Page 1

Men’s varsity soccer

Trades barrier Parents have to be convinced the trades are a viable career choice

The Conestoga Condors faced the Sheridan Bruins

News

in

Marathon of Hope

home

the season

8;

“Terry

opener.

A

learning

newsroom

for

journalism students

Fox ran

for

our

lives,

now

it’s

our

turn to even the score.”

News 13

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

Monday, September 25, 2006

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

38th Year

— No. 15

e

Conestoga hopes to raise $45,000 for United

Way

BY CARA LICHTY In just over a

month’s time the

2006 United Way Campaign at Conestoga College will take place. This year the United Way committee and Conestoga Students Inc. are teaming up to hold this two-week campaign, which runs from Oct. 23 to Nov. 3. During that time they hope to raise money and awareness.

“The United Way causes

huge

a

ripple effect,” said Sheila Hollidge,

chair of the United “It

Way

campaign.

causes such a positive impact

on so many

different

organiza-

tions.”

During the two weeks, the campaign will feature various events

Way

including the annual United

barbecue and a number of other events that will be sponsored by Chartwells Cafeterias. The United Way committee is working on having various agencies

come

ing the

to the

first

Doon campus dur-

week of the campaign.

(Photo by Eric Murphy)

Conestoga remembers Conestoga College’s

Dawson College

in

flag

was lowered

to half-mast for four

days out of respect

for

those

killed

and

injured in the tragic shooting at

Montreal, Sept. 13.

Hollidge said she hopes this will really bring a face to the agencies

and give the college community a chance to see the impact these groups have on a day-to-day basis. “If the agencies come to the school to show what they’re about

OSAP woes Incorrectly

makes everything more real and actually brings it home,” said

can plague students

out forms can delay funds by a

filling

week or more

it

By DAVID ROGERS

Hollidge. difference in

The new school year is underway,

any fundraising effort.” This year’s campaign hopes to bring in roughly $45,000 between

and the last thing students want to worry about is not having enough money to get through the year. Hopefully most OSAP recipients filled out their forms correctly; if not, they may be in for a

“It really

makes a

the faculty, staff

and students.

Hollidge said any form of support goes a long

way and

6,000 students,

if

dollar

it

that with

each donated a

would be a huge contribu-

tion.

“I

a lot of the students are

working hard

to

said

Hollidge,

goal

is

to

make

make ends meet,” adding their real the students

more

aware.

released.

“Last year I applied for OSAP and they granted me (about)

“Until

Matresky

at

bringing people together from so

many communities

is

a really great

common problem

is

students

Each student and supporting

viduals, parents or spouses if mar-

are

ried,

required

declaration

signature

to

sign

consent

forms. “If students haven’t signed those

forms and submitted them to our

forget that last step of the process,”

of the agencies that will

Matresky

sholIidge@conestogac.on.ca.

“A

lot

then

the

loan

doesn’t

of students sometimes just said.

“So they come here looking for their loan and it’s not here. “Another common problem is if there is supporting documentation required to back up something that they’ve put on their OSAP application, they don’t submit that either.”

Students should expect a delay of

OSAP

when he had an was

trying to

car),

I

may be

not, they

in for

sell.

didn’t even have (a

because

I

form,

that

could also affect the amount of funds released in January. “If, for example, they’re not earning any money while they’re in school and then when we question

them further and they say they are and this is how much (they’ll) be making over the time period, it could have a dramatic impact on they’ll

be getting

for the subsequent release January,” Matresky said.

“Sometimes students don’t ize

how

in

real-

important that information

is.” •

lyier Lemon, a third-year busimanagement studies student at

ness

it

I

it

it

and got it appraised ship, and brought

you misreport your income, or the income of dependents on the

how much OSAP

they found out

me a book which was much more was actually worth. I went

value on

If

application

wasn’t driving

did and they gave

a

than

original

started

issue with a car he

at the time, but if

problem

at a dealer-

in

the

new

value.”

At

point.

this

Lemon’s

OSAP

information began to change.

“A person office set

my new asking

up

at all

the financial

aid

these papers, put on

car value, and then started

me

about

if I

this year.

“I got

$5,000, and I got my $3,000 at the beginning (of the school

“I said

indi-

lot to us.”

can contact Sheila Hollidge at

OSAP

have filled out their forms

correctly,

major

year).”

surprise.

means a

Students interested in working with the United Way committee

satisfied,”

recipients

show

offices,

women’s crisis centre, Anselma House and many more.

are

that

said, “it will not print the

Hopefully most

up here looking for their loan and they haven’t done part of the

print.”

a

computer

had

OSAP last year.

issues with

Lemon’s

Conestoga

“College students are the future; seeing them putting in the effort

proceeds are the Food Bank of Canada, the Literacy Group, K-W Multicultural Centre,

the

College, said, “Probably the most

feeling,” said Kolinski.

receive

tell

loan for them.”

Paul Matresky, manager of finan-

and awards

we

the conditions

all

process.”

Penny Kolinski, campaign director at the Waterloo United Way, said she is grateful for any support from the college. “To see Conestoga College

Some

Conestoga College,

surprise.

cial aid

know

one week or more for such errors to and OSAP funds be fixed,

was working

beginning, to

who

happen

in

January.”

Some

students

manage

the

OSAP

paperwork well, but do not manage their funds well once they have the loan.

“Some good

at

not

so

students are tremendously

some

budgeting, and

good

at

are

budgeting,”

Matresky said. Those students can be found in the financial aid office from the middle of November onwards, looking for more money. “We don’t generally advance on OSAP, because it’s like robbing Peter to pay Paul,” Matresky said. “So we try and tide them over with some bursary funds we have here, if

it’s

available, if

it’s

a true

emergency.”

For those students who have budgeting, Matresky and

during the school year and what

trouble

and how many hours per week.” “In January I went to get my loan, and they didn’t have one for me,” Lemon said. “They said that there were information changes and I didn’t fit the requirements to get any more money. No one had let me know about that, so I was just out of luck and had to put my books on credit.” He has had no OSAP problems

financial

not,

at the

it

knows what’s going

aid

staff advise

not to

pay rent upfront for the entire year.

This also helps you if you have issues with your landlord, so you can withhold some money until issues are dealt with.

Matresky tells students, pay to end of the calendar year. “Then wait until January if you want to pay the rest out of your secthe

ond instalment.”


.

Page 2

News

— SPOKE, September 25, 2006

Now deep thoughts questions answered by

CONESTOGA

random students

By ANNELISE THOMPSON Starting ,

Describe your

first kiss

business

degree program underway

Conestoga College

...with Random

New

...

this

students

fall

looking to obtain a business degree have more options than just attending university.

Conestoga College’s School of Business

now

international

has a four-year

business degree

program which college students can take in order to obtain an honors degree now, rather than

“My

first

kiss

was

(Photo in

kindergarten.

We

the sandbox.

She was

were

CSI in

Sheena Sonser (left to Amy Kunz keep an eye out

director

director

by Brandon Walker)

CSI VP Roxy Stanciu and the needs of the students.

right),

for

Business.

The program has 26

great.”

CSI changes

Josh Nagtegaal, third-year

machining co-op

The

He

up.”

of a new school year brings new hopes and expectations

three years

We

were watching My Pet Monster and my par-

old.

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI). There appears to be a buzz of excitement coming from the new CSI office, now located near the Tim Hortons on the second

made

first-year

start

from

us kiss so they could take a picture.” ents

Erin Freeman, law and security

reiterated

that

Stanciu,

the Sanctuary,

CSI’s vice-

ble.

we

weren’t as

visi-

Also,

“Now, we’re getting 15 to 20 drop by in a day,” he said. CSI is also excited about the new Student Life Centre. “We’ve put a vious location.

when was I

1

5.

saying goodbye.

at

We It

lot of time and effort into it. We played a very heavy role in the planning of it.” Jackson said it is tentatively scheduled to be open by

camp were

was

Fines,

draw

larger crowds.

“We’re a more social

“Kayla

Newman. Grade

6 graduation party. We made out in the laundry room.”

Jeremy Howey first-year firefighting

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

many

different

Tyler Fines,

Last year,

CSI director CSI went through to the executive. The

The new

year started with Justin Falconer as

Laura

president and Leanne Bird as vice-

November, Bird from her position

Bingeman, Troy Brundle, Nicole

president. Then, in

Desousa, Tyler Fines. Amy Kunz and Sheena Sonser. Brundle, a third-year broadca,sting student, said he wants to make CSI’s events larger than life. “Although I won’t be partying, it’s exciting to see the inner workings

was

disqualified

because her status

changed

to

part

at the college

time;

45

it

stu-

of 2007.

we

“so the

are fairly gratified with

numbers we have now.”

He

also said

remember

it is

important to

that students gradu-

from a diploma program 2008 may enter the third year of the degree program, which in

again will boost enrolment.

“A

of students

lot

who

are

already in (business) diploma programs want to eventually go into a degree program,” he said, “so this is an opportunity for

people to enter a degree pro-

gram

right

from

their existing

program, at the same location.” Another reason for business students to consider enrolling in

degree program is their advancement in the business

the

world.

“There

is

a certain currency

with degrees, and that in many situations in which a student

wants to progress beyond midlevel, they may be required to have a degree,” said Mensink.

A student who enters the degree program needs to be preintensive study pared for including a heavier course load

kinds of people.”

many changes

directors.

“We want to

away from the high school dance aspects, too. We want our events to be like college parties.”

board with

target of

fall

but

confident

ating

get

the introduction of a completely directors are Caleb Bender,

law and security

too.

a

end of October. He said the barbistro won’t open until at least November. Another reason for optimism is

new board of

first-year

friends,

That’s what we’re here for.”

the

complete silence for that one moment.” Lindsey Langdon,

its

is

students

year,

Marketing the program came late last fall because the approval for the program came toward the end of October. “The approval really came after our major thrust into the high schools,” said Mensink.

right into the office.

(students’)

to

Roxy

“Our new location helps people. WeTe constantly getting students in now, whereas in the past, when we were located in

was

come

We’re

Matt Jackson, CSI’s president, said they were lucky to get five students drop by in a month at the pre-

central location is part

attract

kiss

dents)

keting, as well as contests at events,

new

president.

first

into the

you have a problem with anything, even if it’s something CSI has done. I’d rather (stuoffice. “If

Orientation.”

said

“My

CSI

students

come

we’re starting to get facial recognition with students because of the work we did at

CSI’s

of the reason for the excitement,

first-year firefighting

said he

will reach

second-year business marketing student, said he feels the board mentality is different this year. “We’re a more social board with many,, different kinds of people. We’re out here for the students, and we are the students.” Fines said he wants the college to be more social. “Education is an important focus too, but it’s important for people to participate to get the most out of their time here.” He said CSI would use more mar-

floor.

“Grade 6, Katrina Brinks, behind the portable.” Tim Zierten,

inaugural

its

Mensink

create excitement shouldn’t be afraid to

was about

in

dents in the

By BRANDON WALKER “I

certificate said Frank Mensink, the associate vicepresident of the School of

a

she was

replaced by Jackson. In January,

Falconer resigned in order to work for a local Liberal MPP, and Jackson took over as president.

and a lot more reading, said Mensink. “But because the degree is a bachelor of applied business, the emphasis is on the applied part,” he said. “This means that there will definitely be more theory than in our diploma program, but there will be a lot more applied knowledge compared to a university bachelor of degree program.” Current students interested in entering the international busi-

of the machine.

Andrew

moved

ness degree program after grad-

know more about the other campu,ses too. I want to make

to the position of vice-president.

uation should contact Mensink

Then,

sure they’re enjoying the college

tor,

experience,” he said.

vice-president.

“I’m also looking forward to helping students with the little problems like if they have issues with the food or with parking. I want to make sure everyone is happy.” When asked what Brundle thought would be different this year, he said, “People (on the board of directors) last year were friendly but this year we’ve got beef. We’re

Stanciu said one of the most important parts of her job is communication. “Keeping the board

“I’d like to

here for the students, not to kiss

Mercier, a director,

May, Stanciu, also a direcbecame Mercier’s successor as in

members informed

will help

make

at

fmensink@conestogac.on.ca

CORRECTION In the Sept. 18 issue of Spoke, a story incorrectly stated once

the Student Life Centre opens

no longer have

a great board and a great CSI.

CSI

want the students to know I’m here for them. I want them to come to me with issues because I’m really the bridge between what the students want and how it can

serve areas.

“I also

happen.”

will

self-

CSI will continue to offer self-serve after the opening of the

new

centre.

Spoke apologizes

for the eiror.


News

SPOKE, September

2006

25,

— Page 3

Closing the book r

on textbook turmoil By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE Conestoga College students continue to congregate in the bookstore,

purchasing necessary course

materials while utilizing the myri-

ad of services provided.

Jimenez referred to his experience with the services last year as a first-year .student, claiming it was occasionally difficult to find help.

“The

first

week was

Just hectic

and sometimes it’s hard to get to somebody.” he said. “Maybe in the first week or so they could get more people to help the first

Students fulfill their lengthy shopping li.sts, while taking advantage of the services in the Doon

years.”

campus bookstore, including material availability, book lists and per-

Jimenez, however, praised the implementation of the “book lists,”

sonal assistance.

as they are often referred

journalism

First-year

student

Jackie Allwood said the services are good,

although

books required

some of

the

for her courses are

temporarily out of stock.

"They books

for the

are

ing the

and prices of

titles

texts

required for purchasing every year.

such

an

informative

amount of students

Jimenez said he often overhears the typical student com-

she said.

plaint:

should

that there are,"

as a

li.sts

posted for each program, indicat-

Despite

enough

to.

The yellow

useful service.

order

Allwood, who purchased her books on Sept. 14 to avoid the chaos during the first week, may have found her shopping experience more peaceful, but now has to do without .some books for a while.

service.

“I

astronomical prices.

hear

“People

money

wasted all my the summer. I can’t buy

in

(Photo by

the time,” he said.

all

it

say

‘1

these books, they’re so expensive.’”

toward education. “It’s a matter of what

and very high energy and

friendly

Students answer By

MEGHAN KRELLER

inside

is

Conestoga

the covers,” she said.

Get

College’s

I

Friend,

really

enjoy

that.”

who

helps students find

and program area, is normal fqr firstyear students to feel overwhelmed, most students enjoy asking for help and second- and third-year their

book

lists

said although

Vi Friend,

Bookstore clerk

it

Involved a

fair

yearly

was

a fantastic start to

tradition,

Leanne

said

Holland Brown, student

life

co-

ordinator for the college.

“I’m really excited about it and I’m really thankful people have been so supportive of new initia-

call to

become, and remain, a success.

were able to get all their information in one place, she said. One example of the fair’s success was the students’ response to Habitat for Humanity. The organization had during also been showca.sed Orientation and, by the end of the Get Involved fair, had 60 students sign up for volunteer positions. “For me this really highlights stu-

sionate,” she said.

students

own.

tives like this one,” she said.

indicator in locating the area desig-

“Students are very friendly and very high energy and I really enjoy that,” she said.

floor of the

was held on the .second E-wing on Sept. 13. Twelve booths were set up profil-

dents’ interest in getting involved

Friend said the bookstore typically has three to four clerks work-

ing different opportunities for stu-

efits,” said

had no problems asking for help. "I know how to look for books and if they don’t have someone helping, I can get .somebody at the front, so they're pretty good about that."

she said.

second-year accounting student Danilo Jimenez said Similarly,

when

a.sking for help, a little self-

confidence certainly makes

more effortless. "The services here are

it

all

really

manage on

their

with even more people recruited during the first couple of weeks of the the

floor regularly,

semester.

She said students are a lot of fun and encourages them, whether they’re first-year or not, to ask for

help

the

good,” he said.

ing on

often

when

they need

“Customer service

it.

is

what we

are

The

dents to get involved in their on-

and off-campus community. Most were volunteer positions, however, there were some paid positions open for application. “The focus was on student lead-

volunteers

Holland

said

Brown.

at

some

point in

have to change schools or re-locate, and it can be an overwhelming yet exciting change.

Someone who has gone through

just recently

that chaotic time is

new

Learning Resource Centre supervisor, Linda the

college’s

allowed

presently has about 50

who, she the

have

said,

organization

to

supervising staff, building resources for students. and budget-

One major

ing.

difference

is

in

terms of the size of the Learning Resource Centre and staff. “This is my old library times 10,”

Holding the

weeks of

fall

is

the key to

most students possiHolland Brown.

“It’s a really

have

two

fair in the first

classes

small

window we

connect students with these opportunities before they get busy

and

to

their timetablq^s get filled

up

with other commitments,” .she .said. “If they can factor them into their schedule early enough there’s a greater chance they will be successful and remain committed as the year goes on.”

when you start a new position and the learning curve itself. But I love the energy and

I

think that

it is

very

motivating,” said Schneider.

she said.

Schneider thinks the first couple of weeks are an education process for

She’s finding out what

her.

as a librarian in the faculty library,

some gaps might be. “I’m kind of taking stock at this point,” she .said. “I’m seeing what creative ideas the staff has, what they want to carry forward and where some of the gaps might be

but after a few years decided to

that

Schneider

of participants, .she said she was quite happy with the turnout and the support of the new initiative. “This is how a culture of leadership and volunteerism gets established,” she said. “It just builds year to year.”

kinds of things the college already

Schneider.

Catharines,

Although Holland Brown would expand in terms

like to see the fair

supervisor at Learning Resource Centre

Most people

originally from St. where she attended

is

Brock University and received her in environmental studies. Schneider started out working at the University of Western Ontario

masters

Conestoga College. “I really like colleges from the point of view that they have a very practical perspective on educatransfer to

of

Orientation.

students and those present at the

their lives

some

at

KWSAC

really

are as an

organization.”

ble, .said

and

“They

who we

help to shape

recruiting the

for both the

was valuable

our volunteers very pas-

Sexual

students serving students.” fair

“I find

senting

was thrilled with the response from Conestoga students both at the fair

By PEGGY O’NEILL

services at the bookstore, yet is frustrated by the fact the books she needs are out of stock.

of the benHolland Brown. Joan Tuchlinsky was there repre-

Holland Brown. “Even the paid positions fell under the category of

New

(Photo by Holly Featherstone)

their understanding

ership or volunteer positions,” said

booths,

First-year journalism student, Jackie Allwood, appreciates the

and

the Kitchener-Waterloo Assault Support Centre (KWSAC), a modified collective always looking for new volunteers. Tuchlinsky, KWSAC’s public education co-ordinator, said she

The

about,” she said.

fair

get involved

Organizations were able to profile their opportunities and students

Allwood said the signs suspended from the ceiling are a useful nated to your program and said she

Kreller)

Bookstore clerk Vi Friend said although students often complain

about the size of the text versus the cost, books are a vital investment

“Students are very

Megan

Joan Tuchlinsky represented the Kitchener-Waterloo Sexual Assault Support Centre at Conestoga’s Get Involved Fair on Sept. 13. Along with seeking volunteers she also sold handmade stained glass necklaces and rubber bracelets. All proceeds from sales supported the centre.

tion,” said Schneider.

She was doing the same type of job at Western as she is here at Conestoga, which is managing and

has and also where

we

haven’t tackled yet.”

She also wants

to continue build-

ing relationships with her fellow staff

and the students.

So

(Photo by Peggy O’Neill)

far

Schneider is loving Conestoga and feels very encouraged with all of the exciting changes going on around her. “There are always challenges

New

Learning Resource Centre supervisor, Linda Schneider,

is

weeks here College.

enjoying her

at

Conestoga

first


1

1

Page 4

Commentary

— SPOKE, September 25, 2006

Hollywood 01CH

*

4

needs to take a lesson timing

in How

soon

too soon?

is

1 Hollywood has released one blockbuster right commemorating those who were lost in the tragedy.

Five years after 9/1 after the other

Five yeais

is

too soon.

For Hollywood to make millions off a tragedy that affected and affecting so

still

is

many

is

today

lives

insensitive, not to mention,

com-

pletely wrong.

The whole

“Hollywood needs to stop thinking with wallet

fiasco started in

2004

and

with

its

start thinking

its

heart.”

with the release of Fahrenheit 9/1 directed by Michael

Tara Ricker,

Moore. The

production manager

documentary depicted Moore’s view on what happened to the

he believed the Bush Administration allegedly used the tragic event to

push forward

its agenda for unjust wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. 2006 Flight 93, United 93 and World Trade Center were released. Both Flight 93, directed by Peter Markle, and United 93, directed by

In

Paul Greengrass, depicted the events that took place on the United Airlines’ plane,

one of the planes hijacked on 9/11

when passengers

that crashed near

World Trade Center, directed by Oliver Stone, told the true story about two Port Authority police officers, John McLoughlin and William J. Jimeno, the last surviving rescuers extracted from Ground Zero. How can making money off a tragedy, as Hollywood is trying to do, be seen as a good act? The films United 93 and World Trade Center both contributed a percentage of their ticket sales to memorials and Shanksville, Pa.

charities

foiled the terrorist plot.

connected to the tragedy.

Giving proceeds to charity does not justify making these movies,

many remember 9/11 as if it was yesterday. There is not even a monument of remembrance where the towers once stood to pay respect and honour those who were lost that day. There are, howespecially since

ever, already to

movies making millions and forcing the wounds of 9/1

be reopened even before they have had a chance to heal. After Pearl Harbor,

it

took Hollywood almost 30 years to

make

Tora!

Tora! Tora!, a feature film about the attack and a total of 60 years before the blockbuster starring

Or

take for

example the movie

table scene of

ing

“Fm

Ben Affleck and Josh

came

out.

Titanic. Quite tacky with the unforget-

Leonardo DiCaprio standing

the king of the world”

Hartnett

compared

at the

bow

of the ship shout-

to the real tragedy, but at least

was not released until 2001, 89 years after the ship had sunk. It is imperative for Hollywood to make films commemorating historic events so we can remember those who were lost in tragedies like

the film

9/1

1,

but

it

is

especially imperative to give the world time to heal.

Hollywood needs with

its

to stop thinking with

its

wallet and start thinking

above the law

Celebrities

how

United States after 9/11 and

The

caste system that is present world society allows celebrities to get away with anything. Those who are in the limelight or hold special talents have the upper hand

Jessica

with authorities.

Blumenthal

during a Rolling Stones concert in

Glasgow. Richards was just exempt from the law. So are stars ever treated like the

in

People have allowed this for decades, however, now it is more prevalent and making headlines.

Are

totally understood. I

It

He

meetings.

was pulled impaired driving while on

Socialite Paris Hilton

on

BBC

article

online on Sept. 8 said,

police station, she said, because

“There was a around, so

make

I

lot

of paparazzi

think they wanted to

a statement.

They even

stirred the pot

by

prison sentence after being

law.

Dave Chappelle and Sean Penn were both seen smoking in Toronto. Chappelle was smoking

five

said.

comedy

routine, while

it

possible the hotel didn’t

ti’ied

for

drug offences.

Moss a

Penn was smoking during a press conference. The hotel now has to pay the fines for Penn lighting up. Is

Hilton was only taken to the

heart.

have

trial

above the law involve murder. Supermodel Kate Moss’s boyfriend, rocker Pete Doherty, avoided a

violating the Smoke-free Ontario

stand-up

An

the

has also been played in

celebrities

Simpson

Who knows if Simpson murdered his ex-wife. However, if it was just some Joe Nobody, would that man be in jail for first-degree murder? Not all cases of celebrities being

cigarette while perfonning a

severe actions.

to get a burger.

to

in their hand.

in there

Toronto. In the past month, two

he was a common worker there would have been more

way

was

It seems like Hilton knows Hollywood game.

If

her

comes

many people to question much power celebrities hold

tiow

I

15 minutes and out.”

was given three years probation, was fined $1,300, had his licence suspended for 90 days and was ordered to attend Alcoholics

over for

it

caused

‘There’s people watching, we don’t want them to think we’re

giving you special treatment.’

also

Anonymous

when

In 1994, the O.J.

can go? Recently A-list actor, Mel Gibson, was pulled over for impaired driving. He then started spouting anti-Semitic slurs. What penalty did he receive? He said sorry to the Jewish community to the officers involved.

aren’t

murder charges.

Opinion

far they

and

They

impaired driving charges or even

how

celebrities trying to see

general public?

has

made

headlines because

of her cocaine addiction. She man-

aged

to

escape being a convicted

criminal for lack of evidence.

much evidence do

How

the authorities

need to convict celebrities? It's as if everyone allows celebrities to

be the poster children for

criminals. Well, in the end

infonn Penn about the law because he’s Sean Penn? Even Scotland is allowing stars to light up without penalties. Keith

They somehow managed

Richards wasn’l fined for smoking

else

can be said

is

kudos

their talents, rise

all that

to the stars. to use

above everyone

and get away with everything.

Spoke Letters are

welcome

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College Editor: Eric

Spoke welcomes

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

No unsigned

for verification.

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke ,

for publication.

The

Murphy

Advertising Manager: Jessica Blumenthal, Kristin Grifferty Spoke Online Editor: Meghan Kreller Production Managers: Tara Ricker, Brandon Walker Circulation Manager: Nick Casselli Photo Editors: Adam Black, Adam Hannon, Tiffany McCormick, Jon Molson and BJ Richmond

Address correspondence to: Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Editor,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


SPOKE, September

o

o

25,

Conestoga I

students INC

I

2006

— Page 5


News

— SPOKE, September 25, 2006

Page 6

Teachers get on board By JASON SHERRITT

they expected to stay.

“We found Conestoga

College

a very wide range of

been

education ranging from just high

voted the number 1 college in Ontario for the eighth straight year

administration, police foundations

has

Key Perfomiance Indicator it’s no wonder why.

in the

school to college, law and security

and

electrical engineering, to uni-

survey and

versity degrees in criminology

Conestoga’s program co-ordinators and professors are really in tune to

political

students’ needs to

make

and do

all

they can

happy

and

Phillips.

members were very

be aboard

to

said

this ship.”

sure students graduate and

“We

James Phillips, co-ordinator of law and security administration, and Carolyn Harrison, co-ordinator recruiting

HMCS

mission

aboard

Fredericton,

a

concerned with their members’ quality of life and have instituted a number of programs and policy changes to ensure a standard of living and

the

multi-role

Canadian Navy. The Fredericton weighs 4,750 tonnes and is nearly 450 feet long. It can reach speeds of more than 30 knots, which is around 55 km/h. It contains accommoda-

239 personnel,

CH- 24 Sea King 1

torpedoes,

is

working.”

host to

helicopter and

James Phillips,

and

co-ordinator of law

missiles

in

general are very

patrol frigate in the

tions for

did learn that the

Canadian Forces

of police foundations, attended a

carries

science,’’

“Overall, the

find jobs.

a

for students

and

guns.

The focus of

their trip

was

secarit}’ admi/ustration

to

gather useful infonnation for the students in their programs.

and Harrison attended a reception on Sept. 14 on the Fredericton in Hamilton Harbour where they had a chance to speak to a wide, variety of the crew, from the captain to ordinary seamen. Phillips said Harrison and himself made it a point to ask each member which school they went to, what program they took, how long they had been in the navy and how long Phillips

The next Phillips

day. Sept. 15, at 7 a.m.

and Harrison boarded the

ship again, this time to take part in

voyage across Lake Ontario to Toronto Harbour. Leaving the docks was very exciting said a

Phillips.

“The ship pushed off from the dock and then turned to salute the Haida,

a

tribal

class

destroyer,

which is a historical attraction in Hamilton Harbour,” said Phillips.

(Photo by Vat Frankis) co-ordinator of law and security administration, and Carolyn Harrison, co-ordinator of police foundations, received an up-ciose-and-personal look at trie Canadian Forces wriiie Fredericton. participating on a recuiting mission aboard the

James

Phillips,

HMCS

“The Fredericton gave a two-gun and then we were off.” On the way, the Fredericton went through some manoeuvers. showing Phillips and Harrison high speed turns and a rescue demonstration of a man-overboard drill. After the showboating, Phillips and Harrison were

The

treated to a full access tour of the

fact that

blast

They got

frigate.

to witness the

ship

is

equipped with e-mail

Navy

pro-

ples of the

One

member with phone home on a regular

thing the captain of the ship

told Phillips

and Harrison was

Navy was taking

the

part

is

with their members’ quality of

the

In the Canadian Navy, a full pen-

ple in Ontario to have a perspective

Navy when

life is

sion can be achieved after only 20

very difficult for peo-

of the Canadian

quality of

a

recruiting mission because of the it

new

increase in pay.”

that in

constant contact with their partner.

in action

control

number of

basis said Phillips.

each

port provinces like

in

instituted a

cards to call

vides

pro-

on the bridge and rooms, all the while asking questions about their job and life. Many members are married and told Phillips and Harrison that technology has allowed them to stay in

crew

and have

grams and policy changes to ensure a standai'd of living and working,” said Phillips. “One of the greatest exam-

access and the Canadian

years he said. “1

was impressed with how can-

did the crew was with us and real-

resi-

ly appreciated the opportunity to

contact with

ask the real questions our students

unlike major

Scotia and

Columbia.

would be interested in.” One example Phillips relayed was, where else could a graduate

did leant that the Canadian

find a job for life the day after

Forces in general are very concerned

graduation and in just a few years be making over $50,000 a year?

dents have very

little

ships or personnel,

British

“We

Nova

life

Are video games responsible for violence in today’s schools? By ALLISON STEINMAN

Two

fourth-year nursing students

disagree, saying that

A man enters Montreal’s Dawson College and, fire, kills

in a

barrage of gun-

with

individual

it

has to do

tendencies

and

interpretation.

one and sends 19 others committing sui-

to hospital before

cide Since then people can’t help

themselves if Kimveer Gill’s love of violent video games such as Postal, which has the protagonist going on a shooting spree while completing daily errands, played a role in the incident. A but ask

first-year

dent

is

police

foundations stu-

surprised at the idea.

“Video games have nothing to do with it,” said Brittany Swartzentruber. “We might just have to accept the fact that the guy was messed up.”

“Video

games have

nothing to do with

it.”

Brittany Swartzentruber, -

police foundations

“Some people can play a video game and be fine, and some people Samantha Dykstra and Katelyn Hamilton. “He may have interpreted it wrong.” According to a study outlined by Grace Shin on the website httpV/serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/n

just can’t,” said

euro/neuro03/web2/gshin.html, completed by psychologists Karen E. Dill and Craig A. Anderson violent video games are found to be

more harmful

in increasing aggres-

sion than both

TV and movies. The

study showed that young

men

are

especially vulnerable.

However, a video game store employee who is an avid gamer himself said he

is

unaffected by the

games he plays and doesn’t worry about selling them to customers. “I’ve been playing since I was four or five years old and there isn’t an aggressive bone in my body,” said Matthew Weber who works at X-treme Play located at 347 Erb St. W. in Waterloo. “It’s about the player, not the game.”


SPOKE, September

CSI

C c:)K i.-:sTOci A I

25,

— Page 7

2006

JOBS

STUDENTS

wu

(ik^

working

witfifun, u^ijeat staff you ,

wiffwant to ffecome a part of tfie

Conestoya Student One team.

We have scheduled your program timeslot for graduation C8I office during the designated time for yoiu* program, we will waive the sitting photos. If you sign up at the

fee charge.

TIME SLOTS Mondoy October 2nd - Friday October 13th

-

/

ACTIVITY VOLUNTEERS

Preparing and setting up events, hanging posters,

• SELF

SERVE SUPERVISOR As well

Assist with copying, binding, scanning etc. as

maintaining the self serve area.

BARTENDERS

Responsible for serving drinks and monitoring patron’s level of intoxication.

HEALTH SCIENCES •

Monday, October 16th - Friday, October 27 *

EVENT

COMMUNITY SER VIC

PROMOTION COORDINATOR

Assist the Events

Programmer

witli the

marketing

and planning of CSI events. Monday, October 30th> Friday, November 10 -

Monday, November 13th - Friday December 1 Monday, December 4th - Friday, December

-

15 -

MEDIA LIBERAL STUDIES

ENCINEERINC TECHNOLOGY

SECURITY/ EVENT STAFF

Patrol events ensuring the safety of both staff and :fuests

INFORMATION TECHNO For

Monday, January 8 ~ Friday, February 2

sign

"

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

np at the C iSI oflRce

more detailed

descriptions visit

www.conestogastudents.com If you are interested in anj'^ of these positions please email your resume completed with workstudy form to Janie Renwick at jrenwick@conestogac.on.ca or visit the CSI oflict in room 2A106

HEALTH PLAN OPT OUT INFORMATION

CSI

New this year is our ONLINE OPT OUT!!! This link

will

be available

September

Simply

o

visit

1,

2006.

our website at

wwawconcstogastudents-coni

and click on the link

^ &

simple steps.

*

I L //A ^^nestogastiidcnts.com

JOINIA

OPT OUT

and complete the

COM

Volunteer on the Activities and you will have a chance ideas, thoughts and concerns. Visit the CSI office in Room 2A106 for more information.

The

deadline to opt out

i,s

September 2‘L 2006,

.No exceptions or e.xtcnsions will be given.

Conestoga ,

STUDENTS INC


.

News

— SPOKE, September 25, 2006

Page 8

Where have

all

the tradespeople gone?

1 |

MOUNTFORD

By LEANNE

Apprenticeship Program which

is

Once

finished, they’ve completed

j

an unpaid co-operative for a young

work

cut? There’s plenty of

done, but where are

do

to

to be

some

it?

on the decline. There is a lot of job satisfaction in the trades and a lot of pride in workmanship, said Greg White, chair of trades and apprenticeship at Conestoga College, Doon camis

up

and because they are

places,

which would give them a lot more skills to bring to an .employer. They receive the same curriculum as an apprentice but are not regis-

tered as an apprentice.

know of any

don't

who their

tradespeo-

paycheques," he

machinist by

general

a

is

as a

said White,

viable career option,

who

2.

said.

the

of parents have a misconception about trades being heavy, lot

physical labour and unsafe envi-

ronments, said White, who has been working at Conestoga College for eight years.

"Most machinist shops nowadays look like laboratories. With health and safety laws, typical job sites are a good, safe place to work. If

tradespeople are working outside, they are well protected from the

elements and well compensated for putting

up with some discomfort,”

he said.

who

Tyler Mould,

employee Cambridge

at

for

has been an

Ryder Canada two years, said he

young people

of

Alumni

Association’s

monthly magazine received plenty of praise

a provincial confer-

at

ence.

The first annual meeting of the Alumni Association took place on Sept. 1 1 Many board members

is

A

thing

best

may want to but may not be

be an apprentice sure of what’s required to become a successful apprentice, he said. According to White, there are four ways of accessing an apprenperson

ticeship. 1

A

family connection. If a fam-

a projected

azine that was distributed

conference. Connections

is

at

the

provid-

ed by the Alumni department at Conestoga. The magazine got great at

the

many people much praise design.

conference,

with

giving the magazine for

its

his

member is a plumber and has own plumbing shop, he may

take on a son or daughter and train

The disadvantage

person.

that

in

this is that they don’t necessarily

have any secondary school education, and it’s hard to discharge a family member if he or she isn’t working out because of the personal

depth and

accessing an

Out of high school. In Grade 9

model which Conestoga

Save a

ments from both Brock and York universiti.es on the magazine.

“This year,

we have

$10,000

to $50,000.”

Mi^e

Shipley,

Alumni Association treasurer

success with

many

students inter-

first

year council.

Brundle also said the turnout at the Pond Party was a great, adding the students were eager to get involved and participate. Mary Wright, an administrative representative with co-op and career services

at the college,

was

next to give her report. She said statistics are

very prom-

“As of today, we 3,290 first-year students enrolled which is up from last year by 10 per cent. Overall, our fullising at this point.

White.

for a

The

co-operative

apprenticeship model

is

diploma

memorial Conestoga student who died in January 2006 will be

arranged

held Sept. 26.

with a consortium of local industries

where the people apply

secondary program.

If

The second annual blood

as if

they get

clinic held as a

Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre is holding the clinic for William Walker, a

woodworking student who died Walker couldn’t give blood, which is why the clinic is being held in his memory.

Wright

announced

also

career services

is

fair

who

Then they go

in.

for 12 to 16 months as a paid apprentice. After that they return to school for one or two semesters.

represents Ontario

college faculty hopes smaller class sizes will

mean

greater success for

students and teachers in September

As

well,

the

Welcome

many more expected to CJIQ has offered to do some

far with

apply. live

award

advertising to give

it

regarding

the

more exposure.

“Financial aid has been very helpful,” said

Himmelman.

woodworking

technology,

bring

more

believes smaller class

environment.

will

ensure students become comfort-

“We

want to keep them on track and keep them in the system.” Dylan Taylor, a first-year student smaller classes

“I

a

positive

think that’s

pretty

would

learning

good,

it

able with their courses and their

brings everyone closer together so

peers.

we

have more one-on-one time with students, Also,

teachers

will

will

mean

a better under-

standing of the course content.

classes

do benefit students,

it

allows more interaction in the teaching hours,” said Boettger. Not every student runs at the in the

can focus better,” said Taylor. College is a time to do work, if

the teacher

same way so

it

there then

is

it

assures

can be successful with work, he said.

students their

“I feel very strongly that smaller

same pace or

Another upcoming event

and learn

said.

in

Walter Boettger, president of OPSEU Local 237, which represents Conestoga College faculty, agrees with smaller class sizes being a benefit for students.

award has 18 applicants so

he

believes

eampus

fall.

in different ways,”

The Ontario Public Service (OPSEU) Employees Union sizes

Rd.,

to lose the stuat risk

2007.

which

108 University Ave. E. is up and running and an official opening is being planned for later

at the

to 8 p.m.

“We don’t want who may be

events. upcoming some Himmelman said the new Waterloo at

from 2

be held

New Dundee

dents

The union that

news on

clinic will

residence, 55

smaller classes

in

By BECKY SHARPE

that

The

to

work

at

sponsoring an ontaking place on

delivered

trade they are

Success

Oct. 18, from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. in the E-wing with the focus being

this

ested in joining

donor

consortium as an apprentice. They attend school for two or three semesters depending on which

Home Next the board heard from Troy Brundle, the CSI representative on the Alumni committee. Brundle shared an update on the progress of the new CSI location and Student Life Centre which is expected to be completed by mid to late October. As well. Orientation was a huge

By JESSICA BLUMENTHAL

started in

based technology course, and then they can take a specialty course in Grade 11 or 12. After that, they go knocking on 150 doors and see if someone will hire them based on their high school transcript. There Youth Ontario the also is

officer,

increased our funding by

It

machining trades and is presently being used in the mil Iwrigh ting, electrical and chef trades, said

of a seizure.

campus job

the best

for the last three years.

life

accepted, they are registered to a

program. “It’s nice that we’re producing one of the best magazines.” The board was proud of the fact that they received many compli-

have

the co-operative diploma appren-

White. With the co-operative model, the employers love the apprentices; they have lots of background and lots of experience, he said. The apprentices are the future of these companies and the co-operative model should make things easier, he added.

or 10 students could take a broad

time student enrolment is approximately 7,47 1 students.”

enrolment

the first clearly defined pathway,

is

they are going to a regular post-

connection.

alumni relations and annual fund

budget of $40,000,” said Shipley. ‘This year, we have increased our funding by $10,000, to $50,000.” Shipley said the increase comes from more investing and donations being made to the college. At each meeting, the board reviews the itemized budget provided by Shipley and suggests improvements that can be made. The next topic at the meeting was the Ontario Alumni Association Conference “Building a Legacy” at Brock University, attended by a number of board members. One of the highlights discussed at the meeting was the Connections mag-

reviews

ily

magazine out there,” said Glenn Campbell, president of the Alumni board and a 1974 graduate of the woodworking

treasurer for the

we had

in

Employers need to be convinced take on more apprentices. There are incentives for employers to take on more apprentices such as federal and provincial tax credits for some trades and flexible delivery by the colleges, said to

This model has only been around

mechanic. about being a mechanic is job security, he said. “There’s always going to be tracks, and they’re always going to be broken,” said Mould. One of the biggest reasons why there is a lack of people in the trades is because of the difficulty in accessing an apprenticeship, said White.

The

Alumni Association. “Last year

way

is

ticeship

is

Conestoga graduates, got right down to business, jumping into the treasurer’s report, given by Mike

fourth

cian diploma, said White.

College helped pioneer.

all

what turned

The Alumni board, which made up of people who are

who

is

mechanic.

out to be a productive meeting.

Shipley,

the trades

in

on part-time and seasonal employment. Thus far there are 45 employers registered for the fair. The alumni board then heard from Monica Himmelman, the

.

in attendance for

getting involved

decreasing, Tyler Mould says he enjoys his job as a truck

“We had

By VANESSA BUTLER The

(Photo by Leanne Mountford)

a record-breaking year

Off to

were

As the number

really enjoys his job as a

trade.

The

4.

apprenticeship, which White says

about picking

feel guilty

Somehow, we have to get young people to see the trades

A

at

cate

pus.

ple

work

young, they may not be focused or mature enough for the job. 3. Post-secondary programs. A person may sign up for a two- or three-year post-secondary certifi-

As the demand for tradespeople Canada rises everyday, the amount of people going into trades in

"I

ing and their requirements in the

province of Ontario for a techni-

gain

to

the age requirements to

the people

all

experience.

However, there can be barriers. High school students may not meet

person

Toilet clogged? Light fixtures not working? Broken car? Need a hair-

their apprenticeship in-class train-

Justin Birch, a first-year student in advertising, feels that his class

is

not too big but the smaller classes

would still help regardless. “It seems like some people

are

not really focused and they don’t

want to be in the program anymore, so making the classes really

smaller

may

actually

some of those

weed

out

people,” said Birch.

Waleed Azizi, a

first-year student

dis-

allows faculty to have a diversity of

in

cussed at the alumni meeting was the second annual alumni athletic golf tournament. Himmelman said this event is filling up nicely with

teaching styles or methodologies

does not like that his class has around 40 students in it. “The seats are taken up and you have to sit at the back where it’s

more registrations than last year. The sponsors for this event will once again be Johnson Inc., which

so that they can capture every student in those hours, he said.

“As class sizes increase the amount of time you can give to each

student

diminishes,”

said

Boettger.

considered a very important partner to the college and the Alumni

involved with larger classes,” he

Association. She also said for the

said.

is

first

time

CSI

will

be getting

involved in the action.

The next alumni meeting is scheduled for Oct. 2, with the annual general meeting taking place on Nov. 6.

“Lab classes have a

OPSEU

safety issue

business

materials

harder to hear the teacher,” said Azizi.

With a smaller class size the teachers could be easily reached because they don’t have the whole go through and it’s a smaller group so students receive more detailed answers, he said. “My class would be much easier to concentrate on and be more successful in if we only had 20 stu-

class to

would

like class sizes to

be around an average of 30 to 40 students in first year and through attrition it is expected that classes will average in the 20s by third year, he said.

operation,

dents,” said Azizi.


News

CJIQ brings a By BJ RICHMOND CJIQ

on the

is

another

as

air

school year kicks off

tions

at

Conestoga

College.

CJIQ-FM, which is also known as The Condor, broadcasts a conglomeration of adult contemporary music and up-tempo, original pro-

gramming dents

Named

Conestoga

after

the

College.

college's

The Condor

teams. in

directed toward the stu-

of

sports

offers students

both the broadcasting

-

radio and

and the journalism - print and broadcast programs a chance to produce their own radio shows in television

order to gain experience

their

in

of study. However, students

fields

community

also

are

taken into consideration. For example, if there is a proposal to run a soft rock show. Thumell said he and Scott decide how different it will be from what is being offered

on CHYM-FM. "We don't want to compete with other stations. That's not what we are here for." Thumell and Scott akso give certain program proposals more attention if they will help them fulfill the station's licence commitment to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). For example. CJIQ is required to have a certain number of hours that are

dedicated to specialized and

classical music. Thus,

station.

types of programs in the proposals

Mike Thumell. program director of CJIQ as well as co-ordinator of

someone were to and propo.se a jazz show, that might get more interest than .someone who's coming in asking to do a hip-hop show," Thumell said. The final, and most important, aspect of the show Thumell and Scott look for is whether there will be an audience for it or not on CJIQ. If the program proposal has been approved, Thumell and Scott then

- radio and televiprogram, said although the

sion

station likes to see students

open time

fill

the

CJIQ's schedule, there are also shows run by volunslots in

teers in the

community who

are not

"We're (CJIQ) open to everyone." students.

For example. The Polish Review and Church with a Twist, which air every Sunday, are produced by people in the community there

is

on the

who

a need to have these air.

Some

feel

shows

of the programs

Scott

Thumell and

look

specifically

these

for

they receive. "If

come

demo be

show to obtain go on the air.

the

Thumell and Scott are currently the process of reviewing

new

receives proposals from

down with

of the broadcasting and

journalism programs, run their own shows.

Whether dents,

it

is

a

who want

show run by

graduates

or

stu-

volunteers,

Thumell said the process the tion

to

sta-

goes through to select their

programming everyone. The

the

is first

same

step that

for

must

be taken toward getting a show selected to be aired on create

CJIQ

come

in

to

him

the

receives a lot of

"Our doors

fairly

school

it

music show, the people who will be hosting it and will be a talk or

benefit to both the

community

and CJIQ as a whole. Once the program proposal has been put together, it must then be handed in to either Thumell or the CJIQ co-ordinator, Paul Scott. and Scott Together, Thumell review the proposals and look for certain criteria the show must contain. Thumell said one of the criteria he looks for is whether or not the people producing the show are qualified to do so. "We like to know a bit about the people who are producing the show. Have they had experience? Are they technically capable of doing the show?" Thumell and Scott comb through the proposals to find the programs that are creative and original. Thumell said CJIQ wants to have a variety of programs on the air,

show

hence,

if

on the

station that is similar to

there

is

a

currently

one

being proposed, that proposal will not likely be chosen. Beside the

programs CJIQ currently airs, the programming of other radio sta-

radio

stations,

CKMS, jumped

such as

CFRU

or

over to The Condor

because of the large range of coverage. At this time, other shows original to

CJIQ began

as well.

Some

of

shows arc still on the air after These long la.sting radio programs include the hard rock show. Field of Rage on Friday nights and Thumell's Songs from a Quiet Place, which airs Sunday afternoons.

hosted by two third-year broad-

casting

air, is

radio and television stu-

available.

ilon't

"We

try to play upbeat, fun Friday night and people want to be in a bad mood for

music.

It's

Friday," Naylcr said.

had a similar interest in music. "We play pop music and we basically talk

Naylcr said he believes Pop World was chosen to go on the air for a few reasons. The first reason was CJIQ was mainly playing new rock at the time Nayler and Gage proposed Pop World, so the show added to the

about

diversity of the station.

-

dents, Cole Nayler

and Joanna Gage.

Naylcr said he and Gage got the idea

show when they

for the

all

the

latest

realized they

entertainment

"We knew was no pop type shows on

news."

that there

A.side from playing music and keeping their listeners up to date with all the Hollywood gossip,

there (CJIQ)," Nayler said.

Nayler

CJIQ has seen many shows come and go. One

Pop World. The show

on the

upcoming

conception,

debut

current-

is

five years.

its

its

is still

ly

these

Since

made

Gage

and

promote around the

also

concerts

"We really pump come to the GTA."

Toronto area. ple up to

Pop

World

Saturdays, but

originally

was moved

to Friday nights

p.m.,

after

the

this

peo-

Nayler said the second rea.son Pop World was chosen was because he and Gage have a good chcmisti'y together, which showcased that they could work well together on a daily basis.

aired

year

between 6 and 7

"It

is

because

fun,

but

that's the

we make

it

type of work

fun

we

enjoy,” said Nayler.

time slot became

them

aren't

in

steady

year,

he

September.

being knocked

we do get few over the year." CJIQ differs from other college and university radio stations because it is a commercial station that is being used as a training ground for professional commerproposals, but

quite a

cial

Compared

radio stations.

CFRU

CKMS

to

(University of Guelph) and (University of Waterloo),

which are owned and operated by is owned by the college and it is embedded into the programs of broadcasting and journalism. "Our approach is very different. We treat it as if it were a commercial radio station, a commercial enterprise," Thumell said. CJIQ also belongs to the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council (CAB), hence they are very concerned about content of their programming and how they present themselves. Thus, profanity, racial comments and references to violence against anybody are

show, including the

.

that

fill

the student unions of the universi-

nature of the program, whether

its

will

is to

idea of the

Woodstock. The Condor has been on the air for more than five years, after officially launching on Jan. 8. 2001 Some shows that starterl at other

show

posals

a program proposal. This

proposal must outline the general

pletely blanketing Kitchener. Waterloo. Cambridge, Guelph, Brantford. Stratford and

particular

about a year ago, and

in

throughout

outside

broadcasting through most of southern Ontario, and com-

pro-

continue to run their shows. Aside from outside volunteers and graduates, CJIQ also students

shoreline,

approval

final

and selecting those which the open time slots on CJIQ. Thumell said although proposals

but

— Page 9

put together for its

that are also currently on the air were created by students who have graduated from the broadcasting radio and television program in the

past,

2006

in

require a

to

25,

variety of tunes to the airwaves

of the college are not the only personalities who can be heard on the

the broadcasting

the

in

SPOKE, September

ties,

CJIQ

(Photo

by Adam Hannon)

Picking up the pieces Debris covered the road after a two-car accident at the corner of Homer Watson Boulevard and Doon Valley Drive on Sept. 13. No one was injured in the accident.

itself,

ON-CAMPUS CHIROPRACTOR

strictly prohibited.

Before CJIQ made its debut in 2001, Conestoga College had a closed circuit radio station that could only be heard in the lounge and cafeteria of the Doon campus.

November 2005, the college made an arrangement with the In

Corporation (CBC) to receive a donation of a frequency they were using.

The

station is clas-

by the CRTC and it broadcasts on 88.3 at a power of 4,000 watts from the Global Television tower in Paris, Ont. This frequency takes CJIQ's sigsified as instmctional

nal as far north as

and as

HEALTH SERVICES

Broadcasting

Canadian

no longer

Covered bv C5I Health Plan

Mount

far south as the

Forest

Lake Erie

748-5220

Ext.

3679


Page 10

News

— SPOKE, September 25, 2006

(PnoTO by Annelise Thompson)

Enjoying Local Motion Shelby Cowles,

4, of Kitchener,

enjoys getting her face painted at the Car Free Day/Local Motion

Park on Sept. 17. At the event. Hunter MacIntyre and his dad Shawn (right) a puzzle. Residents could also skateboard, rollerblade and ride uniquely designed bikes.

Festival, held at Victoria

build

*

Fairview Park Mall gets a makeover By STEPHANIE IRVINE

by

ly exciting.’’

olition

Fairview Park Mall, built in 1966, has only seen two major renova-

didn’t

Kitchener’s Fairview Park Mall in

tions, the last in 1986.

expected

an effort to re-invent the centre, according to one mall administra-

has been monitoring the needs of

tion official.

this centre

Stephanie Massel, senior director of property marketing for Cadillac

Renovations

are

underway

at

“Our development department

Completion in

Don

Ellis

start

Construction

until

of

last

the

week.

project

is

August 2007.

“Tenants are really excited about changes,” said Massel. “They’ve been waiting awhile for

tion has

this.”

ing tenants are well-informed, as well as keeping disruptions to a minimum. She said her only con-

Massel said features of the refurbished centre will include new landscaping and redesigned main

Tina Rouleau, manager of Rogers Plus, said the renovation can only improve overall busi-

ronment for some time, and felt that it was time to go ahead with

entrances

ness.

Fairview, said, “It’s like Christmas

the update,” said Massel.

floors,

every day walking into the mall and seeing all of the changes. It’s real-

project began this August, but

and the local

retail envi-

The $33.4-million redevelopment dem-

outside,

while

inside

new ceramic tile new general and decorative lighting, new common area seating shoppers will see

and an expanded food court.

Rouleau said mall administradone a great job of ensur-

the

“Newer malls always seem to bring in more traffic,” she said. “They also tend to bring in wealthier customers.”

cern

is

the timing of the project.

“I think that this

is

a very bad

time to be doing the renovations because Christmas is the busiest time of the year,” she said. “I think that they should have waited until after the holidays.”


News

SPOKE, September

Students brave weather to party with a No

By KRISTIN GRIFFERTY

Surprise,

Since You’ve Been

Gone and Make Up Your Mind Heavy

rainfall

and cold autumn

temperatures helped separate the fans

from the diehards

of a

Deadman

at the

the

Conestoga Students Inc. hosted outdoor event in parking lot two for all those who were willing to the

brave the elements.

With the weather at an unseasonable low of 13 C, students layered up and took cover under umbrellas to keep warm and dry. Band members were fortunate enough to play under a protective

crowd energetic and singing

Those

in

for the

wet

crowd, singing hits from their newest album. Gasoline. Popular songs like Santa Monica,

from attending. “(The rain) didn’t affect it all really,” said Silva. “The band didn’t

mind playing

were it

few

long as

Second-year firefighting student said he came for the great band despite the poor weath-

Cody Gray er.

“They’re sexy!” said Gray, of

Theory of a Deadman.

Crowd

part of the lucky

in the rain as

there wasn’t thunder and lightning.

way

Steve

to the front as they spilled

second-year

a

band was great and

surfers

to

Burgess,

police foundations student, said the

to the front, trying to break through

the wall of security.

that

night, the rain did not stop students

tent.

Concert-goers pushed their

The rock band played

Deadman

Mother

Nature wasn't on their side

mate atmosphere. Students were able to get up close and pretty personal to singer Tyler Connolly, guitarist Dave Brenner and bassist Dean Back. Police officers, security and concert staff were able to control the boisterous crowd both in and out-

canopy.

1

Lindsay Silva, the event planner

attendance were oblivi-

Molson beer

— Page

arms of

into the awaiting

for CSI, said that although

ous to the weather, as the smaller crowd gave the concert a more inti-

side the

crowd

2006

security and medics.

kept

along.

Theory

concert Sept. 12.

the

25,

make

was

over

that the turnout

quite impressive considering

the weather.

His

friend,

saying

agreed,

Bradey Carbert, it was a pretty

decent concert. “(1

to

came because)

waste the

1

didn’t

want

ticket,” said Carbert.

“I’m from a small town so I don’t get to see big bands like this.”

$10 prior

Tickets cost

to

the

and $12 at the door. Small town or not, CSI said 1,800 tickets were sold to the concert, and 1,400 people were in attendance.

event,

Right:

About

gathered

Theory in

the

in

of

a

1

Theory of a Deadman, rocked out Conestoga College on Sept. 12.

Tyler Connolly, lead singer of

the rain

in

the parking

lot of

,400 students

Lot

1

2

to

watch

Deadman

perform

rain.

Photos by Kristin Grifferty Theory of a Deadman, crowd at Conestoga College. wet acknowledges a soaking

Dean Back, bass

guitarist of

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in


News

— SPOKE, September, 25, 2006

Page 12

Imagine the beauty of Imaginus By TIFFANY MCCORMICK The Imaginus poster sale made mark last week as a multitude of posters filled The Sanctuary, its

attracting students with recogniza-

movie

characters,

ble

titles

and

bands. Posters are an inexpensive

students

for

rooms,

to

ranging

way

decorate

their

price

from

in

approximately $5 to $30. Television shows such as The Family Guy, The O.C., One Tree

The Simpsons and

CSI,

Hill,

Friends were represented as well as movies like The Breakfast Club, American History X, Kill Bill, Brokeback Mountain, Scarface and The Wedding Singer. Music posters were also in high

with The Beatles, The Led Zeppelin, the Foo

supply Doors,

Fighters, Pink Floyd

McKay gaze

left) Vanessa Somos, Brianne Berry, Nicole Walters and Amie annual Imaginus poster sale. The event took place in the Sanctuary on Sept. 18 and 19.

First-year nursing students (from at the

Beat stress before

Boy.

a poster by Anderson

Disney and cartoon characters were for sale with posters of Beauty and the Beast, Peter Pan, Cinderella, Winnie the Pooh, Betty Boop and

at

SpongeBob Square

beats you

it

and Fallout

(Photo by Tiffany McCormack)

Pants.

Posters akso consisted of drawings, photography, children, cats,

dogs, flowers and scenery.

SUMMER MCPHEE

By This

a busy time of year for a

is

of people and what

lot

difficult for

have

all

tem

many of from a

stress

think

is

that

us

I

lot

is

we

of differ-

ent sources, said clinical psychologist Dr.

"We

Vibike Vaerum. all experience many stress-

ful situations,” said

probably is

that

we

is

Vaerum, "What

most challenging for us

often can’t really control

the people or the events that are directly involved in our stress.” at

Kitchener Public Library on

Sept.

14,

discussed what happens

body when

under stress and tools for coping with it. *What I’m hoping to do today is in the

to give

you some

it’s

tools so that

you

have something that you can do immediately and will allow you to feel

empowered

responding to

She said

in

how you

stress,” said

heightened so you might feel like

the purpose of survival in danger-

you are very alert and upset at the same time,” said Vaerum. The oxygen intake increases

do

ous situations.

becomes problematic when

“It

we

control

can’t

reaction and

it

the

fight-flight

starts to control us,”

said Vaerum. “This reaction kicks

whenever we or our egos

in

feel

intensely threatened, even when there is no direct danger facing us.”

She said

speeds everything up so the nervous system kicks into high gear, which involves

Vaerum, who lead a seminar the

this for

actually wired to

is

this

reaction

both physiological and

psychological hyper arousal.

“On

the

physical

level

what

is that your muscles instantly get tense, on an emotional level you’re probably experiencing very strong emotions like anxiety, terror, anger and possibly even rage,” said Vaerum.

you’re experiencing

any situation that feels very emotionally charged or threatening to us, the body goes through something called a fight or that in

“We a

lot

all

have stress from

of different sources.” Dr. Vibike Vaerum,

psychologist

fight-flight reaction is just the

body’s

way of

preparing

itself to

deal with stress by defence, fight-

back or even running away,” Vaerum. She said the body’s nervous sys-

iTTg

said

jumps four

to five times, she

“One stress

way we cope with

typical

and anxiety

is

suppression of

One of the things that we know now from research evidence is that if we supthe fight-flight reaction.

body

press our stress, our

how

forget

starts to

to shut off this fight or

response and as a result it causes an imbalance in our sysflight

tem.”

She said this can result in health problems such as increased blood cardiac arrhythmias, problems, headaches, sleep disorders and chronic anxiety. “If you have some of these chron^ ic problems then that contributes to more stress and before you know it you have this vicious cycle,” said Vaerum. If a person has a lot of stress and he or she doesn’t release it and just attempts to get rid of it by working

digestive

flight reaction.

“A

heart said.

pressure,

are

Vaerum.

because when this flight or fight response is triggered you’re engaging a lot of fast but very shallow breathing and the output of the

She said the body also releases a amount of stress hormones

large

such as adrenaline. “What happens with adrenaline that your sense of perception

much

too hard, eating too

may

substances,

it

is

good

moment, but

in the

or using

help us

is

feel

will not

take care of the long-term stress.

She

said that

we have

far

more

resources for facing our stress and

we

our problems than

know we

actually

have.

“The key

is

to stop automatically

reacting to stress and start con-

responding to it,” said Vaerum. “This involves being aware of having a fight-flight reaction and then putting efforts into sciously

interrupting

it

before

it

takes over

or leads to chronic problems.”

Vaerum

said there are

ent strategies for

what

is

called

how a

stop

the

said

differ-

to

induce

relaxation

which is a very deep form of relaxation that reverses all

response,

tool

first

“We

induce

this

response

when

a person

stressed just like the breathing but

A,-

The

use disability servic-

disability

which

is

offers a

services

located in

office,

Room 2A137,

wide range of services and

counselling to help each student

succeed academically. A disability may be having a broken arm or being deaf, hard-ofhearing, visually impaired or hav-

ing a mental illness.

injury,

Some

other

having a head medical problem, mobility

disabilities

are

impairment, learning disability or having an attention deficiency.

The

service

helps students by

with a proper

ing the students

accommodation thereby “leveling the playing field,” said Judy Bates,

it

good if he or she is having very intense and very unpleasant

a former counsellor

especially

who

now

is

the

co-ordinator of the service.

Any time we

There are adaptive equipment

bad we just don’t like to focus on it and meditation is actually asking you to do the opposite of that. Ryan Beckwith, a third-year

devices and computer software

management

recorders.

emotions,”

.said

Velum..

feel

student

studies

that are relevant to a student’s

“When situation

and

I

at

per and

Academic accommodations can include an interpreter for the deaf, a

am put into a stressful my nerves get very bad fidgety,”

that

I

transition

said

support and

learning

strategist support.

get a tem-

overreact to

I

note taker, diagnostic assess-

ment, peer tutoring, employment

I

become

If a student is in

the

tests,

there are

need of help on

many accommoda-

smallest situations, causing others

tions such as use of special

around me to Beckwith,

puters,

home

feel

the

in

theatre department at Future if

his stress

in the

until his .nerves' calmr

work-

is

use of adaptive technology.

For more information, drop into 2A13.7 or call 519-748-5220, ext.

lunch room

down.

I

,

'

.

com-

open book tests, extra time on tests, use of math formula sheets, a private room setting and

uncomfortable.”

who works

need

such as language masters, literacy software and four-track tape

Conestoga College, said that for the most part his stress comes from school and his work environment.

and take a seat

J,j.’

who

es everyday.

feeling

is

deeper form of relaxation than, lying on the couch and I,

There are about 700 registered students

relaxation

Shop, said

^

SAMANTHA SAECHAO

identifying a disability and assist-

related he will leave -the sales floor

.c

By

unpleasant.

response.

need

muscles have squeezed out all the air and keep alternating this way. “It’s one of the very first things we teach to people who have really strong anxiety or panie because it shuts off the flight or fight response completely within four or five minutes,” said Vaerum. “It is very effective and once you know how to do it without using your hands you can do it discreetly in any situation while you’re feeling stressed without anybody even noticing.” Vaerum said the second tool is mindfulness meditation which involves focusing your attention on an aspect of your experience, and adopting a calm, gentle attitude toward your experience even if it is

of the effects of the flight or fight “It’s a lot

is

Help for those in

is

hand on the chest and one hand on the abdomen, take normal breaths in and making breathing out slower and longer than usual but continuing to breath until, the abdominal breathing, placing one

is

sale

scheduled for January 2007.

all.”

it

Vaerum

Beckwith. “I find that

two

The next Imaginus poster

watching TV,” said Vaerum. “Once we have this flight or fight response we really need deep relaxation to

,

3258,


News

SPOKE, September

— Page 13

2006

25,

College works to proviije safe environment SUMMER MCPHEE

By

like the

joke that was made, that he

or she didn't

known

It is

harassment exists

that

throughout the various levels of

She said

from the elementary level up to and including the post.secondary level but Conestoga College works to combat that. “Conestoga College students have a right to go to school in an environment that is emotionally and physically safe and non-threateducation;

human

something

“The second step if you I'ecf'uncomfortable approaching the person yourself is to ctinlact someone like me or a college counsel-

BY AMY MEADOWS

worldwide

number

An

18-year-old cancer survivor the Terry

like

many

Foundation, she and

Fox

others

Diane

College graduate, has been the volunteer co-ordinator with the Terry

Fox Marathon

cancer for seven years, because of

like

research

It

said

Jessica

Conestoga

a

having

for the last 10 years,

lost her father

ther to cancer

“Since

my

I

many

and grandfa-

years ago.

started doing this,

dad

is

he

feels like

I

feel

always on my mind. is with me,” Frank

Smith.

said.

Smith gave her speech to a silent crowd at Waterloo’s Bechtel Park

Frank was in charge of the Terry Fox tree, an idea that started in Waterloo and became so popular

for the 26th anniversary of Terry

Hope

Fox’s Marathon of in the

(the 23rd

Kitchener- Waterloo area), a

marathon she said her family has always supported wholeheartedly. “1 was diagnosed with the same form of cancer Terry Fox had a day after the

marathon

in 1998,”

Smith

said.

in

Room

the future

and said

that there is still

the possibility that in

our lifetime

there will

be a cure for cancer. “Even if it isn't found in our lifetime,” Smith said. “If we don’t start

with the Fox family that every location in Ontario

now

looking

now

it

will never hap-

has one.

Strands of yellow ribbon are

handed out

on the ribbons which are then tied to the tree where they will remain for a full year, to be

down

taken

just in time for next

year’s event.

At the foot of the is

tree in

Waterloo

a plaque with the inspirational

This year, Frank has placed 17 names on the tree, dedications she

for cancer research

came during

time in hospital. Sadly, he was forced to stop running out-

his

side of

Thunder Bay after discovering the cancer had spread. He then lost his battle at the age of 22.

Since his

$400 million

death more than has been raised

A volunteer for a senior program, she Onds dealing with a wide vari-

of people something she

incredibly skilled

is

1997’s year’s

at

Bechtel Park, from

“One step at a time” to this “A single dream, a world of

hope.”

“It

is

“I love

a great

some

words of support to the crowd, ranging from babies to the elderly, and said he knows from first-hand experience how cancer affects fam-

she said.

new people

that

show

ter this tree will look.

an excellent way to

kind of dedication and

had

that

keeps us all going, in so many ways,” Zehr said. People on bikes, rollerblades and on foot milled around in the heat, sending a buzz around the busy park. Food and water stands had

up, the bet-

Terry

your family and friends in your memory and to keep those memories alive,”

“It’s the

the kind of spirit that Terry

“The more

way of keeping

I

find

it is-

keep your

many

•‘Terry it’s

mem-

about what to do and where to go if a situation such as hara.ssment occurs.

Ngyuen know that

said

it

is

reassuring to

the school has put proce-

dures and staff members in place to deal with situations of harassment to make the learning environment more comfortable for its students. “My first week at Conestoga has

is

been

she

“Hopefully

said

I

Ngyuen.

said

great,”

will never run into a

where I will need to talk anyone concerning harassment.”

situation

Marshall. “That he or she didn’t

to

Conestoga gets student chapter By JENN SPRACH

International Facility

for

the

ident of the association.

IFMA

dur

lives,

our turn to even the score.”

nOw

there she decided to begin

Conestoga chapter with the

Toronto chapter as her mentor, said Yeung. By the end of March 2006 their chapter was official with a full

Management

Association (IFMA), said the pres-

worldwide and eight student chapNorth America, said Angela Yeung, president of IFMA and a

board of directors and their first meeting took place, said Yeung. “I am able to help students realize more of their opportunities with the APFM program,” said

student in the applied degree archi-

Yeung.

and facility management (APFM) program.

dents with educational

ty

is

an association for

facili-

management with 125 chapters

ters in

IFMA’s mission

now has more 18,500 members in more than

The than

“IFMA new

said.

Some of

provides certification for

provide stu-

advanceto

gain^

student chapter’s

the

goals are; to have

managers with their facility manager professional designation and for practising managers with a certified facility manager certification,” said Yeung. also conducts

to

experience in the profession of facility management, she said.

facility

IFMA

is

ment and opportunities

association

all

interested stu-

become members,

dents

create a

successful chapter with high participation,

make

global

facility

management connections, provide support for career pursuits and

research,

provides educational programs and

increase

managementconference, entitled World

IFMA

awareness,

she

puts on the largest

said.

related

The college chapter is currently planning educational sessions for

Workplace, every year, she added. It was after the World Workplace conference in Philadelphia in October 2005 she realized the benefits of having a student chapter at Conestoga College, she said. IFMA gives students the chance to learn more about their job opportunities and career paths, she

the semester, seeking professional

scholarships and a networking and

career planning educational

IFMA

chapter for October and

November.

The has

college’s chapter currently

16

members and a

faculty

adviser.

epnferende^ ^he liaison

ses-

with the president of the

sion

said.

About a year

years ago.

Fox rhh

IFMA. From

Conestoga College has the first Canadian student chapter of the

60 countries worldwide, she Carl Zehr offered

been set up and emergency services crews were on hand. Everyone at the marathon had the same objective in mind - an objective pointed out in a poignant poem written by a man who ran with

says are from her heart.

well informed by both staff

bers and her student guide booklet

tecture-project

at.

ilies.

above the knee.

money

port,” said Frank.

Mayor

been held

raising

one lung because of cancer, these people need so much sup-

she said.

Terry Fox was only 18 years old when he was diagnosed with bone cancer and forced to have his right leg amputated 15 centimetres

Canada

surviving with

The names

quotes from each year the event has

run across

is

vived or lost the battle or are cur-

pen.”

His decision to

of the ladies here

working with all kinds of people. I’m a people p)erson, I find it such a stimulating experience,”

are written

first

couple of days of school she was.j«,

at

everyone and they are asked to dedicate the ribbon to friends or family who have surto

person to take

a first-year busi-

she was just two weeks

Conestoga College. “When I got accepted to Conestoga, my dad was in Florida, he was so excited,” Frank said. She said today makes each person think about what cancer patients have to go through. “One

ety

Diem Ngyuen,

person directly that he or uncomfortable with how he to,”

attention; an

persistently ask-

making suggestive comments that are unwel-

to tell the

being spoken

is

ness student, said within her

the earliest stage possible. “If someone feels like he or she is being harassed the first step that we

is

type

come.

Marshall said the purpose of the policy is to help resolve the issue at

is

common

in its

harassment can be copy of the policy that all employees and stu-

that

her

from and

and

would advise

at

ing for dates or

sexual

in the

applies to

into her early childhood education

diploma

discrimination

most

who

individual

1B23, the

protected

is

the

would be unwanted

responsibili-

ensure that every person

or she

when

its

She said

intervention

of harassment cases she deals with

Student

the

require

that

harassment in accordance with the Ontario Human Rights Code.

just

rently fighting cancer.

She, however, stays optimistic for

988,

threatened."

is

Marshall said there are approxi-

dents.

Frank’s father passed away in

the person feels that his or her

if

level.

nation

hopes up.” 1

Frank,

would not survive. ‘Twenty years ago 1 would have died, 10 years ago I would have lost a leg. I’m here today, free from funding,”

That

these fundraisers.

said without research funded by

organizations

name.

his

in

increases every year with

“Sometimes

Marshall.

said

lor,"

Detailed definitions of discrimi-

hope

of

to

what the sanctions can be for someone who is found to have harassed someone. According to the booklet, which

found

a world

it

mately four or five situations a year

to a running start. Since his

single dream,

want

Procedure booklet contains all the rights of a complainant as well as

unlawful

A

tliey

stop.

safety

ty to

death more than $400 million

writing like an c-mail

Debra Marshall said the Conestoga College Protection of Human Rights Policy and

community

Amy Meadows)

in

or a letter to say that

security gets involved, particularly

Services office.

(Photo by

person

directly they could .send that person

resources for Conestoga

college recognizes

Marathon on Sept. 17 get off has been raised worldwide in his name.

com-

feel

that

College.

can be obtained

Participants at the 26th annual Terry Fox

unwanted

people don't

if

talking with

fortable

ening," said the executive director ol'

the

like

attention."

after attending the

b^ame'

the student

on the Toronto chapter of

To learn more about IFMA or to .visit ptember,' 'a .become '

;

^

www.ifma.org.

.

.>


Page 14

News

— SPOKE, September 25, 2006

Need

number of

After reading a

how few

cles about

I

entertainment

found, as a visible minori-

myself,

ty

arti-

visible minori-

ties there are in the

world,

for balance

I

didn’t appreciate that

much. of Asian descent and

fact very I

am

studying

ty,

am liv-

communi-

ing in a mainly “white”

profession

a

that

employs mainly “whites.”

Now mind you, I am not racist or anything of that

Students aren’t the only ones hoping for a quick finish Glowach may be smiling but he said he’s not having fun doing construction on the Student Centre. Glowach hopes to get things finished within a month.

Lack

Life

It

we

courtesy on roads

of

saddens me to see how poorly treat each other on the road

when approaching another

two weeks I’ve had at least a dozen or so conflicts while driving and they are so annoying, and unnecessary. I’ll give you a couple of examples to illustrate what I mean: I was stuck in traffic on Homer 1 Watson, heading toward Cambridge. Everyone was moving along fine

when,

suddenly,

these

Racers come flying

down

lane and barge into the If

the right

down

the

be courteous and stop, turn on your signal and lane, at least

someone to let you in. you will be let in within three cars and you won't run

wait for

Odds two

to

nearly clipping

was

at a friend’s house until day and I was taking the country roads home, near Clyde Road in Cambridge. I’m going along great, until 2.

I

late in the

someone coming

are

the risk of plowing into someone.

the opposite

in

me and

refus-

a result of

into a

this, I

nearly drove

mailbox because

I

was

blind-

ed by the light (and no, it wasn't Bruce Springsteen in the other car).

when you’re

driving

turn off your high

beams

Please people, at night,

Hogers

and

BET

Entertainment Television)

BET

(Black

itself is

American shows and movies and which broadcasts music sort of like MuchMusic. In the movie business, yes there are a few other, ethnic groups, but still not that many if you really think about it. Can you really name at least seven well-known multi-

less than

such a rush to get to

me

off,

com-

don’t slow

All drivers need to forget the “got to get there first,” mentality.

Just slow down, wait your turn and use common courtesy. You’ll be surprised at how much smoother your travelling goes.

what you nemd to

y<

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Let’s look at television shows.

Almost all of the American primetime shows such as Lost, Kyle XY and Desperate Housewives as well

some of our very own Canadian shows such as Whistler, Instant Star and Comer Gas, have either an allas

white cast or almost all-white

Now,

I

am

cast.

not putting the shows

entertainment

OMNI

Sex and the City) and

the posted speed limit!

pelled to cut

are in the entertainment business.

friends and their lives, almost like

on

Global),

or

me, they do 10 kilometres

feel

still

how many

off,

CMT

on

a television channel with African-

your destination that you

not enough compared to

(about four African-American best

after this

smt

lias just

race other than Caucasian, but

the

in

person raced across to get ahead of

If you’re in

are Asian, African-

feet

in the process.

here’s the kicker;

who

actors

down, I do think the majority of the shows are good, I just wish they showcased more diversity. When it comes to music in the

down.

es to turn off his high beams.

As

And

me

just

way media

more Caucasians

Girlfriends

They wait until I’m within 10 of them and then they take

am

American or Spanish or any other

Reba

left,

looking to turn in front of me.

direction approaches

left lane.

you’re going to go

empty

Ricky

my

out from a side street to

Just in the past

.

motorist.

This time. I’m on my way to school and I see someone creeping 3.

these days.

I

pointing out that there are

world than any other race. Also, it seems as if you have to be Caucasian to get into the limelight or get your 15 minutes of fame. Seldom do you see an Asian, an African-American or even a Spanish person in television shows or movies. There are the occasional TV shows that are mainly just for other ethnic groups, such as George Lopez on ABC (almost like

(Photo by Cara Lichty)

Jaret

sort,

but not more than all the Caucasians I can list off the top of my head. Yes, there are big-name

millionaire actors

who

are Asian?

Or even South American? There are quite a

out there,

few African-Americans enough to name seven.

world,

that

is

it.

guess

I

how

I

am

just ranting about

shows and movies cou]d be if ethnic groups were featured more prominently. North America is a lot more diverse now than it was 40 years ago. The entertainment world is better television

slowly following but,

be

shouldn’t

it

at a tortoise’s pace.

It’s

time to step

it

up.

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•';L

Mow


News

Dad By

A

Brian

couple of years ago,

Lamondin

sons were spend-

felt his

much time playing video

ing too

games and not enough with more family-oriented activities.

.social,

He wanted to find them away without plaints of In this

now

he

way

a

to pull

and com-

strife

search he developed what to

Hockey on

as

game based

Board; a board

by more people than just his two boys, said Lamondin. “When was designing it in my head and on the computer was

on, yes,

you guessed it, hockey. Hockey on Board, although still in the works, has evolved from a simple thought to a detailed protothat Lamondin is confident become a success. Lamondin, now 43, has lived in the

type will

Kitchener- Waterloo

for

20

game

has

area

years and his idea for the

I

just doing

for my.self to see if

it

but his finished product will consist

of a smaller, foldable board, three-

dimensional players and a box to replace his current shrink-wrap

in

making

motion

trying to eliminate sdrne of

time spent playing video games, said Lamondin. "It's really been in the past coutheir

ple of years that I've

become

really

my

idea

gung-ho about getting

Lamondin said he would play around on the computer whenever he had a spare hour. He and a friend played with the design forever trying to get the kinks out of

The two-player game

it,

he said.

on a hockey rink, comzones and face-off is set

Each gamer has

six players

on the "ice" (a centre, two wingmen, two defencemen and a

Two

Lamondin St.

sold prototypes at the

Jacobs Farmers Market for two

months over

summer and

the

they

arc also currently available to order

so

sales

far

through both means, as well as through word-of-mouth.

customers seem

In general, fied,

me how much

having with

The

fun they are

reaction from his initial tar-

his

well as from adults

two sons

came

10-year-old plays

as

-

as a bit of it,

my

15-

and people my age love it even more,” he said. “That's what I was counting on but I was never really sure.” Lamondin said he thinks Hockey on Board is populai' among all ages

year-old loves

because of

it

its versatility.

are friendly to

The

all skill levels,

he

rules said.

“There’s a watered-down set of

dice are rolled at the

beginning of each turn, one for

rules for kids

moves

where if it’s in hockey, it’s in the game,” he said. “You can play with off-sides and hitting, it’s all possible. It just depends“on how complicated you want to make it.” Lamondin said there isn’t any

and

other

the

The

shooting/passing.

for

goal,

the

same as hockey, is to score. Once he had the grid pattern of the game figured out he was confident his design would be enjoyed

doesn’t think that will deter con-

love either one, they should love

sumers from

this

taken

and a full-blown

set

that,

somewhat

since technology has

board

games have

lost their

over,

his product.

market

everything becomes new again,” he said. "They just keep rehashing old “In

it.”

a surprise, he said.

“My

appeal but he

this game,” he said. “This is as Canadiana as you get. It’s a board game and it’s hockey and if people

question

"There hasn't been much negative feedback,” said Lamondin. “Everyone who comes back to me tells

(Photo by Meghan Kreller) Waterloo resident and inventor, Brian Lamondin, is confident his board game will be a hit. Hockey on Board is a realistic, two-player game that is more fun than checkers but way less complicated than chess, said Lamondin.

satis-

he said.

get audience

turned into reality,” he said.

the

trends.”

Lamondin said he realizes board games will never wipe out video games but the right type of board games will come back to a certain degree.

“Hockey on Board

is

the right

type (of board game),” he said.

There are a

lot

of hockey

trivia

games out there that don’t reach a huge base of people, Lamondin said.

If

people don’t

know

a lot

about the history of the game they won’t play the trivia games, he said.

Hockey on Board

is

different

because it’s not about boring facts; it’s about playing the game most Canadians love, Lamondin said. “Nothing smells like hockey like

game.” Being a hockey fan himself, Lamondin said it has been easy to keep his idea going. “They always say when you invent something you have to have a kind of love for it,” he said. “1 love hockey so it was, and still is, pretty easy to get excited about.” Lamondin. having recently settled into a new home, has taken a bit of time off but said he is now ready to continue focusing on new ideas and ways to market Hockey on Board. “Now that I’m moved in and hockey season isn’t far off I’m getting that fire

where or what they wanted

Conestoga Mall was buzzing with excitement as more than 200 people

roamed from booth

to

booth look-

ing for the perfect volunteer position at this year’s

Volunteer

Fair.

ization for volunteer

awareness

in

K-W

As all

could seek volunteer opportunities.

the

paper and radio.”

stop because they are curious.”

unteer for the Hospice Association,

the organiza-

tions that bring in the

most volun-

“What we would

really like

see

is

people re-engage

their talents

back

and strengths

into the

community

Gwenanne Jorgenson, the community relations

ROOF, Waterloo Food Bahk and

involved, such as Kidsability, which

co-ordinatorfor the Volunteer

a centre for child development.

Action Centre

is

munity, hand out flyers or

paigns, such as breast cancer or

pam-

and give presentations to promote the volunteer opportuni-

There

is

who

TV camhad

phlets

multiple sclerosis,

ties

booths set up at the ftiir. Jorgenson holds the volunteer fair twice a year, and has always held it

available

at

that

particular

association or organization.

For people

who were

unsure of

in

September

at

also

Conestoga Mall.

with a life-threatening

who

ill-

and for family and friends

ness,

extremely rewarding to be

everyone should volunteer,” he said. “It is a few hours out of your week, but

it is

a few hours spent wisely.”

Wendy Morrison and Norah

however

this

year there was a dif-

ferent response.

“We

have seen a lot of students however, there has been a good

he said he will .slowly but surely it

big.

Even with the progress made so far Lamondin said he has already reached a goal. “If it goes off into the blue and makes me a billion bucks so be it.'-jg he said. “But if not at least I can say

gave

I

it

a

.shot.”

more

about

information

Hockey on Board

www.hock-

visit

Jorgenson said that without voltions

showcased would not

of need,” she said. “Organizations like

they do.”

“We need

“If you are at all interested in volis

a position for

everyone,” said O’Leary.

“There is no task too big or too small” added Morrison.

people with strong pro-

fessional backgrounds

leadership roles to the

the top of

otherwise

organization, all

and strong

sit at

way

to the

the

bottom

will suffer,” she said.

“What we would

in the resource centre at

unteering there

MS

Jorgenson said right now there is a great need for leadership roles within the volunteer community.

people

Kidsability in Waterloo.

the

Cancer Foundation and AIDS association rely on their volunteers and without them, they would not be able to function the Society, Breast

retired.

both former teachers

^

ter

volunteering

they

exist.

“People have to understand that it is not a matter of want, it is a mat-

the

after

fair

unteers over half of the organiza-

citizens

working Generally the fair attracts young adults in college or university;

in his vision.

continue to work on making

O’Leary are also senior are

along

Balancing working full lime for the Region of Waterloo and part time for B&D Delivery Inc., along with raising two kids, makes it hard for Lamondin to put him.self 100 per cent into the game. However,

way

are coping.

“It is

They

also a good response to

associations with national

a vol-

there for people in their time of need,

teer support are those with children

HopeSpring Cancer support centre. Each organization had volunteers to speak with people from the com-

now

of-life care centre for individuals

living

to

involved included Rogers television, the

is

a high-quality, compassionate end-

as volunteers.”

She said generally

the Kitchener- Waterloo area.

organizations

it

probably because there has been more advertising through the newsis

do something rewarding

a retired accountant,

commu-

Volunteer Action Centre, “I think

are retired and

a fair like this exists, but they will

“There has been a better turnout year than other years,” said

to

who

with their time.” For example, Frans Ten Tusscher,

get people

lot further

adults and senior citi-

who are shopping who may otherwise never know that “You

said if he had more time on his hands he would probably be a

Lamondin

volunteer

for

want

about where they can volunteer in

the

amount of

^

advertising buddies

eyonboard.com.

figured out.

said.

this

it

my

who knows.”

but

For

for the distant future, he has

committee met with them on a oneon-one basis and figured out interests and areas of strength, which allowed them to narrow down places they

Gwenanne Jorgenson,

Along with Lamondin will

said.

“Ideally

would be Don Cherry and the Hanson brothers in ads aired during Hockey Night in Canada,” he said grinning. “All a pipe dream now

stores to pitch his product.

zens this year

nity relations co-ordinator for the

of

in the

belly to get

be bringing his prototype to local

mall you get a better response” she

and surrounding areas. More than 37 not-for-profit organizations set up booths in centre court and spoke with people of all ages

Some

“With the event being held

my

Internet advertising,

teer for, the Volunteer Action Centre

The event was put on by the Volunteer Action Centre, an organ-

to volun-

in

going again,” he

Conestoga Mall gets good turnout By SARAH JAYNES

>

erasable boards he

cessful

goalie.)

(

had custom printed, 12 players made from computer printouts and pieces from the hardware store, two dice, a miniature magnetic puck and a dry-erase marker. Lamondin said he is happy with the prototype

around with the design." Because his sons weren't interested in the older board games, but were both hockey fans, he decided

circles.

f

with to date arc prototypes of the

game made of

said he has been suc-

plete with lines,

ITn

cards right.”

He

grid shaped as a

^

I

online.

when

I

it

would actually work,” he said. "Once I had something usable knew it would sell if 1 played my

packaging.

to put his long-lived idea in

sons

1

in the works for almost as long. “The main idea had been rolling around in my head for 15 years,” said Lamondin. "1 would gel little ideas but then leave it for months just to come back and keep fooling

been

— Page 15

2006

25,

to play with

What Lamondin has ended up

boredom. refers

game

invents board

MEGHAN KRELLER

SPOKE, September

is

really like to see

people re-engage their talents

and strengths back

into the

commu-

nity as volunteers.”

To

learn

more

about

Volunteer Action Centre, http://www.volunteerkw.ca/

the visit-*


Page 16

News

— SPOKE, September 25, 2006

Helping students avoid

Gallery supports local art

excess stress By TIFFANY MCCORMICK

whelmed and asking questions here? and what such as why am I

With the school year well under

way

may

students

begin to find

down with

bogged

themselves

assignments, projects, essays and

everyday homework. To avoid becoming overworked

and stressed out Student Services offers a variety of tips and services (fc—to help students keep on top of their workload. Joy Tomasevic, a learning skills advi.ser, said the most crucial thing for students to remember is time management, planning and organization.

‘Students need to find an cient plan that

works

effi-

am

doing?, as well as having a

I

short temper or an irregular personality.

She recommended students come help as soon as they need it and take advantage of resources such as counsellors, tutors and in for

she said.

resources,”

the

“They’re here to help manage the

of being a student.” Another factor to avoiding stress

stress

who

People

have a passion for

some form of art often dream of making it big in their chosen medium, hut an accomplishment like this is very hard to come by. Fortunately, the Homer Watson House and Gallery in Kitchener provides a venue for public expression for artists, including

who

ones

writing services.

“Use

AARON SCHWAB

By

The Road

on Old Mill Heritage cunently housing an

gallery, located

Doon

by

Cros.sroads,

is

and feeling overworked is health. Tomasevic said it is crucial for students to maintain good health and

exhibit entitled.

take time for themselves.

Kipfer.

She said students need

for them,” she

to

remem-

down by day

are held

jobs.

Not About

It’s

collaborative

a

Fish,

the

of

series

works by Paul Kekish and John (Photo by Aaron Schwab)

more about

“It’s

the colour and

medium

as part of

their exhibit,

Not About the Fish,

It’s

on display

is

Homer

at the

said.

ber to eat well, sleep and exercise

She recommended students have some way of organizing their

as they are necessities for mental

using”

said

and physical health. “Studying is important but it’s not your whole life,” she said. “A

Tiffani

Tyo about

healthy balance

and are heavily laden with images of fi.sh, televisions and female symbology. “It’s about the process behind how each piece was

gallery.

created,

and they used the -symbols they had at hand to put into the art-

“In the end. I’m the one that analyzes all the evaluation forms and -

press

work.”

from the ones that have been approved by the committee to go forward - 1 fit them into the schedule, do all the contracts and choose all the artwork,” said Tyo of her

There’s graphic design involved

.schedule either with a planner, cal-

Palm Pilot or more if need be. She said “there’s not one tool that works for everyone.” Tomasevic added that doing work at school and making good endar,

down

use of breaks can help cut

homework

Services counsellor,

Study Smarter Not *“’ Harder workshops for students. The workshops consist of 14 PowerPoint presentations, which students can access on the college self-help

website, that cover areas such as

time management

and memory.

The presentations give students tips and strategies to stay on top of work and offer “different ways to Tomasevic

said.

She said the presentations are a Conestoga’s satellite campuses and help cut down the real asset for

wait students face to see her for help. “It’s

the

an outreach program to get

message out

to as

as possible,” she said.

dents

who may

for stu-

only need a bit of is

to .see

a two- to threeTomasevic, but

she said that’s normal as the is

fall

when

comes

it

strate-

to getting

work

done.

Doing bits of each project or assignment eases the workload and can help make tasks more manageable. She also gave the ABC method

when

A is

comes to prioritizing work. work that must be done immeit

diately,

B

can be done but

urgent and

C

nice to get

to.

is

work

that

isn’t

would be

Magazine

suggested students “prioritize and proportion time to get done what needs to be done.”

A strategy Magazine uses

is

look-

how students spend their extra and eliminate or cut down any-

ing at

time

She said working outside of school

is

a

major issue many

stu-

dents deal with. “It’s

one of the biggest barriers

to

success,” she said. .students

.she

range

helps

from 17 to 59 years old, are first-, second- and third-years and come from all programs.

To avoid becoming stressed or overworked students need to recognize

Magazine mentioned the Swiss gies

when

they begin

to

feel

stressed and overworked.

Tomasevic said some symptoms can be frustration, feeling over-

multiple in size

curator

paintings,

from 20 inches

Magazine, whose busiest time of the year is before, into and after midterms, said it is important that students use their resources and get help when they need it. For more information on how to cope with stress and keep on top of school work, visit the college website, click on current students and

at

jobs as

Mary’s

St.

High

School in Kitchener, are very physical in terms of their creation process and overall look; lines

Lab

Would you

like

your

own

Come to Rm. 2D 18 on Wednesday, Sept. 27 from 11

am

to 2

pm

and find out

Personal

more about

Assistant?

our services!

tor

which artwork

will

be shown in the

apparent on the canvases. style of painting helps to emphasize the artists’ motives behind the

which include persuadaudience to look beyond the instant gratification of the image and find something more underneath. Over 15 pieces appeared in the show, all of which were up for sale, at prices ranging from $500 to $ 2 000 The artwork thht goes on display at the Homer Watson House and Gallery is determined by a selection process with the help of an exhibition selection committee. Tyo hears proposals from individpaintings,

ing

the'

.

,

Residence It’s

that time of year again

Break

-

it’s

back

means back

this will

itself ties in nicely

historical

back-

but because every day

something new. “There’s something different every day,” said Tyo. “It’s not a sitat-your-computer office job. You offers

do studio visits; usually I do a couple a week. I meet artists, I get to go to openings and talk with artists and interview them, and I’m able to relate to their pasactually

-

no,

to school

to the hustle life

be followed. “The biggest problem is obviously underage drinking” she said. “Beer bottles are not allowed in the building, but we find them everywhere.” Fabian, a first-year telecommustudent

nications

mean packing mov-

Conestoga,

at

said living in residence

sometimes

Conestoga residence, for means renting a house with a few roomies.

to handle.

it

“Ya,

it’s

“There

is

it

can be a

is

great but

bit too

much

or people to hang out with, but you

residence can be a great time, but

have to remember that you have class in the morning.”

few things to remember before choosing to dish out the cash and moving on up. Stephanie Willis, a front

desk rep

at

the residence,

says living in residence can be a great time

if

“I .see all

blast,

and

doesn’t

it

you don’t get too crazy. the students having a is

a great time but

come without

its fair

it

share

of problems as well,” said Willis.

She said students

remember

that living

just

on

have to their

own

can be fun, but there are certain

Kaitlin Kirkup, a first-year adver-

student

tising

at

Conestoga, said

she has mixed reactions. “1

lived

University

in last

said Kirkup

residence

year

As calm as the job of an art curamay seem, it can be a very intense and exciting job, Tyo said.

do and media releases, interviews. I get to promote (the artists). the

all

So

design.

in

and website

invitations

a slew of different

it’s

things,” she said.

Although there are no specific low points to Tyo’s job, the hectic nature of meeting deadlines can get intense and hairy, Tyo said. “We have ten shows a year and the rotation of the exhibitions is usually every four to six weeks, so that whole installation process I do myself,” she said. “Hanging all the artwork, doing all the lighting, all the labelling,

all

of

that.”

work always pays off in the end: “It can get intense, and during that one week, you’re hairy, and the opening reception happens, and you’re like All of Tyo’s hard

‘Oh, this

good

is

why

reason.’

do

I

it,

this is a

rewarding

It’s

at the

end.”

Paul Kekish and John Kipfer’s exhibit. It’s

Not About

the Fish, can

on display at the Homer Watson House and Gallery until be

.seen

Oct. 29.

I

got lonely sometimes,” she

“It

joked. “All of

residence

“When

threw

it

in

at

York it,”

the letter for the

friends lived in a

on campus; I missed them.” What about the alternative. Living in a house can be equally but

fun,

also

comes with equal

headaches. Andrea Bolen, a third-

marketing

year

student

at

the

University of Ottawa, said the best

were renting a

life

house with her friends. “1 did the residence thing

but renting

Bolen.

“It

is

the

cuts

fir.st

year

way to go,” said down on living

expenses because of the amount of people sharing rent, and you always get

along with your roommates

because you get to pick them your-

year and hated

came

my

different residence

times of her

always a blast,” he said. always a party going on

in

there are a

that

receives mixed reviews

the van full of furniture and

others

and

studies

grounds,

with her muse-

rules that have to

not time for the season premiere of Pri.son

Homer

the

at

Art exhibition curator is not a someone without a passion for art and history would choose, and Tyo enjoys her work not only because the Homer Watson house

life

By ANGELO MAZZIOTTI

curator

career

um

shows

“I talk to the press all the time,

Watson house because of her background in museum studies.

very This

is

For first-year students, living

Faculty-

sion before the final selection of

exhibit

For .some,

Skills

sion for the arts and the

they have here.”

paint and brushes used

ing into

Admin

and presents them to the An evaluation form is then completed for each submis-

and shapes are often gouged into

of a college student.

Office

ual artists

committee.

the canvas, and the texture of the

and bustle and hectic everyday

OPEN HOUSE

Gallery.

involvement in the process. As for her career choice, Tyo chose to follow the path of art

time. This

then services.

who have day

and Kipfer, teachers

Watson House and

meaning

the

The paintings done by Kekish

cheese method from studies

usually the busiest time

of year.

The

difficult,”

thing that isn’t a necessity.

Currently there

semester

is

she said.

many people “And

information.”

week wait

said staying

“Playing catch-up

behind the which range

exhibition

they’re

to eight feet,

Student

a

give students.

at night.

think of things,”

crucial.”

on top of work and not getting behind is the best advice she can

Student Services has provided

concentration,

is

Magazine,

Joan

the texture and the

Paul Kekish and John Kipfer’s painting “7 fish (6+1)”

mail

this

out right away.”

self. I

recommend

it

to eveiyone.”

However, she said it does have a downside as well. “You really have to make sure you all stay on top of the rent,” she

Kaitlin said she had a bad experience because she did not have a roommate, and the space was too

said.

small.

clean.”

“That’s really the biggest

problem and you

make

sure you

really have to keep the place


News

SPOKE, September

25,

2006

— Page 17

Peppers’ latest delivers

Chili

By ROSS

ALDWORTH

Silent

tadf

H^rrificsiIIy

Hill;

After 23 years as a band, you that the Red Hot would be done trying new things and would be ready to

might expect

By ERIC MURPHY

Chili Peppers

sit

back, relax and just

make

the

Silent Mill

music that they know works. If the Southern California foursome's studio release. Stadium latest Arcadium, is any indicator, you’re probably right. What ain’t broke

(Internet photo)

A

is

left to right: Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Flea, Anthony Kiedis,

John Frusciante and Chad Smith.

the result.

lack of any major innovation

At 28 tracks spread over two discs (named Jupiter and Mars), the notable shortage of throwaway tracks proves that Stadium is not a lazy cash-in from an evaporating well of creativity, but rather a labour of love from four musicians

Anthony Kiedis,

right.

Free from the sharp sty-

deviations that have separated

Blood Sugar Sex Magick, Stadium plays like a Best Of album that just happens to be

is

the band’s

reminiscent of 2002 ’s

If,)

Stadium Arcadium is the showing

come. Pick up a copy, book two hours alone with a stereo, press play and enjoy. You won’t be needing the

flows into melodic, introspective

channeling the

spirit

of

1999's Califomication. These both

On

blend seamlessly with funky, bassdriven tracks that could have

come

Rose wakes

find herself in the mysterious

abandoned town of Silent

Hill

As

the distraught

it

second thought, better make

game of the same name will have

video

gamers and

horror

flick

enthusiasts shaking their

and and

in

disappointment.

masterpieces like Pulp Fiction and

quick to

Reservoir Dogs with the cult film

Avery seems to have dismissed the notion of good cohesive dialogue and success for poor computer graphics and the running popularity of a video

the

doo-doo like: Silent Hill; enjoy your stay, or Silent Hill; the game is on, or Silent Hill; once you’ve entered there’s no turning back, in classic

Hollywood fashion

have come up with a few Silent Hill taglines of my own.

more

in the

disturbing history of Silent Hill,

the not-so-silent

1) Silent Hill;

movie you wish that was - Roger Avery should be looking to Tarantino for some writing lessons after this terrible wreck of a 2) Silent Hill; enjoy your sleep

movie

icon, Tarantino,

is

not scary at

dumber than they were before they watched

attacking faceless nurses in old

vengeance, be careful what you choose.”

school uniforms that resemble a

bad

rendition

of

Michael

Jackson’s Thriller video to a levitating

bed

that shoots body-split-

it.

To quote one of the Silent

So this

Hill,

A

NEW COMEDY FROM

result

could be deadly.

Help is

on the way. BOB

JON

nOlFOR SCOONDREL UFE'SAGAME. LEARN

HOW TO PUY.

massacre asSX

WW.TEKASCHAINSAWMOVIE.COM

cussiFrcAnoN

In Tiheatres October 6th!

In

Theatres September 29th!

(allianceatlantisfilnns.com

in

think twice before you bring

Too nico? Ibo honest? Too you?

BILLY

waits

DVD home to a loved one, the

TIE DIRECTOR OF "OLD SCHOOL

THORNTON HEDER

characters in

“Evil

rought To You

Br

all

game. Scenes derived from computer graphics range from a group of

four hours with the stereo.

This Stu

-

and could very well put any moviegoer asleep. 3) Silent Hill; once you’ve watched it there’s no turning back - honestly, if people do decide to watch this movie, understand that they may very well turn out this

learn that Silent Hill isn’t like any

The more she searches

with

performance.

heads

Having worked on dialogue is

associated

taglincs

dismal display of demonic

this

So

to

mother search-

es the creepy town, she

Even

from every direc-

arc terrible.

This big screen

her daughter missing.

Rose finds herself tangled

skip button here.

After watching Silent Hill, it is no surprise that writer Roger Avery (The Rules of Attraction) has been overshadowed by former co-writer Quentin Tarantino for the last few years.

Smallville,

SG-1) hoping to find answers to her daughter’s nightmarish sleepwalking episodes. After crashing.

tion.

adaptation of the popular

Rose discovers that the town has been abandoned for the last 30 years because of a continually burning underground coal fire that leaves a trail of terror and a variety of dark creatures that appear every time an emergency-alert siren screams through the town.

to

By The Way,

Ferland;

ting barbwire

ness.

I

While not without its minor blemishes (the glaringly out of

yet and hopefully a sign of things

Ethereal, tempo-shifting material

ballads

new

Chili Pepper’s strongest

throughout.

Rose Da Silva (Radha Mitchell; Finding Neverland, Phone Booth)

other place she has been before.

place

felt

in

material.

entirely

appar-

development can be

since

last

throughout the entire album and the influence of each stage of

heads

have gamers and horror shaking their great disappointment.

Stargate

each Chili Peppers album from the

sense of culmination

enthusiasts

Other tracks blend the band’s trademark mix of styles with such ease and fluidity that you’d think they’d been at it for two decades.

bassist

A

will

flick

(Jodelle

listic

ent

name

obvious examples.

Oh,

Flea, guitarist

recent history.

races with her daughter, Sharon

John Frusciante and drummer Chad Smith) who have clearly found their strengths and refined them to perfection.

(vocalist

the shelves in

hit

from the sessions that produced 199rs Blood Sugar Sex Magik. And those are just the most straight

does nothing to detract from the album’s appeal.

one of the worst

This big screen adaptation of the popular video game of the sanfe

From

remains unfixed and a rock solid

album

is

horror flicks to

leaving her to battle evil and dark-


Page 18

News

— SPOKE, September 25, 2006

Golden Hawks face tough road By CHRISTOPHER MILLS

Some would

call

last

year a

to a respectable 2-1 after their first

onship.

games, but their toughest opponents still remain. They face Western and McMaster in the coming weeks, before finishing the season against a high powered Lancers

Golden Hawks

football

know The Golden Hawks began

team. Others

season

better.

nationally ranked

Canadian

Interimiversity

last

the

in

Sports

such a progression,

at

many would consider the Golden Hawks an Many cited a small underdog. hard to see

it's

why

so

defence that was likely to be picked on by stronger and bigger offenees.

offense

was

Jamie

may seem

(CIS) top 10, and entered the playoffs ranked third before ‘upsetting” of University t-^t-cond-ranked

That

Saskatchewan to cap a perfect season and win their second Vanier Cup. the school's first since 1991. The Golden Hawks seemed to be an underdog all season, despite a regular-season winning streak that reached 20 games going into last year's playoffs. It was the culmination of a journey that began with a 1-7 record in 2002. The Golden Hawks turned things around in 2003, finishing 6-2, but it proved to

sons.

that

logical, but

same defence

it

that led Laurier

undefeated

back-to-back

to

sea-

understand

n't quite

Jeffries couldit

either, but

and his team relished the

fact that

A

progression, as the team finished

a perfect 8-0 record and slayed their dragon from the previ-

deserved.

their

rivals

from

University in the Yates

McMaster Cup game.

The 2004 season brought more with

ous season by defeating McMaster in their home stadium to win the •—-Yates Cup. They outscored opponents 420-158, before suffering a tough defeat at the hands of Laval in the Uteck Bowl. The winning streak continued last

year as the Golden

Hawks

stormed through the regular season, piling up another 8-0 record, before steamrolling strong teams from MeMaster, the University of

season.

the

underdog

label

is

finally

shoes to

the

season with a generous ranking of fourth in the

CIS standings and an

overtime win over the University of

Guelph, but they dropped to eighth following a disappointing 29-19 loss to the University of Ottawa

Gee Gees two weeks ago. The loss ended Laurier’s 21 -game regularseason winning streak and stopped their overall

games.

A

winning streak

shutout win over a

at

13

weak

till

year’s

this

some big

taking, over for all-star

Pyear, but he doesn’t feel

been any added pressure. always in the back of your

there has "It’s

mind,” he said.

new

year, a

"It is

new

a

new team, a when

season, but

the defending national champions, there’s no place but to stay there. Anything less is kind of looked at as a feilure, but it’s a new

you’re

new team, so you just have to. go a game at a time.” He added the team just needs to season, a

maintain focus and not take the success of the past few years for granted.

a reality check,” Partington

“It’s

said,

referring to his team’s loss

and drop

in the national rankings.

we were

kind of being complacent since the start of camp. We’ve had a lot of success in the past few seasons and everyone I think has kind of gotten used to it. “I

The Golden Hawks began

Partington,

starting quarterback, has

he

they were often so underestimated. All of this leads into the current

of

University

the

at

Windsor.

Ryan

Head Coach Gary

season where the Golden Hawks will look to defend their title without a number of their quarterback championship stars; Ryan Pyear, running back Nick Cameron, running back Bryon Hickey, kicker Brian Devlin, defensive back Ian Logan, defensive tackle Kyle Armour and offensive lineman Mitch Zappitelli, among others. And alas, a season where

be bittersweet as Laurier lost to

the

three

Looking

Cinderella season for the Wilfrid Laiirier

Hawks back

Western Ontario and Saskatchewan to their national champi-

York team brought

en route

think

think the loss, as bad as

it sounds, helped us out a bit.” Partington said despite an unconvincing start to the season, the I

may have

Golden Hawks

in no way consider be a rebuilding year. "Definitely, we look at ourselves as a contender,” he said. “If you this to

Fully equipped, sound tested

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with your band. Just plug in and soloist or

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Above; The

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Golden Hawks runs practice

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team

drills at

University Stadium

Waterloo.

Mills)

in

The Hawks

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have a tough time repeating as national champions.

Call or drop by to

book

your rehearsal. 519-896-4976 30 Manitou Dr. Kit. bandjamstudios.com

Right:

The Golden Hawks team undergoes a

football

rig-

orous practice in preparation for a game with one of their conference rivals. Wilfrid Laurier is the defending national champions.

don’t,

I

don’t think there's

much

respect of his peers and will help

us

sense in playing the season.”

Coach Gary

season

this

Jeffries agreed, say-

ing he believes in the players he

for

many

Pyear, often an underdog in his

own

puts on the field each week.

contenders

build

years to come.”

during his career,

right

is

matter of learning from

excited about the opportunity he

what we’ve done thus far,” he said. "We’re young, it’s an inexperienced group,

has been presented with. “This is a dream come true and a tremendous career development

beat up, we’ve got a

opportunity,” he said on www.lau-

"It’s a

we’re kind of number of kids out, but we’re very confident in the young men who are playing

had a goal

each week.” Easing some of the strain on the young team is the presence of championship quarterback Ryan Pyear as the team's new offensive co-ordinator. Jeffries acknowledged that having someone so

we

young

ability

in

such a high position

is

he feels Pyear’s expertise and experience can only make the team better. “I just had so much confidence in him and I don’t think there’s ever been a challenge that Ryan hasn’t accepted as a player, and I saw no reason why he wouldn’t embrace this one, and he has,” rare, but

Jeffries said.

His outlook has not changed naming Pyear to the coaching

since

staff earlier this year.

this past

achieved

are in pursuit of our next goal.” Pyear should make the Golden Hawks a better team, and at very least help prepare them for the

But much of the Hawks and success for this season is yet to be determined. Their fate for this year will be revealed in future.

how

they fare against the top-tier

teams

in the conference, including

CIS fifth-ranked McMaster Marauders and the Windsor the

Lancers, a devastating team likely

be climbing into the rankings Win or lose, it will not be an easy road. Having Jeffries at the helm, the OUA Coach of the Year for the past three years running, automatto

soon.

Golden Hawks a But with power from last year’s

in the business

ically

makes

Yates

Cup

story

on

www.laurierathletics.com when Pyear was announced as the offensive co-ordinator back in February. "I believe we have a great one in Ryan who understands young people, has the

it.

now we

history,

of developing great athletes, but great people,” Jeffries said in a

“We’re not only

“As a team, we season - and It’s a page in our

rierathletics.com.

the

star

team squad

all

the

contender.

but gone,

this

year’s

need to channel Cinderella if they hope to repeat as national champions. Midnight is closing in fast on this fairy tale and it will be hard to

make

will

definitely

the slipper

fit.


Sports

SPOKE, September

25,

— Page 19

2006

COUNSELLOR'S CORNER: Mature Students ^ost-sccor»dory coucotion

is

q journey of exploration, one thot stretches comfort roncs

ond embraces diverse ways of thinking end doing out

in

Returning to school after years of being

the workplace or raising a family con be intimidot'rvg. exhilarating, chollcnging, ond

sometimes unsettling, and despite a wealth of framing, odults feel unsure of whot

life

experience from work, home, or prior

expected of them

is

in

the college environment.

Mony mature students ore apprehensive about returning to school and are concerned about how they will perform academically Them challenges ore different than those of younger students, including but not limited

boloncmg parenthood end home

to;

rc'lcorning and re-devcioping study and research

important part of thot odjustment includes developing competence skills,

life

with school, and

It can take time to odjust ond on

skills.

a willingness to utilize resources, and an openness to leorn

in

learning and study

from peers.

Here are a few observations about mature students thot might eose some

of-

the

uncertainties about returnir^ to learning.

=s

KNOW

TH/^T

MOST ADULTS

LEARNING. The

truth

is,

before, ond they octuolty enjoy

ro

(Photo by Nick Casselli)

The men’s soccer team warms up before their Sept. 15 game against the Sheridan Bruins. The Condors opened the season with a

=>

TO

not better thon they did

it,

THINK ABOUT WHV VOU ARE RETURNING. Don t

DO WHAT IS RIGHT FOR VOU. whot

^

is

important to you and how

There

it will

is

best

be surprised

if

you fmd

MAKE YOUR WELL BEING A PRIORTTV.

Think about

no right way to do this fit

your

life

circumstances end goals.

Don't compromise on the things that

keep you physically, emotionally, ond spiritually well

Make sure you

build

them

into

your schedule,

=5

team comes

if

reasims other than the ones you hod anticipated to continue your learning.

tie.

Men’s soccer

FEEL APPREHENSIVE ABOUT RETURNINS

thot most adults do very well

DISCUSS YOUR PLANS.

Think obout how others

Mottre students ore olso sometimes concerned about

your

in

fitting

might support you.

life

m socially. The

Student

Services Office con help, either mdividuolly, cm through the Mature Student Message

Board by providing a place to meet ond cxchew^ ideos For more information, contact the Student Services Office.

back By MICK CASSELLI

tie in

Solid goalkeeping, tight defending and a clogged-up midfield con-

scoreless

mesh

reveling

in

a

up

in

swiftly

lit

second half as the Bruins netted two quick goals past rookie goaltender Aleks Bednarowski. But a tenacious group of Conestoga Condors refused to throw in the towel, and late in the second half were rewarded with a free kick following a blunder committed by the Sheridan goalkeeper. the

The

initial shot was turned aside, Condor forward, Behrad Rakhshani, made no mistake, boot-

but

ing in the to 2-

rebound

to trim the lead

reach of the fallen Bruin goalkeeper

knot the

little

disappointed

didn’t get the win, but

it’s

ONTARIO COLLEGE STUDENTS

we

great to

see our guys battle out of a big hole

WIN:

like that.”

Veteran forward, Rich Parsons, team has shown a lot of promise but still has some work to said the

“We just need to work out some of the kinks and develop team chemistry. “There

game up

at

two.

much

so

is

locker room,

it’s

Geoff Johnstone, has bestowed confidence in his team and is expecting a playoff berth

“Our team has speed, great

-

SONY PSP PLAYERS -

first

unbelievable

touch ball con-

and an excellent big man

in

-HMV

GIFT CERTIFICATES-

goal for us.

“We

have what

playoff contender,

it

takes to be a

we

Just

PAftfrePATi

need to

IN

THj

harness our attributes.”

Fans are encouraged the

to support

Condors soccer team,

next

home game 26

Humber

at

Sudden iou

vuioa,

pxirkuLoly tn one vyt v*

dooMe

nundnuH in (iw ftoc.

as their

will be held

on

5 p.m. where they will College.

Sept. battle

Sudden

vition

aAd/ur

vm or

0 HEART

AND STROKE

/I TROUBLE SPEAKING It

Tmootary Ioh of tpecds trmme unimacadmg: tprcdi

/I L

DIZZINESS

Wwaiiitm w twddm (A.

eipecuUv

witfe

my of the Ant $ipn

ONTARIO COLLEGE STUDENT ENGAGEMENT SURVEY PARTI* TO LEARN MORE VISIT: httD://www.iwnc(aieQelultion.cofn

FOUNDATION Seek iniinedialc

SEE THEM

-APPLE iPODS-

this season.

SIGNS OF SIROKE

WHEN YOU

$1 1000

a matter of

coach,

/I VISION PROBLEMS

lECOliNIZEIIIE

talent in our

all

time until we click into playoff form.” Although, expecting a win, head

trol

1

With the clock ticking down, the Condors eagerly flocked to the Bruin’s zone like the salmon of Capistrano, and in the midst of frenzy, Condor veteran, Victor Nobre, flashed sparks of magnificence and headed an airborne ball out of the to

“We’re a

our website htfp://www. conestooac on co/pp/stserv/mdex, isp

do.

first half.

The radar screen

Visit

said an excited Nobre.

the

dying seconds of the second half in their season-opening game against the Sheridan Bruins on Sept. 15.

gested any

A Messe^ from Student Services

“This is the biggest goal of my four years playing on this team,”

The Conestoga College men’s soccer team salvaged a

style

in

medical attention if >ou have any of these svmptom.s.

BETWEEN SEPTEMBER - SEPTEMBER 30, 2006 1

* SpoiKiOrea by; Ontario

Mini^ot Training. Coleiaes&

Univorsliics


Page 20

— SPOKE, September 25, 2006

Sports

Conestoga’s intramural fall season is here at last By

ADAM BLACK

mural sports for the social aspect,” said McCartney. “It’s a way to meet new people and keep an

With a month of school almost

being introduced as a new it’s creating excitement

starts in

mid-October with sports and ice hockey, basketball

sport and

like ball

amongst

and volleyball.

students.

Individuals interested in signing

Conestoga kicked off on

dodge-ball league,” said Caitlin

up teams for the second session of

18 with slo-pitch and touch

Old-Staebler, a second-year recre-

intramurals are asked to attend a

ation and leisure student.

captain’s meeting

first

sports at

session of intramural

“I can’t believe they’re

active lifestyle.”

a way to meet new people and keep an

“It’s

football.

For students looking to keep active, yet not have to worry about all the pressure of competing in varsity sports, intramurals might be

going to be really exciting to watch and play.” it’s

active lifestyle.”

Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the ball diamonds by the recreation centre. Touch football kicks off on Wednesdays from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Slo-pitch takes place

Katie McCartney, fitness

the answer.

Katie McCartney, the reception,

and equipment

technician

and equipment technician, organizes intramural leagues at Conestoga, says these leagues are not only a great way to keep in shape, but also to have fun. “I think many people join intra-

“I think

fitness

She also said they are welcoming ideas from students for new sports to be added to the league. For example, starting January dodge

Unfortunately, to sign

up a team for the

the second floor of the recreation

A $30 bond from each team during centre.

fret,

Black)

action

Conestoga’s men’s rugby team pounded the Loyalist Lancers 29-10 to open the season.

more

For

is

required

Sensational

registration.

soccer

on you can contact Katie McCartney at 519748-5220 ext. 2317 or e-mail information

intramural sports

first ses-

kicks off

http://www.conestogac.on.ca/re

sion of intramurals you’re too late.

But don’t

Adam

on Tuesday, Oct. 17 at 6 p.m. at OT’s Sports Bar on

you’re looking

if

(Photo by

Rugby

making a

done, the "Sept.

ball is

By JORDEN FELICIANO

c_centre/html/intramurals.html

the second session

most wonderful time of the when the Union of European Football Associations’ (UEFA) Champions League invades the mid-week soccer schedule four times a month until an eventual champion is crowned in Athens, Greece on May 23, 2007. With the first round of fixtures It is

the

club soccer season,

exohange students.

Talk for hours with hot Get unlimited

local calling for the entire

school year.

already in the books, several of this season’s favourites have got off to

a great

start,

champions

namely last years’ and front runners

again, Barcelona of Spain.

“They displayed

their

domina-

game

against Levski,” said Paul James, 42, head coach of the York University soccer team

tion in their

and soccer analyst on The Score’s Sportsworld program. “Their 5-0 result was not an illusion and they displayed a total

team

effort,” said

James.

five different players

score sheet,

it is

get

“When on the

a reflection of the

team effort.” With most of the focus being put on Barcelona, some of the other favourites have less attention on them, which some think isn’t such a bad thing. total

“I think with teams like Milan, Lyon, Chelsea and Manchester United, the pressure won’t be so high on them going into matches because they don’t have all the media attention and expectations,”

Student Only /montht

Lee Godfrey, soccer analyst GolTV. Chelsea, Milan, Lyon, Arsenal, United, Manchester Valencia and Bayern Munich all started off their campaigns with said

for

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of talent, so I think they are the toughest matchup on paper with Barcelona.”

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and prices may

charges, monthly system access fee and monthly enhanced 91

the

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service access charges are extra.

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oedit on your future TELUS monthly

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THUS

they thought

biggest threat to

Barcelona the toughest challenge.” and said, agreed Godfrey “Chelsea is a well-coached team, well organized and have an excess

friendly

0IUdioShKlc.

FUTURE SHOP

who

Barcelona’s

;:^telus the future

the

crown, James and Godfrey have a similar club in mind. “Definitely Chelsea,” said James. “They are in the same opening group as Barcelona, and for the last two seasons have given

8 months**

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Champions League match day two resumes Sept. 26 and 27 with the key matchups being Benfica United, against Manchester Arsenal and Porto, Inter and Bayern Munich and Roma and Valencia.

Digital Edition - September 25, 2006  
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