

a fatter contract.

Jose Canseco,

be the next big thing

Superstars

the long run, a

fair,

realize that in

compensation is

far

to thirst for

With the irreparable

in

base-

effects of

a

player’s

a

career.

able athletes, but to those athletes

and couldn’t give what the fans think of

are greedy

a rat’s ass

big splash in a refreshing pool of

them, well,

cold-hard cash. Like many other young studs, the importance of maintaining a

time, any dignity they once had will have long flown out the win-

plump

wallet and posting huge

individual

numbers became of

greater importance than the wel-

be a worth-

to

of trash.

The enormous athletes

salaries paid to

just say,

let’s

over

dow. Vince Carter is a player who has walked right up this ally. Spitting in the face of Raptors

Carter,

like

reminders of

are

I

was

very excited to see ing

I

was always

all

the animals

little,

zoo, but every time

sad.

remember

I

how money

is

ruin-

at the

I

of the riches they will do anything to get more, even if it means

going somewhere else to play. One possible suggestion to put an abrupt halt to this perpetual

problem

would

be

do enjoy

a

simple

I

got to

But when left

feeling

how

I

left this

upset,

time

but

I

every sport were playing per-

athlete shot for the moon, even the ones who missed would be among the

a tiger have to offer? In traditional Chinese medicine practices tiger parts are the most sought after

vis-

ingredient.

becoming. Almost every animal living at the zoo is endangered, and most are on

Different parts of a tiger are thought to cure such illnesses as

impotence and fevers. Wine made from tiger bones is. believed to be the long sought after elixir of life, though none of this has ever been scientifically proven to be true. My question to you is this when you visit the zoo next time would you like to see a monument

list.

mum,

memory

dedicated to the

of ani-

mals like the tiger, or are you prepared to take a stand for the rights of the other creatures we are intended to share this planet with?

a

That may seem like a lot, but sadly they are four of only 400 left

stars.

And I for one would rather gaze upon a star than listen to a probaby cry for more money.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Jackson responds I

would just

like to take a

and respond to Ms. Van ter that

was published

week.

last

I

note

all

minute

Allen's

in the

let-

paper

your points

some facts to offer you. The CSI did in fact sign two

but have

agreements with the college before moving forward on the stu-

P|nt

centre.

They

are available for

students to read in our office

if

choose to spend the time wading through the countless pages of documentation. It is the

they

who is not comcommitments in agreements which have creat-

college, however,

ing the

ed

good on

their

a further note

to that,

I

would

make myself very clear agreements were signed

just like td that the

by our previous president, Justin Falconer, and there is very little I can do to change them. I am, however, trying

my

with

would have been much easier for me to sit back and allow

around throughout

the college to take advantage of

and the potential for them to be

the situation and not fight to get

included

what they deserve, but I have elected to stand up for you and every other student here which

to

guess

I

it

the students

is

never the easiest thing to do. you were in attendance at our

If

hardest to get a

new agreement which

will protect

the

why

to

she

in

left

an

the organization

article.

would

you or any other in and take the

student association does to benefit

my feet and crying foul” they would not have voted 100 per cent in support of the work and posiing

As

far as the student

I

student to

invite

come

you, not only

how much

at the

this

TICKETS SB’S"*

college level

back and question what the environment would be like here at Conestoga College without dedicated and but provincially.

I

sit

hardworking student leaders

Ire Star

I '

try-

embers Save S3 Members

nTVifr

IN

(,nr

THE SQUARE

enlre Hours:

ing to represent the student body.

tion of the CSI.

Jk

comes to dealing with internal human resource issues that arise. You stated that you are unable to respect the CSI and what we do,

time to learn just

was me “stomp-

Marv Yiiigoe

k.

The CSI has when it

support for the CSI after hearing our presentation. I would be com-

it

some but many more.”

be extremely careful

students pass a unanimous vote of

dents thought

^

will offend

touch

but

those stu-

“Gutsy, honest,

visceral theatre that

this college as

annual general meeting you would have witnessed the close to 500

if

y

was run, I was upset rumours being spread

that a story

tion to this centre.

fortable guessing that

this situation.

On

to letter to the editor

the students’ $8 million contribu-

MON

F*l

I

»

1G1 1

Groups of 15+

o v v Queen

3AM

t.

v j

Street

SPM

N

SolTlI;

~

u j

t

i

Kitchener

SAT 10AM

COM

newspaper

reporting on the leaving of our general manager, I was not upset

Matt Jackson,

H222SS91 8E52SB 'Viv'r* pert cf

President of

CSI

»>vt

f amily'

We

know

hunters go after elephants and rhinos for ivory, but what does all

ited are

these beautiful animals: a dad and twin cubs.

if

PGA, and

are predicted to be extinct

But why are so many people

time

this

scarce the animals

of the list of priorities. If every professional

NHL.

Better yet,

to the point of near extinc-

interested in poaching tigers?

also

I

to

within the next 10 years.

they received from

attention

formance reflected the size of a player’s paycheques, achieving a personal best would be at the top

in the

them

threat

They have either homes or poached

tion.

They

I’ve always been a cat person, and the must-see animals at the zoo include lions, tigers, cheetahs and leopards, all of which are critically endangered. The Sumatran Tiger, which is the smallest of the tiger family, has by far the worst odds. The Toronto Zoo has four of

be working wonders

deforested their

zoo 10

to the

sport.

to

these creatures.

zoo.

the critical

seems

People are the main

tourists.

about

world.

in the

their time

salary cap on every professional

It

Opinion

my

years later I see that she was right. The animals were energetic, and most (especially the cheetah) loved the

they have gotten a whiff

Annelise

Thompson

left feel-

telling

fair that

Now, going back

enough dough.

Once

wasn’t

that they really

Every few years there are and lockouts because the

in

it

vivid

ing professional sports.

like the

People gravitate toward like-

who was before he made

image of

tarnished

ball.

Well, that

fail to

time, greed will only result in a

come on down.

Here is a finely-tuned athletic machine with all the credentials to

just

poster boy of distraction.

millions,

description beautifully.

him

athletes think they are not raking is

When

walk around and do whatever I felt like, but all the animals were caged. She explained to me that it was a safer place for animals, and

competitive soul.

Canseco’s case

was

I

mom how

in a sea of boos: a conreminder from the fans that

strikes

Sadly,

when

ones

to

stant

the

one out of hundreds, when a young hotshot quickly rises to be

trip

at the

books as one of the greatest players to ever to walk out on the field, Canseco will be remembered for pissing on the flames that smothered the fire of his

And, unfortunately for most athletes,

in

the

younger.

he swims

less piece

down

Instead of going

below the Raps

sit

Carter returns to Toronto,

they consider

excellence.

The appalling

When

Opinion

is

standings.

in the

Casselli

they often forget

Jersey

cally enough,

Nick

These big-shot blue-chippers become so accustomed to living

how

New

the

ed.

life,

now part of Nets who ironi-

mighty-dollar, and

take their careers for grant-

the sweet

After a recent visit to the Toronto I couldn’t help but compare

Zoo

fans. Carter sold out for the all-

do not appreciate how is to make a living, and

athletes

— Page 5

zoo

Trip to the

1 Professional sports

2007

19,

®DT


r

Page 6

.

News

— SPOKE, February 19, 2007 —

Architectural

New

residence website more esthetically pleasing time whether or not the website is actually creating a higher login rate

Bv KRISTIN GRIFFERTY changing

Conestoga residence is once again, and this time it's branch-

World Wide Web. ThePlace2Be.ca is the new residence website that* was created in accordance with the company's ing out into the

new

rebranding.

Residence began updating

its

image, and has revitalized its game room, its soon-to-be weight room and other amenities after input from students. The new website is both appealing to the eye and easy to access, with many informative tool bars with accompanying photos to help paint a clear

and vivid

picture for the student.

Manager and residence life coordinator Ryan Connell said the new look of the website helps stu-

how much

dents realize

fun resi-

with

Connell

students,

feels

the

turnout at residence next year will determine just how successful the

website actually

“Our goal

is

is.

working

to start

establishing a waiting

list

at

for our

residence,” said Connell. “I would think the amount of applications

we will

receive for residence next year

be able to show how (much of new website actual-

an impact) the ly (has).”

management

receive recognition

are currently residing there. “I

feel

exactly

needed for any new student considering residence” Connell said. “If by chance there's something that it's missing, we are available 24 hours a day at our front desk to

answer any questions a potential student

may

have.”

Connell's enthusiasm

when

discussing the

is

new

evident

site. It is

one more positive change that Conestoga residence is implement-

just

generally

ing in order to serve the students

esthetically pleasing to the eye, the

wants and

While

the

website

is

amount of information

it

provides

minimal, and isn't always available without the click of the mouse. However, Connell said the is

site

is

designed for students

who

are considering applying for residence, not necessarily those who

better according to their

needs.

ThePlace2Be.ca was created by Black Cat Advertising as well as Kent co-ordinator company visit

gives great information about

of the residence staff which ‘wasn't there before, and better

community

explains the

that

we

to build in residence,”

work hard

explains Connell. “Visitors, for the first

load the

now

able to

tive than the past

is

to

ed by the

site

appeal to those

who

site for the first

are considering

dence time

at

some

at

are visiting the

moving

it

is

unclear

(Photo by Kristin

Sprague, a prospective Conestoga College student, uses the new residence website to look into living arrangments.

point in

not

it's

certainly

what

there's an overlap as far as

their careers could entail, but the

tend

specific goal of placing the stu-

dents in project and facility man-

the degree pro-

agement

positions.

“More of tion as

management

a

opposed

posi-

to a technologist

a design office or a site superThere’s certainly

in

intendent.

more manage-

gram, things tend to be a little more open; we're perhaps a little more judgmental, expecting the

overlap, but this

more independent work, ask more questions and be a bit more inquisiAs for where you can go tive.

other colleges have diploma pro-

with your career, a degree often more recognized.”

this field.

it

clear that a

it

quite

is

is

not neces-

is.”

there

said

is

an

is

ment-focused.”

Biedermann

Conestoga

is

to

Conestoga's,

the

only Ontario

college with a degree program not the

degree

same

in

as a university

she said.

in architecture,"

“To become a practising architect in Ontario, you actually need a masters students

- we aren't to become

graduating practising

architects, we're graduating stu-

dents with an architectural degree and knowledge of the architectural

design cycle, but with the

abili-

management or facility management. “They don't need to go on and

work

ty to

in project

-

get a masters

option for graduates of the three-

find themselves

year architecture and construction engineering diploma pro-

away

COUNSELLOR'S CORNER: Finances

although

said

grams similar

“It’s

diploma from

certainly

Biedermann

Grifferty)

Kelly

at this

we

-

all

have very explicit requirements,” Biedermann said. “This is what you’re going to do on your assignment and this is what you're going to do on your project.

to

because

into resi-

point during their

Conestoga.

While

program. “In a diploma program,

them,” she said. “I don’t want to say that a diploma is no good,

time and perhaps

“But

degree program has more of an architectural bend and has the

ma

any less valuable. “Our college diplomas are excellent and with them, our students do extremely well with

has been created to

degree,”

a

noticeably higher than in a diplo-

sarily

browse and

get

Biedermann said. the same focus at

Conestoga College

search using flashy tools and popup menus. The information provid-

two more

over, in

they

years,

class this April.

diploma pro-

“If students in the

gram branch

According to chair of engineering and information technology Julia Biedermann, the level of learning in a degree program is

made

interac-

website and gives

chance

visitors the

more

its first

than a person with a diploma, she

rules of the building.”

The new website

graduate

While Biedermann said a person with a degree can go further

downresidence handbook and

time, are

The architecture project facility management degree program will

students to do a bit

all

to bridge into third year of

gram

the degree program.

“Whereas with

dence really can be. “It

AARON SCHWAB

By

Williams.

For further information, www.theplace2be.ca.

hard work

for

website provides information that is

the

the

students

in

they're going to

employed

right

very good career oppor-

tunity positions.”

Volunteers needed

Are financial pressures creating stress for you? Is it difficult to concentrate on studying because you’re not sure if you can pay the rent or buy groceries this month? There are a number of things you can do to help ease your financial

for

worries.

By

your financial situation has changed, check with the Financial Aid office to see if you can have your OSAP entitlement reassessed. They also have information on bursaries. The Conestoga College bursary is available to all students. There may be some other bursaries and scholarships available for students in specific programs. Scholarships and awards available for students in each program are listed in the Student Guide you received at the beginning of the school year. Information can also be found on the College Website. If

Explore Conestoga

MEGHAN KRELLER

Looking for something producto do during study week,

respond better to people who are already in the programs,” she said. “The student involvement

tive

makes

besides study?

sion.”

Jan Stroh, student recruiter for the college, says

why

not add to

your resume by volunteering at Explore Conestoga, one of the college's major annual events. Stroh is looking for 50 to 65 volunteers to help out with the

for a

great

impres-

first

Conestoga students really porimage and live up to the level of customer service we need at these events, said Stroh; even student recruiters from other colleges have commented on tray a great

Another way to relieve the pressure is through employment. Ask at the college’s Student Employment Office (SCSB, Room 220) for help finding part-time work during the school year or contract work for the summer. Opportunities for employment may also be available at the college through the work/study program, including working as a peer tutor. Service clubs and churches may also

college's largest student recruit-

Conestoga's student leadership. “I can see why we're the num-

ing event. Explore Conestoga

ber

faculty and students to ask ques-

end of study week,

provide support.

tions.

get

sessions

attend

It's

more immediate needs, Student Services can provide a limited grocery vouchers and provide access to the College/CSI-sponsored

you’re having

number

of

food bank.

you would like to discuss any of these options or other ideas, please ask speak with a counsellor in Student Services. If

to

campus, and meet with

their families to visit a

a vital event for the college

because If

is

an opportunity for applicants and

it's

the last opportunity to

applicants

get

to

choose

Conestoga, said Stroh. If they've applied to Conestoga, they've probably applied to other schools in and around the area. “(Explore Conestoga) can really make or break the deal,” she said. In past years, Stroh has noticed

A Message from Visit

Counselling Services our website http://www. conestogac. on ca/isp/stserv/index.jsp .

an

exceptional

response

when

existing students take part in the event.

“People coming into programs

college

I

Ontario,”

in

she

said.

Stroh said because the thrce^tov event takes place during the ifllvolunteers, as

it's

harder

many

take the opportunity to go to get

away

paid work. Although

unpaid work,

all

to

students

it

or is

volunteers will

receive either a letter or certificate

of recognition to add to their portfolio.

This year's Explore Conestoga will

be

March 2

held to

at

4 and

Doon campus at

Guelph and

Waterloo on March 4. For more information about volunteering your time e-mail Jan Stroh at jstroh@conestogac.on.ca or call ext. 3279.


:

.

News Learning MOUNTFORD

marks

Are you one of those people who at an exam, and your mind goes blank? Do you have an assignment due and have no clue where to start? Whether you’re at the Doon or Waterloo campus, the Learning Commons may be your

The

service has been around for

nine years at Doon, said Lynn Gresham, writing service eo-ordinator.

On

Feb. 6 and 8, the Waterloo

campus had

its

open house for

its

new Learning Commons. The Learning Commons is a place where people can come for any number of their learning needs, said Anne Moore, who runs the Waterloo service. “It’s better to get the start

help

at the

and then you’re on your way,”

she said.

Not everybody can be an expert everything. Everyone needs help eventually, said Moore. The Learning Commons can help in

with things like strategies for math, test

preparation,

managing

test

anxiety and managing time.

For example,

in

the hospitality

good

as they could

lot

of support

people struggling with

test

test anxi-

them get through the

ety and helps

environment.

Multiple choice exams are really

common

and apprenand people have to be

in the trades

ticeships,

those to survive the pro-

at

gram, said Moore. “I can help people with those kinds of strategies.

“We’re really trying to get beyond that stigma of admitting they need help,” said Moore. At this time the Waterloo Learning Commons is open on Tuesday and Thursday mornings, until the

demand

for

it

picks up.

“Hopefully, someday the Learning Commons will be open all week-long and people can drop in and say they’re stuck on this one part, and they won’t be worried about admitting that they need help in that area,” said

Moore.

For some people,

it’s

just talking

out the problem.

One

came

and said he had to do an oral presentation on self-improvement in one of the programs. He said he couldn’t fellow

in

(Photo by Amy Meadows)

a Conestoga counsellor, waits in the E-wing to offer information and advice during eating disorder awareness week, from Feb. 5 - 9. The counselling services office is located at 1B21.

Barb

Kraler,

Eating disorders no joke By

as nine are developing unhealthy

Eating disorder awareness week, which ran from Feb. 5 - 9 at the college, aimed to promote body satisfaction and to call attention to

attitudes

such

states that

and

said.

write

Other students suffer from anxiety.

They know

test

they can apply the material but they get into the test situation and their

minds go blank.

They

are

struggling

and their

content

he could go home and up and it would be no prob-

lem, she said.

Moore

the material,

him

talked to

in the hall

he did his oral presentation and people were really impressed. “He did the work, I helped organize his ideas around it,” she said. after

Anorexia nervosa I Intense weight

are dissatisfied with

Excessive dieting For women, possible loss of menstrual cycle I

aspect

of their body.

I

Womenshealthmatters. ca

I Still

If you or someone you know is affected by the symptoms of an eating disorder, consider accessing

While eating disorders are more among girls and women, many men and boys are affected

personal counselling at counselling

prevalent

services on campus.

too.

ical

Public Health Canada also says eating disorders carry with them a

high risk of mental illnesses such as depression and other physical

life is short, fret

an

of gaining

level

some

less

some aspect of

fear

I Drastic weight loss or keeping weight below a healthy

women

avoid falling into the dieting

are dissatisfied with their body.

felt it

disorders:

toward eating.

Ninety per cent of

Womenshealthmatters.ca also 90 per cent of women

ideas.

felt really

Student Services lists the following information on eating

trap.

an oral presentation and

After that he

what’s required for their assignments and move ahead, she

cent

Student services had stations set up around the college with information on the various types and stages of eating disorders and ways

himself

and

per

statistics.

gled with writing in high school,

main

CHARACTERISTICS

Some

shealthmatters.ca.

to

prioritized the

including severe cardio-

of the information presented during the week at the college included the fact that girls as young

Moore said they talked about how he. improves himself in his life. All sorts of ideas came forward. They did some mind mapping around how he would express in

illnesses

of young women are preoccupied with their weight according to women-

Seventy

think of anything.

they can come and get re-orientated and refocused again on writing

AMY MEADOWS

vascular complications.

services, they have to

complete a communications course, and while it’s not core to being a chef, they have to pass that course to get through the program. If they strug-

— Page 7

Moore.

She said she gives a to

good

solution.

2007

hand

aren’t as

be, said

looks

19,

Commons

offers helping By LEANNE

SPOKE, February

Help

is

also available

staff at

“feeling fat,” regard-

of weight

Bulimia nervosa: Uncontrolled, secretive binge eating I Frequent fluctuations in weight I Purging of food (e.g. selfinduced vomiting, abuse of lax-

from med-

the doctor’s office.

Counselling services can be reached at 519-748-5220, ext. 3360 and are located in Room 1B21

atives)

I Fasting or excessive exercise

extensionmmSI

Live longer with daily physical activity, healthy eating and following your doctor's advice.

wwwportdpoc^fln.cpm

Start your engines! Enter the

“CGA

LINE

Ontario One-Hour Accounting Contest” for college and university students on

UP ONLINE TO WIN UP TO $5,000

The Certified General Accountants of Ontario (CGA Ontario) invites you to enter its new online accounting contest. First, sign up at www.cga-ontario.org/ contest and obtain a user name and password for the contest. To qualify for the competition, you must complete this task by Thursday, March 22, 2007. When you login to complete the contest you

must choose between two

levels of difficulty to test

must be done before day of the contest). 3 p.m. on Friday, March 23, 2007, The competition begins promptly at 4 p.m. (on that same day) and lasts for one hour. Eligibility is restricted to students currently

your accounting and financial

skills.

This step

(the

enrolled at an Ontario university or college.

March 23, 2007.

IN

CASH.

TIER OF CHALLENGE. and registered students choose between two

3rd place = $1,000 cash and a scholarship worth $5,000 towards CGA program of professional studies.

the

Tier 2: Intermediate-

1st place = $5,000 cash and a scholarship worth $5,000 towards CGA program of professional studies.

the

levels of

the

the

A REWARDING EXPERIENCE.

The

and Intermediate-Level Financial Accounting

Questions 1st place = $4,000 cash and a scholarship worth $5,000 towards the CGA program of professional studies.

CGA program

3rd place

difficulty; both tiers offer cash and scholarship prizes (see below). Remember to choose your level of difficulty carefully, because this decision could earn or cost you the win.

Tier 1: Basic-

and Advanced-Level Financial Accounting

Questions

2nd place = $3,000 cash and a scholarship worth $5,000 towards

CHOOSE YOUR Eligible

2nd place = $2,000 cash and a scholarship worth $5,000 towards CGA program of professional studies.

the

of professional studies.

= $1,500 cash and a scholarship worth $5,000 towards

CGA program

of professional studies.

EVEN MORE INCENTIVE TO WIN. team in either tier $5,000 from CGA Ontario awarded to its

university or college that boasts a first-place

receives a donation of

accounting department. Additional information about the format of the contest and the rules

and regulations

is

available at www.cga-ontario.org/contest,

CERTIFIED GENERAL ACCOUNTANTS OF ONTARIO

I

Help Line

E-maft

416-322-6520

info@cga-ontarto.org

or 1-800-242-8131

www.nameyourneed.org or www.cga-ontario.org

Name Yowr Need

C MI


T

Page 8

— SPOKE,

News

February 19, 2007

There’s

options

lots of

when buying a By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE Music-savvy students with

tight

budgets seeking to play the guitar or bass have the benefit of several options

wallet-friendly used,

including

rented - and yes - new.

guitar a

new instrument

advised to buy new, since the buyer can choose among intermediate-

prices.

Hatch said

it

how

determine

level instruments that are decent in

also important to

is

the instrument

quality but not top-end.

was

your purchase.

Hatch said an entry-level Yamaha

Contact the instrument’s previous

electric guitar will sell for as little

prior

treated

to

addition,

as

$250

owner

ordering online, inquire about the

model.

potential buyers with diversity in

methods, shipping company’s which can often lead to instrument

he said.

buy used (instruments) because money's usustudents

"Typically

ally

Dave Hatch,

said

tight,”

salesman Regina St.

a

Waterloo Music, 3

at

often

ing

on quality rather than tantalizing

The used instrument market provides a number of avenues for quality and price.

are

make an informed purchase based

if

In

possible.

it

$399, depending on the

to

"Yamaha

is

always a big player,”

Some brands even offer value packages on intermediate-level guitars and basses. Fender, for example, offers a

damage. Fan advises buyers to physically examine the instrument themselves, keeping a wary eye for cracks in the body, which have instru-

Squier Strat series electric guitar starter pack including a Squier

ment's sound quality. In addition, if opting for an electric guitar or bass, make sure there aren't any

Affinity Series Strat guitar, soft carrying case, a Fender Frontman 15G amp, an instructional book,

ensure you are getting a good deal. In fact, aged instruments that have been played repeatedly tend

strange noises emanating from the

tuner, strap, cable

have more and broken-in sound than their newly-manufactured contenders.

"Have someone (professional)

sells

N., Waterloo, a store that

instruments as well as provid-

ing repairs and music lessons.

Hatch said buying used

is

ah

expedient option as long as you

of a resonant, pliable

to

"When wood

ages,” said Hatch, are

“characteristics

added

to

the

negative

instrument

when

look

at

it

Used

pur-

chase new acoustic guitars place a small radio inside the body and turn it on to help loosen the wood and

promote adsorption of sound waves. "The more an acoustic guitar is played, the better it sounds,” he said.

Fan said used guitars range in price from thousands to as cheap as $20, though it is imperative to

sometimes

Special

guitar and Studio 10

II

at www.epiphone.com. There are many variables

to the store,” said

Instrument

rentals

option

are

to con-

when purchasing an instrument. Though used may seem

another

students

for

want to learn guitar. Hatch said stores

at a glance, if a poor purmade, a used guitar may be more expensive to repair and main-

who

cheaper chase

that

offer

system based and gold standards. bronze denoting heavy use and gold, rare use. Long and McQuade Musical Instruments, located at 36 King St. N„ Waterloo, offers daily, monthly and yearly rental rates of a variety

is

rentals usually have a

tain in the

on bronze,

tar

long run than a

new

“Some

vintage (guitars) will

Hatch said avid musicians learn-

the learning Learning

commons

Skills

Service

ij.

sell

more than a house,” said Fan. For more information, call Waterloo Music at 519-886-4990. for

Writing Services

(Photo by Holly Featherstone)

Nate Fan, a salesman at Waterloo Music, demonstrates there are a large variety of instruments to accommodate student budgets. Some of the new guitars and basses sell for as little as $200.

CrackBerries By BECKY SHARPE

gui-

complete with warranty. In contrast, some used pieces are characteristic of gemstones in the rough and have an incomparable unique vintage sound.

silver

of brands.

Peer Services

amp

sider

Hatch.

I# 15

at

for approximately $275, available

amp and cables. depends on how (the instru-

such as a case,

viable

who

and an additionand picks for

www.fender.com. Epiphone offers a similar package featuring a legendary Les Paul

include the additional necessities,

rigid sound, owing to the fresh-cut

Fan said some people

of strings

set

al

(for you),” said Hatch.

instruments

ment) was sold

lacquer finishes.

plugged into

approximately $350, available

Nate Fan, also a salesman at Waterloo Music, said new acoustic (hollow-bodied) guitars have a more

wood and

it's

an amplifier.

“It

(guitar's) tone.”

on the

affects

"It's the in

You've seen them in the hands of students, teachers and staff in various colours and styles. Blackberries have taken over the lives of small device users and have replaced normal cellphones, MP3 players and e-mailing devices. Blackberry’s official website, www.blackberry.com, gives you the benefits for each product and lets you know what berry is best suited for your lifestyle. There are seven styles and more than 15 models to choose from, including ones suited for business, social life, planning and organizing. Matt MacAulay, a third-year stunology, has been studying Blackberry technology over the

PSLGs are FREE weekly study sessions that are designed to help students through historically difficult courses. They offer a chance to meet with a tutor and other classmates to compare notes, discuss concepts, develop learning strategies, and prepare for exams! This semester, PSLGs are offered in the foSowing courses:

past few

months and says

wonder

people

it's

no

becoming when it's so

are

addicted to the product user friendly.

Course

He

Leader

Applied Mechanics

CIVIL Mechanics

erf

PN A&P

& Math

BScft

l

A&P

Mondays

Room

Day/ time #1-2

7A618 3A4b3

Jason

tuesdays

11-12

Pamela

TBA

TBA

Nabil, Stefan

Mondays Mondays

@1-2 @2-3 Wednesdays @2-3

2D16 2D 14

2

Biology

CONSTRUCTION

Brent

&

Undsay

Mechanics of Materials

David

Mondays Tuesdays

EET&CET

Stephen

3A509

@3-4 $j>

Wednesdays

2A619 2A619 2A11I

5-6

@2-3

from other

Blackberries

personal digital assistants (or smart is

the push e-mail service,

accompanied by a

full

leave

home

thing and

without

I

it."

refuse to

she says.

my social and professional life one device." Biermans says the Blackberry is highly addictive and you don't realize how much you need it until something happens to it. “I've accidentally dropped it in

“It's in

water and

I

froze,

I

didn't

know

what to do,” she says. “For those few hours while it was drying and couldn’t use it I was so worried about what would happen should it not turn on again. “My whole life is in that device and if didn’t have it my instant reaction would be to panic, how would contact friends or family,” I

I

I

she says.

Biermans says her phone is not on a data plan so she can't do everything such as use the Internet, the online planner and e-mail service. but she can text message, listen to the MP3 player, watch videos, store pictures and use it as a cellphone, which is more than enough to satisfy her addiction.

QWERTY

keyboard,” he says.

“When

receives an e-mail

is

a user -

it

'pushed out

Blackberry immediately like

to the live

messenger, as opposed to the

normal

style of mail

pickup where

the client or device polls the server

new mail.” MacAulay says because of the

occasionally to check for

Electronic Devices

Learning Groups start the

week

of

January 22, 2007 unless otherwise indicated and of April

meet each week 9, 2007

schedule

until

the week

is subject to change. alms to accommodate as many students as possible, but is unable to meet ail needs. * For more teforroatfon on PtSGs, please contact The Learning Commons, 2A103, or ca« (519) 748-5220 ext.2308.

* Please note that this schedule

QWERTY contacts

Please note: Learning Group availability is solely based upon attendance. If students are not attending, the group(s) will be cancelled. * Please note that this

feature that originally distin-

phones)

Materials

GAS Chemistry &

“The

guished

all

Blackberry Pearl.

dent in software engineering tech-

Peer Supported Learning Groups Winter 2007

for

keyboard users can text faster than on a reg-

much

ular cellphone. “It’s a full alphabetical keyboard and much faster and easier to use than pushing a button three times

year police foundations

just to find the right letter.”

He

also says

that

Blackberries

today can be seen as a type of tus symbol.

sta-

Bonnie Biermans, a second-yearstudent

(Photo by Becky Sharpe)

Bonnie Biermans, a second-

in police foundations, says she can't go anywhere without her

student,

shows

off

the

QWERTY

keyboard of the Blackberry Pearl and how user friendly it is for people

who

are addicted to text

messaging.


SPOKE, February

19,

— Page 9

2007

on

Mfissfrqe. JLArtOf

$

I

per minute*

I

in

1

^

,

and

^O.

<f>0

minute increments

HOUR 5

Ip:

Monday

8

T uesdatj

8:5 0-4: 3 O

Thursday

:

5

0-4

:

3

O

— <3:50-4:50

Lvcnine appointments I

,f avaiiab

t

t

1

»

Conestoga Students P artially covered un

C51

offer an Advertising

health flan with doctor's refe nrak

OCTOBER OPF1V X Xj X Book y 0ur appointment

X

at the

LAST

Inc.

is

happy

to

announce

that

Sendee. Whether you need advertis-

ing for events, services or putting out information,

30TH

CSI office,

Room 2A106

do it. Just visit the CSI office if room 2A106 for more information and Pricing,

we

can

[student^in?

LAST MINUTE

PROJECTS?

CHANCE

we now

Sell Serve Area

ROOD! 2A108

HOURS monday

pm

8 am-8

,

Tuesday

am

8

Kniiisia

8

-

pm

Wednesday

am

8

-

8

pm

Thursday

pm

8

am

8

am - 4 pm

-

8

Friday

If/

Saturday 10

Shooters

am

-

2

pm

Sunday

Self Serve Area

closed

’OPEN LATE

CONtSTOt/A


The Madagascar in

Feature

— SPOKE, February 19, 2007

Page 10

hissing cockroach

length. They’re currently

on

is

one

of the largest in

display at the Ontario

its

species, reaching two to three inches

Science Centre.

Ontario Science Centre a nice mixture of education and fun By JENN SPRACH

at

The Ontario Science Centre place

great

a

new

about

learn

to

is

blood

innovations.

There sion

is

a quick information ses-

called

a blood donor clinic.

The profile explains it is your femur bone (thigh-bone) which makes the new blood when old

Hot Spot where

a

Andrew,

The of Toronto, said his

6,

favourite thing at the centre

big elephant heart which

and inventions that are currently in development. One in the works is software to help reduce car emissions by three

in this section.

It

The

was the

is

found

sports section has a pitching

cage which

up

set

is

distance from

to the

home

standard

plate for pro-

into

your car and the software helps to reduce fuel consumption. This will not only save you money but reduce the amount of emissions going into the atmosphere. This invention is expected to be released within the next couple of years.

Another item under development is the Noah’s Arc of seeds. The Norwegian government is gathering seeds from every known food source in the world and will store them inside a hollowed out mountain on a remote island of Spitsbergen for safe-keeping

in the

event of a world disaster.

Many

children couldn’t get the

to the end,

ball

but

many

adults

Jonathan Cross, a first-time visitor at the centre, said he enjoyed the bobsledding exhibit because it simulated what it feels like to be

one of the riders. People get to take a ride on a miniature version of a bobsled

some

living earth section has

an interesting exhibit. People taste water from three drinking fountains labeled A, B and C. One is bottled water, one js Toronto tap water and the other filis

After tasting

The innovation

section explains

questions

forces things parents

tell

samples you

the

enter your choice into the comput-

and compare

On

it

to other visitors.

the other side of this exhibit

you can discover how much of your body is water. When a person stands on the scale a tube with measurements fills

to

how much water

is in

your

body.

The

track.

exhibit says

have more

and Tein-

therefore

their chil-

per cent

women

tend to

fatty tissue than

men

men,

composed of 70 water and women are 60 are

per cent water.

dren.

How many

times have parents

told their children that soda

Personally,

pop

water.

an

humid

I

am

33.3 per cent

This section also has a hot and

will rot their teeth.

This destination was chosen because if refrigeration was to fail,

Here they have proof. There

is

rainforest

showing the

differ-

exhibit with a tooth in water, soda

ent types of flora growing there.

it is cold enough that the seeds would not spoil. The whole project is expected to

pop and juice. and see if it has

cost $5 billion.

right.

Throughout this section they also have exhibits of animals such as frogs, cockroaches and snakes. Although there are hundreds of exhibits some people feel not much

The

centre

is

a

also

place

to

areas of science includ-

explore

all

ing the

human

vation,

electricity

body, sports, inno-

and the living

In the

are

lots

By

human body

section there

It’s

rotted.

This section also has the innova-

where you get to be the and build whatever your

tion station scientist

electricity section is proba-

bly the one people

explaining

most from the centre.

their

remember

childhood

the

trip to

Two

answer the dreadful question children ask, where do babies come from? There is also a station where people can check their reaction time on

people go on stage and hold hands and touch a ball with electricity running through it, shake

an interactive meter.

Once you step off the plastic box which grounds the electricity all their hair falls back into place.

Another exhibit shows the safe amount of blood to lose which is also the amount people can donate

their

heads and

all

their hair stands

up.

“It’s

has changed

at the centre.

Alexis Patch, of Stratford, said,

“It

needs to be updated.”

heart desires.

a great place to

of exhibits

reproduction.

Pull the tooth out

the way, your parents were

The

earth.

kilo-

of the best exhibits. What kind of water do you prefer

er

couldn't either.

day-to-day

The heart of an African bull elephant can weigh up to 28 grams and its blood vessels can reach 350 centimetres.

tered water.

fessional players.

you plug

will be a device

has been.”

is lost.

speaker talks about various ideas

per cent.

Schneider, a first-time visitor to the “We weren't adding, centre, expecting it to be as interactive as it

She said she remembers a lot of same exhibits from when she

the

came as a child. Drew Cameron, 17, of Stratford, said, “I remember it being a lot more exciting when was younger.” The Ontario Science Centre is I

open 10 a.m.

to 5 p.m.

everyday and

admission prices are $ 7 for adults, $12.50 for youths and seniors and

There are as many as 40

different types of rainforests, such as evergreen lowlands, evergreen mountains, tropical evergreen alluvials and semi-deciduous. Tropical rainforests are found in a large belt around the equator, where the temperature is

constantly warm.

1

great,”

said

Gesme

$10 for children. For more information www.ontariosciencecentre.com

visit

Photos by

Jenn Sprach


Feature

SPOKE, February

19,

2007

— Page 11

Fletcher, creator of Link News Magazine, points to an audience member who has the answer to one of the many questions she asked about the film, Journey to Justice.

Sylma

Chad Tindall, Gerima Harvey-Fletcher and Nii Addico perform for people attending the showing of Journey to Justice, a National Film Board of Canada documentary about the lives of black Canadians and the struggles they endured in the early 1900s. The event was held at KitchenerWaterloo Collegiate and Vocational School on Feb. 9.

Canada

Black history runs deep within By CHRISTOPHER MILLS Journey to Justice is a moving documentary about the history of

people

black

Unfortunately,

Canada.

in

a history

not

it’s

most would expect. Racism was abundant in Canada’s past, and while progress has been made in

many

areas,

some of

the

wounds

oppression to bring about change. “All of us need to understand that

blood

both specific and systemic,” Mills said. “Everyone has a history and a culture and we need

focus

The

is

people know

that.”

film centres on Canadian his-

torical

icons

Ray Lewis, and Hugh Burnett.

like

Stanley Grizelle

Maedith Radelin, principal of N. A. McEachern public school - and Waterloo Region’s

first

cipal in the public

black prin-

system - said

Black History Month

is

a time to

black of Canadians and bring awareness. “People tend to stay with what they are familiar with, so we need share

the

history

openness,” she said.

Tiffany

McCormick

Canadian Pacific Railroad.

Canada.

to let

Photos by

opportunity,” she said.

the

the first black citizenship

racism

Lewis was a member of Canada’s gold-medal winning 4x100 metre relay team at the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles. When he returned

must be a differentiation

made between immigrants and

Stanley Grizelle was another former CPR porter who eventually

refused a position as a track coach, he was forced to return to a job at

became

small

issues of race in today’s society,

there

Canadian-born minorities. “For immigrants like myself, our main challenge is even getting into the system because we are still at this place where you’re not qualified in Canada, your experience isn’t in Canada, so there’s no

judge

run deep.

A

Waterloo Collegiate.

to Hamilton following the games, he found that because of his skin colour, he was the only member of the team whose opportuniAfter being ties didn’t increase.

group gathered at Kitchener- Waterloo Collegiate and Vocational School in Kitchener on Feb. 9 to see the film and listen to The director Roger Mills speak. documentary brings light to a dark side of Canada’s past, and to the lives of Canadians who rose above

still

Roger McTair, producer of Journey to Justice, introduces the film at a gathering for Black History Month on Feb. 9 at Kitchener-

home

in

In the film, Grizelle tells the story

of

how

his father

he was young.

drove a taxi when

One day

his father

asleep in his taxi and one of the white drivers slashed his face with a razor. Grizelle said he remembered his father coining home with

fell

all

Hugh

Burnett

is

the other

major

Burnett referred to as the Canadian Martin Luther King - was denied admission to a restaurant in Dresden and in

the

often a different one.

film.

The fought the discrimination. government responded by holding

It’s

some-

thing that needs to be worked on. There are different solutions for different situations."

Radelin said the important thing for

anyone

to

remember when

face discrimination

over him.

“The other

challenge, for those minorities who are Canadian ... their challenge is

is

they

to not feel

they are responsible or that they have done anything to deserve

that

it.

“With any kind of oppression, think the big challenge

believe

that

the

is

I

to really

problem

is

not

a referendum. Not surprisingly, the

with you, but with those who find difficult to be inclusive,” she it

segregation was upheld.

said.

Burnett continued the fight and eventually, Frost,

it

under Premier Leslie

was

made

illegal

in

Canada to discriminate by race when it came to employment and housing.

Not many people

are

aware of the

racism that existed, and still exists in Canada. Most consider segregation and racial discrimination to be

American epidemics. who was Radelin,

born in Jamaica, said when talking about

At the same time, you

worth.

need

to try and mainof dignity and self

“You need

tain a sense

to

try

to

see

barriers

as

you can’t go through them, you have to find ways around them. You can’t let them

things that

if

stop you.” For those

who missed the screenJourney to Justice can be purchased through the National Film ing,

Board. A copy is also available through the main branch of the

Kitchener Public Library.


Page 12

— SPOKE, February

Feature

2007

19,

Students break barriers of blindness* By TIFFANY MCCORMICK

him

to reach those

milestones and the longer

Our society is driven by image and visual effects, and thrives on the term “seeing is believing,” so where does that leave people who can only see shadows, blurred fig-

took

it

more worried you got.” With certain milestones reached,

the

she has one major hope for mer son's future. “I'm hoping he can be independent,” she said. “I'm hoping he finds something that he loves to do,” in

Jennifer said

ures and sometimes nothing at all?

According to the MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia, “blindness is the lack of vision or a loss of vision that cannot be corrected with

terms of a job.

"I

don't think he'll

glasses or contact lenses. Blindness

be the fireman but if that's- his dream right now. I'm not going to

may

tell

him he can’t do that.” She is hoping that he can live on his own, take the city bus and know where he needs to go. "I'm hoping he'll be able to get around the city." While being blind doesn't make a person an outcast, the risk of

be partial with very limited

no percep-

vision or complete with

of

tion

light.”

Only 18 per cent of people who are termed blind have complete loss of vision.

Many

people can

distinguish between light and dark.

Jordan Heard, a Grade at

increased isolation

student

1

W. Ross MacDonald School

who

those

in

Brantford, is partially blind and has been since birth. When asked what comes to mind when the colour blue and yellow are mentioned, Jordan responds

greater for

is

or partially

blind

are

blind as simple daily tasks, such as dressing, eating and travelling, are

more of a challenge. Brad Wettlaufer, a Grade 12 stuW. Ross MacDonald at

dent

with “the sky” and “the sun.”

School,

While at school in Brantford, which is solely for the visually

tion.

“When

sight

I

impaired and blind, he takes part

see outlines, light and dark,” he

activities

much

like other kids.

in

At

recess he and his friends play out-

and enjoy making snow angels and playing on the swings and side

slide.

spare time, he enjoys swimming, choir and piano leshis

In

(Photo by Tiffany McCormick)

demonstrates how students who are visually impaired or blind use the computers in the adaptive skills technology lab. The computers all access JAWS, screen reading and magnification software, which is a common program those with visual impairments use. Cates said assistants need to log in for students but once they are into the system, voice activation comes into play and tells the students where they are going onscreen in menus and websites. Leslie Cates, a part-time adaptive technology assistant,

sons.

Even though Jordan’s impairment is

not obvious at school,

when

out

“Getting him into school, that was quite an overwhelming experi-

in

public, being left out

and even to him.

ence,” she said, explaining that Jordan started out in the regular

had helpers they probably didn’t realize he needed the extra help. Jordan “was out there

school system but was transferred

just

teased

new

nothing

is

when

Jordan said he feels “sad”

other children don't want to play

to his current school

with him.

know how

Being a this

to

firefighter

eight-year-old,

wants have a

to

is

the goal of

who

said

he

be one because “I can

fire truck.”

At is

no

limit to

or learn. “It's a regular school, really nice about

glasses.” Jordan wears

them

to help

aid the vision he does have.

Jordan

is

still

in

the process of

A

and it,”

Preston Skating Club, and since

that's

it's

what’s

she said.

major obstacle she faces

all

the children

like

all

the other kids,”

she

said.

Jordan’s gymnastics lessons are

better.”

There what the students do

with his impairment,

life

him

have wrestling,

skating and track and field.

just for the blind

live

“because they

to deal with

his school they

Even though he has learned how Jordan said sometimes he wishes he could see just like other people because “then 1 wouldn’t need my

and one-on-one, but

private

mom

is

amazed

his

him not be hanging up on

“just to see

have that fear to the big double bars.” Jennifer said she’s not too sure she could do that. "He’s so unaware of his blind-

get-

ness,

which

ting people to understand her son’s

think

it

impairment.

he's not aware that he doesn’t see

“It’s

the

is

knowledge

nice,” she said. “I

is

helps that

it's

from

birth so

that people don’t

like other kids.” Jennifer said there

blind.”

have been times when Jordan has had trouble seeing things that

have of the fact that blind doesn't mean completely

now only

Jennifer said people sometimes

needs large print books. Jennifer Heard, Jordan’s mother, is hoping he won’t need Braille.

forget he has vision problems and

plete sight.

admitted that she too forgets from time to time.

“There are times when he will tell he can't see something and it'll be right in front of him and I’ll start to get frustrated and be like ‘why can't you see?’ Sometimes he can walk out on a clear blue day and see the moon but he might not be

learning to read and right

Even though things have been going well with her son, Jennifer said there are definitely times

t-

“You're

stressful in his early years.

just waiting for

she

is

when

overwhelmed with taking

care of him.

When ties

it

comes

to public activi-

Jennifer said, “I try not to limit

him too much. He might

as well

try.”

He

took skating lessons

at

the

would be simple

to those with

com-

me

(Photos by Tiffany McCormick) Left:

The adaptive

nology

lab,

a lab

skills

for

tech-

students

has a documents in

with visual impairments, printer that prints

Braille to further assist

Conestoga students who are blind and visually impaired. This is a sample of what the printouts look

Right:

like.

The optelek

is

a magni-

fying screen located in the

adaptive

skills technology lab. enables students with low or partial vision to magnify their work so they can read it. It

Currently one student uses this

machine.

able to find a

book

blind with light percep-

is

I

always

my

describe tell

lack of

people that

I

can

said.

He goes day

a

to school for seven hours

and

with

practises

the

wrestling team.

On weekends

he spends time

with his family and completes farm chores. While walking, if Brad senses a hole, “I just drop some-

down to He added

thing or yell

get an idea of

front of him,” she said. “It’s a very

the depth.”

that if there is

weird, strange sort of visual issue

a

sometimes sometimes it’s not.”

ence

he's got,

that's right in

it's

there and

eye surgery

He had

at the

age of four.

a procedure to uncross his

eyes and the doctors didn’t think

it

would make any difference. “The next day after the surgery he came up to

me

and said

mommy,

I

can

see,” she said. “It was like, oh my God.” Another moment was the first time he walked. Jordan was also diagnosed with mild cerebral palsy and is developmentally delayed so he couldn't walk until he was two and a half. “It’s been difficult to deal with

but

it's

getting

easier,”

Jennifer

adding “for a while there was always that unknown." Jordan wassaid,

supposed to walk and was supposed to be completely blind. n't

Jennifer said

all

he must get over, it

by walking up

When

One memorable moment Jennifer had with her son was when he had his

hill

those things were

comes

it

“I experi-

it.”

to

identifying

Brad said “the sun is a big bright globe and when it comes to colours I think of fruit.” He gave objects,

the

example

“Buildings

that a lime

are

just

green.

is

big

square

blocks with shapes on the side.”

As

for teasing and public

ments,

Brad

offensive

said

if

com-

something

said he usually doesn't

is

pay attention. "I ignore certain things and really have not experienced serious, hurtful sayings.” Memorable moments Brad has had are the day his mother let him drive her car on his 16th birthday and his school canoe trip to Algonquin Park. He said one day he hopes to have a career and that one current barrier he faces to

is

unknown

not

blind

the inability to travel

were do more

places. “I wish

so

I

could

I


Feature

SPOKE, February

2007

19,

— Page 13

Assisting sight impaired students

r

By TIFFANY MCCORMICK

that

impaired face many challenges those with sight would find no dif-

She said even if students are in programs where employment may not be a possibility, sometimes doors open to unexpected paths. “I have some students going down some paths where one would have

ficulty in.

some questions

the face of obstacles or difficul-

Throughout those

who

their

daily

lives,

are blind or visually

White canes, guide dogs or assistants are often helpful to the

But they use other techcoded buttons, counting stairs and listening to audio tapes and CDs to aid them blind.

niques, such as colour

in daily life.

Braille helps with

reading and writing.

Kelly Nixon, a counsellor for disability services, said

when

stu-

dents are accepted to Conestoga

they receive an information pack-

age giving them the option of receiving assistance

they need

if

they feel

test

accommodations

it’s

in is

enrolled in programs at the col-

completing a business degree at the University of Waterloo. “It’s rewarding in general for people with disabilities to know that they can pursue their higher education and their disability does not have to be what limits them in

lege.

furthering their education,”

are available as well as voice acti-

vated computers which are accessible in the library, the student’s

classroom and the adaptive technology lab. Currently there are six visually

impaired and two" blind students

“I’ve learned not to have expectations about

what a student can

and can’t do, because they may end up proving that they’re able to do it through certain accommoda-

currently

she

said.

John Howe, the vice-principal of W. Ross MacDonald School, has been there since 1966 when he began as a physical education

tions,”

Nixon said. “Even if I thought there was a program a stu-

teacher.

dent couldn’t do I could only advise them of where they might

of teaching the most insight he has gained about his students and the way they learn has come from

some difficulties.” Nixon said counsellors in disability services need to ensure they r are separating education from employment. “They have a right to

face

get their education even if they may never be hired for a position in the future.”

Howe

their

said throughout his years

involvement in sports.

He mentioned

that the first wrestling match his students competed in against fully sighted stu-

was unsuccessful. He said he knew it was because he hadn’t taught them everything they dents

disturbing. His

above

the

ties.

my

want

I

students

ed.

As

when

it is

eye

to

know

sure

for

row

is

becomes increasdamaged resulting in nar-

sight field, blurred vision

Reduced

I

In

an

by

lights

quickly from the blocked drainage cells, while chronic loss

CAUSES There are many causes of

in

diabetic

to

know

my

I

learned

students that being repet-

using a hands-on approach and being enthusiastic were the three most important things that I could do to teach my student athitive,

letes.”

Howe said success was an important part but was always relative to each student’s ability. “In one case it might be winning a gold medal and in another it might be fighting hard enough not to get pinned in wrestling,” he said. “When I thought my students were successful I celebrated their successes with them.” He said the school recently heard of the death of a former student and said when something like

pigmentosa.

A cataract is the clouding of

to win.

“In those early ^ears

from

painless and vision

is

gradual.

which blocks from passing through the eye. Although they are not

night blindness.

light

tion

they cause blurred, dimmed or double vision. Diabetic retinopathy is caused by changes in the blood vessels of a diabetic’s retina which can Abnormal cause' blindness. blood vessels form, some burst and others even break loose from

related vascular area,

4

Variety of rental units to living

4

the degeneration of

and results an abnormal development of excess pigment. It is often hereditary and follows the pattern of bad night vision, tunnel vision and continued vision loss thereafter. There is no treatment for retinitis pigmentosa. in

accommot

arrangements

Safe, affordable

of

comes

the retina and the choroid, a

painful,

apartments tha

home, allowing you to focus

Conveniently located close to universities

& colleges

&

24 hr. emergency contact numbs* (peace of mind for the parents) /

4

Steps to shopping

&

NEEDED! For Explore

Conestoga 2007

Thursday March 1

Friday March 2

Saturday March 3 Sunday March 4 This event is held on the last weekend of study week. It is a great opportunity to build your volunteer hours and gain valuable experience. If

interested please contact

Jan Stroh

at. j

With this condi-

the eye’s lens

4

Volunteers

glauco-

ma, macular degeneration and retinitis

would need

retinopathy,

is

Macular degeneration is caused when the macula, the lining at the back of the eye, breaks down. The retina is like film to a camera and the macula is the centre of the picture with the sharpest image. Retinitis pigmentosa begins as

blindness, including cataracts,

the E-wing of the school.

Let TransGlobe

your

halos

involves pain as pressure rises

ally

that also features Braille

vision,

Self-

see.

is

Tiffany McCormick)

impaired, Conestoga has a voice-activated elevator

total blindness.

themselves

very destructive.”

effort to assist the visu-

side

and blurred vision are early symptoms. There are two types of this disorder, acute and chronic. Acute glaucoma around

glaucoma (Photo

properly,

not controlled the struc-

and eventually

that there

because they can’t pity

is

ingly

are struggles for everyone and

sorry

drain

ture of the eye

need-

the worst thing they can do feel

doesn’t

build within the eye. If the pres-

far as the struggles they

want them

when transparent

resulting in excess pressure to

to

face as a result of being blind,

is

fluid inside the front part of the

respect others and always be willing to help

back of the eye.

Glaucoma

all

go on to lead a good, long and happy life. “I hope I have taught them to work hard and not give up in

actually

Government of Canada Columbia and the other

British

it’s

students,

else, is that they

working out quite well.” She added accommodations must be provided no matter the program a student chooses. To turn a student away from a specific program would require proof that the student would be a danger to himself or other students. “Other than that we have a duty to accommodate,” she said. Nixon said once students graduate she doesn’t always hear from them, but from those she has, one is a business graduate who works for the

it.

She said

but

happens hope for his

tmd

home away from home

1 - 888 - 310-7000 www.GOtransgIobe.com

St r0 h(Q)conestoqac.on.ca

TransGlobe Property

Services


)

,

— SPOKE, February

Page 14

19,

News

2007

Standard bra sizes (Photo

don’t By NATALIE

ANDERSON

Saechao)

women

most

fit

put up with

it

Most women love walking

because she believed there as a comfortable bra.

new

bra.

Powell, originally from Brantford, measures and fits women for the proper

strapless, satin or lace, a

new

size bra.

into a lin-

Seamless or bra

nice

it

is

to be female.

of size however,

is

The question

another story.

Diem Nguyen, who works Express

in

the

right,

A

to

DD

at

La Senza mall,

thought of bra shopping, they never con-

sizes

sider a custom fit bra as an option because of cost or availability. Lindsay Langdon, a first-year law and security administration student at Conestoga, said she has always had a hard time finding a bra that fits properly.

in

most bras and

A

to

D

in

others.

“The problem fit

perfectly

is

into

a lot of

those

women

don’t

sizes,”

said

Nguyen. “Each woman’s body

is

differ-

“If the

ent.”

La Senza employees are trained on how to properly measure and fit a bra, said Nguyen, who is a first-year general All

at Conestoga. even that our sizes aren’t large

business student “It’s not

women,

enough

for

dard,”

she said.

The $105.

is

women

it

doesn’t

makes

start

at

Become By JESSICA

The

number, 1-800-661-4219.

full

Jessica Fleming agrees with Serjeantson that

BlueWorks Erotica event will Atmosphere cafe, 24 Carden St., in Guelph. Short stories and poems, live DJs, food and a welcoming environment are combining to

that

across Canada, but can be reached at her

really easy-going. People

the evening provides a positive, encouraging

“The kid gets the designer shoes, the husband gets a new truck and mom gets the $ 0 bra.” The average price of a bra from La Senza Express is between $35 and $45. “You buy the right thing once or the wrong thing three times,” said Powell. Powell travels to clinics and workshops 1

it’s

Feb. 28.

bra size.

toll-free

seedy. However,

acceptance.”

make

wears the size she wears for a reason.” Powell started making bras after being fitted with a custom bra. She had worn uncomfortable bras for some time and

BLUMENTHAL

People looking to explore and share their sensual side through literature have a place to go on

“If men wore bras they would be 500 bucks and no one would say anything, but women are so put down,” she said.

have the right sizes,” said Powell, who makes more than 200 sizes of custom-fitted bras from A to KK. “Every lady

sensually liberated can show their intelligent sexual side with

need half sizes.” Grace Powell, of Healthy Bras, said 85 per cent of women are wearing the wrong

“Anybody can measure but you have to be able to (properly fit someone) and

died on them.

it

third annual

be held

bras that Powell

Chris Cossette

their friend’s car after

fit

to get one.

some

reality

size fits then

around or vice versa,” she said. Langdon said she never thought about having a custom bra made because they are costly and she wouldn’t know where

they are just too stan-

“The

cup

...

to

programmer/analyst students, help push

makes the custom-fitted bra. “I was fitted with it and I was selling them the next day,” she said. Although some women loathe the

standard

receives

left

and Mark Edwards, all first-year computer

Then she or her business partner

Cambridge Centre

says the store

from

woman

a splurge that reminds a

is

how

one

All for Sasa Rajic,

was no such thing gerie store and picking out a

By Samanf^l

A

space that

at

mind

is

She thinks everyone should since people won’t

organ and Erotica night

just try

it,

espe-

vulnerable.

feel

People can participate or just

most important sexu-

their

and support-

liberating, enjoyable

cially

for a creative social evening.

person’s

is

ive.

sit

and watch.

There’s no pressure to get on stage and read. So

unique in the sense and judgment-free

event, said Christoph Kesting, organizer of the

12 writers have signed up to read. Kesting said people’s No. hope is to meet other sensually liberated and engaged individ-

event.

uals.

al

it

“It’s

floor

a

is

is

pressure-free

far,

1

more than candy store pom and dance antics. People go to erotica readings

Everyone’s a closet erotica

added. “People

who

fan,

don’t want to go are lying to

because they are interested in the beauty of literature and love erotica,” he said. Garth Serjeantson will be reading at the event

themselves, plus what are they afraid of?”

and he believes the event allows people

There

For

sexual without being dirty.

“Most people’s

initial

Vi

that

is

interested,

is

visit

a $6 cover charge. Proceeds will go to

AIDS committee

the

reaction

those

www.facebook/event.php?eid=2230958009.

be

to

he

of Guelph-Wellington

region.

it’s

ELECTION NOTICE AND CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

CONESTOGA iftow#

ONE PERSON SS TO BE ELECTED AS A MEMBER OF THE CONESTOGA COLLEGE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND ADVANCED LEARNING BOARD OF GOVERNORS FROM EACH OF THE FOLLOWING TWO CATEGORIES: Eligibility is

as follows:

STUDENT MEMBER Open

to

all

fUl-timo

and

part-time students enrolled in a

related courses leading to

a diploma,

certificate,

program of

instruction (a

group of

or other document awarded by the Board

of Governors

TERM OF

OFFICE: SEPTEMBER 1, 2007 - AUGUST be enrolled as a student during the term of office)

31, 2008.

(Candidate must plan to

SUPPORT STAFF MEMBER All

persons employed by the Board of Governors. Conestoga College, on a full-time or who are neither an Academic nor an Administrative Staff Member

part-time basis,

TERM OF

OFFICE:

SEPTEMBER

ADMINISTRATIVE

1,

2007

-

AUGUST 31,

2010.

MEMBER

persons employed by the Board of Governors, Conestoga College, on a part-time basis, who are neither an Academic nor a Support Staff Member

All

TERM OF OFFICE: MAY 1, The terms

2007

-

AUGUST

full-time or

d

31, 2009.

of reference for these elected internal

members are the same as those for Board of Governors Nomination forms will be posted on February 19, 2007 Nomination forms will also be available in the office of the Secretary-Treasurer of the Board (Kevin Mullan). externally appointed

members

of the

Closing date for nominations: Lists of

(Photo By Natalie Anderson) La Senza Express employee, Diem Nguyen, says bras should come in half ,s.'zes

t

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

nominees

to

MARCH

be posted on campus

8,

2007

bulletin

boards on March 19, 2007

ELECTION DATE: TUESDAY. APRIL

3.

2007


News

SPOKE, February

2007

19,

— Page 15

Bars can be dangerous By ALLISON STEINMAN

Many young

people enjoy head-

out for a

ing

remain anonymous knows all too well the importance of being safe

She said she doesn’t have any

can be a dan-

recollection of the events of Nov.

friends, but the bar

2004

26,

Waterloo regional police inspecBryan Larkin said it's impor-

“Who knows what

munity safety

to

of

causes

leading

Her parents took her to the hospiwhere nurses had trouble getting an intravenous into her, due to collapsed veins and dehydration. “1 woke up after being in the hospital for some time, not knowing where 1 was or how 1 got there,” tal,

never leave anything

hol-related deaths remain one of

the

death

unattended

in

a bar

amongst young people.” Larkin

(Photo by

encourage

Summer McPhee)

a

bar including jackets,

in

Waterloo regional police

“Ensure you have a buddy system,” he said, “so if something hap-

of

He added

G

students

By ANGELO MAZZIOTTI Imagine walking around in a ciraround and around and around

cle,

at

of

University

the

Guelph are going to do just The university is holding a

that.

relay

fundraiser benefiting the

Canadian Cancer Society. The 2hour event is being tagged as the 1

ultimate night for celebrating sur-

and is being held on March from 7 p.m. - 7 a.m. Students create nine-member, non-competitive teams which take turns either running or walking

year

the

“Last

university

amount

we

year

$55,000, which

raised

over

institution

has ever risen for a relay event to date,” said Vasko.

“This year's goal

and

is

money

“It

for a great cause.

takes place on a Saturday this said Vasko,

student

at

the

instead of gaining

a second-year

“So

universtiy. all

those carbs at

the bar while drinking beer,

you

can lose a few pounds while helping to find a cure for cancer.

It's

a

achieve and

to

have 400

raise

maybe

at

least

eclipse

this

goal.”

Laura Collins,

a first-year stu-

dent, says she can’t wait to hit the track.

“I'm really excited to have a part, in this whole thing,” said Collins. “I don’t go to sleep anyway, so this overnight thing should be a walk in

we

think

I

SAMANTHA SAECHAO

By

Wishes

will

Vasko said she is very proud of what they have accomplished to date and is anxious to see how this

do come

you're

means

the world to

to

her friends

young

a

true

and

child,

you when

came that

later that her

true, to start

was able

wishes

to children.

Each province

in

Canada has a

may be

a

support

referred to the

Wish Foundation by his or her parents, family members, or even doc-

that bar-goers stick

and often harsh treatments)

more bearable. The cost of a wish varies depending on what the child wishes for. The foundation covers the cost of

required.

from

Funding donations

is

fundraising

essential to the

has been fulfilled.

The most popular

life-threatening

illness

requests

and

verified by a physician,

are qualified for a wish.

According to the foundation, having a wish granted makes

World, meeting a celebrity like NHL superstar Sidney Crosby or wanting a computer system and even entertainment centres. For more information on volunteer work, donating or the foundawww.chilout check tion drenswish.ca.

in comparison. “I’m actually kind of nervous,” she said. “We have had such great

can

live

up

to the

I

just

know we

hype and expec-

tations.”

Last year, a

new

pacemaker implant saved Max’s life. jS<m> he 'em spend

mere time with

EXCLUSIVE

GROUP BUYING POWER

his grmd/atker.

to

Conestoga College Please gjve to

Heart and Stroke f*ourt&t<on<

Eating out tonight? Make a smart choice. For healthy food choices, food safety and 100% smoke-free seating, choose an Eat Smart! restaurant. Contact the Waterloo Region Community Health Department at 883-2253 or visi t^ eatsmart. web- net.

~

214

Judy

at Ext. Contact a no-obligation quota today!

for

Local Toll-Free

Email

519-743-5221 1-800-321-9187

jwestman@staebter.com

Waterloo Insurance a

.EHLRPOOi

are

vacations to places such as Disney

year turns out

success in the past;

or

Wish

Foundation. Every wish requested

Children ages three to 17 who have been diagnosed with a high-

it

illness

wish, as well as medical expenses such as wheelchairs, respirators and a medical assistant if

hH agair

risk,

all

the

2 have had

chapter.

child

also be referred by a

friends.

wish

at

everything (the discomfort of the

nurses or social workers.

community member,

together

true for kids

an organization

to help grant

She advised

not.

States.

was a year

blood-

ing trouble standing.

she

organization, other families or even

by a television documentary about a wishgranting organization in the United

my

stream.”

times and never drinks from anyone, accept whether you recognize them or

drink,

it

tion after being inspired

vomited so was but a

small trace of a drug in

and

it

1

had

I

said, “there

was slurring her words, not making sense and havthe

tors,

happens. The Children's Wish Foundation of Canada has granted 2,480 wishes since it was founded in 1984. Laura Cole started the organiza-

A

achieve this goal.”

really

when

It

the park for me.

asked to

According

They can

more than any

is

post-secondary

other

woman who

I

Wishes do come

set

$75,000. We think that with student enthusiasm, we can and will

ed and having snacks. Assistant chairperson for the relay, Alyssa Vasko, says it's a great way to get exercise while

local

received.

participants

around the university track. On member walks each average around the track for roughly an hour and 20 minutes. When taking a break, teams can hang with other participants while keeping hydrat-

brother, within minutes of finishing

for donations for this event.

records with the

it was harmless being knew him slightly,” she said.

a designated driver.

A

31

year,”

“Because much,” she “I figured

simply have fun.”

vival,

raising

date rape drug.

that

win-win situation.” Every member of every team-will be collecting pledges and asking Last

2 hours.

life

either a horse tranquilizer or the

inspector

always tuck $20 away for a cab and plan ahead with to

“Practice courtesy at the bar, and

run and walk for cancer

for

The doctors determined she had been drugged, and said it was

pens, or you are not feeling well, a

U

1

she said.

Bryan Larkin,

wallets,

friend will look after you.”

Students

cellphone and drinks.

cellphones and drinks.

Spider-Man Kitchener on

like

Feb. 10.

for

including jackets, wallets,

people to go out in groups and never leave anything unattended in

Getting a makeover A Happy Space employee paints a child’s face at the fifth Total Women’s Show at Bingeman’s

police

said

the

scious.

encourage people go out in groups and

Police

ing at bars. “Tragically,” said Larkin, “alco-

me

drink.”

By the time she got home, she was vomiting and nearly uncon-

a local bar from an acquaintance.

com-

times includ-

at all

she said.

the intentions

were of the guy who bought

after accepting a drink at

tor

tant for citizens to exercise

was lucky that I had a group of and my brother who were

looking out for me,”

at the bar.

few drinks with

gerous place.

“1

friends

<***<•>&sr.of

-


'

News

— SPOKE, February 19, 2007

Page 16

TVCCA tove btom ('tutaeUi By BECKY SHARPE

and Ledivaldo FawKrista Scaramuza who now live in Kitchener. The group teaches fami-

Everyday we come across simple challenges which can include sewing, cooking, keeping clean, eating right and completing

ture,

in

our

The

who

life.

EMCC. CADI-RO is an acronym

skills

allows

such as cook-

and proper

sanitiza-

gain experience in missionary work, Krista .said this group wouldn’t have been started without the support of church communities. “It’s all about love while teaching,” she said. “If there

was no

Ledivaldo said

it’s

always a bless-

your work but when you see

and make jewelry

paint

to

from seeds

ing to see

how much

“When you

people can

are enabled with the

you

feel

pride in that

someone has learned from your lessons you feel purpose in your work,” he

said.

For more information or to give support

CADI-RO,

to

www.emcc.ca or

to sell.

love

from sponsors and no love from those teaching there wouldn’t be any purpose to the lesson.”

and dangers of chemical addiction. This course also teaches parents the

how by

an excellent way for

is

ability to teach

m Brazil started

CADI-RO

students or adults to volunteer or

es adults environmental awareness

dangers in child prostitution so they can protect their children. The artistic side of the course shows adults

The program was

from alcohol, drugs or

GARRA meets once a week.

give to other countries.

Center for Assistance and Holistic Development in Rondonia, which is

for

lust.

when working with food and keeping homes clean. The arts and culture course teachtion

a living.

funded by

education

Icam

ing, cleaning

(pronounced kaa-jeeone of the many programs

is

for adults

is

homework.

Health-care adults to

CADI-RO ho)

literacy course

cannot read or write. This

Children with

countries, teaching skills to families

make

suffer

course enables them to assist their

such as Brazil fami-

and communities do not have such an opportunity. The Evangelical Missionary Church of Canada (EMCC) is working in Brazil and many other lies

so they can afford to

who

for Brazilians

from addictions.

blessed with

the ability to learn these skills at

In countries

and culand has a support group called

GARRA

almost anytime

including

skills

literacy, health care, arts

assigned tasks.

As Canadians we’re

many

lies in Brazil

GARRA helps people with addictions ranging

call

visit

519-894-9800.

(Photo by Becky Sharpe) Sewing, cooking, reading and keeping clean are just a few of the basic skills most Canadians take for granted. A mission group helps uneducated adults in Brazil learn these skills as well as many more.

'

Support groups make a difference CARA LICHTY

By

and sup-

ferent counselling agencies

port groups based in just

Eating Disorder Awareness Week, which was Feb. 4 to Feb. 9

K-W.

they’ve

discussed their problem

with their doctor.

The Eating Disorder’s Coalition

“I feel like

a fly-on-the-wall a

lot

of Waterloo Region has been put-

of the time when I’m working.

ting together

two weekly, non-profit support groups. The first is for the men and women suffering with

makes me

the majority of those living with an

an eating disorder, and the other for the parents or spouses.

person,” she- said. Pringle said patients often come to her concerned that the doctor

eating disorder are between the ages of 18-30, and it affects both

the coalition, said she

shouldn’t be the only

at the college,

when such an epidem-

time of year ic is

brought to society’s attention.

According

to

Statistics

men and women.

Canada

About one

in

who

of people

recovering from either anorexia or

every week.

The

some cases

in

those dealing with the

disease are not alone, and because

it

so prevalent there are several dif-

is

ROGERS I

W

f

Your World Right

Now

J

Top 10 Fergalicious

2.

I

3.

I

-

4.

This

is

a great cause.”

Arthur also said she hopes the coalition will be able to start fundraising so that more advertis-

up at the gatherings each week. Darlow Pringle, a receptionist

Money

The Bank

On The

- Lit'

In

Scrappy

Hotline

Pretty Picky

Promise Shortie Like

10.

Bow Wow Smack That

“It

would be

like discussing

how

smoking with someone who’s never smoked a day in their life,” said Pringle. “I difficult

it

is

to quit

meetings for those with the disease run every Wednesday night from caregivers meetings run the

same

(Photo

by Cara

Lichty)

Calling all students Steve Coote and Craig Ballantyne stand inside Door 3 on Feb. 12 to promote job opportunities for students at Bell Technical Solutions.

time each Tuesday.

of us relaxation means

lot

Mine

time.

relieve pain.

Meditation

a simple practice

is

amount of sary

is

time.

All that

relaxation better

Kerry

Lemon, company

you

is

Neha, a representative from Sahaja Yoga Ontario, said

repre-

sales

sentative

sit.

clothing

a

who

has

much

you, giving boost to get

a

through the rest of your day or week.

PHONES REDEFINED

ation that

is

is <

r JjjL

mediation is

might be hun-

dreds of years old but

is

still

effective today.

Studies have shown that medi-

to

but

she

to

It

new

her

be a Buddhist yoga, this exercise

for anyone.

said

inars,

people of every age. Practising mediation does not

or a master at

4$

"If

a

ular with

mean you need

group session might be more

beneficial.

means of relaxbecoming more popis

*

out with mediation that attending

ring tunes today.

Meditation

I

she thinks for people just starting

for a

first

ting in silence for

J

attended mfedi-

sem-

that

7

a quiet spot and a place to

tat ion is

^

neces-

is

“At

found the idea of sit20 minutes a little ridiculous,” she said. “But being able to think about nothing and to just ... be, feels amazing.” Although mediation can be done individually it can also be done in iu group setting.

involving no props and a minimal

another form of

4800 on your Rogers wireless

download your favourite

can lower your heart rate and blood pressure, which will reduce not only stress, but also tation

on the couch with a snack of choice and watching Seinfeld reruns. However, regardless of how good it might feel it there

Akon

Text ‘'PLAY'’ to to

their

to

Just close your eyes and relax

at the

-

phone

relate

see the progression in patients after

Ciara

9.

-

to

issues.

6:30 pan. to 8 p.m. The parental or at

a doctor’s office, said she loves to

For a

7.

-

numbers

ing will be possible to get

sitting

6.

8.

won’t be able

think these self-help groups are an

coming.

By CARA LICHTY

Irreplaceable - Beyonce

-

see the positive energy inflate in a

Fergie

Angel

w

It

can

amazing way for people to connect and realize how many people are on their same level.” The Eating Disorder’s Coalition

Luv It - Young Jeezy Wanna love You - Akon

Lips of an - Hinder

5.

I

the people wouldn’t keep

of February 5

1.

good when

a difference,” said Arthur, “or else

RealTrax w ring tunes Week

attend the meetings

“These meetings must be making

both.

positive side of such high sta-

tistics is that

for

glad the

is

support groups have a strong core

every four people are suffering or bulimia or

who works

Barbara Arthur,

is

feel so

be a

you

start out in a group you have support and can ask

questions,” she said. also

learn

"You

will

proper formulas and

techniques.”

Meditation might be something

o v e s how it can

you find it hard to let go and get focused. If you’re inter-

refresh-

ested there are free sessions at the

little

er during a stressful day.

will

to look into if

KPL on 25 Queen Tuesday at 7 p.m.

St.

every


Feature

Former Argo’s

SPOKE, February

is Black History February Month, a time to celebrate the history and accomplishments of peo-

people like

Dame

I

Norman, Okla. think those same people

in

“Do you

would

were rooting for me to make the hits and sack the quarterback?

And

yet

wasn't allowed to eat

I

he said.

their restaurant,”

in

era.

the time, and

all

I

people that

tell

Liggins maintains that education biggest

the

is

tool

in.,

fighting

football

was very fortunate

“I

to

have a

football

scholarship

of winning both a major college bowl game and a professional

University

Oklahoma, to somewhat educated,,

championship, and “Granny” is one of them. “To achieve something you want

which has helped me open mind,” he said.

thrill

to

do when you’re

to play football,

in

Grade 6 or

unbelievable,”

it’s

my dream, so I’m just coasting right now.” Born in 1946 in Tulsa, Okla., Liggins was at the heart of

he said.

“I fulfilled

American segregation. “Because the race thing was so devastating back then, I was ashamed to be black,” he said. “Black people back then would use cream to whiten their skin and straighten their hair. Then James Brown came out, and he powered the whole thing about being proud that you're black.”

When

Liggins was six years old

mother to raise three boys on her own. “My mother did a great job raising three boys without a father,” his father died, leaving his

Liggins said. her.

“Therefore,

I

owe

She provided a roof over our

heads.”

After his father’s death, Liggins

began taking an

When

interest in sports.

came time for junior high school, he knew that football was his game of choice. it

'

(Internet photo)

Granville Liggins,

known as “Granny”

to fans, is

among

the few

former football players who fulfilled his dream by winning both a major college bowl game and a professional championship.

whom

of

Knowing that his Oklahoma. mother could not afford it, he

experiences with racism, Liggins recalls one specific incident with

played hard through high school and earned an athletic scholarship to play for the Sooners.

great emotion.

“I told my mother that I was going to do it, and I did it,” he said. “It was one of my biggest achieve-

for

ments.”

made

I

sort of buried

good with academics.” Liggins’ first dream was football

for

the

to play

University

The school had 15,000-20,000 students enrolled at the time, 100

of

In 1966, Liggins

was working

at

to

we

still

lunch. Bill

In spite of the Civil Rights

having passed

in the

United

“The advice black person

would give

I

to

any

By

get educated.

is

doing that, no one can steal that from you; it’s in your head,” he said. “There are bad people on the white side and the black side, but eventually those people will disappear. Education is the key to tolerance,

compassion, the

ability

to

deal with things, to accept people, to

be able to judge people by char-

acter.”

Recently, Liggins was chosen by

- along with Mike “Pinball” Clemons, Chuck

the City of Toronto

round by the Detroit Lions, who offered him a $10,000 contract and asked him to switch from his natu-

“It was great to be at City Hall, where governments are formed, and they had the ceremony going

ral

nosetackle,

position,

line-

to

“Then a

call

name

comes, some guy by

Munroe,” Liggins said. “He said ‘I’m from Canada. We’d like you to come the

Ealey,

Curtis

on,” he said. “I

CFL would be

Liggins

made

We

think

the best for your

the trip to Calgary

and immediately

by the

fell in

love with

“Cowboys, Indians, horses;

the

with

a

great.”

Canadian dollar was worth more than the American dollar,” he said. “I was rich. So I came to Canada.” the for played Liggins 1967-1972, from Stampeders going to three Grey Cups, defeating the Toronto Argonauts in 1971 the

to get his lone ring.

traded to the Argonauts

1973 and played

in

Toronto

until

his retirement in 1978.

He remained

in

ability to

deal with

by character.” Granville Liggins,

former Toronto Argonaut

$3,000 signing

bonus.

He was

age,

things, to accept people, to be able to judge people

I

‘that’s myself to The Oklahoma!” Liggins said. Stampeders offered him a $13,000

1967,

was

my

honoured

is the key to compassion, tolerance,

thought

contract,

city

at

“Education

the city.

in

you,

Dick

of

style of play.’”

“In

tell

living in Toronto, to be

backer.

the

to a restaurant for

other races and cultures.

make the drafted in the 10th

Liggins next goal was to

NFL. He was

him by the university. One day, when the lunch whistle sounded at

way

tied to ignorance;

is

Bruce Smith and Ulysses - as one of the top-five Argonauts of all time, in honour of Black History Month.

see our city (Calgary).

their

see black

and white.” Following Oklahoma’s Orange Bowl win over Tennessee in 1968,

the Tulsa Paper Co., a job procured

noon, he and two white co-workers

have an

Talking about the recent Super Bowl, featuring the first black head coaches to make it to the championship game, Liggins said he was angered by the attention being paid to the colour of their skin. “Maybe it was something they had do,” he said. to “Unfortunately,

were black. And only three were on the football team. “On road trips that was a problem, because it was two guys to a room,” he said. “Unfortunately, one guy was on his own. Nobody wanted to room with him.” When asked about his personal

myself in sports because I didn’t really have a male figure in my life,” he said. “That was the only thing I wanted to do in my life, I wasn’t really that “I think

the

to

of

become

7,

importance of education. So much of prejudice

people not knowing enough about

racism.

get to experience the

be treated.

I

tear up.”

I

like to

everyone lived by this one rule, wouldn't that be a nice world to live in? wanted to be treated nice, so treated other people nice. Since I’ve been in Canada, I’ve done that.” Liggins realizes the gift and “If

I

“That’s

the hypocrisy of justice back then.

That was the

Argonauts. Exciting enough now?

many

1

and Liggins took his hamburger and made the lonely walk back to work. Liggins recalls that on a Saturday afternoon that same year, Oklahoma was playing Notre

At 60 years old, Liggins spends days working as a salesman in Oakville, and his nights relaxing with his wife Angie, walking his dog and enjoying life. At first glance, his life may not appear to be one of great excitement. But get him started and he will happily laugh and tell you stories of defeated obstacles and dreams come true - dreams that include a 1968 Orange Bowl victory, a Grey Cup ring and a teamMVP award with the Toronto not

in the restaurant.

it

His two co-workers stayed behind,

his

who

“In America, you have the extreme rich, the extreme poor and chaos in the middle,” he said. “We have no aren't perfect here, but problem walking down the street wouldn’t in Oakville or Toronto. do that in Detroit.” Liggins maintains if everyone would follow one piece of advice, all of our problems would disappear: treat others the way you

lunch but immediately told that

he could not eat

Granville Liggins.

There are

was served

States in 1964, Liggins his

players

— Page 17

2007

a cause for celebration

life

By CHRISTOPHER MILLS

ple of black heritage:

19,

Toronto follow-

ing his retirement because he loved

what Canada stood for. "The thing love about Toronto and Canada that they don’t have in the U.S is that in Canada we have I

Today, Liggins is content to enjoy the peacefulness of life and embrace the progress that is being

made. progress was State's Boise incredible upset ot his alma mater in this year's Fiesta Bowl.

He

said

exemplified

such in

“When was in my senior year, we won the Orange Bowl in Miami 1

and there were only three blacks on the team,” he said. “When they went (to the Fiesta Bowl) this year, the team was 70 per cent black. Liggins’ embraces life with his wife Angie - who just happens to be the aunt of disgruntled kicker Mike Vanderjagt -

when he

finds

NFL

and himself feeling

In

Liggins also says the gaps between the wealthy and the poor are more prominent in the United

down, he slides in a DVD ot that soggy Sunday in 1971 when his Calgary Stampeders stunned the Toronto juggernaut to win the Grey Cup. “It was the highlight of my CFL career,” he said. “I watch it every now and then and it cheers me

Ulysses Curtis.

States.

up.”

systems to

lift

people up,” he said.

two things do: get sick and

“In the U.S, there are

you can’t afford get old.

We

to

have systems that will

help people.” (Internet photo)

honour of Black History Month, Liggins was chosen by the City of Toronto as one of the top-five Argonauts of all time. Other honourees included Mike Clemons, Chuck Ealey, Bruce Smith and


.

Page 18

Entertainment

— SPOKE, February 19, 2007

The Hip are anything

'E Week of February

March

21

2007

19,

September 23 October 22

-

April 19

but tragic

-

By KRISTIN GRIFFERTY You dare that

reality

dream but know around. You are

to is

held to your roots by authority

and leadership and know that when the time arises, you must be the leader. Keep dreaming, reality will always be here.

You

regularly perform a balanc-

good at Whether in love or friendships, you have a way of keeping yourself and others equally happy. Watch your feet; you never know if you'll slip. ing act and

are pretty

staying on top.

Taurus April 20

May

-

Scorpio 20

October 23

November

When you want something your

and

determination ensure you aren't empty-handed. You work for what's yours while

many

will

think things are handed to

know you deserve

you. Let them

what you

receive.

Your passion

May

21

21

is

Sagittarius

June 21

-

November 22 December 21

decipher

regardless of

solution

wi.thin

when

you're

occur-

chased.

You

While your mind may be in control, don't neglect your heart. The two may not always agree

the

thrive

Ballads

one being on high-ener-

ring.

gy and high-tension situations

but that doesn't

and love adrenaline rushes. Don't be afraid of getting caught; it could be just as fun.

make

Cancer

fljpp ijjfMBb

void.

it

June 22

-

fWJ

July 22

Capricorn December 22

Your emotions often lead you the paths you choose and you usually begin sentences with "I feel." You hold tight to your memories and hate for goods things to end. Everyone loves a softy so try to stay this way.

You

who demands To many you would be

harmless

if

that drive ful

brought out

many

lighters as the

“lovers” (as anointed by Downie)

scrambled for their cellphones and cameras to try to capture Downie

moment of standing still. Downie was nothing short of

in a rare

43-year-old rocker who was dressed all in black, danced, pranced and shimmied all at once to the soulful sound of his brilliant, as the

Blue

By JENN CURTIS

you forward. Be care-

how you pursue your

and

feel

make

The Blue Man Group just wrapped up their Toronto shows at I

same

at the

time.

You

intellectually

best

for

is

been formances in I’ve

you but

your emotions get trampled on in the process. Share

don't

when

let

friends ask

how you do

it;

your strength can help them.

right

are there to help set things

on the big

comes

them per-

to a

my

few theatre perlife, but none like

scale, but

when

to personal matters,

it

you'd

rather let them lie. Before you can help save the world you need to focus on the home front. How can you fix the world’s problems when you can't fix your own?

art,

February 19 March 20

August 23 September 22

in

order to gain.

fine.

Hip their unofficial showed their enjoy-

Tragically

national band,

ment by singing along, beers in one hand and a joint in the other, as security looked the other way as happy fans swayed to the music with their arms around friends and neighbouring strangers.

When

that

but

it

cele-

Sherri said

Wood it

from the Toronto

best in a Feb. 9 article

that “they’re the

comfort food of

rock, firmly rooted in our national identity,

and

it’s

hard not to get

into their bluesy brand of

mashed

potatoes.”

The Tragically Hip

is scheduled perform at the Juno Awards in Saskaton on April

to

1

hit

the

They pulled people on stage and came out into the audience. The blue men kept me interested

stepped into

throughout the entire show. I’ve never seen anything so funny and

even though people can

I

know the personalities of each of the blue men individually. The Blue Man Group concept is got to

so simple, yet it works so well. Three men dress exactly alike and all

are

painted blue. it

Why

are they

shows uniformity

really

the

all

same on

we

inside.

From

the

moment

I

the Panasonic Theatre

I

felt

like

1

may

as pieces of plastic pipes, to

long white pieces of tissue paper

amazing music.

we were

told to tie

ourselves wherever tied

mine

in

my

hair.

we

No

you

I

one knew

why we were given the paper or why it seemed so important. The few rows were also given raincoats because paint often splashed first

off the stage.

Throughout the show the Blue

Man Group engaged

the audience and made us a part of the show.

-

McCormick

tummy.

in the right

is

it.

As

they played their

added florescent paint in

the black light that

items, such

make

drums they glowed was in the

that

theatre.

At one point all three blue men went into the audience while the lights were flashing. One came and stood on the back of the chair in front of us and I guess he liked my dad’s bald head because he took some blue paint off his head and put it on my dad. At the end of the show the blue men went to the back of the theatre and pulled tons of that white tissue paper over the entire audienM Everyone was covered in it. As we were exiting the theatre the blue men and all the musicians in the show were out in the lobby and were posing for pictures and meeting their fans. This is one of the best performances Eve been to, and I’ve seen shows on Broadway in New York City.

a third-year

journalism student holding

They used everyday

them on wanted.

feel like indigestion

will lead

inventive.

was part of the show. The ushers were handing people

your mind can't

unsettling feeling in your it

Canada Day

unique

decide and your heart has you confused; acknowledge that

Sure

a

Sun

Trust your gut and things will

direction. Don't ignore

Tiffany

humour, music and intelligence amazing show. felt like I

in their

blue? Because

Pisces

be

many

bration and outdoor cottage-like

Loyal Canadian fans, who have been accustomed to making The

and

The Blue Man Group combines

are

You have an urge in your life to keep things in check much like a bookkeeper keeps ledgers, you always want to know if there's a profit or loss. Don't keep living your life in the form of a bank book, sometimes one must lose

than 20 years of perform-

at

ing more.

numerous microphone poles as Downie is animated which keeps the crowd happy and wantprops,

had the

form.

January 20 February J 8

August

decisions based on what

More ances

Sinclair

venues. The Tragically Hip proved that if given instruments and a microphone, they can rock out any size crowd and any type of venue and still have fans begging and screaming for more.

look different on the outside,

great pleasure of seeing

-

You

and drummer Johnny Fay, accustomed to years of Downie’s unusual stage presence, rocked along with him. With a white handkerchief and

and

goals

and don't overuse your authority; no one likes a bully.

the ability to think

members Gord Downie, Gord

and Rob Baker have been making music together, along with bandmates Paul Langlois and Johnny Fay, for the past 23 years. The band is immensely popular with fellow Canadians. Tragically Hip

Man Group a

this.

You have

(Internet photo)

The

not for your passions

Aquarius ^3

it

such as Long Time and Fiddler’s Green

the Panasonic Theatre and

'

new

Guitarists Paul Langlois and Rob Baker, bassist Gord Sinclair

are a person

authority.

old or

bandmates.

-

January 19

down

how

was.

the chase, especially

a situation

a

moments of

You love

the

The Kingston-born group has been making music for decades, and has kept the same loyal fan base along the way. Playing a smorgasbord of oldies and newbies, the Hip belted out familiar songs like At the Hundredth Meridian, Poets and Bobcaygeon, while sprinkling in some new tunes such as In View. Fans assumed their role in the whole performance, singing along with Downie to every song,

Running You process information and

to

stage with finesse and charisma.

-

you're

Gemini

Downie took

entertain,

untouchable completely involved. You're rarely persuaded to give up and usually end up devastated when things don't work out. You need to know when to ease up on yourself.

when

Mofe than 20,000 Torontonians were treated to yet another stellar performance from Gord Downie and the gang as The Tragically Hip rocked the Air Canada Centre on Feb. 8. Prompt, eager and ready to

The Blue Man Group captures audience and makes them feel

fate

their

in the

palm of her hand.

never felt before. This show would be a fantastic time for the young and old and everyone in between. like they’ve

(Internet photo)

The Blue Man Group wrapped up Panasonic Theatre.

its

recent Toronto tour at the


Sports

Dodge MCNANNEY

By ALEX

risk

it

week

every

at the rec centre.

Brian Takahashi, a first-year gen-

and science student, loves the sport so much, he decided to bring it to the Conestoga College

eral arts

team if they get down to one playand during that time that person has to try to get the opposing team down to two players to make the match a tie.

“We have almost 100 people playing dodge ball

The game

ball.

sport,

many

school and high school for

lic

of

its

participants.

Takahashi oversees the league, and is

also a referee.

He

said he volunteered at the rec

game

centre and wanted to see the

brought to Conestoga. has been a

It

process so

far,

as

of a trying

bit

some

players are

adjusting-to the rules, such as

still

not being allowed to pick up two

same

balls at the

time. There

is

also a two-minute time limit for a

we

but

didn’t get

to

laugh.

But the thing most is that

ancl science student

dodge ball has brought back fond memories of pubintramural

get to play,

be refs, so I kind of got suckered,” he said with a

first-year general arts

Introduced this semester as an

— Page 19

which would be 40 or 50 people,” he said. “But we have almost doubled that. We have almost 100 people playing dodge ball every week.” Takahashi said he was hoping to play, but had to become a referee due to a shortage. “I originally thought I was going enough volunteers

Brian Takahashi, dodge

... is

2007

eight teams,

to

every week.”

intramural circuit.

19,

turnout hits the target

ball

er

Taking a ball in the head at about 50 km/h isn’t something most people would enjoy, but approximately 100 Conestoga students are willing to

SPOKE, February

likes ball

“That’s definitely one of the prob-

lems right now, is getting everyone on the same page,” he said. “There are lots of people who want to play and have great fun playing, but because they don’t know the rules they get frustrated by it.”

But regardless of the kinks in league, Takahashi said he’s been surprised at the.turnout. “When we first did up the schedule, we only scheduled for the

that it

Takahashi

appears dodge

be sticking around for

will

the future.

“Oh

yeah,

ty to

draw people

After Feb.

sustain-

definitely

able,” he said of the

8,

game’s

abili-

to play.

K Command

is at

the top of the standings with a 10-

2 win-loss record.

Ram Rod

is in

second at 9-3. In a tie for third are the Rusty Trombones and Rusty Manor, each at 8-3. In fifth are the Engineers at 6-3 and rounding out the top six are

Team BRT

at 6-4.

(Photo by Atex McNanney)

Members

of

a dodge

ball

team compete

in

action on Feb. 8.

Online course perfect for hockey fans By VANESSA BUTLER People who are passionate about hockey will be happy to learn that OntarioLearn.com offers an online course called, The Hockey Hall of Fame Presents. Dan Piedra, director of continuing education at the college, said he decided to take the hockey course which covered the history, business aspects and political side of the game. “I’m a hockey fanatic,” he said. “I've always thought it was neat the way hockey connected to the culture of society.”

The course’s contents involve four discussion

which

sessions,

each have a series of topics to cover, such as violence in hockey, business and hockey in Canada. The course requires 42 hours of

commitment, a grade of 55 per cent to pass, and has a mid-term, an essay and a written final exam. “The student doesn’t have to know anything about hockey,” said Piedra, who happens to be an

Colin his

James

for those

who

don’t play, but are

just interested.”

Piedra said just over half of the

is

a day

I’ll

always remem-

And

the first time

I

saw Colin James

live.

«ffhe packed house

at

Centre

Jpare

was captive moment he strolled on

in the

from

the

essay,

stick.

to

The

instructors of the course are

Kevin Shea, editor of publications and online features at the Canadian Hockey Hall of Fame, and Phil Pritchard, who has been working at the hall since 1988, and is vice-president and curator.

pictures

depicting

as Cherrios, beverages or a particular

team.

The hockey

stick

is

not just a stick to

“It’s

also

tool.

play

hockey with,” said Piedra. “In Canada, we seem to value what a hockey stick is; it has some value used for gardening, fura part of culture.” Today, a copy of Piedra’s essay, Evolution of the Hockey Stick, sits in the Hockey Hall of Fame archives for everyone to read. it.

It is

niture;

The until

it’s

hall

is

5 p.m.,

open from 10 a.m.

Monday

to Friday

successful completion of

and Sunday and on Saturday from

the course a student will be able

hockey

9:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. The general admission price is $13, youth

and trace its development, history, role and structure as a labour

and seniors are $9 and children three years old and younger are

Upon

to explain the origins of

organization.

They

will

also

be

said, referring to his third Little

Band foray

into

blues,

soul

free.

rhythm and blues. James belted out songs from all of his Little Big Band albums, including lots of old favourites and plenty

talented musicians, Colin

Backed by seven phenomenally James and The Little Big Band were a smash

songs from his latest solo album because, as he said, sometimes you just have to do something a little dif-

success in their Kitchener debut.

ferent.

words what that show meant to me. His music has been a part of my life since I was a kid, and hearing him live for an hour and a half was like a long, can’t really put into

leisurely stroll that

I

all

down memory

lane.

won’t soon forget.

“It really

means a

come

lot to

N

mfi

Big and

of new tracks. The charismatic performer even threw in a couple of

hand.

you’ve

Piedra’s

used as a marketing

stage, guitar

One

he included hockey sticks with endorsements on them, such In

were guys. For his essay Piedra wrote about the history of the hockey stick, including where it began, how it evolved, the changes that were made over time and how it is more than just a piece of equipment. He also included diagrams illustrating the evolution of the hockey 18 students

doing something a little different than usual,” the Saskatchewan native

Freezing cold. Cloudy. Snowy.

I

hockey community, marketing and merchandise strategies and the impact and growth of hockey as a sport in Canada. the

Saskatchewan native captivates audience at the Centre In The Square

ber.

in

able to identify Canada’s place in

rocks the house

By STEPHANIE IRVINE Feb. 6

avid hockey player himself. “The course gives you history and insight into the game. It’s meant

me

out to support

that

me

5

*s

vn Waterloo iveActs

beatgoeson.com

Clearly Kitchener likes different. A roaring standing ovation

DMfjl

brought the ever-modest James and Co. back on stage to perform a three-song encore to a rapt audience. It was an experience I’ll always remember, and one that set the bar for all shows to come.

V

(Internet photo)

Colin James; Kitchener debut

Vi


Page 20

Sports

— SPOKE, February 19, 2007

,?e;i

»-»«

Conestoga Condors goalie Brandon Holman denies a Canadore Panther Condors also lost against St. Lawrence College.

player’s shot.

The Panthers would go on

to clinch the

game, winning 3-2

in

a shootout. The

Shootout losses topple men’s hockey team By ADAM BLACK

Lawrence College (SLC) saw

lots

of back and forth action. Forward

The men’s extramural hockey team fell short of glory at the Conestoga College Extramural Men’s Hockey Tournament on Feb. 9, losing two games in shootouts, one being the consolation finals.

Ryan Walker opened up up

ing, picking

and shovelling

his it

the scor-

own rebound past

the

SLC

Hookey scored off the first shot of the game. They dominated the

The opposition, however, seemed to mimic Conestoga’s play, scoring in the exact same fashion just moments later. Before the first period was over, SLC would score again from an awkward angle. The Condors responded in the

game, constantly putting

second, as a blistering shot from

the

In

game

first

against

the

Condors came out soaring. Forward Joe

Canadore Panthers,

entire

the

pressure on the Panthers’ defence.

However, with less than three minutes left in the game, a Conestoga defensive miscue lead to a Canadore goal. This seemed to shake up the Condors, because 20 seconds

later the

Panthers scored

again to go up 2-1

in

the dying

minutes.

goaltender.

from defenceman Markus Churcher caught the goalie off the point

guard to

game

The was far from done, as Hookey would score two more goals 30 seconds apart. SLC scored one more, but the Condors held on to win 4-3. This tie

the

at

two.

scoring for the Condors

sent

Conestoga

to the consolation

Conestoga Condor player Ryan Cote, retrieve the

puck

in

right,

gets tangled up with a Canadore player while trying to

the defensive zone.

final.

“We played

hard, but

pay off. Some the aspects weren’t in

didn’t really

of

our favour,

like

the reffing,

but what can you do?”

Brandon Holman, Conestoga Condor goalie

But the Condors wouldn’t give With seven seconds left a goal by forward Steve Bithel tied the up.

game

at

two.

to a shootout,

2-0,

making

The game then went which Conestoga

lost

the final score 3-2 for

Canadore. This crushed all hopes of back-to-back tournament wins for the Condors.

The second game against

and final matchup of day against the Fleming Aiks, Condors came out flying again,

In the third

it

St.

the the

with Bithel scoring off a scramble

Fleming began to get into penalty trouble, and Conestoga was able to capitalize on a 5-3 powerplay with a goal from forward Nathan Klinkman. However, the Condors would soon find themselves in loads of penalty' trouble as well. Two powerplay goals helped the Aiks tie the game at two. In the final minutes of the game, both teams became frustrated, exchanging hits and slashes. The game would be decided in a shootout, which the Aiks won 2-1, making the final in front

of the

score 3-2.

net.

The only shootout goal

was scored by Hookey.

Defenceman explained

why

Boettger

Scott

things got a

heated with Fleming

in

little

the final

game. “The game didn't really get heated between both teams, it was more heated between the teams and the ref,” said Boettger. “The ref was making all sorts of calls.” Even though the tournament didn’t end in Conestoga’s favour, the team didn’t put all the blame on themselves.

“We

played hard, but

off,” said goalie

“Some of the

it didn't pay Brandon Holman.

aspects weren’t

favour, like the reffing, but

our what

in

can you do?” The men’s hockey team plays their next tournament on March 9 St.

Clair College,

Chatam campus.

in at

Photos by

Adam

Black


Spoke20070219