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Lawyer names

Paramedic predicament

Olinski president By Dwight

Irwin

Outgoing

Jon Olinski was officially named Conestoga Students Incorporated president for the the

2001/02 school year, at a CSI board of directors meeting on April 9.

Service helps students find homes. PAGE 3

Sperling said,

how

lawyer

that

Sperling

was found

candidate to

Jessica

be ineligible

my

term (as chair).’’ had no knowledge of her ineligibility and it was just a misunderstanding of the constitution between herself and Trevor

She

said she

Trewartha, the chief returning offiBut, she said, she holds no ill

feelings towards the CSI.

“Hopefully going

through

make

all

wish them

The

will not

A

made by

be taken

amendments

to the constitu-

coming

But the proposed amendments from the 1999/2000. school year, as

members of

the CSI, can’t be

ing last

stitution.

at

an annual general meet-

fall.

was deemed ineligible and Olinski won by default. Sperling was also dismissed a

result,

Sperling

as chairman of the board because

she

is

not considered a

member

of

the corporation, in accordance with the constitution.

The questions of Sperling’s eligibility came up after a March 28

BOD

meeting.

Confusion arose

Tom Wilson, left, a faculty member at Loyalist College and a judge in the paramedics skills competition at the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre, on April 5, keeps a close eye on second-year Conestoga paramedic students Jennifer Neilson, middle, and Sherry Foster while they attend to Amanda Finch, a first-year paramedic student who played a victim suffering injuries from an accident. (Photo by Kyla Rowntree)

that recognized part-time students

no weight because they weren’t passed at the annual meeting because there was no annual meet-

membership (the students) to become part of the constitution. If the proposed amendments are not

As

4

this

be passed within one year’s time and these weren’t. “I’m going to make sure we have an annual meeting next year,” to avoid having any future problems with amendments that don’t get passed, Whiteford said. If two-thirds of the students at the annual meeting agree to any of the 2000/01 proposed amendments, they become part of the CSI’s con-

must be passed by the general

The lawyer said the proposed amendments from 1999/2000 hold

PAGE

an annual general

taken to the annual meeting to be passed because any proposals must

invalid.

ing within one year’s time they die.

Councillor only cares about money

to

some time

was

All

COMMENTARY

amendments

the board this past year

fall.

tion

8

past year.

proposed amendment to the constitution from last year allowed part-time students to be part of the corporation, but the lawyer dismissed the amendment saying it

passed

PAGE

year long and it has

proposed

All will

all

change any decisions

iheeting

Volunteer week kicks off April 22.

decided to overlook

made over the well.”

former chair of CSI board

I

BOD

ble to be chair I

Jessica Sperling,

I

She said

continue volunteering whenever she can. “Hopefully going through all of this will make for a strong future for the CSI. I wish them well,” she will

the fact Sperling has been ineligi-

a strong

for

she

said.

this will

future for the CSI.

bad I and

BOD

She is a part-time student and under the 1999 constitution, parttime students are not allowed to sit on the CSI executive or its board of

I

PAGE 7

I feel

can’t continue with the

cer.

I

Students raise cash youth centre.

was unfortunate

to run for the position.

directors.

for

“It

things happened.

finish

was deemed the winner of the March 13-15 election, after the CSI received word from its Olinski

Brad

president

Whiteford said the legal costs will likely total about $600. After the April 9 meeting,

Trewartha took personal responproblems with this

Classes to run later in the day By Reni Nicholson

sibility for the

Conestoga College’s Doon cam-

year’s election. “Jessica and Jon have been taken

along on a ride and

I

apologize to

them for this,” he said. Trewartha also volunteered to help the CSI sort out its constitutional problems this summer. “The CSI has been set back by

pus is preparing for an influx of about 500 new students for the fall semester 200 1

Enrolment

these complications, but this

by students, does. At that meeting, former CSI president Phil LeBeau lodged a formal complaint against the election

stitution

the

what

gram.

process.

The CSI took

these con-

a

stepping stone in bringing the corporation forward.

Now

they have

the opportunity to look at the con-

it

and really understand means,” he added after the

meeting.

The ident

BOD

elected

new

vice-pres-

of communications Jamie

cerns to the lawyer to ger a legal

Taylor to be

opinion.

month of the school

its

chair for the final year.

the

college

has

new programs

including the bachelor of science degree' in nursing program connected with Mohawk College and McMaster University, the pre-

because the 1999 constitution says part-time students can’t sit on the CSI executive, while the 2000 constitution, which was never ratified

is

at

increased due to

service

firefighter

program and

the addition of a second year to

computer programmer pro-

To accommodate the overflow of new students, current students need to

be aware of timetable changes

September, McGregor, college for

said principal.

Grant

Classrooms will be occupied from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., said Donna Runions, manager of college academics and administrative service, and Friday afternoons will have to be better utilized. Currently fewer classes are scheduled on Friday afternoons and classes end daily at 4:30 p.m.

“We’ll do our best to try and

accommodate students, but that doesn't mean we can’t avoid early mornings and

late afternoon,”

she

said.

McGregor and Runions want

to

inform students of the scheduling changes now before the start of the fall .semester, so that arrangements can be made for child care and after-school jobs.

Continued on Page 2


Page 2

— SPOKE, April

16,

2001

Conestoga desires polytechnic status Government wants By Jody Andruszkiewicz

on

its

community,” Tibbits said

reference

Conestoga College is signalling government that it wants to become a polytechnic

to the Ontario

institute,

according to college pres-

ident John Tibbits.

Responding

made

to a

in the Investing in

Students

Task Force report which outlines that the Ontario government should choose three or four colleges to convert to polytechnic institutes, Tibbits

said

Conestoga

of them

is

a polytechnic

in

insti-

tute’s effect on a community’s economy, “and that’s something Conestoga already does.” He said the government is asking

how

some

not just

$100

100,000 square feet of space to the

main academic building on the Doon campus by the fall of 2002. The SuperBuild expansion fund, created by the provincial government to help post-secondary institutions deal with Grade 12 and OAC

approximately $3.5 the applied degree

lot

costs

Tnillion, citing in robotics the

“You can’t be a polytechnic institute with-

of

Tibbits,

Conestoga College president

Tibbits said being

ISO 9001

choosing which colleges can convert to a polytechnic institute, the

to a polytechnic institute could pos-

provincial government

itively affect

Polytechnic institutes are educa-

is

looking

government

The

on

acts

granted to Conestoga by the provincial

certi-

fied benefits the college because in

the

same time because

of secondary school reform, was

John

this plan.

college

is

Tibbits said there

graduates entering the post-secondary system at the

out degrees.”

adding that it’s going to take of time and effort to construct

intent,

a

at least

program

degree

applied

a college

letter

make conversion

will

million. Tibbits said designing an

nic institute

will turn itself into a polytechnic institute

and cost

college

hoping to be one

government the recommendation. if

to

for a detailed plan of

recommendation

how

detailed plan of

trying to obtain.

However, Tibbits said converting funding as

it

will be

main academ-

building will create 71

ic

Tibbits

new class-

cial to students in

applied degree.

gram because

for quality

among

easier to attract corporate funding.

students as the college’s student

In addition he said he thinks degree

population could double in size

programs will be worth more in founding from the provincial gov-

from 5,000

ernment.

the possibility of constructing

He added

In

converting, Conestoga to

a

polytechnic institute, Tibbits said

examining other polytechnic institutes around the globe as well as doing a significant economic study. the college will be

Ryerson, located in Toronto, was the

last

polytechnic institute in

Ontario before

it

converted to a

university during the 1990s.

“A

polytechnic institute focuses

be easier to be granted the status of being a polytechnic institute if Conestoga keeps its Key Performance Indicator rank at a high level. KPIs are used as benchmarks of excellence

that

it

will

colleges

for

across

the

certainly

“I

think polytechnic

institutes will get

he

more (funding),”

said.

In

addition

funding issues,

to

province and Conestoga has been

Tibbits said the college will allevi-

ranked number

ate the potential

past

two

1

in

KPIs

for the

years.

It could take almost 10 years to convert Conestoga into a polytech-

growth problems

through capital investments like the $14 million SuperBuild project

which

will

add

an

estimated

Over $14

first-year programs,

mencing

moved to

in

the

are

fall

being as a

and

revised

the

health-office

program do not have first-year students who will be affected by moving the programs to Waterloo because these programs are first- time programs. McGregor said these programs are eligible for the move because administration

they are first-time programs.

would be too upsetting to move a program midway through a stuIt

dent’s

like to

career,

said

shuffling of classrooms and

of the

new

Sue Garlick (Cambridge 623-4890) Titia Taylor

(Doon,

ECE ext.

392)

Susan Hartley (Doon ext. 338) Maureen Nummelin (Doon ext. 300) Mark Salmikivi (Doon ext. 353) Peter Sheldon (Doon ext. 212) Ted Spicer (Doon ext. 282) Edie Torbay (Doon ext. 381) Greg Bums (Doon, ext. 613)

Nominations Nominations

OPEN on March 12, 2001 CLOSE on April 20, 2001

The wing

funded by the Ontario SuperBuild Growth Fund, is

and

work together

to

streamline the transfer process as

well as determining the value of college credits at a university.

Budget. The fund was created to fulfill the Ontario government’s commit-

coming in “double cohorts” September 2003 when both Grade 12 and OAC students will be entering the college, because the

ment

to

the

modernize and expand the

infrastructure of Ontario’s colleges

province eliminated the

and universities. Funding in the amount of $14.2 million has been designated to the

in 1998.

construction of the building that

administration

will consist mainly of classrooms.

to

The building

will

be

built

on the

west side of the main teaching building at the Doon campus. Construction is to begin at the end of June and is to be completed in

A portion

of the west wall of the

down

during construction. The connec-

On

on the

first floor will

be made

one classroom

the second floor,

will be lost for the duration of the

The expansion said

space will not be availanother year, college

make room

ing in the

are

is

discussing plans

for the students

com-

fall.

an

“It’s

we’re

year

this

for

dilemma

interesting

in,” said

some ways

McGregor. “There

we

that

can better

use the facilities.”

1

David

will

,600 to

1

have capacity ,750 students,

Putt, director

cal resources.

for space include a

of physi-

new

lab

and

renovations to the existing biology

computer opennew computers; an additional computer nursing

lab;

a

access lab including 30 teaching lab; and a

room cunently

being used by staff in the Learning Resource Centre will be converted

group teaching room. Also affected by the increased enrolments will be the bookstore, which will eventually be made larger, said McGregor. into a small

construction.

for about

Since able

OAC

Solutions to the immediate need

July 2002.

adjacent to the hall leading to the blue cafeteria and the Sanctuary.

construction

that the college

university systems

In the long term, McGregor said, these plans will also help with the

in

done as a result of a flood of about 300 first-year students and approximately 200 second- and third-year students, said McGregor. “We’ll also be losing space due the

outlined this problem as well and

,600 students

tion

wing,” said McGregor.

For information or nomination forms, contact one of the following committee members:

1

adjusting of timetables are being

to

adding the report from the

said,

Investing in Students Task Force

funded program 1999 Ontario

provincially

C-corridor will be knocked

McGregor.

The

nominate a distinguished teacher?

college

very hard to get fair value for

“It’s

college credits at a university,” he

being spent on addition

announced

campus

the Waterloo

the potential

did outline a problem in that

recommended

adding that

said,

is

their college credits at a university.

a

degree programs will cost more than diploma programs, but Conestoga certainly wouldn’t be charging more than the universities.

a

The software engineering prohome child-care program

Would you

also investigating

is

Tibbits

com-

gram, the

AUBREY HAGAR AWARD

tuition,

1

result of the, shuffle.

for the

college

there

students don’t get full value for

major Waterloo campus near the new Millennium Park that could be ready by 2004. This conversion will affect

million

Continued from Page Three

He

to 10,000 students.

accommodate more than

to

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

The

benefi-

a diploma pro-

they can get a diploma and an

the colleges applying for this status.

degree programs.

to say that a poly-

would be

rooms and eight new laboratories. The student residence is being expanded to house a total of 436

diploma programs

differentiation

went on

technic institute

tional institutions offering full-time

and applied

demand

a

degree.

last April.

addition to the

is

from the community for highly skilled employees and it would be a tremendous benefit to the community to have a polytechnic institute to meet that demand with employees who have applied degrees. “You can’t be a polytechnic institute without degrees,” he said, adding there is a demand from students and parents to be able to get a


SPOKE, April

News

Area rooms for

rent

life,

you need someone

turn to. Call the

By

rooms on the directory are single rooms with kitchen privileges,

Diabetes Association.”

adding there are 193 listings

Carol feto, dietitian

Guelph and Ayr can submit a listing one year. “This allows them to be on our Web site, as well as on a hard copy to run in the directory for

Even though exams

week away, some

are

a

still

students

are

already thinking about next year as they scramble to secure housing for

next

we make available to students who do not have computers.” list

This

fall.

Elaine Brunk, the receptionist in" student services, said now until the

is

the

first

year the housing

directory has been available online.

for the college’s housing directory,

Brunk added that students without computer access at home are also welcome to use the computer

which

in student services,

end of August

the busiest time

is

put together by student

is

services.

According to Brunk, the housing directory

is

who would

a

list

of local landlords

like to rent

rooms

to

students.

and during the summer, out-of-town students who visit the college can use the student services phone to call prospective landlords. also has a

For a fee of $25 landlords from Cambridge,

map

The

office

posted for students

to locate a specific address.

Brunk

Kitchener, Waterloo,

at the

to

Canadian

moment.

These

almost all be rented by the time students return to

HELP

will

SOMEONE YOU KNOW. CALL OIABOES ASSOCiATtW

I

I

ASSOCiATlOX c<v<A&ie«Ne DU DiABtTE

www.dictoetes.ca

classes next year. Elaine Brunk, student services receptionist

She said these will almost all be rented by the time students return

some

stu-

be looking

in

to classes next year, “but

dents

will

still

Attention

aii

students

Needing money!!

September,” she laughed.

said 95 per cent of the

The rooms on

the

directory

range in price from $220 to $750, with most of them falling around the $350 mark. Landlords and students are also provided with a sample copy of a roomer/landlord agreement. “It’s good to have everything in writing,” said Brunk, “so both

know what

to expect.”

She added

that the directory is

important because a lot of students do not want to stay in residence

and

it

provides them with an

alter-

Be

native.

The housing

Elaine Brunk,

a

receptionist in student services, points to the

the student services

located

in

districts

contained

in

which highlights the the college’s housing directory. office,

map

different

(Photo by Kirsten

directory can be

accessed through Conestoga’s Web site at www.conestogac.on.ca, and is found under services, student then housing. services and Students must have access to

Adobe Fifield)

in order to

download the

a Conestoga

College Tour Guide! Talk to Melody, Information Centre,' Or call 748-5220 ext. 730

directory.

Conestoga College

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to Conestoga College

— Page 3

“When dfabefes enters your

Online directory helps students find housing Kirsten Fifield

2001

16,

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

and communities.

!

SCSB


— SPOKE, April

Page 4

Commentary

2001

16,

FAIRFAX WOULD LATER REGRET GOING THROUGH AIRPORT SECURITY WITH ALL THAT LOOSE CHANGE.

CSI policy unclear The CSI

is

using in-camera sessions inappropriately at their board of

governor meetings.

An

move

in-camera session means to

into a separate

chamber

exclude the public and press from a discussion. The session

when debating matters of a confidential, personal or financial The problem with the CSI going behind closed doors is that on

shutting out students

By

As

it

seems as

if

the

CSI has some-

is

the

discussing.

is

know

Students do have a right to

why

they are

a student body discussing student issues, the students

should be aware of what the CSI

provider so

nature.

issues that should be public.

using these in-camera sessions

thing to hide.

to

used

is

about their health insurance

CSI going in-camera

March 28. The CSI is considering an

to discuss this issue as they

did on

ed health care. This issue

alternate provider for the students’ extenddirectly related to students

is

and

it

should

not have been discussed in-camera.

The The go up The

CSI

discussing the issue and a decision has not been made.

is still

may

students have a right to know_ if their health insurance fees

next year and what the benefits are

CSI

CSI changes

if the

providers.

policy on in-camera sessions doesn’t state a reason as to

in-camera was necessary in a confidential topic.

It is

this instance.

The

health insurance issue

why

is

not

a student issue that directly involves students.

Jon Olinski, current CSI vice-president of operations and CSI president-elect, asked to

He

said his reason

go in-camera to discuss the health insurance issue. was that he felt that the college advisor who attends

every CSI meeting. Jack Fletcher, director of student services, should not

was discussed. Olinski said he personally didn’t want him there because he didn’t want Fletcher’s college-related influence on the issue. have been present

in the

room while

Olinski said because Fletcher

is

lio

the topic

a college employee, he thinks this

The worst

service

self-service

is

issue puts Fletcher in a conflict of interest.

Olinski also added that discussion of the health issue could have

Woe

me. Oh, woe

is

brought up some personal information about students regarding health

not making enough

concerns that should not be made public.

my

To make matters worse

three

members of

the

CSI

executive, Brad

Whiteford, CSI president, Jessica Sperling, former chair of the board,

and Olinski, could not produce one policy for in-camera sessions. When Spoke requested a copy of the in-camera policy, Olinski said the policy

was

CSI’s constitution

in the

when in fact it isn’t. CSI procedures and

Sperling said the in-camera policy from a lines booklet is being

guide-

used and Whiteford said the policy was stated in

Robert’s Rules of Order.

When policy

is

members of

three

CSI don’t

exactly

being used, the credibility of the CSI

The in-camera policy Rules of Order

at a

used by the CSI

that is

so broad that

is

p.ossible for

them

to

Whiteford said the policy needs

to

be revised so the CSI

isn’t

going

in-camera on issues that don’t need to be discussed in-camera.

He

said he

would hope

that the people

who

cussion in-camera understand exactly what the policy states.

Whiteford added that there hasn’t been enough time spent training

He

members

said board

Weylie

about

it is

she

lic

and when they are

rubber stamp procedure where they

assume the position without any formal training. Whiteford suggested the CSI hold in-camera sessions

about politicians giv-

little bitter

called to task

Politics

money;

that

supposed

when

CSI will go in-camera. All of the members need to familiarize themselves with the policies and procedures involving the CSI so they can be knowledgeable repre-

cally

the

sentatives of the students.

how many

greater good.

pay will be the same.

when

she was criticized for

I

wish

60 per cent pay hike. at the Walper Pub work as a bartender would

I

me

into

my boss

my

$5.95 hourly wage

it

for the

I

certainly didn’t get

Coun. Weylie

will

work harder

doesn’t matter

hours she puts It’s

her

in,

a benefit salary.

The message Coun. Weylie

is

really sending to her constituents is

will because she represents

that she’s not involved in munici-

pal politics for the public service,

Kitchener council was the only

raise

After

cent.

November

the

election.

than

I

tee’s

commit-

recorrunendation to increase

by 36 per cent. The amusing aspect of this

council’s pay

tion, if

you can

amusing,

is

situa-

that Kitchener council-

would have been paid $37,800 had the pay increase they were to lors

scaled

I

have chair.

back to

I

have constituents

to represent.

work very hard

constituents

call this situation

not been

we have to

I

have to attend or

attend or chair. Well,

we

to

We both have make

sure the

represent get the

rather she’s in

it

for the

money.

Other Kitchener councillors agreed

who peti-

with the 10,300 residents tioned

for council’s

pay to be

slashed.

too bad that Coun. Weylie

It’s

had

to

say that she was sorely

tempted to resign

in disgust

when

best possible representation.

citizens organized themselves

Coun. Weylie says she might have to go back to selling insur-

protested these pay hikes.

ance part time because the

money

she gets from her work on council isn’t

enough.

What’s worse

message

is

and

that she sent the

that politics is

no longer

about public service, but rather self-service.

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) in exchange for the

Keeping Conestoga College connected

The views and opinions newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements coninsertion of advertising in the paper.

expressed in

Editor: Dwight Irwin; Photo Editor: Kirsten Fifield; Production

Manager: Kyla Rowntree

Advertising Manager: Jody Andruszkiewicz; Circulation Manager: Rcni Nicholson Faculty Adviser; Sharon Dietz; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas is

ext.

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room

4BI4, Kitchener, Ontario,

N2G 4M4.

691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

CSI

this

SPOKE

be liable for any damages beyond tlie amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:.^0 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accomtain the

address

paid

more people than I do and she has a bigger budget to work with. It’s irrelevant. She has meetings

let

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

Phone: 748-5220,

It

am

I

SPOKE

Spoke SPOKE’s

rate,

and drawback of receiving a

money.

Of course the counter-argument is that

in

Coun. Weylie

receives a salary.

receive

SPOKE is

job where

vice-president of academics to help

Both she and

in-camera policy needs to be written which stipulates specifi-

my

people and do something for the

rejected a citizens’ advisory

A new

Unlike

she was tempted to resign in disgust

that

because she works hard and puts

she claims that

Furthermore, in January, council

instead

work those people

She sends the message

on an hourly

calling for an in-camera session in the middl6.

know

insults the hard

do.

extra effort she deserves more.

got into student politics at

I

topics to be discussed in-camera instead of holding a meeting and then

dents’ right to

are

money.

crying foul, Coun. Weylie

Conestoga as the student union’s

that

is

meetings

They need to respect the stuof going in-camera whenever they see fit.

why people

to get into politics.

to

their act.

making

about public service.

municipal council in the region to

up

By about

isn’t

it’s

That’s the reason

gusting. What’s

who work more than 40 hours a week and don’t bring in ple in this city

that type of

it.

give councillors increases in pay.

to clean

by, the

whiny and angry

get

to discuss ail

The CSI needs

on "it

Well, tough luck.

repre-

and

by 60 per

aren’t properly trained like a

say-

is

a

ing to the pub-

where

people on the CSI board of directors.

elected to a position,

politicians

it’s

getting a

decide to take the dis-

all

Christina

dis-

it is

can go back

job not be enough? There are peo-

worse

The CSI in-camera policy

I

currently pays for

when

absolutely

discuss almost any topic in-camera.

know what

my job

constituents they represent, these

be questioned.

a copy of Robert’s

don’t

to as

ing themselves such a pay hike and

is

is in

I

you haven’t noticed, I’m

just not

sentiment

Glance.

In case

good enough. That’s what Kitchener Coun.

$32,000 a year and

know which in-camera

is definitely to

$32,000, the 36 per cent increase.

my bills, including school. How can $32,000 for a part-time

making

part-time job. I’m only

sents,

the

me. I’m

is

money from

logo.

shall not

arising out of errors in advertising

panied by an illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, April

Letter to the editor

16,

2001

— Page 5

Laptop lucky

Peer hosts support international students with transition For many, the transition secondary education

to post-

college community

in get

a

of student

taste

Canada. While

initially,

made even more challenging by the additional adjustment to a

dents

were

new culture. While we can provide academic

returning

is difficult;

for

the international student, this transition is

support for these students, the peer host provides contact with someone who sees Conestoga College from a student’s perspecIt is

a great advantage for inter-

national students to in other college

meet students

programs, and to

in

We

recognize the contribution of

the peer host volunteers and

Canadians,

international stu-

partnered recent

in

with

semesters,

international

students

have,

themselves, volunteered to become peer hosts.

They wanted

make

like to this

would

thank everyone involved for

invaluable service.

From

all

of

us

in

English

Language Studies, best wishes

for

continued success.

sure that

Melanie Reed,

had an experience as good as their own.

English language studies

new

This

tive.

life

to

international students

is

indicative of

support

this

Conestoga’s

how

was,

co-ordinator,

valuable

and

is,

international

and

to

'

stu-

dents.

Chris Buuck, chair,

English language studies

What a mess Kirine Boulanger, a second-year business student from Guelph, was the laptop winner in March’s cafeteria contest. The laptop was presented to her on April 9. (Photo by Rent Nicholson)

Got something

to

say?

Do you have a beef? Spoke wants Write a Letters to the editor

to

hear from you.

letter to

the editor.

must be received by Tuesday

at

noon

for the fol-

lowing issue. Letters can be e-mailed to spoke@conestogac.on.ca, dropped off at the Spoke newsroom 4B14, or mailed (see address at bottom of page 4).

at

Please include your full name, address and phone number.

Anonymous

r

i

letters will not

be

printed.

~

SPOKE wants to hear from you

.

The

I

Please

reporters at Conestoga College’s student fill

off in the

out the survey below and deposit

Spoke newsroom

in

it

newspaper want to hear what you like and dishke about our publication. into boxes in the learning resource centre or at CSI’s office in the Sanctuary. You can also drop

i

j

it

4B 13.

| I

j

I

What information

is

important in your

life

at

What do you want to know about Conestoga

What do you

like

What would you

Conestoga College?

College?

or dislike about Spoke!

like to see

more or

less of in

Spoke!

We would like to hear from you. Spoke is your newspaper and it should represent your needs and interests. We will take your sugand do what we can to ensure that this publication beneOts all members of the Conestoga College community. Thank you for your time and we look forward to hearing your concerns and serving your needs. gestions to heart

I


Page 6

— SPOKE, April

16,

2001

Students question membership fees deemed

Outlay of $815 By Reni Nicholson

deducted in small

The

registration fee to

become

a

of the new Ontario College of Social Workers and

member

too high for social services designations

it from their paycheques amounts until the fee is

By Reni Nicholson

paid.

“A number of regulatory

colleges

Service Workers was the

were looked at,” said McDonald, “and from other regulatory col-

main concern voiced by those who

leges our size, such as the chiro-

attended the information session on

practic college,

Social

the

new

college held at Conestoga

fees are

Knowles wins seat on board

we found

on the lower end.

that It

Print shop employee Lynn Knowles has been elected to the

board of governors support

our

staff

position.

Knowles won with 7 1 votes

works

in

out to be about $1.50 per day.”

the April 4 election.

Alumni services officer Monica Himmelman had 34

services

The annual membership payments collected by the college are used to pay for staff and possible

faculty, the

judicial hearings.

had

These judicial hearings are conducted when a member has done something unprofessional that goes against the code of ethics and standards of practices agreed upon by every member. The fee will go to sustain the col-

employment

College April 5. About 45 people including sec-

ond-year students from the social

program at the college, program advisory committee and several agencies in the area came to hear Glenda McDonald, registrar of the college speak about the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers Act that was acclaimed

Aug.

15,

2000.

Membership

in

the

college

is

mandatory for all those practising social work, said McDonald. “If you want to give yourself the title of either profession, you must belong to the college.”

Membership

college

the

in

McDonald

presented.

no subsidy program available to compensate for the payment, no money can be received

when

the fee

is

claimed

income tax purposes and the annual membership is valid from for

McDonald

said

some agencies

have pre-paid the fee for

their

employees and

have

in

return

sit

on the board

commencing

staff

in

membership

After

her

three-year

have the opportunity

The

figures level-

position

is

one of three

Its mandate, as stated by McDonald, has two purposes. She said the legislation was primarily

board on a rotating basis. Last year an administrative staff member was acclaimed and next year the academic position

created to serve and protect the

of social workers and

social service workers.

She said most people aren’t able to understand that the college’s pri-

mary interest doesn’t concern the members of the college. “Our members aren’t the primary party at stake, the public is.”

us have been discour-

aged that there was nothing to hang our hats on with our five-year degree,” said Patrice Butts, a faculty

Glenda McDonald, registrar of the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers, spoke to an audience of about 45 April 5. The information session explained the necessary membership in the college for social workers and social service workers who want to use the titles. (Photo by Reni Nicholson)

member in the gram who has work from

social services pro-

a masters in social Wilfrid

Laurier

University.

Butts said concerns should not

Butts told the

room

the act is a

positive thing. “It’s

We are rising to join ranks with those in similar professions,” she said. fession.

an important step in

this pro-

be the application fee, but the step being taken to have the specifically

profession recognized.

will

become

vacant.

Help wanted No experience needed

We provide Must be

all

training.

8d:^e to start

immediately.

Please

call

Maridy at

74^4660 or fax resume to

ORIENTATION AND REGISTRATION WEEK (FALL 2001) Physical

August 27*^ -31** 2001

Activity

How much? How often?

Orientation Assistants will:

Assist with the successful orientation and registration of incoming students to

Conestoga College during orientation week.

Participate in a brief training session (scheduled the

week prior to

orientation

week)

Possible job duties include:

Providing directions and information

Distributing orientation materials

Assisting with a variety of line-ups for services

Assisting at various registration tables

Assisting with photo I.D.

visit

to take

internal positions elected to the

PEER SERVICES IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR ORIENTATION ASSISTANTS

To apply

term,

member

the seat.

HELP WANTED

fall

31, 2004.

748-jl235.

the

semester and ongoing until Aug.

ing out at about 40,000.

“Many of

January to January.

will

as a representative of support

will

foresees

Sajel

3.

The college has gained about 7,000 members in its first year and

practice

is

Knowles

student

officer

another support staff

the question period following the

There

and

votes

hearings.

public interest and to regulate the

information

24

Boteju had

lege, as well as funding the judicial

payment of an initial $445 and $370 annually. Concerns about the amount of the fee and how it is used arose during requires the

votes, liaison officer Jan Stroh

Student Services (2B02) to complete an implication form and book an

I-888.334-97S9 vvww.paguide.com

interview. Deadline for submitting applications is

Monday April 30*^


News

SPOKE, April 16,2001

— Page 7

Class project beneficial, though short of goal By Jody Andruszkiewicz

Thompson and

Even though they

fell short of over $1,000 for

their goal to raise

Thompson Youth Centre and Argus, the first-year recreation and leisure studies revenue generathe Betty

tion class

still

managed

to raise

the other for Argus. For the purposes of this fundraiser, the Argus women’s centre was chosen as the beneficiary. According to Tyler Young, group leader for the Argus section of the class, the idea for this fund-raiser

came from Greg Bums, program

“This project helped our class

come together and become a unit to deal with real

leader for Betty

$417.25 during an April 3-5 fund-

co-ordinator leisure studies.

eight

Betty Thompson, located in downtown Kitchener, and Argus,

Young, 24, said Bums has been a resource for helping with problems,

Grille in

located in Cambridge, are youth

but outside of that, he

Waterloo Region that

in the

help troubled teens by offering them counselling services.

The

centres

Betty

in

Thompson has an

shelter called Safe briefly closed

overnight

Haven, which

doors during the Christmas break because of a lack of funding. its

Argus runs two centres, one for men and one for women.

The

class

was

groups, one raised

split

money

into

two

for Betty

recreation

and

everything

left

hands of the class, including the hierarchy of the groups. project,

the

year an

first

The

at

Sheptenko,

1

also said this proj-

8,

ect helped illustrate to the class the

and negative points

positive

to

fund-raising.

Bums

September

excellent

and culminated with the Pulling for Prizes fund-raiser. The class had to solicit prizes from businesses in the community and advertise their event on campus. “It was a learning experience for us,” said Young.

involved.

in

was a dinner for Montanas Cookhouse Cambridge worth an esti-

mated $120.

back

started

Thompson, whose

largest prize

event like this has been done in that class,

experiences,”

group had 39 prizes available to be won. Argus had 45 prizes available to be won.

raiser for both organizations.

of

life

Heather Sheptenko, group

said

“It

said this project

experience

was an for

all

Heather Sheptenko, raised over

develops their

skills for

going

out and soliciting prizes, which

is

hard for students to do,” he said, adding that the project isn’t yet

complete as those companies who donated prizes still had to receive

$400

and

left,

Tyler

for the Betty

Young chaired committees

that

Thompson Youth Centre and Argus

during the Pulling For Prizes fund-raiser held on April 3-5. (Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz) their letters of appreciation.

Bums

annual event. However, different

also said as far as he

concerned,

this project will

SM£ April in

non-profit organizations will

is

be an

chosen for next year’s event.

Chapter B1* Grand River Valley

Dinner Meeting

assodation with tho Sludont Chapter of tho

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Page 8

— SPOKE, April

16,

2001

week

Volunteer College learning By Kirsten

adviser hopes to recruit

skills

someone

Fifield

more

Canadian National

Week,

Volunteer

which runs from April 22-28,

week

but

know Week.

there It

is

good

a National Volunteer

raises

awareness for

stu-

dents to go out and volunteer in

community.” Turner said the peer host program

their

at

She added

who

are

landed

or

learning

opportunity

to

be

immigrants, English, an paired with

that

out an application at student for an interview.

sit

They

then

are

required

to

attend a training session that will teach them about college and

community resources, culture shock, intercultural communica-

adviser

any student

fill

and

for

that they

skills

is

welcome

to become a peer host as long as he/she feels comfortable with the different resources avail-

if

and where to refer students they require additional servic-

es

such as tutoring or coun-

tion

selling.

The program is considered an on-campus activity and requires hosts to spend one hour per week

able at the college, can share infor-

with each student they are paired

mation about the community and

with.

is

able to help students practise their students volunteer

“which is more than normal. This allowed us

this year,” said Turner,

to

“It’s

make

English.

“We had 28

week

hosts during volunteering

hosts were paired with more than one student.” She said students, who are interested in the program, are required to

Melissa Turner, learning

the college gives international

students

in

some peer

services, provide reference checks

can meet with someone every week.”

since

for students to

time,

does make a

students

program at the she wants to use this

volunteers at the college were honoured two weeks ago during Peer Appreciation Week. “It is really

it

lot of

huge difference

co-ordi-

to recruit peer hosts,

not a

“It’s

nates the peer host college, said

and

is

adviser.

who

with

friendship role.

a great opportunity to raise awareness in the student population about the need for volunteers within the student community, says the college’s learning skills

Melissa Turner,

familiar

culture, in a support

awareness

raises

make 65 matches because many

not a lot of time, but

it

does

huge difference for students in dial they can meet with someone every week.” Turner said the commitment for hosts is one semester, but some a

Melissa Turner, learning skills adviser at the college, shows off the board she created to promote becoming a peer host. The program is being highlighted as part of National Volunteer Week. (Photo by Kirsten Fifield) matches continue for the entire year. Hosts are also required during the

do not attend surrimer classes, but remain in the community, are wel-

summer months and

come

students

who

to volunteer.

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SPOKE, April

Conestoga found

guilty in simulation

Exercise began on March 7 with staged accident By Kyla Rowntree

Wojtek

LASA Conestoga College was found guilty of four offences under the

Plaga,

a

in

coiiege

Woodworking Centre

second-year

Lawyers played by students and

student, played the role of

faculty

the faculty supervisor at the college at the

ments April 4

at

a

mock

trial

con-

ducted as part of a second-year

LASA

student

consolidation

exercise.

The

exercise allows

LASA

stu-

dents the opportunity to use their in

skills

a real-life situation that

began with an accident and ends in a trial and conviction. The consolidationexercise began on March 7 when a staged accident occurred in the Ontario Woodworking Centre shop at

time of the accident.

Scaffolding collapsed on two students killing one and injuring the other.

A

involved.

The

college

found

small courtroom

was

was

The college was found

as an employer to provide equipment,

tive devices.

was

also found guilty of failing employer to ensure that measures and procedures were carried It

materials and protec-

as an

tive devices.

out in the workplace.

The college was

also found guilty

LASA

of failing as an employer to provide

student, played the role of an inves-

information and instruction and

Chris Grey, a second-year

from the Ministry of Labour

supervision to a worker to protect

and testified as a witness. Lauren Vickery, a second-year

the health and safety of a worker

tigator

and also

played the survivor

failing, as

an employer to

take every precaution reasonable in

of the accident.

the circumstances for the protec-

She testified that she did not have any formal training on scaffolding. Brian Dykman, a second-year

tion of a worker.

up in room 3A615 and students were

LASA

called to the witness stand to testi-

gator from the Ministry of Labour

fy in front of a provincial court

judge played by Gordon Miller, a retired deputy chief of the Waterloo

and he also testified. Pictures and evidence were presented to the judge to show the

regional police.

scene of the accident.

set

guilty of

an employer to provide equipment, materials and protecfailing as

guilty of failing

LASA student,

the college.

investigated the accident

scene and questioned the witnesses to determine the guilt of the p^lrties

Ontario Health and Safety Act and regulations for industrial establish-

— Page 9

2001

16,

student, played the investiy

Brian role

Dykman

(right),

a second-year

LASA

The consolidation

student, plays the

as a witness as part of the continuation of a

real-life

continue

exer-

with

a

exercise will

civil

trial

on

April 18.

Dykman is playing a Ministry of Labour investigator in a courtroom setup on April 4 in room 3A615. Gordon Miller, a retired deputy chief with the Waterloo regional police department, played the judge. cise.

The

civil trial,

which

will

have a

jury present in the courtroom, will

determine the punitive damages

and

(Photo by Kyla Rowntree)

award

the

parties

compensation.

CSI award winners

Healthy

eatlwg...

regular physieal ‘

^

aethfliy

ww;pofticspadion.cam

Rec Centre The 2000/01 CSI executive received awards 5, at

at

its

banquet, April

the St. Jacobs Best Western hotel. Winners were (clockwise

Brad Whiteford, executive award of recognition for his role as president; Jon Olinski, award of recognition for role as vice-president of operations: Ellen Menage, ex-officio award of recognition; Mike Harris, executive award of recognition for role as vice-president of academic; Tracy Evans, executive award of recognition for role as vice-president of student life; and Jack Fletcher, a certificate of appreciation and the first CSI lifetime achievement award. (Photo by Dwight IrwIn) from bottom

left):

Other recipients of CSI awards were, back row Martin, certificate of appreciation; Fred Harris,

at

available in your area.

you connect with the many resources

that are

employment, housing, counselling and other agencies in Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge, Guelph and other communities. Especially as the school year draws to a close for graduating students,

you

it’s

important to

outside the college. These resources can help

home, find a car seat, baby clothes and toys, connect to counselling groups and workshops, or give a number to phone in a crisis. Specific professional support can be provided for pregnancy, alcohol and drug counselling, single parent and family supports, credit counselling, legal aid, and many other services. If you’re not sure where to go for help, just ask us. We’ll help you get connected with the find an affordable

right people.

A M^sage from Student Services (Room 2B02)

Hotline The

recreation centre has a new hotline in place. It is easy to access.

now

From

outside the college

phone - 748-3565

From

inside the college

phone -

ext.

565

Name the new

bar

Conestoga’s recreation centre and Spoke

wants students to name the new

We have information, brochures and contacts with social services,

amke a connection with people and places

Tony

of asso-

Janeen Hoover, award of excellence; Steve Coleman, award of distinction and staff member; Adam DeRooy, board of directors: and Trevor Trewartha, award of distinction and certificate of appreciation on behalf of the Walksafe Program. In front: Roweena Kurg, BOD and certificate of appreciation; Jessica Sperling, BOD chair award of recognition; Christa Adair, BOD and certificate of appreciation; Jen Webb, BOD; and Ginny Hawkrigg, BOD and certificate of appreciation. (Photo by Dwight irwin)

Student Services are here to help with issues that students face on a

daily basis, but we’re also here to help

to right:

ciate registrar

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Community Resources The counsellors

left

on behalf

bar, in the

concourse of the rec centre. Just

fill

name

in the following ballot with

your idea for the

of the pub. Drop suggestions off at the rec centre.

Spoke, or send interoffice mail to the rec centre, c/o

Tony Martin, through

Deadline for ideas

announced Student’s

is

the student services office.

April 16. Winners will be

in the April

23 edition of Spoke.

name

Program Telephone number Idea for pub

name

The student who chooses the best name will

win an editor’s

chair,

donated by Pepd.


Page 10

— SPOKE, April

16,

2001

CSI Award Banquet Winners Alumni Volunteer Award Brad Whiteford

Certificate of Appreciation Alan McColeman, Andrea Brennan, Angela Rivas, Angie Grosicki, Becky Appleby, Bojana Perisic, Chris Allen, Christina Adair, Colleen Clark, Craig LeBlanc, Dae Won Lee, David Poidevin, Drew Elliott, Gail Inger, Ginny' Hawkrigg, Jaime Taylor, Jamie Hendry, Jeff Wells, Jenn Webb, Jennifer Coenjarts, John McDonald, Josh Denomey, Jung Choi, Kathleen Turton, Kerri Hansler, Kerri-Lynn Kit, Kristen Gilmartin, Kwok Leung, Linda Down, Linda Elliot, Mike Lantz, Philana Pendleton, Robert Good, Robin MpMurray, Rosanne Bauman, Roweena Knrg, Ryan Grosz, Sean Campbell, Stephen Kauk, Sue Carpani, Virginia Van Gorder, Yvonne Berendsen, Walk Safe Staff, Security Services, Physical Resources, Peer Services, Registrar’s Office, Spoke, Recreation Centre

Awards

of Distinction

Trevor Trewartha, Chanh Lam, Steve Coleman

Customer Service Award

of Excellence

Josten's

Award

of Excellence

Janeen Hoover

Board of Director's Award of Recognition Chnsta Adair, Jennifer Blunt,

Adam DeRooy, Albert Dikkes,

Thomas

Brian Dwyer, Ginny Hawkrigg,

Muller, Wojciech Plaga, Jaime Taylor, Jenn

Roweena Kurg,

Webb

Board of Director Chairperson Award of Recognition Jessica Sperling

CSI Staff

Member Award

of Recognition

Janie Renwick, Marianne Sippel, Alycia Punnett, Jamie Hendry,

Steve Coleman

CSi Ex-Officio

Member Award Ellen

of Recognition

Menage

CSi Executive Award of Recognition Brad Whiteford, Jon Olinski, Michael Harris, Tracy Evans

CSi Lifetime Achievement Award Jack Fletcher

These people have made a

difference.

We owe them

our thanks.


SPOKE, April

News Bourque’s Avalanche With the Stanley

of the NHL’s

start

Cup

playoffs, everyone has

Lord Stanley’s

on who will mug home this

As of April

here are

different ideas

9,

my

take year.

predic-

tions.

New

-

Conference

Eastern round

solid goaltender

Jersey vs. Carolina - The

Devils will have no problems with

Hurricanes,

who have

little

playoff experience.

Carolina is improving as a team and Jeff O’Neill enjoyed a breakout regular season, but it won’t be enough to put a scare into Scott Stevens,

Martin Brodeur, Jason Amott and company. Devils will win in four.

Toronto - The Battle of Ontario 11 should be as exciting and have even more side stories than last year. Ottawa won all five

Ottawa

meetings

vs.

this year,

won

but they

season series last year too,

the

before losing to the

Le^s

in the

The Leafs have been

round.

first

.

and has taken them to the Cup

Cup champion

inconsistent all

season and

still

don’t look ready for a strong play-

while Ottawa has dominated most of the league all season, with off,

continued consistency. We’ll see if the moves the Leafs made last year will help

Curtis

the playoffs.

in

Joseph has been known to steal some playoff games, but I think Ottawa will beat the Leafs in six. Washington vs. Pittsburgh Washington finished third in the

budding

they

first

defending Stanley the

because had a strong season both up front and on defence. Olaf Kolzig is a east

They’ll

come

a quiet exit in five games.

Sharks in seven.

Detroit vs. Los Angeles

-

Detroit

Arena in 2001, a span of 19 games. The Kings were supposed to fade after they traded Blake to Colorado, but they did the opposite, charging from way

be

behind to

tough to beat, but there’s a guy in Pittsburgh named Mario. The Pens

enough goals

will score

late,

hasn’t lost at Joe Louis

before.

finals

stars in this league. The Canucks won’t be able to match the Avalanche’s firepower and will make

their goaltending

to over-

questions

and win in seven. Philadelphia vs. Bul^alo These teams battled for home-ice advantage right up to the last day of the season. Both teams are strong

steal

seventh in the west.

Despite rolling into the post-season, the Kings can’t

match Detroit’s expeRed Wings

rience and will fall to the in six.

Dallas vs.

Edmonton - This

best match-up of the

first

is

the

round. For

the fifth straight year the Stars and

Oilers

will

battle

in

Round

one.

six

scoring eight goals in his last

games.

make

If

he stays hot,

he’ll

the difference in this series.

Eastern Conference - second

New

both are led by aging players, not young hot shots. The Red Wings are older than the Stars and will wear

down quickly against their heavy-hit-

round

Expect Wings goalie

ting opponents.

Chris Osgood to straggle against the

Jersey

vs.

Pittsburgh -

Even Mario won’t be able this

Cup

win 2001

will

— Page 11

2001

16,

Devils team,

to stop

who have

strong lines and can even

four

an

stifle

offence as strong as the Pens. The highest scoring team in the league will also expose Pittsburgh goalie Johan Hedberg, who has only 10 NHL games to his credit, as being

too inexperienced for the

NHL

playoffs. Devils in five.

Ottawa vs. Buffalo - Buffalo made two great moves

at the trading

dead-

Stars

who

love crashing the net. Stars

in six.

Eastern Conference finals New Jersey vs. Buffalo - The Sabres will put up a valiant fight, but will be dropped by the Devils. Hasek is no longer the world’s greatest goalie and he’s known to get hurt in -the playoffs. Expect the Devils to take advantage of this and win in six. Western Conference finals Colorado vs. Dallas - For two consecutive years the Stars have beaten the Avalanche in the west finals in seven games. Expect it to go that far this year. Colorado has a better overall team, but they have trou-

Edmonton has won only one of those

line,

defensively, but the Sabres have the

playoff rounds, but this year the

Donald Audette,

edge in net with Dominik Hasek, while the Flyers have Roman

Oilers have been

consistent

ing, while

The main

on the

Cechmanek, who has never been in the Stanley Cup playoffs. The Flyers have more firepower on offence, but if Hasek gets hot, he’s tough to beat.

match-up will be the Oilers’ speed

speed,

versus the Stars’ stifling defence.

will be an extremely exciting series, narawith the Stars winni^®

Sabres can match it. Plus, they have ha» earned this team deep Hasek

Avs

into the playoffs before.

Sabres in

seven.

Buffalo in seven.

fou®***^

seven.

Stanley

Western Conference - second round Colorado vs. San Jose - The

New

Jersey vs. Colorado - This might be the best Stanley Cup finaF> of the past 10 years. These two teams

Sharks will offer

are so fast, score at such a high pace and possess great defence and great goaltending. There are few soft spots on either team. But the Avalanche will win Ray Bourque

Western Conference round Colorado vs. Vancouver Colorado will make quick work of Canucks. Joe Sakic is at the top of his game. Peter Forsberg is a force. Ray Bourque and the

injury-depleted

Rob Blake

are hungry for their first

Cups. Patrick

Roy

is

still

magical

between the pipes and Milan Hejduk, Alex Tanguay and Chris Drary are

more

than any of the past four.

It

Sonnes.

Louis vs. San Jose - This is a rematch of last year’s first round, where the Sharks upset the first place Blues. Both teams have struggled as of late and the first one to snap oiit of their slump will win St.

Both teams have inexperienced goalies and potent this series.

bringing in Steve Heinze and to boost their scor-

keeping their

roster.

gritty players

The Senators have

but unlike the Leafs,

little in

for the powerful Avs.

Colorado

Avalanche

in six.

is

the

competition

Upsets can

happen, but don’t count on this series.

great

it

being

in

just too good.

ble finishing the Stars,

who

quit until the final buzzer.

Expect the

to

The Sharks’ Mike Ricci is one of the best in the league come

the hardest series to call. Both teams

in the

playoff time and he’s on fire as of

have tons of playoff experience and

seven.

offences.

Detroit vs, Dallas - This

may be

Tutors and hosts recognized and

don’t

squeak by the Stars in game

Cup

finals

his first Stanley

NHL,

in

Cup

in 21 seasons overtime of game

HEALTH CARE TIP

appreciated at peer services reception By Kyla Rowntree

“She goes way out of her w'ay as said McGrath. “She goes way beyond the role of a tutor and she is a mentor to others.” About 150 tutors, hosts, faculty and college management recogtutor,”

The Al Logan award was presentto peer tutor Andrea Brennan, a

ed

second-year nursing student,

peer

reception

on

April

Conestoga College. The Al Logan award

memory

in

worked

as

counselling

of Al

at the

4

at

is

presented

Logan who

head of Conestoga’s department for 1

years.

and tutors

at the reception.

Al

Logan award

student services

who

students

display

down the overall number of calories in your diet,

has never seen such a turnout.

particularly those that are high in

and the college. program at the colvery successful and he

is

how much

St,

Letters of appreciation from fac-

1982 as a

result of

The award

who

dis-

ulty

and students

were

read.

The

the college

at

letters outlined the extra

and commitment the

make

tutors

The award

someone’s life. Tutors were described as a

given to a student

displays a significant contri-

community

spirit at

to

line for students

time con-

a difference

who

in

life-

use the tutor-

David Logan, son of the late Al Logan, presents the Al Logan award at the peer reception on April 4 in the blue room cafeteria at Conestoga College. The award was given to Andrea Brennan, a second-year nursing student, who wasn’t present at the recep-

Conestoga College. Brennan’s name will now appear on the Al Logan plaque. Liz McGrath, a peer service

ing service.

administrator with student servic-

Jack Fletcher, director of student services, and Elaine Brunk, a

Brunk has been with college for 15 years. She worked in registra-

receptionist with student services,

tion with continuing education for

and retirement was announced.

10 years and has been with student

es,

nominated Brennan for the

award.

McGrath

said

John Ambulance

has

it

tribute

who

exercise and

grown.

plays similar qualities to Logan.

bution to the

Remember to

weigh yourself regularly and above all give youself a pat on the back for each pound that you lose.

said this

lege

presented to a student

is

fat.

was a

John Tibbits, president of the colsaid tutoring is one of the

couldn’t believe

department.

is

at the col-

lege,

He

counselling

pancreatic cancer at 56.

work

the students

Conestoga’s

in

tutors

try cutting

services at the college that benefits

Logan, who* worked

Logan died

college,

time to honour them.

similar qualities to

in

the

at

some weight?

to lose

Follow Canada's Food Guide and

opened the reception by saying she

lege and Gregory said this

presented to

is

Need

Carol Gregory, co-ordinator of

About 175

The

WEIGHT CONTROL

nized the efforts of the peer hosts

Brennan has been

an outstanding support as a

tutor.

Certificates

were presented

to all

the tutors at the reception and shirts

were presented

were

at

(By Jody Andruszkiewicz)

tion.

to the hosts.

the reception

their

services for the past five.

Fletcher has been with the col1 2 years. He was the chair of students services for eight years and for the past four years he has

lege for

been the

director.

Cettt I

Pryti'I’ll

I

\

u

I..888434-97I69 www.paguide.com

III

\,

!

h

m

<, iii.lt


I

Page 12

— SPOKE, April

16,

2001

DID YOU CONESTOGA COLLEGE IT’S

KNOW

GOING TO EXTEND CLASSES TO 5:30 PM EVERY DAY IMPORTANT THAT YOU KNOW:

* CONESTOGA

IS

IS

ADMITTING 500 EXTRA STUDENTS THIS

FALL

* CONESTOGA SAYS THERE ISN’T ENOUGH ROOM FOR THESE EXTRA STUDENTS... BUT THERE ARE ROOMS ALL ACROSS CAMPUS THAT SIT EMPTY EVERY DAY

BOTTOM

LINE:

YOUR MARKS COULD SUFFER

YOUR PART-TIME JOB WILL BE AFFECTED «-

i*

THIS

IS

UNFAIR TO STUDENTS

MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD

IF

YOU HAVE A PROBLEM WITH THIS LET THE COLLEGE KNOW


Digital Edition - April 16, 2001