Page 1

6

Varsity sports get

vu: rfp:

When

underway

teams

...

Feature in

the

14

Health services gets a makeover

a two-part

half of

first

Rome

student’s account of enjoying the breathtaking sights of the Eternal City.

Kate Battler takes a look at two Condor varsity

in

A

$40,000 in renovations provides students with privacy and independence.

series.

News Monday, September 20, 2004

Conestoga College, Kitchener

Pond Party By

— No.

36th Year

offers fun in the

1

sun

STEPH BAULK

Conestoga College’s annual Pond Party

was a great success despite morning rain and continu-

the early

ous rain clouds passing overhead throughout the morning. First-, second- and third-year students gathered Sept. 9 around the

pond behind out

the

the college to check

held

festivities

Conestoga Students

by

Inc. (CSI).

Sumo wrestling and a gladiator jousting competition were popular events the students were able to participate in throughout the day.

Hamburgers, hotdogs and beverages were served to hungry students by hardworking CSI

mem-

bers and various volunteers.

Students were also able to buy in a designated area and hang

beer

out while listening to Rufus, a live band, performing outside.

Nichole Jiminez, events programmer, said she thought everything turned out pretty well.

“I’m looking around and everybody’s having fun, so that makes me happy,” she said.

She said until about 1 1 a.m. they were planning on having the party

when

inside, but

come

they

out

they saw the sun

by Alexandra

(Photo

moved

quickly

everything back outside.

Cliff

“I’m really happy,” she said. “I a little bit nervous with the rain thing, but I’m really happy it’s going well.”

that

Mastronardi)

on the offensive against a Conestoga student at the annual Pond Party. CSI hosted the event offered free food and events such as sumo wrestling and gladiator jousting. See Pages 10-11 for more details. the Condor, Conestoga’s mascot,

is

was

Aaron Reid, student in the

gram, said it’s

“It gets

is

Amy

a second-year

woodworking pro-

this

his

first

year

Pond Party and he

attending the thinks

19,

ing,” he said.

way

“It’s a great

to

meet people.” Bennett, 22,

a first-year

is

student at Conestoga and said she

of people

lot

in

my

program

great

way

is

a

Remo

meet people,” she said. Schlumpf, 19, a third-year to

good way

student in the architectural technol-

meet people, but because the

ogy and design program, said he has attended the Pond Party every year he’s been going to Conestoga.

also thinks the party to

“A

don’t live in residence, so this

a great idea.

lineup for food

people talking, socializ-

hard to do.

is

a

was so long

it

was

He it is,

said the party

is

pretty

good

as

although in past years the party

like

“I

CSI

better here,” he said,

it

actually at the pond.”

it’s

president,

the weather

was

Falconer,

Justin

were great and

said he thinks things

“We were

a little worried waking morning and seeing the rain, but in years gone by the weather’s been a great ally for ensuring the students had a great

up

hasn’t always been at the pond.

“because

friend for the day.

certainly their best

this

“And

time,” he said.

that’s exactly

what’s going to happen.”

General education programs face cuts By

RYAN CONNELL

hours in some program areas this

which doesn’t assist in the growth that Conestoga is experiencing. The Liberal government has not only issued a freeze on

year in order to realign itself with

tuition this year, but the

the provincial system average.

isn’t receiving

Conestoga College

The college

is

reducing

hoping to lower its projected deficit of $1.4 million from its approved budget of $86.4 million this year, by reducing the number of general education is

also

electives.

of

academics

says that

some of the

Vice-president

David

Bums

basis

college

evaluate

order to

some of the programs in make a fair, consistent

workload

for the next three years.

we do because you

money to deal with many things we want to do,”

the

Bums

“There is a freeze on tuition and, although the grant says.

money

isn’t

frozen,

it’s

leges,

for very long.”

Bum

says.

receiving

more general electives and higher program hours than other colleges,”

universities or school boards are

he says. “Maybe

The Ontario college sysbecome the lowest-funded

^.cational sector on a per capita

money.”

David Burns, vice-president

more than $2,000 less per student from the government than what

has

been providing adequate

not ade-

“When we compare ourselves to other colleges, we generally have

receiving.

“The province has not

quate for our increased expenses so

can’t operate with a budget deficit

Ontario colleges are

for students.

“The province has not been providing adequate

The college has decided to eliminate one elective from some programs this fall in order to realign itself with the amount of program hours that are offered by other col-

to look very closely at

from various pro-

funding for growth

funding increases that the college was expecting to receive from the

“We have

electives

grams

allows the college to re-

what do we do?”

everything

tion

it

cuts are attributed to the lack of

Ontario government but didn’t.

Mark Derro says that by some general educa-

Studies

eliminating

we

can’t afford to

continue to do that unless the gov-

ernment offers some more money.” Chair of Liberal Arts and Media

“This

is

ofacademics

allowing us to take a

good look at our program design and make sure we have a balance and a harmony all the way really

“Any

students,” he says.

reductions

have an impact on the students but we’re trying to minimize that by positioning courses so that it doesn’t happen.” Derro hopes that by removing some general electives from various liberal arts and media studies programs that it will encourage students to focus more on their core courses in their programs. However, some students are disappointed to hear about the removal of electives from their programs because they enrolled in the program with the expectation of are going

to'

receiving the electives.

(the

public relations student, said she

with me.”

Rohfrietsch feels she’s at more of a disadvantage than university stu-

dents because the cut in general

means she

electives

now be

will

learning even less than what a university education has to offer.

“There’s always that rivalry that university

is

and now

better

if

they’re going to be cutting college

back even more compared to university, then that’s only going to

make

it

worse,” she says.

Bums

says he thought a

lot

of

students weren’t overly interested in

Sandra Rohfrietsch, a first-year

work then

didn’t

elective)

that’s fine

taking

some of

the

elective

courses to begin with. “I actually think

is

it

an advan-

was disappointed about not being

tage to have time to concentrate on

through,” he says.

able to take a liberal studies elec-

their core

The first-year students will see the most impact to their programs in the liberal arts and media studies

tive

Derro says. “At the end of the day, what we’re trying to do is make sure whatever we do is academically sound and it doesn’t have a major impact on our fields,

in

when

her

she

year of studies

first

was

told she originally

would.

take

if

wanted

to take electives,

concentrate

on

think that as

whatever

then

I

don’t need to

we’re trying to do

would

trust the col-

the province

Rohfrietsch

they tried

it

they’re not going to

I

they feel like

it

lege,”

I

it

is

they’re doing, that really, overall,

“I really

but

program so

long as they take the time to really

last

says.

“But

if

year and thought

do.

We

is

is

lose.

What

follow what

saying

we

should

can’t afford to offer above

that right

now.”


Page 2

News

— SPOKE, September 20, 2004

Now deep thoughts Conestoga College

...%vith Random

questions answered by random students

What do you

bring from

home

to

keep you from getting homesick?

“My

girlfriend.”

Chris

Hussey (Photo by Justin Bastin)

Trish Weiler, a nurse at health services, stands with colleagues

made

“Booze and plenty of

possible by

new

in

a

new treatment room

was

that

funding.

Health services gets

it.”

a $40,000 makeover

Colin Silva

New equipment helps students By JUSTIN BASTIN

“The technology

New equipment at health services

“Music, pictures, and

my

is

teddy bear.”

helping students with disabilities

get a college education.

An

Michelle Webster

electronic

guitar,

my

computer

more independence and services

co-ordinator

Marian Mainland says the $40,000 worth of renovations to health serv-

and pictures of

“Now

to

make

go about

it

easier for students

their daily routine.

come

to

Karen the

new

"Without

it, it

doesn’t matter

school. are set

an

educational

whose son Chris facilities,

will use

says the equip-

come

to

The fact that these facilities up the way they are, things the

new

lift

system

health services renovations includ-

ed adding an extra bathroom, docoffice,

a

new

waiting

room

independent of reception, a recovery

room and a treatment room away from the door for

relocated

ment helps preserve the privacy of students and allows them to simply attend school, which before would

greater privacy.

have been very

Services.

difficult.

basically

run smoothly.”

tor’s

Pellin.

would be

impossible for them to

Along with

how many come, we can accommo-

it

assistant

Disability

to

Conestoga.

date them.”

ices will

pillow,

more students

students

my

to talk to

will allow

health services office which allows

privacy.

dog,

people around the world,

my

system has

the

opens the

world for them,” she said. She also says the new additions

replaced the old hand crank lift in the attendant care bathroom in the students

“My

lift

many of

for

students just

disabled

Health

services

Room 2B06

is

located

in

across from Student

Grandma and Grandpa.” Pawel Mosiadz

Just stuff from

so

it

looks

like

my room my room.”

Kendyll Meldrum

“A teddy bear that

my

gave me.” Miguel Rojas

girlfriend

“Sony Playstation.” Ryan Poole

(Photo by Kristen McMurphy)

Watch where you park Smife Conestoga you could be our next respondent! ,

Conestoga security guard, Mike Lee, leaves a warning ticket on a car parked 100 illegally' parked cars during the first two days of classes.

ticketed about

in

Lot 9 on Sept. 8. Lee

-


.

News

SPOKE, September

•New cameras added Rw ICMMICCD uniA/nciu By JENNIFER HOWDEN

-i.i-

i_.

i

.

Conestoga College to

is

adding

five

Doon campus

students, faculty

to

and

visitors feel safe.

(Doon)

“In reality

campus

but

you are

safe

is

a very safe

doesn’t matter

it

you don't

if

feel

how

safe”

said Al

Hunter, chief of security and parking services. The new cameras are part of a

dents

cameras added to the Guelph campus. Not only have more cameras been added but they have also been upgraded from an analogue system

there are

This means instead of having to go back and search through tapes to find an incident, to a digital one.

all

the footage

system.

is

on the

right there

the police need footage

If

"We

(put the signs up) for

secondly, are too

it’s

dumb

security

school is currently in the second year of the five-year plan, which involves a number of security ini-

pause and zoom in and out a lot easier than they could with the old system. They can also search the

they’ll steal

tiatives including alarms,

tape using a motion sensor.

cameras

system also allows forward,

The

and emergency telephones. One of the cameras is being mounted on the west side of the

cameras also have an automatic iris. This means they can adjust to the light of any scene, making it

Student Client Services Building

easier for security to see in heavily

to give security a better

shadowed or low-light areas. The digital upgrades are not com-

parking

lot 8.

going up

view of second camera is

A

at the front

of the recre-

ation centre to give a better view of

Lot

10, the front

of the recreation

centre and the sports field.

A

third

camera will be on the end of the Ewing for better coverage of some of the entranceways going down into the business wing. A fourth camera is being installed near

Door 4 to get a better view of the roadway and the bus stop. Finally, a camera

wing

and Lot

A

at the

is

top of the A-

for better coverage of

total

Lot 5

6.

of nine cameras were also

added to the ATS building. There were no cameras surveying that

plete but security hopes to have all cameras under the digital system as soon as possible. Aside from the cameras, perimeter

alarms have been added

high value are stored. is

now

alarm

in

high

where portable items of

risk areas

One

area that

protected by the perimeter

where $10,000 worth of equipment was the

is

fourth

floor

stolen last year. 1

connect students directly to security if they need assistance. Signs have been posted at the front of the college alerting stu-

security

features

said

Hunter.

“The whole idea of

the

cameras

is

to prevent

it

in the first place.”

that it’s not the students security has to keep an eye on.

“Our students are very, very good,” he said. "They are the least of our worries when it comes to people committing offences.

Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre still has several

rooms available for students

looking for a place to

buying and installing new cameras. total expenses from this year have not yet been totalled.

The

Some of the money to cover the expenses comes from the college women's

said.

Kobylnik said once a virus gets on the network it is really diffiit

fixed so this

is

a

students and they only had approx-

good preventative procedure. While staff scan for viruses, they will also make sure students have anti-virus programs on their com-

imately 520, as of press time.

puter.

dence,

the resi-

John Kobylnik, said the

capacity of residence

Students interested

is

about 528

in living in

residence should contact the resi-

dence immediately. Returning students to residence may have noticed fewer channels on their television this year. Last year the residence received extra channels that weren't being

paid

grant

"Rogers found out about that and decided since we weren't paying for it they weren’t going

funds to colleges to upgrade their

Funds also come from

security.

the

increases

parking

in

the

Doon

HOWDEN

who are unhappy about $30 hike in parking fees at Conestoga College should be happy they don’t go to school at Humber, Fanshawe or Centennial. At Conestoga the annual parking passes have increased to $240, up from $210 last year. However, at Humber College in Toronto a two-semester parking pass costs $450. At Fanshawe Students

the

and those at Doon campus. The Guelph and Waterloo prices will now be $225, up from $ 80 last year. Daily rates for those two campustheir prices

1

little bit

people had the big brother mentality but we don't see it that way at all," he said. "I think (the cameras’ raise the students

1

comfort

level.”

of a delay.

"We’ve got one IT guy and 520

ing

in

pass

London an annual parkcosts $306 and at

Centennial College

Laurier

in

University

Toronto a

at

in

Wilfrid

Waterloo

costs only $184.

There are also a few more parkspaces available this year. About 40 parking spots in Lot 10 were reclaimed after construction last year had them blocked off. ing

year Lot 12 was put in provided another 306 spaces. Lot 12 can only be accessed by an access card, which can be purchased for $7 more than Also,

increase to $1.25. from

rates will

$

1

the regular annual price.

Chief of security and parking Al Hunter, hopes that

for

price increases will help pay

improvements to the parking Many improvements are being

made including re-paving some

al

services,

eventually

.

The

ing

last

which

es will stay at $4, but the hourly

lots, line

be a

of

Hourly parking meters at Doon also increased to $1 .25, up from $1 Waterloo and Guelph campuses have also seen a price increase in an effort to close the gap between

month parking pass

may

lot

campus have

lots.

there

security.

"There was a time when a

parking pass costs $158 per semester. On the other hand, an eight-

“But

in

the

long run you’re

going to be saving yourself.” This year’s move into residence

Kobylnik.

before being connected this year.

Kobylnik reminded students to keep their eyes open for posters

In terms of. Internet hook-up,

completed the college’s information technology (IT) department will set them up on the network and then they are set up again at the residence, said that

is

Kobylnik.

^eek and

Hunter said overall the students have had a positive attitude towards

program was,” he said. Kobylnik said he wants everything to run smoothly although

students are required to have their

reception up to channel 42.

“Maybe

passes

and from different programs that want to invest in the security of their equipment.

College

computer scanned for viruses

to us,” said Kobylnik.

This year, residence will get

Once

a

"Some students last year, when we asked them about that, didn’t even know what an anti-virus

went smoothly. This was the first year that staff decided to do the move in over two days rather than have everyone move in at once, said

it

is

provides

that

(Photo by Jennifer Howden, Chief of security, Al Hunter, stands with a sign that alerts people to the cameras. The signs are there to make the students feel safe and to make possible thieves aware that they may be caught if they try anything.

painting, lighting, provid-

more parking spaces and gener-

maintenance.

all

lots

will

be card

The major security problem at Conestoga is vehicle related thefts and Hunter says that by makaccess.

ing

all

the lots card access this will

keep unauthorized people from entering the lots and therefore, eliminating possible thefts.

students,” he said.

for.

to give

which

safety grant,

then

not going to

have virus problems,” he

cult to get

live.

The general manager of

is

It’s

more outsiders coming in.” Last year, $100,000 was spent on

Conestoga’s parking passes cheaper than other colleges’

hopefully you’re going to have a

connection that

STUDENTS, STAFF AND VISITORS

risk

Hunter also said

By JENNIFER but

campus for THE SAFETY OF

not to catch people but

and loses channels puter gets connected

EFFECT

at this

ward off

help

when you raise the somewhere else,”

frankly,

Internet viruses ALEXANDRA MASTRONARDI

IN

"I'm not so naive that I believe they are going to stop stealing but.

Residence eliminates

By

and recording

up and see the

to look

HOUR

VIDEO MONITORING

who

thieves.

provincial

There are also 6 emergency telephone stations around campus that

for the thieves

24

Hunter and the security team hope the cameras and the other

around Conestoga’s Doon, Guelph Waterloo campuses. The

rewind, fast

two

cameras.”

and

to

Doon campus

to

reasons,” said Hunter. “First, so our students know the cameras are there and hopefully feel safer and,

for any reason all security would have to do is burn it onto a CD. The digital

— Page 3

and potential thieves that cameras around campus.

five-year plan to bulk up security

new

2004

.

building last year. There were also

three

new cameras help make its

20,

a half before your

com-

By MIKE

BORS

The Conestoga College Doon campus will be closed to students

around the residence advertising

upcoming

required to

And he their input

events.

“We really want on what they want to

said,

The residence can be reached 895-2272.

at

"It

has

come about

for a

number

of reasons," said Barry Milner of

on Oct. 9, 10 and 1 due to a total water shutdown. However, no classes will be affected since it’s the Thanksgiving long weekend. The shutdown is

do.” you’ll have to wait a

College to close for water shutdown

1

make

final

connections

related to legislated upgrades for

backflow protection on municipal water supply systems. Backflow prevention is a device that does not allow water to travel backwards into the city system.

Physical Resources, "one of them primarily being the Walkerton inci-

dent a few years ago.”

we've had to rely on whole campus to provide details on where we’re using our water,” Milner said. “With these upgrades we should be "In the past

three meters for the

Milner said instead of trying to

able to take a look at different sec-

one large the road, which would

tions of the building and determine where the water users really are.

protect everything

preventer at

with

have been very costly, the college has

“Hopefully, then we’ll be able to

decided to do each building where

put in various measures to be able

the water

comes

into the building.

“This actual work

removing the old water meter and doing a new tie-in where that meter was and making sure the piping is all intact,” Milner said. is

to

conserve water

in

those particu-

lar areas.”

Milner said the shutdown will not affect

the

because

it

supply.

is

student

residence

on a different water


Page 4

Commentary

— SPOKE, September 20, 2004

College education good investment With colleges provincewide crying the deficit blues, students must be wondering how the lack of funding will affect them, and their education. All of the colleges, including Conestoga, are being forced to

make

sacrifices this year thanks to a two-year tuition

freeze placed

ernment

is

on them by

the Liberal government.

The gov-

also providing approximately $2,000 less per

student in grants which forces the college to do

more

budget juggling. As a result, Conestoga has had to reduce the number of general education electives offered by various programs. This has some students questioning whether their education is being watered down. The answer is no. The core courses in all programs are being retained, meaning students are learning what they need to in order to get a job in their chosen field. Although it's possible to survive without a post-secondary education in fact, millions do it everyday - a college education usually results in a better paying and more satis-

fying job. Colleges provide hands-on learning, something that is invaluable, and yet isn’t offered in most universities. Also, colleges fill a need in society, by offering programs that respond to industry demand. Even though many workplaces do hold university degrees in higher esteem than diplomas, college is still an important institution that offers a high quality education. And everyone at Conestoga should consider themselves lucky to be attending or working at the No. 1 college in

Ryan's mother considers his student activity fees.

Ban on breed not the answer Many dog owners

an important asset, and a valuable investment for the future.

For the community, this college for students,

it is

is

Kate Battler

of Rottwielers that lived on a horse

and the Ontario government’s plan to

ban

pit bulls

Bryant

Ontario.

Some of the gentlest dogs I’ve come across are Rottwielers and German shepherds. Two that come to mind are a pair

wary of

are

Attorney General Michael Bryant

is

across the province.

currently in the process

of drafting legislation to do just

and

that

believe this

I

is

farm on the outskirts of Kitchener.

not the

The

Opinion

Stress and de-stress

Yes,

news

Summer was

a time for fun in the sun, but now it is time for noses to hit the proverbial grindstone once again. Students pay thousands of dollars in tuition, not to mention the cost of textbooks and possibly accommodations, and it is no fun to see that money go down the drain thanks to failing grades. However, all work and no play isn’t healthy either. Students must learn to balance their leisure time, class time

and homework.

for biting and attacking peo-

For anyone needing help achieving a healthy balance. Student Services is the place to go. Counsellors there will give you lots of great advice, not only on how to study, but how to reduce your stress and be happy. Your college years should be some of the best years of your life. So make sure you enjoy it.

own any

aggressive breed.

aggressive

willing to

If a

ity,

A

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

No unsigned

were

also

dren and loved the attention the

youngsters lavished on them, even

Owners, especially the irresponsi-

if it

Bernards and

ble ones, are not going to be will-

ear.

not the dog that deserves the

or shipped out. While responsible

St.

It’s

blame

in the

case of the attack,

it’s

dog if

is

a reflection of

dog

a

its

owner

attacks, regardless of

the breed, the

held

pit bulls

down

owners should be

accountable

and

the

dog

should be put down. Instead

owners are not

likely to

The people who

in

the

tougher

requirements for those

to

sible owners.

ple to

the

it.

They form

most

targeted

news have been

raised in a bad

environment. I

urge the police and the govern-

ment

the major-

of owners and their pets will be

unfairly

the rights of responsible peo-

own these animals as pets. Many of the vicious dogs seen in

go against

will be hurt

the occasional pull of an

Banning any breed of dog takes

by a ban of any type are the respon-

ity

of banning breeds

province should bring

pay any attention

meant

away

the ban, irresponsible ones won’t

the owner.

and

ban on

ing to just have their pets put

huskies

to target these

people through

tougher legislation on puppy mills

and dog fights and fighters rather

and persecuted

because of the public’s perception

then unfairly targeting

of the breed.

with a provincewide ban.

all

owners

Spoke is published and produced weekly by the journalism

students of Conestoga College

Ormston

Spoke Online

Advertising Manager: Ryan Connell Production Managers: James Clark

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Kristen

McMurphy Howden

Jennifer

Desiree Finhert

for verification.

Photo Editors: Tim Murphy, Kate

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

Battler

letters will

Faculty Adviser and Supervisor: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke @conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

The

rubbed. They

also in constant contact with chil-

likely force the breed underground.

such as Rottwielers,

Editor: Jennifer

letters to the

bellies

their

German shepherds. Great Danes, pinschers, Akitas, Doberman

aggressive

welcome

Spoke welcomes

bam

sucks around and loved to have

German shepherd? would

two dogs would out of the

whenever a car would pull up, but would stop about 15 feet short until her owner called her over. These dogs were the biggest

type of

have been labelled as potentially

is

ban

licensing

Letters are

like to

this dog, what is stopping them from banning other breeds that

numerous other

breeds. If the province

A

ation centre.

who would

ban on pit bulls becomes realwhat is stopping someone who would train an aggressive pit bull from going out and training an

are

chows, boxers,

Conestoga Students Inc. helps out by offering great entertainment and fun activities right here on campus. And the events are not hard on the pocketbook either. And students can join a team or get some individual exercise at the recre-

are often in the

bulls

pit

but so

ple,

larger of the

come bounding

answer.

Address correspondence to: Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Editor,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

Web

site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


SPOKE, September

20,

2004

— Page 5

CAREER FAIR

2004

Yfsn: CAREER SEDGES, Room220, Student Client Services

a single location

in

Building -Employer Guidebook

Where?

- Career Fair information - Bus schedule .^A^, - Resume/Cover Letter

RIM PA

assistance

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2004 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Visit

Doon Campus - Career

(Rm 220 SCSB) Guelph Campus - Main

Services

Waterloo Campus - Student Services Office or www.partners4emplovment.ca for Career Fair information and updates!

What

is

Career Fair?

V An opportunity for students and soon-to-be

Preparation:

V

www .partners4emplovment. ca to obtain

graduates to meet with potential employers

V

Develop

job leads for career-related

V

opportunities

Visit the Career Fair website at

employer information and profiles Pick up an employer guidebook tone week prior to the Fair ) in the Career Services Office at

Getting There:

please visit the

V To Career

Doon Campus From Career Fair

Fair

Doon. For Guelph/Waterloo campuses,

9:30

11:00

10:30

12:00

11:30

2:00

1:30

3:30

Campus

Employer Guidebooks

Administration Office

will also

be available

the Fair

V

Make

sure your resume

professional.

Develop a

up-to-date and

Have your resume

Career Services

V

is

list

critiqued in

if necessary.

of questions to ask employers

Career Services Office

V V

Bus leaves from Door #3 For Guelph and Waterloo campuses, please visit the

Campus

Administration Office

S A map and driving directions to RIM Park is available

on

the Career Fair website

Student Client Services Building,

Room 220

(519)748-5220, ext. 3756 For info email sfree@conestogac.on.ca or sdonczvk@,conestogac,on.ca

at


News

— SPOKE, September 20, 2004

Page 6

Campus

jobs offer

students reasonable

hours and wages By KRISTEN

MCMURPHY

new

dent or

to

career

services

office

access code, available from career services by calling

does get postings from different

Free says Conestoga’s job post-

areas of the college, but we’ve

ings will be available on the col-

found

lege’s website in the near future.

is

it’s

best

for

students

to

apply directly to where they want

If

you want

life.

We’ve found

falling

directly to

into the starving student

stereotype

have that

to

it

may

you

best for students to apply

where they want

to work.”

one-on-one

Sara Free,

accept the fact

you

need

will

career sen'ices officer

to

find a part-time job.

Conestoga has a

College

lot to offer

living

students

who

to work,” says Free.

are

away from home and close

to the college.

The

There are many on-

and

registrar’s

office,

to

campus jobs that offer a reasonable amount of hours and decent

name

wages.

Students can also access both onand off-campus job postings at

at the college,

advises students

are interested in

working

a few, are areas of the college

that often hire students.

Sara Free, career services officer

who

www.workopoliscampus.com. To access the site you will need an

at the col-

assis-

(Photo by Jason Sonser)

tance.

Catherine Wilkins, director of the Learning Resource Centre,

“We do a lot of mock interviews

said students must register with the

with

students

Free

says.

LRC

too,”

She

encourages students to use these

rec centre, learning resource

centre

to apply for a job,

and need help with your resume and cover letter, career services provides

payments and other expenses associated rent

To keep from

ext.

you

being devoured by student fees,

with student

748-5220

3756.

noticed your

summer money

hard-earned

“The

stu-

the college,

already

at in.

lege to

Whether you're a returning

may have

go speak with someone

the department they’re interested

For upcoming graduates and current alumni, there will be a Career Fair Sept. 29. Career services is located on the second floor of the Student Client Services Building. Office hours are Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. services.

easier

access

to By JASON

LRC.

SONSER

new

databases added, including the

AB1 Inform Trade and Conestoga College students may

date

find accessing their account infor-

Sept 23

&

24

Fine

Art

and

Sanctuary

<

Wildlife <

hours

Music

a

Library, short for the Association of Computing Machinery Digital Library. The LRC has also added a collection of about 8,000 e-books. “These databases are full text

ber of colleges.

and images so that the student can read or download an article with images and charts and diagrams,”

school year. Catherine Wilkins, director of the centre, said the LRC has implanted

new library system called Unicorn which is being implemented in association with a num“The big thing

and system is you can now log in to your own account to see when you have material due or overdue, or if you want to put a hold on something, you can do all of that yourself, and you can get access to the full catalogue,” Wilkins said. for students

day

Frames & Hangers

said.

acquired some

additional licences for video pro-

ductions. “It’s

not really a student thing,

may see more media in your classroom because of this but you

licensing.”

Wilkins would

like

to

remind

they offer library

that

“We do

Catherine Wilkins,

a standard orientation for

students for

all

programs," Wilkins

said. “It's really

students

come

important that the to those sessions,

because that’s where we can show them the new databases and get them set up with their PIN.”

director ofLRC

Film

LRC

She said the

instruction sessions.

may see more

media in your classroom because of this.”

«<

Wilkins

students

“You

9-5

the

in

for faculty with this

Giant-Sized Posters

last

materials

this

Fantasy

place

mation

Learning Resource Centre easier

Industry,

which will be useful to any student doing projects around business processes, and the ACM Digital

Wilkins also advised students

Photography

Wilkins said students have been asked to register with the LRC this year,

which has not been done

in

previous years.

“We

THE

^JVIAGINUS

we

take your student ID,

your bar code which becomes your library card, and we give you a PIN number. You must have a PIN number for access to the remote databases,” Wilkins said. “Everybody who wants to use EBSCOHost, Ovid, or any of the electronic resources that

we

have,

you want to do that work from home, from residence, or from offcampus, you need a PIN." if

Wilkins said the new system has come about because the college subscribes to the databases and the information in them is proprietary.

I

"The vendors didn't want the colleges giving they

wanted us

to the

meet the

LRC

to talk to

staff so that

when

to

and they

have a question, they know who

to

ask.

wand

1000s of Posters

come

free to

access, tighten

so

up,”

Wilkins said. “All the colleges are having to do this.” Wilkins said there have also been

“1

they

really

want students, when

come

in here, to really value

the sense of place to study and to

do

their research,

because

it's

for students,” Wilkins said.

here

“You

sit and look out over the pond, you can work with your peers in group or seminar rooms, or you can go out into quiet study. We're really aiming to be a student-cen-

can

tered part of the college.”

Starting Sept. 20 there will be a book give-away of texts that are

no longer needed in front of the LRC and will continue until the books are gone. “Everyday, there’ll be carts in the hall, and as they are emptied, we will just add more resources.’ Wilkins said. “There won't he any specific subject at any tiflp just walk by all the time.”


News

Busy business

SPOKE, September

at the

— Page 7

2004

20,

bookstore

By DESIREE FINHERT website that will show

stocked

new

with

wear and

gift

clothing lines. They've been waiting

an average of 20 minutes to purchase stacks of textbooks necessary for the first semester classes. And there’s another

The bookstore under buys books and usually sells out. The cheapest book is the Human Rights Code pamphlet at $2. The most expensive is Digital Systems for long. its

23 people lining up

down

outside, anxious to track

their

courses’ reading material.

Principals and Applications at $200.

That was the scene outside the bookstore on Sept. 7, the first day of classes at Conestoga College’s

Nigel Cain, 18, a first-year elecengineering technologies stu-

trical

bought seven books for a about $550, including the most expensive on the shelf. Cain said the Digital Systems dent,

Doon campus.

A

guard

security

managed

total of

door

the

at

flow into the bookstore and monitored patrons. This precautionary method allowed staff traffic

to help students find their

and Applications text has no special features or learning Principals

books.

tools like a

Although the bookstore was open prior to orientation, most students didn’t buy their course material causing the aggravating lineups and the presence of security on Sept. 7.

Supervisor Mary Andraza said the bookstore has a new inventory

management system and cash regsystem making monetary

ister

quicker.

cards

credit

Debit and

now

are

integrated

with the cash register.

now

seconds

takes five seconds,”

said Andraza. “We're thinking the

moving much smoother

lineups are this year.”

Mary Andraza, bookstore supervisor, Doon Campus.

the school year with a

new puzzle

featuring a

and bulletin boards

new

look,

piece logo

that focus

on

Student Services

staff,

with the

pay out $300.

better than just renting them," said Bowlby, who would never buy a textbook used. “Getting

them

firsthand,

It’s

For ond-

I

my mind

in

my own

can make

I

notes in them.

I

not an actual notice

if

things

can write them

then ask the teacher.” or even sec-

thrifty first-year,

and third-year students, Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) sells used textbooks. The book-

looks

at

She said

wanted

staff

“We

We

having.)

wanted

to

show

that

collaborative,"

when you work with

she said.

with a peer or with a learning

together to something that’s neat,

about the

She said

suggested forming an identity for Student Services, and simplifying

make them

and quicker to read. “People are moving by boards

it

adviser, we’re doing

it

skills

together.”

Gregory said she

new look of

excited

is

the Student

redesigned

in three

counselling strategies

"The

main

sections:

services,

learning

and peer services. thing that’s

first

new

quickly, so instead of trying to get the details of the message, just get

we’re

link

Services,”

Gregory.

wanted

make

it

said

to)

make

it

to

Student

“(We

interesting,

unique.”

result is a tri-colour circle

of

three

Counselling

pl^ftue

le'^ng by green.

is

all

puzzle

formed pieces.

represented by pur-

and symbolized

signifies peer services

strategies

is

in

is

about

The website

is

features a lot of

contacts in school and in the

new

com-

and new information for faculty and staff on how to refer a student to Student

new

articles

Services.

There where,

is

a

new message board

Melissa Turner, spent the

social

summer

work

intern

new

designing a

“Come

er person’s experiences will help

other students

feel

comfortable

with making an appointment.

The website

where

new and

also has a link to the

GLBT (Gay, Lesbian,

Bisexual and

Transgendered) message board, as well as a message board for mature

to

If

here go,”

identity for

you don’t know Gregory reminds if

returning- students.

Student Services cannot pro-

vide what the student needs, they will find out

Student Services.

go

students.

to obtain that help, she said. It

is

common

for students to

can post the students’

website will reach out to students

Gregory

and will encourage them to walk through the doors of Student

1,350 students in the

their experience

Student Services. Gregory

said being able to read about anoth-

Services.

come

ter

Student

into said,

semesters

thing.

as

the

selling

in

appointment,”

“We hope

said.

that

Gregory

demystifies

things for people.”

Student Services offers a wide

range of services including personal

counselling, career counselling,

learning skills, peer tutoring and

saw and win-

hosting,

last year.

“You can come

could be just asking a it could be for a coun-

Services, office

fall

It

question,

where the student can

Gregory said she hopes the new

comments about with

trator

left),

student gives permis-

if the

sion, staff

Brenda Burgess, councillor Shawna Bernard, services co-ordinator Carol Gregory-Shident, councillor Jenn Meksula and peer services adminisCouncillor Keith Martin (from

new.”

information, including emergency

munity,

Student Services designed a new logo with the help of a Conestoga graphic design student. The final out

everything

(Photo by Paige Hilton)

is

one eyeshot,” she said. “Frequently asked questions are new. The logo is new. What

easier

the gist and the

new image

Services website, which has been

the advertising students

the bulletin boards to

.

a counsellor or

Carol Gregory, co-ordinator of Student Services. “Everybody’s working exciting and identifiable.”

The bookstore has already sold out of some texts and re-ordered them. Late book orders have not been delivered yet and some books

“No

one’s in a hierarchal position, so that

said

teacher.”

books for $180 and the technical nursing package is four books for $ 210 Bookstore hours on Doon campus are Monday to Thursday 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

someone

helping

Services has to offer.

process,”

especially our

year texts for a reduced price. The accounting package includes four

got a sense of putting the

was

building

it,

shrink-

inspired the circle concept.

and educate them on what Student

was a wonderful team

stressed out about

Andraza. New shipments should be in by the middle of September. By the winter semester the bookstore hopes to offer a website where students can view book options on line. “There’s going to be a whole deliver,” said

offer

skills and peer one place, which

in

all

(whatever problems they are

it

for class.

publishers

wrapped packages for certain programs which include all the first-

learning

selling,

sort out

“1 think

it

“We’re probably not going to be able to go as smoothly,” Bowlby said. “Everyone’s going to be

is

to identify

summer designing

order to reach out to students

cerned about needing

Some something

on back order then we’re at the mercy of the publisher as to when they can if

Student Services as offering coun-

together,

in

“But,

but other students

texts,

a certain

it

pieces

identity

placed.

not in stock yet and she’s con-

Student Services’

fit

graphic design student, spent the

new

The second book Bowlby needs

is

students are

spending around $500. First-year business students spend about

people linking

like

you look

if

is

not

way,” said Gregory.

help of advertising students and a

a

first-year

$800 on

sendees

collaboration for success.

Most

age.

be stocked a week after an order

ful.

“It

beginning

will be less expensive. But Cain's expenditures are aver-

list

used book business when they begin buying back textbooks this spring for resale next fall.

hands is

Conestoga

books for her part-time program, but thought buying it will be help-

Puzzle pieces Student Services

of classes at

on the shelves because they're back ordered. Andraza said shelves can usually

down and

By PAIGE HILTON

week

are

Luane Bowlby,

minutes both outside the bookstore and to pay for her merchandise.

first

store will also be getting into the

exercise book, but a first-year

textbook sales the

tools.

hoping next year’s reading

is

Bowlby only bought one of the two

pop up

19,

tallies

He

College’s

But are the lineups worth the wait? educational assistant student, claims she had been waiting 45

disc.

$400 worth of engineering (Photo by Desiree Finhert)

"It's

"So what normally took about 30

compact

of money, but not compared to everything else,” said Cain, who will also buy $300 to “It’s a lot

early,

transactions

how many

on order, how many are on hand, the price of the book and name of the book for each course," said Andraza. Meanwhile, if it’s in, it won’t be are

There are 23 people waiting in a queue that serpentines around racks

here for any-

college

groups,

Services office

2B04.

workshops and The Student

orientation. is

located in

Room


News

— SPOKE, September 20, 2004

Page 8

Hope By CHANTELLE TIMPERLEY

Counsellors are available to help with the same strategies that were

It is

the beginning of another year

Conestoga College and students

at

They

offered in the course.

also

and

into every first-year class

go

talk

are going through personal adjust-

to the students about the services

ments, getting a sense of what the

that are

demands to

are going to be

and how

They

available to them.

used to hold a series of study

skill

presentations every afternoon dur-

handle them.

Student Services for a personal

who wants

to

seminar.

semester?”

she

Barbara Kraler has been coun-

Conestoga College for 20

selling at

tell

them when they

are not coping

way that is healthy for them. "For some people it’s headaches,

in a

stomach aches, can’t sleep or

ing registration, and also a work-

it’s

shop for mature students. However,

sleeping too much, can’t eat or

ber everything

sions did not get a response from

“There are also what we

students.

nitive signs

Some

year before. their

really

learned the

are questioning

“Do

programs, wondering

want

Common

was found

it

scheduled ses-

that

when

she

says.

cog-

call

a person

not

is

able to think straight, they forget

1

to be in this?”

things,

problems

trate.”

that counsel-

and are unable

behavioural

are

sickness, fear, worry, intimidation,

signs as well like irritation, being

doubts,

in a

adjusting

transitions,

to

There are two categories of

The

first

somebody

stu-

group

the harder

home

being away from

what

anticipate

is

They

There

a certain degree of uncer-

is

tainty that

is

frightening to them.

The second group

who

students

know

students to

the offers lots

supports with their stress

and success.

Some wonder

they will be able to pick up

not alone,

new

Room

Student Services, in

2B04, an

going

from having a summer of fun and

work

having to think about

to

studying. to

offer

courses such as strategies for stu-

how

dent success to teach students

manage

skills

their time, find study

and take notes.

them manage People

It

also helped

their personal lives.

who

took

tended to be

it

more successful and a decision was made

make

to

the

course

However, due

mandatory.

funding crunch

it

to

a

was removed

from some programs.

to

appointments

look

sit

A

they

feel

trained profes-

down with them and

schedule to help them

at their

how

understand

they

if

need the help. sional will

School programs used

to

can arrange

have individual

they can balance

their courses.

supports,

Practical

like

tutors,

are struggling as a class. If a

group

Once

GALHARDO

again students at

Conestoga

tages that

we

think

it’s

and T-shirts that say Walk Safe on

awareness that

them.

ment and program

I

very

heightens the

it is

a safe environ-

that

there

is

help

hand,” said Allan Hunter, chief of

Conestoga College has employees

security and parking services at

who escort

the

students and staff to and

from vehicles as well

as residence,

Thursday

between

the

hours of 6:45- 10:45p.m.

The volunteers who work

Walk Safe

Walk Safe has two in the

stations with-

Doon campus

dents and staff can for

are trained in first aid as

member to

in

which

stu-

speak to a

of the program

in

order

have an escort. One station

is

homesick

families,

isolated a person

the

wrong

could think they are

in the

programs

and

wrong,

because of

how

be

just

disconnected they

who

is

It

are feel-

to connect with their

go

necessarily

not

but

Another way themselves

is

take

to

and being outside for fresh

good place

it

in.

students only feel good about

home

going

they

not giving

are

themselves a chance to understand

can

in

fit

Sometimes they

school

at

just

keep

too.

their old

of

being physical. Going for walks

not fitting

every weekend. Sometimes

care

getting exercise and

reinforces the idea of not coping or

If

is,

walk away. Students

to

make them feel more The school’s recreation

home

likely to

feel.

Connections are also key.

ing

is

it

to start.

bad

their

centre

Being

late.

is

a

Every student it.

habits, such as

much

drinking too too

can

should also moderate

Students

some of

air

energized.

has a membership to use

or staying up

tired or sick

can

relationships and do not develop

have detrimental effects on school

new ones away from home.

work.

It

can end up making students

Kraler said a number of students

some-

feel like their lives are else.

min

could

It

still

whole

their

“When

younger person

a

it’s

for the

may need

first time, your parents

to

measure

sellors

have some help around having boundary,”

are

in school.

still

“Our job stay,”

and what

abilities.

nobody can help

to

having their

now

they

and the

rest

them, or that their situation feels

undivided attention, and

uncomfortable

have other

to

talk

Counsellors have heard

it

about.

and

all

priorities

of the family

is

also being affect-

Kraler said she would rather to

make

a

connection than not do anything it

and be struggling come

home once

a while to be still

should

let their

they

still

own

well being,

know

families

that

independence.

is at

the entrance

by

who work

for

as well as

“You have done some

things that

have enabled you to get into college in the

first

place, and

had

to

I

think

said.

“You

have been a certain

we

student to get here, and

expecting that you’re you’re going to be

level of

aren’t

at the status

when you

grad-

uate.”

“You’re

learning,”

she

said.

“Trust in those abilities.”

College can apply by submitting a

idence.

resume, having a police backcall

ground check done and complet-

and request an escort

ing an interview with Hunter and

and Walk Safe, which

in

CPR

also patrols the

cam-

walkways.

requested

is

location

to Hunter, there is also

an extra Walk Safe presence on pub sure students get to

and

radio

Walk Safe

Surveys

escort

education

co-ordinator.

with

the

students

continuing across

the

province have been done, which to Hunter,

Walk Safe

employees are not encouraged

to

apprehend people.

prevention and deterrence,

rather than apprehension.”

Walk Safe service.

Any

is

a paid

have given Conestoga College positive

feedback

about Walk

Safe, according to Hunter.

“The main thing we’re looking is

the

the

at

them.

for

make

possible.

is

equipped, will meet them

tions around the school, such as icy

According

themselves and their

in

their vehicles safely, as well as res-

According

Walk Safe

it

Students and staff can also

Walk Safe are trained aid

If

Kraler

feeling of security

E-wing doors and the

Volunteers

nights to

that

They

care as well, but that

into security

first

reminded

care about them.

people

they need to experiment with their

time.

“Just for your

inside the

in

advice,

people forget that,” she

ed.”

Students can phone

someone spend time

last

advised students to have confi-

dence

think

their options are.”

As some

who were used

Some

suggested.

make people more helping

people see different perspectives

“Mature students may have kids

she

to

“It’s

isn’t

she said.

a

it.”

their role in help-

ing them simply by knowing they

she suggested. “We’re kind of a

pus and monitors hazardous condi-

College.

and patrol the campus Monday through

Doon campus of Conestoga

see students suc-

moving away from home

at

at

said.

ceed.”

listen

effective

it

think

to-

every

easier

third party to

the bookstore.

because

Safe

to

have as a counsellor,”

the campus.

ple wearing conspicuous jackets

Walk

them

“I think that’s one of the advan-

other station

“I

“Teachers want

this

she

are not emotionally connected with

safety of students and staff around

College can count on seeing peo-

The

order to ensure the

in

students,”

dents are adjusting, so are families.

exam

CPR

with

year

Kraler mentioned that just as stu-

need the help, they could

well as

because they experience

that counsellors

Walk Safe brings By JEN

your teachers

to talk to

experience.

She mentioned

about

arrange to meet with someone from

The more good

is

a student.

dents do not return, she said coun-

of students get together and decide they

the person

on as

the week.

in

tion.

found they

stay

who’s not personally involved

Some programs will also ask counsellors to come in and talk to is

and teach-

starting with classmates

down and

School just becomes

are sympathetic about any situa-

it

positive way. Stress levels will go

something they have to do during

to help

are also available.

their students if

by creating sup-

is

ers. “It’s

likely

that person is to see transition in a

where

without judgment.

after

a student gets connect-

and find some other coping mecha-

students, enabling

swing of school

The more

for students to take care

systems. Kraler recommended

port

should have their families them.

nisms by talking to somebody

specialize in study skills. Students

into the

you’re

it.”

continues to offer help on

One way

situation,” she

“You might be able

times have a hard time getting back

off.

when

thing

ongoing basis from people who

left

com-

these things are a

natural

They some-

where they

that

visit

come back to tell counsellors their help made a difference. When stu-

said.

Counsellor Barb Kraler wants of

returning

is

mon,

adjusting to a

are getting used to

being back in school. if

(Photo by Chantelle Timperley)

going to happen

but are unsure of what to expect.

you’re

some of

are trying to adjust to the their situations.

to find solu-

they

life.”

they

“Know

They

sits,

tions.

for the first

time.

newness of

can be

it

it

all

“It

ed to the school, the more

of themselves

begin to feel

they

if

stressed because the longer

freshman students dealing with

is

the time and cry-

all

Kraler suggested students talk to

and balancing school and fun.

dents under stress.

bad mood

ing often.

feeling isolated, loss in confidence

your

concen-

to

that

like

questioned.

important for people

She said there

approached about are home

lors are

much,”

too

eating

feel

should be one of the best times of

years and says a person’s body will

Many are seeking help for their stress. Some worry they will not be able to learn new things or rememthey

student

for the stressed-out

volunteer

student at Conestoga

“With

this school there’s

been a

higher recognition rate of the pro-

gram than almost anywhere

in the

province, so we’re pretty proud of that.”


SPOKE, September

s\GN

4

2004

.UP IN THE c SI

TRIP

FOR

NEW FIRST

20,

AUDITIONS

2

.

QUEBEC

YEARS! SEPT. 27th

-

ALL DAY

Conestoga STUDENTS INC BBQ WATERLOO

BBQ GUELPH

CAMP«S free poop/ pop

C"MPUS FREE f00p/ pop

THURSPny SEPT 23

THURSDAY S'PT so

"LL WATERLOO ST U DE||TS WELCOME

"LL GUELPH

STUDENTS WELCOME

"AM - 2PM Conestoga

Conestoga

STUDENTS INC

STUDENTS

.INC

— Page 9


Page 10

Feature

— SPOKE, September 20, 2004

“So

CSI event

tion,"

this is a really great tradi-

he said.

number of people

In the past a

way

great

to

meet students

just

out, said Falconer. “I

ple

know a number of those peowho did it last year are now

elected student leaders;

By

ALEXANDRA MASTRONARDI

a

way

great

new people The Pond Party held

at the col-

lege Sept. 9 turned out to be a suc-

approximately

attracting

cess,

2.500 students.

The Pond Party get

is

a great

way

to

of your comfort zones,

out

to too,”

he

said.

event The was put on by CSI and

organized by CSI’s

programmer

events

Nichole Jiminez. The event called for more

Falconer.

about

a great

way

to

start

the

school year.”

it's

attract

meet new people and start to get involved, said Conestoga Students President Justin (CSI) Inc. “It’s

at

approached the CSI and asked how they could help

Pond Party

the

\

4

than 35 volunteers and 15

staff

mem-

bers to help run the activities.

This year's Pond

a great way

“It’s

to start

the school year.”

Party events included sumo wrestling and jousting. The

party

Justin Falconer,

CSIpresident

The Pond Party has been a Conestoga tradition for well over a decade, giving students a chance to break away and meet other stu-

in their

programs

in college

where-

Friendship.

Although

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

for

free

Above, first-year robotics students Preston Drennan (left) and Jeff Dorak

students, event

as at university students generally

the

have a whole host of different

cost

classmates.

live

House of

the

dents outside their programs.

Falconer said students are stuck

fea-

also

music from the band Rufus, a DJ and free hamburgers hotdogs. and Leftover food was donated to tured

CSI between $ 2 000 ,

$1,500

battle

and (Photo by Ryan Connell)

.

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

Rainy weather

Pond

Party.

in

the morning didn’t

The sun shone on those

dampen

the festivities at the

in line for

free food.

it

out

in

a fun

game

of jousting.

two students in sumo wrestling costumes try to push each other. Left,

(Photo by Ryan

Volunteers of

flip

flower burgers to feed the eager lines of hungry students. Approximately

meat was purchased from Schneiders

Inc. for

the event.

$800


Feature

Clockwise from

Keith Martin, a counsellor at for

20,

2004

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 11

right:

President of Conestoga Students Inc. Justin Falconer

hotdogs

SPOKE, September

hungry students

Students eagerly wait

Student Services, at the

in line for

Pond

flip

(left),

and

burgers and

Party.

hamburgers behind the school

beside the pond. The Pond Party has been taking place for more than a decade.

Cliff

the Condor, Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mascot, plays a friendly

game

of

jousting with another student outside by the pond.

(Photo by Steph Baulk)

(Photo by Ryan Connell) (Photo by Ryan Connell)


Page 12

News

— SPOKE, September 30, 2004

Recycling gets a Wet-Dry makeover* By NICOLE

DEAK

The new Wet-Dry system was recently introduced to Guelph, and is

seen as a valid recycling option

many regions The system,

for

Guelph

1995,

in

in recycling In

introduced

to

the newest step

Dry Recycling Pilot project, which included 900 households over a period of six years. This program required residents to separate their

garbage into two components, wet waste and dry waste. put

into

blue

coloured bags and included such items as plant and food waste. Dry

waste was put into green coloured

bags and included such items as newspapers cardboard, and

(Photo by Desiree Finhert)

Andrew bottled

Seyler, 18,

beverages

works for the cafeteria stocking about 500 a walk-in refrigerator. All of the products are

in

recyclable.

blue box.

cessfully, a

1981, the City of Kitchener,

In

before the Region of Waterloo took

Styrofoam cups. The wet and dry waste would then be shipped to the Materials Recovery Facility where it would be converted into Wet-Dry recycling. To date, Guelph’s diversion rate sits at 38 per cent, one of the high-

tion rate

However, the Region of Waterloo is not trailing Guelph by much.

00 per cent participawould be expected from 1

residents.

home

“It’s

not that

won’t work," said

it

we

of the blue box. To this day, the

Arsenault. “It’s that

region continues to recycle and

with taxpayers' money.”

is

Ranking

the top five in the

in

province, Waterloo Region

sits at

a

The Region of Waterloo

think-

is

Unlike

cities

such as Toronto and

Guelph, the region has been approved for a long-term landfill. The term, lasting for 20 to 30 years, is seen as being cost-effective to residents and is saving taxpayers' money. Jon Arsenault, manager of engineering and programs for the region, said Kitchener has one of lowest

operating

tonne of waste

costs

per

in the region.

“Each municipality must deal with their

own waste and

find fund-

ing to provide the service," said Arsenault.

“We

Wet Waste Diversion program

have a significant

1 feel there is no need to find any alternatives.” If the new system was to be

in

Depending on the Wet-Dry system may or

the near future. results, a

41 per cent diversion rate.

the

are playing

ing about rolling out a Pilot Scale

waste.

diversion rate and

est rates in the province.

could cost millions

it

of dollars. In order to work suc-

able to produce minimal tonnes of

most materials.

1989, Guelph started a Wet-

Wet waste was

implemented,

over waste management, was

in the area.

is

having no Wet-Dry system and still maintaining its initial focus, the

may

not be implemented.

The Ministry of Environment wants to set a new policy by 2008. The ministry would like to see the region sitting

60 per cent waste

at a

diversion rate.

Arsenault said

in reality, there is

a lack of funding to build such an infrastructure.

“I’d like to applaud the ministry,

but their timing

off and they are

is

not realistic.”

For many years the region of Waterloo is not expected to make any immediate changes to

their

However, the possibility of the Wet- Dry system is there, but no decisions will be made for years to come. system.

recycling

Christmas <x>mes early

Want to promote your upcoming event in Spoke?

for the By TI M

Santa Claus Parade

MURPHY

The Santa Claus Parade will still be coming to town this year after the Grinch almost stole Christmas.

The Twin City Jaycees,

an ad.

Lions Club, said they were happy to get involved.

this

year that they would

in

“We

will

make

power

happen this year,” he said, but remained sparse on the details until he meets with the Jaycees to diswill

cuss the particulars.

Burek announced this week that exchange of information,

after an

capability.

looking good, and

ing. like a

good parade

look-

it’s

this year,”

said Burek.

He sure the parade

parade

because of their financial and man“It’s

announced

Club was chosen over the

other groups to lead the

said the Jaycees will assist the

Lions with putting on parade, but

will

it

this year’s

be for the

last

time.

The parade, which typically costs between $15,000 and $20,000 and has 40 to 70 floats, will be held on Nov. 20.

Got something to say?

guarantees your

appear Spoke.

information

offering

with volunteer and financial issues,

forced to do.

Placing an ad

community groups,

the Lions

to take over the event.

Charlie Davis, president of the

which has been active in the community for more than 40 years. Steve Burek, spokesman for the Jaycees, said it was a difficult decision to make, but one they were

to place

other

struggling

be unable to run the annual event

Be sure

Fortunately, two weeks ago the Lions Club of Kitchener stepped forward, along with about five

will

Do you have a beef? Spoke wants

to hear from you. Write a

Stories only run

if

space

permits but ads always run.

the editor.

letter to

Letters to the editor

must be

received by Tuesday at

noon

For rates or to place an ad

Spoke’s ad manager

call

at ext. 3691.

for the following issue.

Letters can be e-mailed to spoke@conestogac.on.ca, dropped off at the Spoke newsroom at 4B14, or

mailed (see address at bottom of

page

4).

Sec*® Please include your name, address and phone number.

.

Anonymous be

letters will not

printed.

(Photo by Janet Morris

. .

A security

full

note

Scrap that would have made a great spice rack

Doon Woodworking

for

mom

was

left

outside a locker

in

were

semester’s occupants to remove their locks by

left for last

the

centre. Security notes

Sept. 10. Hundreds of similar notes were posted pus during the first two weeks of fall semester.

all

over the

cam^


SPOKE, September

20,

2004

— Page 13

WE NEED YOU! THE CSI

LOOKING FOR INTERESTED VOLUNTEERS TO WORK ON COMMITTEES TO ENHANCE STUDENT LIFE AT CONESTOGA. IS

THE GENERAL MANAGERS ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE AND THE GM'S SERVICES COMMITTEE WILL MEET MONTHLY TO REVIEW, ASSESS, AND SUGGEST ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES PROVIDED TO STUDENTS. WE NEED FEEDBACK/

DROP BY THE CSI OFFICE WITH YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION AND DESIRE. P LEASE

Conestoga I

STUDENTS INC

THIS WEEK WATSOH SHAPK - GEPPY KOOH - SANCTUAPY - SEPT 20TH

POOL.

james -cuhhxgham WIN CASH MOHEY SEPT 22ND cot*ieoxah

IMA6INL/S POSTEP SALE W3CL-L- SE XH THE HOUSE - SANCTUARY

SEPT 23PO £ 24TH


Travel

— SPOKE, September 20, 2004

Page 14

Enjoy a colossal holiday FOR JUST PENNIES Experience the wonders of Rome without breaking the bank By JENNIFER

ORMSTON

daunting from the top,

I

was

at the

knew it and there bottom before my efforts were greatly rewarded. As 1 examined my surroundings. I was in one of the most realized I

Legend has your back Fountain,

to

it. if you stand with Rome’s famous Trevi

make

wish and throw a

a

I

areas

exciting

coin over your shoulder into the rippling water, you are sure to

Rome

racehorses crossing the finish line,

city:

but their focus

saw an

oasis in

anywhere but on

the road.

Luckily I

is

b u

survived the crossing,

j

one of the most beautiful things about this elegant fountain is admission is free. Throughout my travels, discovered for less than one cent it was possible to spend an exciting day ets,

Rome;

in

each other to the death. Some of the spectators may have been splattered with blood as the triumphant

plunged his rusty sword into man one last time. conjured up images of what the

fighter

the defeated

was

that

it

glee as gladiators brutally fought

1

sightseeing

still

like

felt

was pouring out of my body. With the legendary amphitheatre less than 20 metres before me, my imagination was spinning, envisioning myself standing in this same place centuries ago. I probably would have heard cheers of

f

pock-

was

heat

unbearable and sweat

of

j

in their

The

expected.

For destitute students backpackwith nothing

backs and the change

to

adventure.

1

t

a

ing across Europe,

their

my

I

I

return to the Eternal City.

more than the clothes on

was refreshed and ready

I

For the rest of the walk, I was mesmerized by the colossal building looming in the distance. It was even larger and more spectacular than had imagined. Although the walk was not far. it had took much longer than

not only drive as aggressively as

Venezia. In the distance

sight

continue

look

phrase,

before you cross the

ward making my way through swarms of tourists in Piazza

the

new meaning both ways street. Romans

gives a whole

the

to

enough time for me to hope the legend was true. While travelling through the nar-

this life

row, antiquated brick streets in the

as he uneasily

I

lowly slave or prisoner, forced into of violence, was thinking

made

way

his

into

came

the stadium, cold metal chains rub-

across ancient monuments, magnif-

bing against his wrists and ankles,

and breathtaking architecture, and the only cost I incurred in enjoying these wonders

knowing

area of

historic

Rome,

1

statues

icent

life

was photo-finishing fees when I returned to Canada. Of course, that is, unless you fall

Colosseo

brought

Le Colisee

vendors, selling everything from

The Colosseum the

city |

Rome’s end

district

world: the Spanish Steps.

the

and numerous planters

filled

with

As

I

gazed around, the diversity

shopping

photos would make. (

The Schorn Family

and

Gucci

Valentino lined

(

streets

300 Great Ranton Bvld

around me began to feel the

urge

pull

out

Waterloo, Ontario

for

budget!

|

the

stairs

as

a

Romans

using

meeting place to

reunite with old friends.

Although

the

stairs

seemed

in

when in Romans do.

as the

the roadside. Regardless, the cool

Trevi Fountain

water

smoothly down my and with the Colosseum in

already relived

budget, the best option was to take

With a high around 40 C, began to feel like I was walking through a sea of boiling water. However, with the Colosseum, the day’s final destination in mind, I continued for-

pricey cameras; and

keeping

near the giant amphitheatre.

thought: getting water.

their

off,

pole sticking out of a brick wall on

translation

with

their

Rome do

it

adage,

hands and cross several lanes of speeding traffic to get to a public water fountain,

make sense of

fiddling

the

you would like to splurge land go into the Colosseum, it is open from 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the summer. Admission is $20. I fondly remembered my days in Italy after returning home. Fortunately for me, the legend of

street

and

laughed

If

August heat began to take its toll as my day of wandering wore on. My mind became consumed with one

guides

my

was looking down

(mind

The scorching

mak-

shirt. I

CANADA

rowdy children under control; North American tourists trying to

keep

sticky

his

ing no effort to hide the fact

(he I

a

astounded me: there were young Italian parents, speaking quickly in their

(

N2X 3H5

that is a

different

against

body. “Bellisimo,” he said,

to

credit cards.

story

tightly (

my

of the people that gathered there

their native tongue, trying to

The sweaty gladiator, who (exuded an aroma of body odour, put his hands around my waist and pulled me

Bulgari

like

threw

I

my

budget out the window, thinking about (what a great souvenir the

Designer stores

But

over-flowing pink azaleas.

to reality.

“Only 10 euros.” To be honest,

(thoughts of

high

which actually looks like powerful sea-god Neptune as the lead actor and two tritons by his side in the supporting roles, is one of the most famous staircases in the the steps

back

you have your

picture taken with me,” he

I

heart

the

a giant marble stage with the

Making your way down

his

said with a strong accent.

fountain,

can be a challenge, as it is tricky to weave through the congregation of tourists, their free-roaming dogs

me

let

“I’ll

over-priced food and water, to phony

Within the same vicinity of the

moments of

upon him.

i

victim to one of the countless street

Louis Vuitton handbags and fake diamond-encrusted Cartier watches.

the last likely

A perspiring Italian, dressed in a polyester gladiator costume and wielding a wooden sword, quickly

ROMA

*

were

I

vendor with a truck

full

of

ice-cold water.

my

precious

life in

my

my

Venturing across any road

Spoke can now be read

once saw the “fountain” wished had doled out the cash for I

But, in order to stay within

in

I

1

bottled water; the structure

was

nothing more than a brown metal

throat,

slid

came

true.

my Roman

games, puzzles, weather and reference www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

links, visit

Jll'/f /

|

<- 2 *

have

Hopefully you’ll be as lucky!

online!

For the latest college, entertainment and sports news, as well as

I

holiday.

*

mmi


Entertainment

“1

don't think

The Atkins diet has been in use more than 30 years, but has

for

only recently enjoyed a surge in

“The

have

fair to

it’s

somebody do something

that they

can’t do for the rest of their

life,”

Bruce Schofield of Kitchener. Scofield says if you eat properly,

said

philosophy

Atkins diet

intake

tein

behind

than

carbohydrate

more

intake we’ll have

fat loss,”

he

said.

exercise,

breathe good oxygen you will live

want

healthier and longer.

maintenance Scofield, which involves a person

and protein from foods meat, eggs and cheese. The

plenty of fat

such as

system claims to change the body

burning

burning

carbohydrates

to

products

C2 and

half the sugar

compared

such

Coca

as

Edge

Pepsi

offer

and carbohydrates as similar

to

beverages,

which follows an Atkins low-carb lifestyle.

Restaurants

and grocery stores

use Atkins friendly-labelled food to

more products.

supported and denounced Atkins’

Nonetheless,

have followed the fitness

water,

Scofield, a fitness years,

worked

does

that

for 10

in the military for

20

tionist.

He

runs the Kitchener health cen-

more than .200 month and says more than half the people who talk to him who were on this plan say they services

tre that

millions

diet.

manager

Family

at the

Fitness Centre in Kitchener says he

would not recommend the Atkins diet program to anyone.

1

clients a

gained excessive weight back. “They weren’t able to maintain it

was

just too dra-

matic of a change," he said. vide energy and

if

they

as

fat

MULLER

thing that’s different.

lution

col-

Burley.

lege’s radio station,

also the sta-

manager now. all

the

responsibilities as before, but

now he can make more

decisions.

However, he also has

to

attend

more meetings. that

can sign stuff

didn't sign before," Burley

I

said.

Moving up he

it is,

“It’s

in life is just the

way

said.

what radio’s about. You

work, you get to a place and you try

and work up within

that organi-

guess

I

didn't tick

anybody off

along the way,” the 46-year-old said.

But his new job only thing that

Since

the

is

spring

title

new

is

not the

at

of this

back and

talk to

someone about

come up

New

(Photo by Janet Morris)

with a

game

Bruce Scofield, fitness manager of the Family Fitness Centre on Victoria Street, Kitchener, promotes lifestyle change, not a carbohydrate free diet, as the best way to lose weight.

look for college radio station

Music and image embraces

CJIQ. year.

of the radio station,” said

A new computer

system was

introduced Sept. 3 to the station, to make life a little easier.

By MELISSA

diversity of students

HANCOCK

among

students

new look and sound of

Conestoga College’s radio station. Mark Burley, station manager of

CJIQ FM,

88.3

interview that a

new logo

said in a Sept.

new

10

slogan and a

that best represent the

"With computers, you can have everything done and ready to go and you just basically assign (the programming) in the scheduling software at a certain date and time, and everything changes,” said

students have been introduced this

Burley.

was time

The imaging

So far, the reactions to new image have been

school year. the station’s positive.

was

“It

like

revelation,”

this

Burley said. “Change

is

good and

it

for one.”

which says

Second-year advertising student,

the station’s slogan, and the entire

Carrie Strauss, 22. was hired by

sound of the

voice,

station has also

been

changed, along with the way the station

moved

zation. "I

sit

their lifestyle to

Diversity

pro-

1

and

body weight

and have a fitness assessment done

inspired the

the

"In other words,

your

recommended people who

Scofield

are concerned about their

next step in the evo-

the

has

that’s

in

body," he said.

students at the radio station, have been working to change the look and sound of CJIQ. “It’s just the

still

do

to

it

plan that suits them.

is

said that he

good food,

is

down and

breaks

fuel source for energy.

at

He

wastes

that it

to go

Mark Burley, who gramming specialist

same

“Food because

Burley, along with other staff and

At CJIQ. the station manager has a new face. But that’s not the only

is

healthy, said Scofield.

whereas protein rebuilds muscle tissue and allows your body to work as a system and uses fat as a

Times are changing at CJIQ 88.3 By DENISE

and increasing carbohydrates. "This is the time where old habits die hard,” he said. “You can lose all the fat you want but if you don't change what made you fat, you’re going to get fat again.” People just have to become better at reading labels, know what is in food and eat things they know are

a person has too store

you you move to a program, said

what you want

Scofield said carbohydrates pro-

much of them

are at the weight

to be at then

beginning to eat normally again

said.

manager

Once you

and

sleep

"Anything outside of not have my support.” he

the weight loss,

Studies over the years have both

theories.

drink

years before that as a fitness nutri-

fat.

New Cola’s

tion

— Page 15

pro-

of carbohydrates and sugar, Atkins followers are allowed Instead

A

2004

the

we have more

is it

popularity.

sell

20,

Atkins expert advises against famous diet By JANET MORRIS

from

SPOKE, September

is

marketed.

CJIQ has

more of a rock sound, although they will still play Usher and other new pop music. CJIQ can be found at FM 88.3. Anyone with suggestions can contact Burley at ext. 3662 or pop by to

his office in

CJIQ

summer

for the

as part of an

program her he said. She devel-

(Photo by Melissa Hancock)

experiential learning

course offers,

oped and took part in the marketing studies done on how the radio sta-

Free CDs showing the new CJIQ logo were handed out annual Pond Party.

was

Strauss

tion reflects the school.

very

at the

passionate

about the work she did for CJIQ, said

“Diverse species. Diverse

3B 15.

Deborah Reyner, co-ordinator

of the advertising program, and she inspired and initiated the

music.”

new expe-

program that gave her the opportunity to work on the riential learning

Mark Burley, CJIQ manager.

radio station project.

“My god said.

“Diverse species. Diverse music,”

Burley said. “She came to that

and

it

blew

me

me

with

away.”

Strauss said the project wasn’t for

marks, she just wanted the work experience and wanted to see something happen

plan she

first

with the marketing

began

to

develop for a

wanted

work,” she

to

put

said.

it

Pond

Party.

The

CDs,

produced by Music, were developed to give sam-

Universal

to

“The

of some new songs that will be heard on CJIQ, he

ples

plan started as a class

when by CJIQ

project and then I

was hired

started

all

I

over again.”

said.

She went through hundreds of designs before coming up with

“It reflects

the

If students

(left), and Cale hang out with station manager Mark Burley at the School’s radio station on Sept. 10.

Third-year broadcasting students Jesse Parent

Fair

(right),

the

logo to reflect that diversity.

black and white.

said

want

new image of CJIQ,

Conestoga is a diverse school and he wants the music played on CJIQ and the new Burley

students

more of than

an

old fart like me.”

the final product.

(Photo by Denise Muller)

Reyner

great,”

Burley said the new logo can be found in the back of the student handbooks provided by Conestoga Students Inc. at the beginning of the school year. It can also be found on the cases of the CDs that CJIQ handed out at the annual

class project last school year. “I

she’s

“She’s just so passionate.”

on sale

at

to

wear

T-shirts are

the college bookstore,

Burley said. They are available in

(Photo by Melissa Hancock)

Second-year advertising

stu-

dent Carrie Strauss, 22, says she is excited about CJIQ’s

new

look.

“After taxes, the T-shirts are about $25,” he said. "The first order is almost sold out and we’re going to have to get in some more.” Burley said he is very excited about CJIQ’s new image and he thinks the students are as well. “It really is

amazing,” Strauss

“It’s exciting to finally

see

it

said.

done.”


v

Page 16

Entertainment

— SPOKE, September 20, 2004

Enrich your Sign up

one

for

By JENNIFER

ORMSTON

ing skills outside of the structured

creative. Visual arts

curriculum offered

vide

at the college,

building

spacious

2004

20,

“The teaching style at the gallery differs from the college because our instructors do not necessarily

Conestoga College students have

way

to educate.

who

artists,

opportunity

the

to

They

tire

working

provide a somewhat

The

gallery

is

explore

Doon campus,

1754 Old Mill Rd.

The

it.

classes range in price

$125 for the

from

four- week introduc-

tion to acrylics course, to

$200

What energy! Be creative with You are seen as decisive but

sometimes gut,

it's

Listen to your

hasty.

you

telling

to take a risk.

Old and new far

a variety of visual art courses in

in

college has had a partnership

with the gallery for

least

at

enabling students

years,

to

six

take

part in an assortment of continuing

education

courses,

ranging from

sculpture and casting, to acrylics

and

watercolour,

said

Chandra

Erlendson, education co-ordinator

and programmer for the Homer Watson House and Gallery. Inexperienced artists are wel-

come

to enrol in a

such as

oils

and delivery

in

The conflict in your life can become draining if you let it

for

recommends visual many reasons.

arts classes for

addition

“In

to

the six-week adult sculpture pro-

promoting the

new

Some

of the courses have already

begun, so students

who

April 20

ested should enrol immediately.

For more information on the

ences and use a different side of

courses, contact the gallery at 748-

students obtain

their brain

This ics

is

when

good

taking art classes.

for learning

academ-

and memory work.

“Art

also

allows

4377 or

at

son.on.ca.

programs @homerwat-

To

register or for fee

information, contact the college’s

students

to

express themselves and be more

continuing education department

748-5220.

ext.

at

3634.

fs

Taurus

jfe

are inter-

experi-

arts,

fes-

Create win-win solutions.

gram.

their instruction.”

Erlendson

a historical art gallery.

The

different approach

friends are never

away. If you need help, ask.

ter.

the rare opportunity to participate

September 23 October 22

conveniently locat-

ed near the college’s at

Libra

4

programs pro-

another side of yourself.”

said Erlendson.

use the formal teaching-certificate

time. this

Week of Sept.

of the college’s continuing education classes

Walking down the tranquil wooded path to the Homer Watson House and Gallery’s quaint garden studio is like taking a step back in In

Horoscope

with art

life

May

-

Scorpio October 23-

20

November Be

more

present to people; no

21

fooling anyone and you'll hurt

Accidents happen, act with speed and urgency to correct them regardless of the sticky situation.

yourself more in the end. Think

The Yang

romance not

or an Aries.

You

glazed over eyes.

aren't

lust.

to

your Yin

a

is

Gemini

beginner course,

or watercolour for

beginners and pastel drawing.

Gemini

Novices should not be apprehenup, said sive about signing

May

21

-

f-PjB Sagittarius

June 21

November 22 December 21

|

\«Wr

Erlendson.

“The introductory classes are just They are starting points for students with no experience in a particular medium who want to learn something new.” For the more advanced student, that.

the

gallery

classes acrylics

sculpture,

in

Money now.

even the smallest of contribu-

your wallet; you

This time you will finish

tions.

intermediate

offers

Achievements are never easy for you. Acknowledge and reward

Last spring’s adult sculpture course was particularly popular among the student body, according to Erlendson. “Casting techniques would be a

H|

Cancer June 22

will perse-

December 22

-

Januarv 19

111*

that class.”

Now

programs have also been successful

run with

with students

be serious even

in the past.

students

are

activities,

looking for

and

perhaps

always dreamed of taking a watercolour course. Others may be seek-

A blow

Take your active personality and

Several of the gallery’s other art

Some

easy on

Capricorn

July 22

-

MOmUms?—

nice alternative for those looking to

leisure

the road.

it

may need cash Be enthusiastic

vere.

and watercolour.

complement

down

not your forte right best to take

and energetic and you

that project.

casting,

is

It's

(Photo by Jennifer Qcmston)

Conestoga College offers a variety of visual nearby Homer Watson House and Gallery.

arts courses, held at

it.

is

the time to

surround-

in the

There

involved and take ownership of

flict

your

life

m

JBl

July 23

-

Your that

you approach ears.

is

half

full,

don't let

and no one will your thunder. Check your ego at the door though. steal

*

Virgo

You need- to be challenged to keep motivated. Requesting and offering feedback will bring unexpected success. Don't dodge

glass

water evaporate. Demonstrate

a "can do" attitude

August 23 September 22

head on.

treat

January 20 February 18

come

will liberate you.

it

unavoid-

Aquarius

your way. You can alleviate stress with constructive alternatives. Try something out of the ordinary

stress, face

if

calmly with open

August

patient, the truth will

is

an unspoken con-

22

JUgjf

- it

may be

uncovered

Leo

b

Be

your ego

people with dignity and respect.

ing sea of wacky antics. Get

career.

to

Whatever happens,

able.

Strive

for

relationships.

Pisces February 19

March 20

wholeness

How

in

your

well do you

know your friends? Some one very close needs guidance. Communicate clearly and honestly to give them the best help. really

Janet Morris

is

a 2nd-year journalism

student in tune with the universe. (Photo by Jennifer Qrmstcn) Pottery students are sure to find artistic inspiration in the Homer Watson House and Gallery’s newly renovated, century-old pottery studio, called the Coach House. The four-acre property is close to the

Doon campus, on Old

Mill

Road.


Sports

*

SPOKE, September

Will the Patriots

do

Summer

back Brian Westbrook.

The Green Bay Packers let a fourth-and-26 stand on defence slip through their grasp and cost

ended and the National Football League season is underway. To many people across North America the NFL season is one of the most thrilling times of has

them

Going into the season many teams have Super Bowl expecta-

New

of the

league

NFL

and create a

game

their

but there in

is

ists,

the

may

last

co-MVP

Manning, who threw four interceptions in last season’s Conference Championship game, must finally prove he can win the big game. Improving wide receiver Reggie

Wayne

will look to take advantage

of the double covering of pro bowl

(Internet photo)

This season holds big expectations for the Chris

Brown and

the

offence problems.

As

for the

may have finally

a pro bowl season after

fully

recovering from his

2001 season-ending knee surgery.

The Tennessee

Titans

may have

former franchise running back Eddie George over the off-season lost

but

they

hope second-year back

the Super

Bowl

champion Antowain Smith can both carry the load George once did. The Titans will head into the season led by quarterback and co-MVP, Steve McNair. On defence, Kevin Carter and Albert Haynesworth can slow any team's rushing attack and Samari Rolle and Andre Dyson in

wide receiver Marvin Harrison and pro bowl quarterback.

Seattle

playoffs, but that

create a solid second option for the

Colts running game. Edgerrin James

backfield

will

give

any pass

One of the final favourites make some noise in the AFC is

to

the

Kansas City Chiefs. Last season, led by running back Priest Holmes, quarterback Trent Green and one of the best offensive lines in the

NFL,

the Chiefs provided a high-pow-

ered offence that allowed them to finish

13-3 in the regular season.

but didn’t the

New England manage

playoffs due

to to

win a

Patriots. a

game

in

disastrous

The Chiefs are hoping the problem was corrected with the departure of former defensive coordinator Greg Robinson in favour of former Chiefs head coach Gunther Cunningham. Last season’s NFC Conference champions, the Carolina Panthers, may have finished just short of a Lombardi Trophy victory, but can still contend. The Panthers added to their league-leading defence by drafting 21 -year-old cornerback Chris Gamble of Ohio State. Offensively Carolina has two solid options at running back in Stephen Davis and Deshaun Foster and quarterback Jake Delhomme hopes

to continue his

unexpected

NFC last

conference

two

finalists

the

years,

,435 rushing yards from last year and Matt Hasselbeck will attempt

of the

to

Philadelphia

Eagles, made a huge improvement by adding Terrell Owens to their receiving core, but by doing so they lost pass defenders Troy Vincent to the Buffalo Bills and -Bobby Taylor to Seattle, two of their main defensive specialists. Pro bowl quarterback Donovan McNabb may have no problem throwing the ball this year, but

with the departure of Duce Staley to

Pittsburgh and losing Correll

Buckhalter to injury for the second year in a row.

McNabb may

himself carrying the ball as as

injury-prone

starting

find

much

running

1

further

prove his

among NFL Other

like to

The excitement

of

NFL

teams

St.

playoffs.

The

NFL

regular season kicked-

off on Sept. 9 and will conclude on

week The

17, Jan. 2,

NFL

on Jan. 2005 with wild card weekend, and will finish on Feb. 6, 2005 at in Bowl XXXIX Super 8,

Jacksonville, Fla.

-

environment and to do some your new community.

A Message

Student Services to talk about adjusting to your problem solving about getting involved in your college and in

from Student Services our website htto://www. conestoaac.on. ca/lsp/stserv/index.isp

2005.

playoffs begin

happenings on campus. with a counsellor

high

Jacksonville

classmates, faculty, roommates and other peers. Perhaps you’ll get involved in intramural activities at the Recreation Centre and clubs and events through the student government. Read Spoke, your school newspaper, to familiarize yourself with

You can meet

have

Louis Rams, and Jaguars and Washington Redskins may provide surprise numbers to sneak into the

the

love you.”

opportunity

that

season include the Baltimore

Ravens and

may be tempered by homesickness and community. Slowly, you’ll get to know some of your

new freedom and

missing your family, friends

“I

status

expectations going into the 2004

Loneliness

have dinner?” and to say

elite

quarterbacks.

Many of you are here from out of town; some are living away from home for the first time. What a change! There’s no one to report to about what you are doing and when. Curfew - what’s a curfew? There is also no one to ask, “How was your day?” “What time would you

was an inexperi-

enced Seahawks team. Now, with every key member returning, the Seahawks will look to avenge the overtime heartbreaker. Shaun Alexander will look to better his

rise to

the top.

defence.

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

Visit

North Division

Seahawks may have overtime to Green Bay in the wild card round of last season’s

The

are

do Peyton

NFC

lost in

AFC conference final-

year’s

is

championship.

hoping they won't come up a game so,

arm and

allow the Minnesota Vikings to

pounce on the

can repeat,

short again this year. In order to

left in his

of

still

ing a trade, inexperience on defence

plenty of competition

Indianapolis Colts,

hall

Brett Favre

Mike McKenzie holding out and demand-

AFC.

the

Last year's

NFC. Future

the

drive, but with cornerback

27th ranked rushing

New England

NFL

the

in

poised for one more Super Bowl

Antowain Smith, who fled to Tennessee, and should easily better last year’s

in

has something

chances of repeating, the Patriots have added one of the most dominating running backs of the past seven years. Corey Dillon. The former Cincinnati Bengal is a huge upgrade over departing back

offence.

line

fame quarterback

championships.

To improve

NFC

the

and running back Ahman Green, the Packers boast the best run-

dynasty by winning three of the past four

to

trip

satile offensive

England Patriots

are attempting to, again, silence the rest

a

Conference finals, but this year they have 20 of 22 starters returning and hope to have another run at the playoffs. With the most ver-

the year.

tions, but the

— Page 17

again?

it

BRENT GERHART

By

2004

20,


Page 18

— SPOKE, September 20, 2004

Sports

games an

Exhibition Coach believes

losing

by one run

is

eye-openei*

not a big deal as long

as the players improve throughout the season By KATE BATTLER

ished third in the province

winning bronze at Colleges Athletic Association (OCAA) championship after going 4 and 2 on the season. Coach Jeff Desrusisseau believes this year’s team will improve on last year’s last year,

(This

is

the

of a two-

first

Coenstoga’s

part series on varsity teams.)

The Conestoga College women’s fastball team and men’s rugby team are well tryouts, with underway, and exhibition practices

games

all in

the first w'eek of

school.

The women’s fastball team coming off a disappointing 2 and 8 season but Coach Fawn Day believes the team is

will

be a

lot

stronger than

always hard to

"it’s

record.

The

new,

experienced

players

who have come

for the

team

helped to off-set the lose of a uated.

more than make

for the ones that

He this

know

offs but after that

lost.

year

is

to

make

the playit’s

up to

the players.

With only two returning this year, Melinda Wilson and Karen Cardwell, the team is in a building year but still has a good outlook. players

“We want

were

says the team’s goal

though because we don’t has,” says Day.

new

Desrusisseau says the players will

tell

w'hat the competition

out

year have

this

couple key players that grad-

up

they w'ere last year.

Ontario

the

to

enough

“They decide

The Condor’s had an bition

game

exhi-

against Wilfrid

Laurier University on Sept. 9

make sure to

their fate

after that.”

players are strong

compete at Fawn Day,

this level.”

women ’s fastball coach Day run

is

believes losing by one not a big deal as long

to get

some game practice in first game of the

before the

as

the players improve throughout the season.

season.

improve then I’m not going to worry about wins and losses.” Day says the team will go with 14 girls from the 20 that have come to try out. "We want to make sure that the players are strong enough to compete at this level.” The fastball team plays Mohawk College next here on campus on Sept. 21 at 5 p.m. The men’s rugby team fin-

game was

“If their skill sets

Desrusisseau

says

the

good eye-opener for the team and show's them what they need to work on as a

whole.

a

Individually,

says, the players know'

he

what

they need to do. “After two practices and an

exhibition

game.

1

think

we’re on pace to do some

good things this year.” The rugby team plays at Fleming next in Lindsay on Sept. 25.

(Photo by Kate Battler)

Third-year veteran Mike Parkhill runs the exhibition

game

ball

during an

against Wilfrid Laurier on Sept.

9.

(Photo by Kate Battlerk

Rookie Brian Crisman stretches

for the ball

during a throw-in against

WLU.


Sports

SPOKE, September

2004

20,

— Page 19

®CAA slashes men’s varsity hockey program By

JAMES CLARK

took the helm just

“The coaches did time in 37 years students will not have the opportunity For the

men’s varsity hockey

play

to

first

at

Ontario colleges.

The Ontario Colleges

Athletic-

(OCAA) made

Cressman agreed and added the team had a lot of returning players who were excited about playing again this season. “I really believe

decision to discontinue the league

nucleus of players

the beginning of April

at

two of the

six

teams

2004

in the

after

league

announced they did not have enough money to support a team. After the announcement was made two more teams left the league due to a lack of competition.

who

only teams

In the end, the

were able and willing to play were

Conestoga Condors and the

the

St.

According

Marlene

to

Ford,

Conestoga College's director of athletics,

the

lot

announcement disappoint-

of people

at the college.

“Students, faculty all

been asking said

folded,"

why Ford.

and alumni have the program has “It’s

basically

because of financial reasons.”

$60,000 to $100,000 to run a varsity hockey program. Conestoga’s costs were It

costs

college

a

much lower

than other colleges

because the college owns and operates its

own

we had a good who would have

come

in and helped strengthen the program to a point where we could have won an OCAA championship,” said Cressman, who has

accepted the position of head coach

A Cambridge Hornets. The Condors have not won an OCAA championship since the for the Triple

1993-94 season. Last year the team placed

fifth in

the six-team league with a 2-10-2

Clair Saints.

ed a

tremendous job

recruiting this season,” said Ford.

the

Association

last year.

a

facilities.

Ford said she felt Conestoga would have had a strong team this year because of an extensive recruiting drive led by Condors head coach David Cressman, who

record.

but

They missed had some

still

(Photo by

the playoffs

bright

spots

The nets

at

Conestoga College’s recreation centre

season. The league was cancelled by the

throughout the year, notably the

tenders

performance of Brent MacDermid and Scott Bradley. Both players were tied for fifth in the leaguescoring race at the end of the season with 27 points each. Bradley will be playing for Fredonia State University’s Blue

participate

again,” said Foster during a noon-

Devils this season, a division three

things were looking really positive.”

school located

in

New York

State.

Other former players are also looking for places to play this season.

who

OCAA

after

two

of the six

re-forming a league.

ty

programs

teams could

any schools

liked to play here

in

in

had a

Athletics league or another league

offered by the college.

Administrators

of a following here and

Administrators

at

St.

Clair and

would in

build

against tions

it

after

learning applica-

would take two

to five years

other

“It

would have been too

difficult

when we couldthem when we were

recruiting players

after a survey

n’t

sent out to Ontario colleges indi-

even

tell

going to be in a league,” said Ford. Ford said there are no other varsi-

cated there was no interest from

and athletes out

for

should look

at

"There are

interested in

hockey

varsity

other varsity sports

still

some avenues

soccer team and our rugby team,”

teams

now

will

get

more fan support

there isn’t any hockey.

“It's just

going to be strange not

seeing the guys out there playing

on Wednesday night.”

WHY FAIL WHEN YOU CAN SUCCEED? means more than the pursuit of a course of study ... it has to do with and period of existence possible to man. It is the harmonious being whole the development of the "hand, head and heart". aienG. white

‘True education

Below are some common complaints some sound advice. 1.

"I don't

know where to

that

I

hear everyday from students, along with

begin".

Make a list of all the things you have to do. Break your work down manageable chunks. Schedule your time realistically. Don't skip classes,

Advice:

exam. Begin studying early

especially near an

in

into

the semester with an hour or

two per day.

much

and so

little time". topics emphasized and areas that important most Advice: Preview. Identify the own study style, but your you don't understand. Adapt this method to for reading. substitute remember that previewing is not an effective

2. "I've

got so

3. "This stuff is

to study

so dry,

I

...

can't even stay

awake reading

it".

Ask yourself questions, take notes and highlight concepts. Discuss the material with others, form a study group.

Advice:

4. "I

Get actively involved with the

it.

Advice:

I

understand

Elaborate.

something 5.

text.

it. But I just can't get it to sink in". remember best the things that are most meaningful to us. Try to integrate what you're studying with what you already know, find examples. You will be able t remember new material better if you can link it to

read

"There's too

We

that's already

much

meaningful to you.

to remember".

is recalled better if it is represented in an organized framework. Write chapter outlines or summaries, group information into categories, and draw up mind maps or matrices to organize material.

Advice:

Organize. Information

To make an appointment

for learning strategy assistance, visit the

Student Services

Office.

(Photo by Kate Battler)

Fastball off to a running start one of only two returning players to the women’s team, runs a first-base time trial while assistant coach Rick Proud (not shown) takes down the times.

^1 elinda Wilson, Istball

A Message from Learning Strategies Visit

to

participate in varsity sports like our

said Ford, adding she hopes these

to process.

a couple of years. This

was dismissed

idea

at

at

the United States, but decided

in

Conestoga colleges talked about running a two-team league hoping schools

not

danger of being cut

who were

trying

Condors for the last three seasons and was planning to return for one more, is hoping to play with a Junior C team this season.

Clark)

to financial reasons.

hour game of shinny hockey held at Conestoga’s recreation centre. “We bit

James

not be occupied by any men’s varsity goal-

Conestoga also talked about getting the team into either the Ontario University

interest

the

due

would have

“1

has played for

Scott Foster,

this

will

our website htto://www. conestoaac. on. ca/iso/stserv/index. isp


1

Page 20

.

Sports

— SPOKE, September 20 2004

(Internet photos)

Forward Shane Doan (above) buries the puck behind Finnish

Canada a 3-2 lead early in the Wayne Gretzky, Mario Lemieux, Martin Brodeur and Team Canada celebrate their victory.

goalie Miikka Kiprusoff to give third period. Right,

Canada unstoppable By JON

Canada

YANEFF

Canada Centre in Toronto. Canada forward Shane

once again hoisting an international hockey trophy, thanks is

to a 3-2 victory over

Finland in the

World Cup of Hockey 2004 tournament held Sept. 14 at the Air

scored

in

the

outscoring their opponents

Doan

minute of the

first

third period to put the

in

Canadians

ahead of their Finnish opposition. The Canadians dominated the tournament, going 6-0 while

22-9.

Canada’s goalies were outstanding. Starting goaltender Martin Brodeur allowed only three goals in his first four tournament games. Brodeur scratched himself from the lineup for the semifinal

match

World Cup win against

the

Czech Republic Luongo when

favour of Roberto sprained

him

left

in

his

wrist wouldn’t allow

morning skate before the game. However, Brodeur was back and ready for the final, stopping 27 of 29 shots on net. to participate during the

Luongo

did a stellar job taking

Brodeur’s place

in the semifinal, as

the Canadians

won

a thrilling

in

overtime victory, icing out a 4-3 nail-bitter.

Team Canada forward Vincent Lecavalier shot the puck from a horrible angle into the top

comer of

the net at 3:15 of the first overtime

period. Lecavalier

the tournament,

was

as

the

MVP of

Canada’s top

with two goals

and five Canada’s six games. The Finnish goalie Miikka Kiprusoff continued his NHL suc-

scorer,

assists in

At this price,

mommy can

cess in the tournament. Kiprusoff lead

the

Stanley

call

whenever she wants. You sissy.

Calgary Flames to the

Cup

finals. In the tourna-

ment, he was unbeaten five

games

in his first

(4-0-1) before losing in

the final.

The Fins got to the finals by sneaking past the U.S. 2-1 in their semifinal game.

The leading scorer for the tournament was Sweden forward Fredrick Modin, who notched four goals for eight points, in Sweden’s four games. Sweden was eliminated in their quarter-final

contest against

Czech Republic, 6-1. There were some distractions in the tournament including Team USA coach Ron Wilson scratching forward Brett Hull against the

the

Russians

in

the

quarter-final

for

The U.S. didn’t need Hull for that game as forwards Keith Tkachuk, Mike being

late for practice.

Madano and up,

Bill Guerin stepped combining for a total of

it 1

points in their 5-3 victory.

Also, Team Finland defenceman Janne Niinimaa quit his team on Sept. 6 after arguing with the

coaches.

The World Cup of Hockey was named the Canada Cup when it started in 1976, but it was changed in 1996. The tournament came to be after fans showed heavy interest in the 1972 Summit Series. Forward Joe Sakic, defencemen Scott Adam Foote and originally

Niedermayer, and goalie Martin Brodeur are the only four players back from Canada’s 1996 roster. Also, Ed Jovanovski was selected as an alternate but did not play in

the tournament.

Canada’s World Cup victory

is

the fourth celebration in the last

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two years. In 2002, the Canadian team won a gold medal at the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics, and in 2003 and 2004 Canada won the World Championship titles. Despite

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