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33rd Year

— No. 35

Conestoga says goodbye on

Pierre Trudeau’s funeral broadcast By Michelle Goring

one way for us to do that.” people Approximately 70 is

minister Pierre Elliott

prime Trudeau on

watched

was broadcast

live to stu-

Sanctuary.

The

funeral

Oct. 3

for former

dents and employees on the large

TV

screen in the Sanctuary at at 10:30 a.m.

Conestoga College

“We

invited

faculty

all

and

administration as well as students said Michael Harris,

attend,”

to

vice-president of academics for the

Doon as

he was a very good prime minister,”

“I think

events to students,” said Harris.

“This

the

funeral

said first-year

“He was a good advo-

Sigston.

saw the

around the school and thought I’d drop by,” said part-time law and “I

LASA Kaila

student

the

in

television in lounge

flyers

c a

t

e

for

was

believe he greatest,

“My

Conestoga Students

members of

attended wore red

roses on their shirts as a tribute.

“He was one of Canada’s most well respected prime ministers,” said Harris.

Canadian flags draped the walls shut

down

game

for the dura-

building has flown at half mass

Inc.

since Trudeau’s death on Sept. 28.

Nancy Hamacher, a

teacher in

the general arts and science pro-

gram, attended the broadcast. American born, she has lived in Canada for 20 years and said she was amazed and overwhelmed at the Canadian persona of Pierre Trudeau and what he represented

to

watch the funeral.” Harris and execu-

Menage

decid-

ed the day before the funeral that college employees and students

would be

who

The Canadian flag at the Doon campus student client services

vide everyone in college the the

tive assistant Ellen

students and

tion of the funeral.

the

I

to pro-

opportunity

Some faculty

room was

parents

Student Association acting

“We wanted

Canadians.

of the Sanctuary and the

security administration student

Angel Linan.

.

interested in watching

the funeral.

Flyers were posted on informa-

guess you could say it’s a family thing.” Although many of the students asked admitted knowing little of Trudeau’s contribution to Canada, they still knew of his eccentric personality that made him a character in

Canadian

“He

tion boards around the college.

“We need to provide more awareness of academic and political

politics to

was

expressed

very himself

remember. and vocal

well,”

said

Linan.

Canada and made

it

more

inde-

to Canadians.

pendent.” First-year

LASA student Dorothy

Klaver admitted to not knowing a whole lot about Trudeau, but she still thought he was a great prime minister who did a lot for

“The

United

States

believes

they’re the only ones that have the

heros

that

Hamacher

can said.

be honoured,” “Trudeau was

Canada’s hero.”

Tibbits receives Business Leader of the Year award Weight room doesn’t

mesh

with students. PAGE 7

jacksaiil

By Micheiie Goring

Kitchener’s

Conestoga College president John W. Tibbits received the Business Leader of the Year award from the Chamber of Commerce of Kitchener and Waterloo, at the chamber’s 19992000 Business Excellence Awards

lege,

gala dinner held Sept. 26.

Tibbits

was chosen

for

Jacksoul leaves Lyric breathless.

PAGE

10

much an

award for the college as it is for me,” Tibbits said. “It’s a recognition of the college and makes us all

winners.”

He

said that people in the.

he added. also led

Tibbits

fight for colleges to

as

successful

a

be designated

degree-granting

institutions

and has situated Conestoga in a strong financial position through

budgeting and right sizing. Tibbits has also been chosen to

the

award because under his leadership Conestoga College has been selected two years in a row as Ontario’s No.l college, according to the Key Performance Indicators surveys. KPIs establish benchmarks in excellence at Ontario’s community colleges. The surveys are completed by students, graduates and employers “I believe this is as

Chamber

com-

is

as

much an award

for

“I

believe this

the college as

is

it

for

me.” John

Tibbits,

president

accompany Prime Minister Jean Chretien on a team Canada trade mission abroad.

The chamber said news release that Tibbits

in a Sept. it

a visionary and a pro-

COMMENTARY Trudeau

happy with the quality of its grad-

award

remembered

PAGE

4

of the business

27

considers

active leader in the community.

Members

Tibbits at

was nominated

for the

the chamber’s annual

general meeting on Sept. 19.

when

community, such as RIM, ATS and Rockwell, are pleased with

found “I was out I had been nominated,” said

with the col-

Tibbits. “I figured a business per-

their partnerships

Commerce

surprised

I

recognizes college president

son would have won.” The chamber of

commerce outstanding members

awards for and individuals began in 1999 with two -awards, the New Member and The Volunteer of the Year awards. This is the first year that awards were also presented in five other categories, adding awards for Business Leader, and Training Workplace

Community Leader. The awards highlight members and individuals that have made exceptional contributions through their involvement and leadership, to the

munity are proud of the college’s No. 1 status and businesses are uates.

of

making

a clear difference

success of the chamber

in

since College Conestoga when he 1987 September replaced Kenneth E. Hunter.

Previous to that, he taught at the elementary, secondary and postsecondary levels in Canada and Australia. He also held various administrative positions including vice-president of administration

at

Dawson

lege.

Tibbits also worked for Touche Ross and Partners, an Ottawabased management consultant firm, where he was involved

with senior executive searches, job evaluations and the evalua-

the current year.

tion of various

Other winners at the gala dinner were John R. Fortnum of Wendell Motor Sales Ltd., who received Volunteer of the Year award; Linda Stemmier of

grams. Tibbits

Executive Court Services, New Member of the Year award; Kuntz of Diebel Donna

tions

Electroplating Inc.,

Community

Leader award; and Uniroyal Goodrich Tire Manufacturing, the Workplace Training award. with been has Tibbits

College,

Quebec’s largest community col-

government pro-

Before joining

worked

the

college,

for four years as

director of personnel for

Canada

Post.

Tibbits

currently

holds posi-

on seven boards

in the

com-

munity including the chamber of commerce, Grand River Hospital, Wilfrid

Laurier

University,

Ontario Skills Canada, Budd Canada; Millennium Park project and Community Technology.


Page 2

— SPOKE, October

News

2000

10,

High gas prices empty students’ pockets By Derek Lester

only

way

can actually cope with

I

He must

Most Conestoga College students, random survey conducted at Doon campus Sept. 28, are

he

interviewed in a

not happy with the high gas prices

pumps these days. The price of regular gas

Mike

Stinson, a business

CBSA to

who have

have time

I

do

that’s for sure.”

student, said, “Basically, all

is

drive to school and

home

Leslie

during

points

to

is

to

Everyone.net

for the class rep-

collect the

owns

most

among

their

classmates.

A on

team set up a reward system where the achievement of each class is

CBSA

the

cbsa.on.ca.

Web

Anyone can

in

for

making

how much money

special

the

“When we money from how much it

space

is

the

the

selling the

buy the second half owned by the

to her

work

place-

ment. “I have a work placement to which I have to drive twice a week and that sucks a lot of my money.” Kevin Brown, a marketing stu-

drives an hour to school every day from Simcoe. “It costs me $10 or $15 each day. It’s pretty expensive.” dent,

He is moving to Kitchener beginning of October.

at the

Every time

we’ll

is,”

he

more points by taking over

tell

making

everyone

I

in

here or

is

book.

memento of your

“It is a nice

class

10 years from now,” said Clarke, co-ordinator of the

Rey management

who brought

program,

studies

the proposal

to'

new

seel I'm

in

Class representatives could raise points toward winning a party for their classes

and

CBSA

for the

raise about $ 1 ,000 if

Jhey accept

your eyes. Can

in

I

Class representatives were also

book is March.

to start

by the beginning of

tell

your eyes,

if

her

I

just

you were a tear

Your legs must be

tired

in

apartment?

stole the stars from the sky

met the girl of my dreams home, would you keep me? Do you have a map? and

directions to your

borrow a quarter? [“What for?*]

my eye would I

I

want to

LaghtfHf

.

I

I

and put

call

my

followed you

just keep on getting lost

in

not cry for fear of losing you.

because you've been running through

my mind

ail

night.

You see my friend over there? [Point to friend who sheepishly waves from afar] He wants to know if YOU think I'M cute. If could rearrange the alphabet, together. Was your father an alien? Because there’s nothing I’d put U and else like you on earth! Are you religious? Good, because I'm the answer to I

I

your prayers.

Hi, I

foe voices

lost

in

SMOKE-FREE Waterloo Regon now

fBunrooi

m

y

me to come

told

my phone number. Can borrow I

You are going to

Dmlgned by VM* Cur

my head

ham to start

using a

and talk to you.

yours?

new

the

proposal. Preparation for the year-

said.

offered an opportunity to collect

me

town. Could you give

the

meeting.

just you? There

it

the

preparations and sales of the year-

CBSA could

banner space.

actually start it,

site will party

must be something wrong with my can't take them off you. Are you from Tennessee? Because you’re the

hot

Was your father a thief? ‘Cause someone

mom

by

raise

advertisement space online. The condition for buying the second half is that the CBSA maintain

site,

access the

from anywhere

e-mail

it

hits

offers to the users. It’s willing to

CBSA. The banner

free e-mail option is offered

California,

Inc.,

a half of the banner space

and uses

promote the use of the

e-mail device

free

ing for the needs of business stu-

fund-raising

the

dents.

resentatives

CBSA executive

a month.

become another way of

fund-rais-

when she goes

Web

the meetings and quantity of items

and

earn points for

is

not affecting her drive to school

excellence

for

and promoted

in activities

servic-

participation, ideas, attendance at

representatives

class

One of the ways

meeting Sept. 28. To be fair in the decision to determine which two classes will

Von Zuben, a social

someone uses the e-mail site it is marked as a hit. Three weeks ago, CBSA counted about 400 hits. The second week of the school year over 500 hits were counted and last week the number climbed to over 800 hits. Pelley didn’t want to estimate

sold

representatives

most

up once or twice. me a lot more money,

“It costs

5,000

events.

them

fill it

a

a week, said Randy Pelley, the computer liaison with the CBSA, who initiated the idea which could

in CBSA activities with a party at the end of each semester, Joe Bentley, CBSA vice-president,

only ten

work very

also

world, 24 hours a day, seven days

The

1

car probably three or four times a week when she used to be able to

student Johnston,

driving

I did before.” Kristen Gilmartin, a paramedics student, said she has to fill up her

Frank Espinoza,

Kimberley

much

don’t do as

as

it.”

mechanical engineering

in points.

their classmates

eyes,

to

participated

Business Students Association will reward two classes of the School of Business who participate the most

ft

can actually

cope with

LASA

measured

Conestoga

Is

I

“I

around outside of coming to school

reward two classes

By Sanja Musa

win, the

way

behind. “I don’t

car-

pool, that’s the only

a pain in the behind, but he

is

sometimes

“I

man-

foundations student, also said the high gas price is a pain in the

because gas is so expensive. “I sometimes carpool, that’s the

class

lege, but she has to drive farther

he added, he’ll manage. Keri Thompson, a law and security administration and police

Frank Espinoza, a mechanical engineering student, said he has had to consider taking the bus

the

because she lives close to the col-

Marketing student Ryan Burley said he spends about $40 a week on gas up from $30 a week.

dollar,

viewed.

told

too expensive.”

school every day.

has a fuel-efficient car. As long as the gas price does not go over a

between 65 and 78 cents a litre, which is much too high for most of interthe Conestoga students

The

es student, said the high gas price

student, said the high gas

agement price

usual-

ly

Students

because I can’t afford to go out. Driving to Waterloo or Guelph is

driving, he added.

at

the

is

also drive to his job, so

not to do any unnecessary

tries

I don’t get enough money.” She said she spends about $45 a week on gas driving from Fergus to

often, so

it.”

line.

Inductee rectaurenta, bore, bingo belli, end plocee of

amueement.

Sponsored by the Waterin') Region Community Health Department Tobacco Information Una 893-2279

jT\ | JSSEjlM


News

They came... they 250 booths

staffed

SPOKE, October

stuff for prospective

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

a

good way

It’s

common

to hear

grumbling

about the 9 to 5 workday, but without a job, there

is

no grumbling

to

be heard.

At this year’s Career Fair at the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium on Sept. 27, it wasn’t grumbling that was heard, but the dull roar of thousands of people packed into two arenas talking about working

same time. The doors for the Kinsmen and

at the

Kiwanis arenas opened at about 10 a.m. with about 250 employers’ booths set up with tons of free stuff

The

security

(LASA)

student

making

contacts,

said in addition to

prospective

different

employers. The second-year

LASA

student

drawbacks of the because it was so

said one of the fair

was

that

McAdam,

20, a second-year

LASA

Conestoga College and the three area universities, Guelph, Wilfrid Laurier and Waterloo, run

police departments to be very dis-

its

eighth

year of operation, the fair was moved to the Kitchener auditorium

because

of

lack

of

space

at

Bingeman Park in Kitchener. For some of the estimated 3,000

Corrections

students

Sept. 27.

year-old

in

attendance,

like

19-

Sara Schizkoske of Waterloo, going to the career fair is

answer any of her questions. Johnston said the police representatives

didn’t

that

them

treat

how

prospec-

employees see them. She said

not only did

it

ruin their reputation

but she was turned off

for her,

wanting to work for them.

Even though there were some problems, Terri-leigh Saunders, 20, a second-year LASA student, said when it came to the law and security program, being from Conestoga put them one step ahead of the game in the eyes of employers.

McAdam

echoed Saunders say-

ing that most of the police depart-

ments

were

about

enthusiastic

being approached by Conestoga

student.

the career fair jointly. In

recruiting

didn’t bother to

tive

fair.

For Kimberley Johnston, 19, going to the career fair allowed her to see what was available

the peoplelined up at their booth.

local

Halton’s

out of going to the

and some had

six reps talking to

Schizkoske,

representatives

well should realize

from

3

employees

up possible interviews was also something she hoped to get setting

than two employees in attendance

give away to prospective employees. Each booth had no less

(Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

administration

contacts.

and

law

crowded, opportunities could be missed because of people standing in the way. “I think it’s almost too crowded to get in there,” said Lesley

to

Kimberly Johnston, 19, speaks with Jaqueline Edwards from Canada about job prospects at the career fair on

make

to

second-year

2000—Page

found a job

saw... they

by employers serve up tons of free

10,

Johnston said she found some

students.

According

to

Schizkoske, some

couraging. In one instance, the rep-

of the recruiters were helpful, even

from Peel Region said

giving the impression there was a

resentative

the four into

women would have

better shape to

to get

even be con-

sidered for a job with the Peel police.

“Some of them made it seem impossible to be employed by them,”

McAdam said.

And in

another case, according to

chance for a job. McAdam said the Toronto recruiters helped even further by saying because all four were women, their chances of getting a job

All four

were good.

women

would

said they

repeat the career fair experience again.

Just Kidding around

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: You may

think

it is

Procrastination

too early in the semester to deal with procrastination, or are you just

procrastinating?

Avoiding or putting off work which needs to be done can come in many forms. Some how much students ignore a certain task, hoping it will go away. Some underestimate

work is actually involved in an assignment. Some see other activities as taking priority, chapter. An extra like vacuuming your room instead of beginning to read that textbook students get Sometimes, evening. whole the become ten minutes of TV can eventually there. from “stuck” on one part of their project and don’t move on To overcome procrastination, you first need to recognize what avoidance technique you employ and whether you want to change it. Then you can try some helpful approaches. An essential element in dealing with procrastination is managing your time and planning. a key to achieving goals. Divide larger tasks into smaller steps more manageable. Set a deadline for each step. Take breaks and build in

Effective planning

which

will

rewards.

seem

is

Work with a

friend.

Be

reasonable and realistic with your goals; perfectionism

counsellor. can get in the way. For further assistance, don’t procrastinate! Talk to a

A Message from

K’tlyn Klinke, 4, plays

Student Services

(Room 2B02)

under the tables during the

Conestoga College Business Students Association meeting at the college on Sept. 28, while she waits for her mother. (Photo by Sanja Masa)

Life

is

short, (ret

an

extension ^

Live longer with daily physical activity, healthy eating and following your doctors advice. www, porticipocNon

,

mm


p age

4

— SPOKE, October

2000

10,

Shorter semester has pros and cons for college The entire Conestoga College community will benefit from a twoweek turnaround at Christmas. The winter semester will be 15 weeks instead of 16 which means there will be a two-week Christmas vacation instead of one week. Walter Boettger, president of the Ontario Public Service Employees Union Local 237, and Conestoga College principal Grant McGregor both agree one week off between the fall and winter semesters is not enough of a turnaround for students, faculty and

adieu

the registrar’s office. If the winter semester were to

start

on

Jan. 2, 2001, only three

working days, Dec. 27 to 29, would be available for teachers to get marks into the registrar’s office and for the registrar’s office to process them.

But the college

is

closed between Christmas and

New

Year’s,

eliminating the three working days entirely. the two-week turnaround as necessary for be submitted, to hear appeals, to notify students of terminations and for promotional meetings. Without sufficient turnaround time students may enter the winter semester believing they have fulfilled the requirements of the pre-

The college views

marks

to

vious semester and then be removed or have

The two-week turnaround will also permit the registrar’s office to send students their marks from the fall semester in a timely fashion. A 15-week semester is not a new idea at Conestoga. Last year’s winter semester was 15 weeks to ensure that there were no Y2K problems at the beginning of January. There are several advantages to a 15-week semester. It gives students two weeks at Christmas to recover from the fall semester which doesn’t end until Dec. 22. An extra week at Christmas gives

Two weeks additional

at

come back to

school refreshed and ready

money

It

He

at their part-time

the

rise

of a new

era.

His contribution to

Trudeau died on Sept. 28 p.m. at the age of 80.

at 3

jobs before returning to school

fall

Like Americans and JFK’s assas-

that the quality of education

Doon

many

leges because of their shorter semesters?

Extending the winter semester into May is not an option because Conestoga students would finish the academic year later than most university students and most other college students placing them at serious disadvantage in the

summer job

issue of a

He was

to

“But

Dale.

said

subtle

changes to the country are just as

to

important like his support of the

it

was

it

Trudeau’s

said

the

feminist

movement and

the

numer-

Trudeau who brought Canada into

ous social changes, including mul-

adulthood.”

ticulturalism and

He was 48

years old

made while

when he was

elected; he dealt with a high profile bachelorhood while trying to heal

the nation’s

ills

1977

In

bilingualism, he

in office.

Joe

Clark

led

the

Conservative party to a minority government ending the Liberals 16

including strikes,

but obviously Canada couldn’t get

was

Laurier had taught

it

was leaving

to walk, but

He was

was Trudeau who brought Canada

century and the

brown

PM bom in this first PM who held

No PM

history

He

flare.

politics,

but he never

prized

citizen

Canada’s

and

was

revered around the world as the

man who defined modem Canada. Many average people made the

Michael Dale

belt in Judo.

with

He was undoubtedly most

into adulthood.”

the first

PM

really left the public’s eye.

it

and pinache.

its

re-elected in 1980.

After 16 years as leader of the country Trudeau returned from his walk in the snow to announce he

birth to the country,

different.

and politics teacher

pilgrimage to Parliament

before him danced the

Hill, to the

Bosporus.

remembered

He was the first PM to declare that he was looking forward to moving into the official PM’s residence because it was the ideal

Constitution and Charter of Rights

Honour to say goodbye. Thousands lined the railway Ottawa and between track

and Freedoms home. “That was a symbol of us coming of age as a

funeral train passed by.

frug, piloted airplanes or

swam

Dale said Trudeau will be most

the

place to hold parties.

But along with style, the

his

man who was

flamboyant elected

1968 held an extraordinary

lect

PM

intel-

for

bringing

Hall of

the

Montreal to say farewell as the He,

country.” In

Wars Measures Act

du Quebec

4

outlawed in Canada.

John A. MacDonald, Sir

Mackenzie King, will always be remembered as one of the coun-

after declaring

the Front de liberation

like,

Wilfrid Laurier and William Lyon

October 1970 he enacted the

try’s greatest leaders.

Trudeau makes history

and the next 16 years would

The War Measures Act allows

would

police to conduct raids and detain

ing and even

persons without a warrant.

when he was in n’t vote for him you have to respect him for never making apologies.

reveal important plans that

help shape Canada’s future.

Michael Dale, an academic sup-

to find a solution that works.

walk,”

No

in

hunt.

15-week semester is controversial. There are advantages and disadvantages. But one thing is certain, it requires communication and collaboration among all of the parties affected

The

birth

country. Laurier had taught

hold of Trudeau, will never

fade.

a

These concerns must be addressed in a dialogue among the college, faculty and the students association. Other Ontario colleges are already on a 15-week semester system including Fanshawe, George Brown and Durham, while Mohawk, Humber, Seneca and Sir Sanford Renting have 14- week semesters. Can it be said that the quality of education suffers at these col-

Dale

“MacDonald gave

many were

later released.

Laurier and King.

others

country enthralled with his flare

15 weeks.

MacDonald,

surpassing

ister,

people were detained

during that time and

“MacDonald gave like

significantly

The shorter semester does impact on some courses and some programs. Some teachers schedule additional class hours to cover all the material and some students especially in programs such as graphic design say they have difficulty meeting course requirements in 16 weeks much less

Some 242

ry as Canada’s greatest prime min-

enough of

ing as Conestoga Students Inc.

Student Association act-

response that he had,” said Dale.

in histo-

the rich and the poor.

one can deny that and along with his unique nature came a

the

go down

they heard about the former prime

we is

Conestoga College,

will

year chokehold on Parliament Hill,

That memory,

However, some faculty are concerned

Tmdeau

sination, every Canadian remember where they were when

minister’s death.

suffers in a shorter semester as

politics at

said

housing and unemployment. He set out to establish bridges between

will

week for marking and calculating

semester.

and

He was

Canada’s 15th and 17th prime min-

Canada

spirit of

of every

hearts

the country has been significant.

semester and for prep for the winter

allows an additional

marks from the

held

Canadian because he symbolized the

Christmas also allows cash-starved students to earn

Faculty will also benefit from a two-week turnaround between semesters.

Former prime minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau held more than just power while he was prime minister.

ister.

in January.

final

By Tracy Ford

their schedule altered

after they return in January.

students the opportunity to to hit the books again.

Trudeau,

port teacher

who

teaches history

“The War Measures Act, in all fairness to Trudeau, was the only

if

interest-

you weren’t bom power or you did-

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), formerly called the Doon Student Association, in exchange for the insertion of

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

The views and opinions expressed in newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of

advertising in the paper. this

Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers

in

SPOKE

are not

endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Tracy Ford;

Student Life Editor:

News

Julie Porter;

Editor: Petra Lampert

Photo Editor:

Tammy

Somerville

Advertising Manager: Petra Lampert; Circulation Manager: Julie Porter

Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz

SPOKE’s

address

Phone: 748-5220,

is

ext.

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

CSI

logo.

SPOKE

shall not

be liable for any damages arising

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions arc subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or

MS Word

tain

file

would be

helpful.

any libellous statements and

Submissions must not con-

may be accompanied by

illustration (such as a photograph).

an


SPOKE, October

News

Campus saddened by Trudeau’s By Tammy Somerville Based on a random survey conducted at Doon campus on Oct. 2, Conestoga students and employees remember Pierre Elliott Trudeau as a man with a vision. They have a positive attitude toward him and of loss

feel a sense

Most

when he

diapers

in

Many

office.

his

at his death.

students say they were retired

still

from

say they learned of

accomplishments from parents experienced his style of lead-

who

Vangroningen says she does not

dynamic

know a lot about Trudeau, but she has heard he was a good prime

sonality that this

minister.

heard he was a good prime minister but his death hasn’t had

any effect on n’t

know

me

him. All

Library

teacher,

says

that bilin-

gualism first

the

is

thing

that

to

mind

when she

thinks

comes of

“It

was Charles

the typical bilin-

gual

Canadian.

bilingualism.”

First-year

for,”

He

epitomized

.

LASA

student Tina

woodworking

country with a tremendous debt.

He

student, says he

also

remembers Trudeau

his

world

of

thinks

ministers our country has ever had.

doors.

It is

“He helped us a lot. He made Canada an actual nation.”

was a

great statesman. Fidel Castro

student Jason

minister did a lot for Canada.

Trying to keep

“I

am

sorry to have lost

was

I

five years old

was too young.

of Quebec separation is something Lee says Alcock

when he stopped being prime minister so I don’t remember that much,”

I

he says.

is

Konrad Bubielo, a

first-year gen-

does not know about Canada’s former leader.

eral business student,

much

When

asked about what

first

the one

comes

who opened

a sad day for Canada.

for student success

agrees

thinking,

and with

Canadian.

a

Fletcher

was

at

leadership

the

convention 1968

election, but never

society

what

I

met the soon-to-

be prime minister personally. Fletcher remembers fondly the

is

what makes Canada

it is.”

his

policies

not,

he made

Matt Miller, a graphic design teacher, says the first thing

about

is

that

he thinks

people either loved

Trudeau or they hated him. “He didn’t sign up for the war so lots of people his age didn’t like him.

exciting

Crane says she has learned a

or

more about

it

be

to

intelligent

Canadian,” says Vangroningen Cromwell. Cromwell says although his death

was

inevitable,

he

is

sad for the fam-

down

some people

take

for

The Doon Student Association

held

the

food

drive Oct.

2-6.

Faculty

and at

ner.

take

them

(students) to the

food bank, give them some Zehrs bags, get out and close the doors behind so they can peacefully take what they need,” said Walker. “I trust the students. They only take

what they need.” A list of food which would be most the appreciated

is

posted

in

front

of

the

drop-off boxes

at

the

college’s Doon

camhalf drop-

although some students do partici-

off boxes are located in the

main

pate, according to Jeanette Walker,

teaching building at the campus and others are located in other

a

member

of support staff with stu-

is

always a

which

gives a certain cash and Zehrs Markets vouchers, is also one of the donors. This year, CSI will give $300 in vouchers and $300 worth of food, in

CSI president Philip LeBeau. services student Sometimes, employees buy food to refill the food bank with some of the cash that the CSI donates. The rest of said

the

money

is

given out to the stu-

dents in Zehrs Markets vouchers

which are usually worth $20 to $60 each. The worth of the vouchers each student gets depends on how

many members family.

Doon campus. Although it is obvious that the need is growing. Walker said, it is hard to estimate the number of students who use the food bank.

buildings at the

shortage of food,” she said.

CSI,

pus.

dozen

donations,

amount

For more information, contact Joan Magazine, the

them to man-

in a discreet

A

generously, but there

30th, so

bank

student services staff

“The college community donates

The workshop will start the week of October sign up before October 20th.

The employ-

students vouchers or bring

Jeanette Walker,

who

ones

dent services.

free for students.

dent services office.

“The college community donates generously, but there is always a shortage of food.”

make most of the

It is

that’s the loss,” she says.

“We

For that reason, the Student Food Share Program at the college is reinforced around holidays such as Thanksgiving by a food drive.

the

will be 4 sessions of an hour each.

so powerful and the

the food

the college are

all.

“He was

things he did were remarkable,

Thanksgiving dinner, there are some who can only fanta-

employees

We'll confirm the exact date and time most suitable for

his

ees of each department give the

es

your timetable at the reception desk.

since

granted a stuffed turkey, potatoes and pumpkin pie as a part of their

Thanks-

Student Services (2B02) and leave a copy of

Trudeau

death.

The students who need help can contact either the CSI or the stu-

acting as Conestoga Students Inc.

or during a test

lot

the well respected and

drive held

size about such a meal.

SIGN UP FOR A TEST ANXIETY WORKSHOP!

WORKSHOP

and bravery.

dent, I guess.”

when writing a test

facilitator.

honour, integrity

Student recruitment and admis-

think

giving

workshop

thinks

intelligence,

sions information specialist Julie

panicky sensations and find that your

The workshop

of

emphasis for tolerance for all types of people that Trudeau stressed. “His vision for a multicultural

inspiring as a

in co-operation with student servic-

Come to

thinking

Trudeau,

someone who was proud Canadian. “I’ve always been proud to be

nervous that you feel sick to your stomach,

mind goes blank before

When

whether

complete your work, are successful on assignments,

* experience

Jack Fletcher, director of student dream about meet-

services, used to

you agree with

mind when thinking of Trudeau,

DO YOU DO THE FOLLOWING?

can't concentrate

He

of reminiscing.

before the

abundant

and

is lots

exciting guy,” he says.

Bubielo says, “I don’t know, presi-

to

TEST ANXIETY WORKSHOP

but your test marks pull you

“There

was an

Fletcher

While

* get so

years ago.

He

By Sanja Musa

*

son

Trudeau’s

of

Michel’s untimely death a couple of

view of Trudeau. ’’When Cromwell thinks of the former prime minister, he thinks of integrity, passion, intellect and

Miller’s

Food

TEST

because

ily

of

going to be at the funeral, what does that say?” adds Miller. Ross Cromwell, who teaches strategies

— Page 5

death

the

is

critical

him but

with the threat

what stands out most in his mind when he thinks of him. “Losing Trudeau is like losing an old friend. I’ve been through a few prime ministers, but he’s the only one who has had the charisma and

us multiculturalism.

He was

LASA

2000

ing Trudeau.

vision.

“He brought

Alcock agrees with Raymor’s opinion that the 15th and 17th prime

she says.

for

Trudeau as one of the best prime

First-year

symbolizes

Trudeau’s constitutional work

Trudeau.

“Trudeau

Susan Lee

Trudeau did for the whole country. Although she was very young when he served as prime minister, Lee says she is saddened for our nation in mourning. CPA teacher Doug Wilson says

sci-

ence

he was

lapel.

Canada together

Charles,

is

did-

Trudeau always wore on his

more vivid memories of Canada’s pre-eminent leader who left a lifelong impression on their lives with his charisma and intelligence.

Anne

know

I

says she remembers the red rose

what he stood

a political

I

technician

first hand, or they were taught about them in history class. Faculty members say they have

ership

personally.

sick and then he died,” she says.

that

Raymor,

first-year

a

modem

Canada. Before he was around it was white and conservative.” Miller thinks of the late Trudeau as tenacious despite the fact he left the

country needs.” Justin

“I

Ultimately he brought in the

per-

10,

he/she has in a

It

is

many

difficult to

students

determine

how

use the program

because the CSI and student services do not count how many students they take to the food bank.

might take five or six students now and CSI can bring 15 students there the next day and I would not know about it. If they see the food bank is empty, they call and say, ‘It’s empty. We’re going to give more money,”’ said “I

there right

Walker. It

is

be enough Thanksgiving bridge over to the next food

hoped there

food collected drive to

will

in the

drive at Christmas.


Page 6

— SPOKE, October

10,

2000

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SPOKE, October

— Page

10, 2000,

7

Rec centre a weighty issue among students By Tammy Somerville

room. “Compared to the fitness clubs,

The weight room in the rec centre is at best a good beginner’s gym, say students, but will their voices

made

heard and changes be

Conestoga

from

graduate

they

be

before

Mike

Pichna, a second-year mar-

keting student, uses the weight

room

four to six days a week, but says

although

“It’s

convenient, the weight

it is

room needs

a major overhaul.

a good beginner’s

the very least

and more Pichna,

at

needs more weights

who

he began

some of

the

at

it’s

Jared Rogers, a first-year

room

little

things like is

annoying.

says that since the beginning of

the missing

bench and has been told

Chris Pagnam, also a second-year marketing student, has been working out with Pichna for three weeks. He

room

has everything

he needs, but it can get crowded at times because of the lack of space

and equipment. “It is an OK gym, but could use newer equipment. For starters, more bench press bars are needed because there are only two.”

worth the $64.50 fee, but he if the weight room

is

at these

more weights, but

money

is

off.

Douangmala uses the facility because as a full-time student, he pays $64.50 a year in rec centre fees and the location is convenient. Since he doesn’t have the choice of opting out of the rec fee, he uses the rec centre to get his money’s worth. If the college would upgrade the

Douangmala says he would pay up to $150 a year and he thinks agree. would students most Following an impromptu survey of centre,

the students in the weight

room, he

substantiated his point.

“People pay two or three times

more than that at other facilities. They would pay more here if it was up to the standards of other gyms,” he says. Second-year journalism student, Lisa Hiller, says she would pay $150 if the school did a major improvement and expansion of the weight

the equipment

EZ

bar and more

universal and leg machines have

definitely needs towels.”

been at the gym since he began, which was 20 years ago. “Over the last six years, we’ve upgraded quite a bit, but the gym

It

curl

Schertzberg says he works out in the rec centre because

it is

accessible

and it is free, aside from the $64.50 he pays each year.

industry is very competitive. It is hard to please everyone. Some guys use the dead weights and not the

“We want more but

a matter

it

is

machines and others are vice versa.

The biggest thing Ryan Weber, a

really

be done to the weight room to meet everyone’s needs. With better equipment, there would also be more employees using it, he says. Recently Fletcher spoke to memDoon Student the bers of Association acting as Conestoga Students Inc. to discuss an advisory committee. The purpose of the committee is to get a broad idea of what students want and find out what is

what needs

“Always keep

to

in

mind,

we need to

community and student says Fletcher. “We want more

use,”

room

she

since

week

three times a

began

College. “It suits

weight room once because he wanted to work out and time was an

Jack Fletcher,

OK

because

is

no

safety.

staff to

is

use the facility. “They play music like Brian Adams at one decibel and you can’t change it because the volume button doesn’t work,”

ty basic.

who

Schertzberg says.

Pichna agrees with Schertzberg.

“The radio doesn’t

it

to get a

Ford and Hiller say the radio is not an issue with them because they usually bring their own. First-year LASA student, Clayton

which I thought was dumb. The dumbbell weights don’t go up very high so they aren’t good enough for doing arms. The lighter weights are only good for chest and back.” everything,

also

says incline benches are

needed and

CSI president they would like

major improvements to the rec cen-

to be done about the radio and the overall state of the weight room.

tre.

“You have to be pretty innovative to get a good workout. A new leg extension machine would be nice

play.

and

definitely an

EZ

curl bar. It’s

officer,

a personal level, Le Beau

says the weight

Doug

Perkins,

room

is

a sorry dis-

“Things are chained down, the equipment is run down.” He says that if Conestoga had more varsity sports, students

pretty rudimentary.”

Athletic

On

would have

to

who

played varsity

buy memberships

gyms because

analyst student, pulls hurts.

room

He says

until

it

the weight

the recreation centre

in

facilities

have.

(Photo by

Tammy Somerville)

at

they couldn’t

need new nautilus stuff. horrible weight room.”

Making

It’s

the facility bigger

just a

is

also

something Le Beau says the rec centre should be working on. He has heard different rumors surrounding the expansion of the rec centre, but

hasn’t heard of anything concrete. He also points out that the main

entrance to the rec centre does not face the college and he wonders is it really

being promoted

who

Fletcher says he and Conestoga

ties.

to see a large expansion out the

it

gets the job

that for

20

years.

also concerned

some of the universal

weights are only a year old, but the

He says the weight room new equipment and more

needs of

it.

“They are keen on the universal machines- that are outdated. They

to.

back

of the rec centre, which would include the weight room. But in reality, it is going to take a couple of years, he says.

monitor people using

room

is

very closed

so the staff can see what’s “It’s a safety issue,” says

going on.

“Someone could be

much and

OVERCOMING PUBLIC SPEAKING ANXIETY GROUP

lifting

females might feel

and use it more.

It is

protection

Are you anxious

for everyone.”

Eric Schertzberg,

a second-year

computer programmer analyst student who works out with Pichna and

at

Speaking?

Avoid doing speeches

at all costs?

make

the

This 4 session group will begin the

week of October 23. Meeting times

to be determined

from

students’ timetables. Facilitator

To

-

Carol Gregory

register, bring a

copy of your

timetable to Elaine or Jeanette in

Student Services, Mike Picha, second-year marketing student, uses the weight the rec centre at least four days a week. He says it is convenient but he’d be willing to pay more in rec fees to have a in

(Photo by

is

a good beginner’s gym but lacks a lot of the tools most

College president John Tibbits want

fade in

speech?

facility.

room is poor. Phil Le Beau says to see some overall

South, agrees that something needs

part of a course rather than

revamped

the air circulation in

a second-

year computer programmer

the small, closed

Accept an “0” in the public speaking

room

key for almost

really

Weber

during public skating.”

not

pret-

centre to sustain their athletic abili-

into getting monitors in the weight

Fletcher.

just affect us,

also affects those using the arena

is

it is

Eric Scherteberg,

had

“I

used to because

is

get the workout needed at the rec

Fletcher says he has been looking

safer

what he

also an issue for

is

and out because of the metal structure. He says even a better radio wouldn’t do anything; it’s been like

off from the rest of the facility.

too

many

Music

He points out that there

weights and the

room

downtown

Kitchener, says the rec centre

Perkins says

Douangmala

who has a membership

Life Fitness in

radio stations and sometimes they do

done.

about

Weber,

Good

at

needs. I usual-

for the equipment, she says for

it’s

issue.

other

do 45 minutes of cardio and then do weights at home.”

As

director of

student services

says the rec centre can only get two

ly

her

space.”

first-year nursing

Conestoga

at

my

is

student, says he has only used the

of dollars.”

is

always the matter of hiring someone to collect and wash them. He does want to hire a development manager whose first function will be to look

to the

college’s standards, Perkins says the

weights.

Fletcher says he has to check into

the towel situation, but there

some of

may be new

needs an

an

the weight

could

four or five years old. While

issue.

dry

least they

Stairmasters and bikes are at least

he feels

lacks a lot

of the equipment other gyms have. “It’s a good beginner’s gym but it

the

people to use the facility, but it is really a matter of dollars.” Tracy Ford, a third-year journalism student, says she has been using

The

it

facility,

to get

do is get towels.” He says he would even pay to rent towels because he has to stand under the blow dryer to

girlie weights.

that although

pretty safe,

how

balance

Look

is

poeple to use the

room

“This place sucks.

the facility

with any of the students’ comments. He has been talking to staff about

possible.

pathetic.

Pagnem, says

Jack Fletcher, director of student services, says he does not disagree

Second-year engineering student, Tson Douangmala, says the weight is

is

would pay $150 was upgraded.

at

in for repairs.

says the weight

says what

week and

this

LAS A

using the weight

started

student,

Doon, says

the fall semester, he has asked about

it is

do

lack of space as well as

has been using the

only having one bench

He

but

variety.”

facility since

that

it

gym

what

good enough. You can get your $64.50 worth if you want to.” I

there

College?

Y and other

small, but for

it’s

Tammy

Somerville)

Monday, October

Room 2B02 16,

2000.

by


— SPOKE, October

Page 8

No clubs Lack of student By Dwight was

It

Week

a

10,

2000

Doon Student services online

for

interest leaves

no one jamming

By Michelle Goring

Irwin

ized by the CSI.

disappointing Clubs

Since the three students who signed up have different interests,

Doon

Association acting as Conestoga

no clubs will be formed. It takes 10 people with similar interests to

Students Inc.

form

—Clubs Week, which ran from

The options this year were touch football, drama and jam, which would give musicians the chance to

the

for

Sept. 25 to 29, got

Student

response

little

a club.

from students. Only three people signed up for clubs and each signed up for some-

play together.

thing different.

student, they can

“People had the opportunity to

and meet

get involved, have fun

their

own

offering this service to students,”

dents

list

in the

CSI

and will continue advertising sign-ups, hoping to get enough people to form at least one

update since

the

1999 and

tinue to keep the

Lynn Robbins.

Student services had been considering

implement.

Kit isn’t giving up. She will con-

taking the initiative to do

as far

for

it.

it

May

took about a year to

part in the four-phased project

club

Clubs Week gives students the chance to sign up for various campus clubs, which would be organ-

club.

Before the changes, the student services portion of the Conestoga College Web site showed a fraction

Kerri

affairs, said.

“We

want people

still

to

get

The

lists

Blood donor By Dwight

clinic at

college

Irwin

(which consisted of

its

requested them, but

didn’t

do too

well.

We

col-

we were hoping quota,” den Ouden

lected 53 units but to

administration

it’s

something

meet our

Eighty-four students made an appointment to donate blood; 70 students attended and 53 blood donations were collected. Seventeen were turned away .-because they had the flu, a cold, or recent tuberculosis immunizations, tattoos or piercings.

Donors must wait a few days

to

give blood after immunization and 12 months after body piercing.

getting a tattoo or

assistant with the

who gave

53 students

the

which den Ouden said was excellent.

Lorraine Wieland, a second-year

management

studies student, said

she gives blood because she hopes * somebody

“Why

Doon

Students

Association acting as Conestoga

for

all

the

Conestoga campuses. “This in no way replaces our services,” assures Robbins. “Rather,

it’s

a

good way

for stu-

who are at a distance to get know our services before they

dents to

and how

map

to the site that

student services counsellor

who wanted

to request

an applica-

have

it

mailed to them, fill out the requested information, and mail it back to

have it included in the housing lists which were kept in a booklet in the student services office.

Now landlords can download the from the

Web

site

ic to

the Blue

the Sanctuary, for the

CBS

would

offer to give her

members blood

if

they

the

and the donors.

we had it in

the lounge

and it was too dark and crowded. The Blue Room is a lot easier to set up and it is brighter, which makes

lists,

and

fax the information to the~college. application also includes a

of the

site

should contact them.

Groups and Workshops Gay /

TBA

Lesbian/ Bisexual/ Transgendered

Discussion

& Networking Group

Multicultural Support

Group

The 53 donations received at Conestoga have the opportunity to save 212 lives. “It only takes 45 minutes to an hour, but our hospitals aren’t getting blood.

Suicide Prevention

Workshop

Week

of Oct. 2

Oct.5, 2:30 p.m.

Relaxation Group

Week

of Oct. 9

Public Speaking Anxiety Group

Week

of Oct. 23

Test Anxiety Group

Week

of Oct. 30

We need more donors,”

den Ouden said. The Kitchener/Waterloo site of CBS is located at 186 King St. N.,

Stress

Management Workshop

not do

for

it

somebody

else?” Wieland said. Fifield,

a

second-year

For more information on CBS and blood donations, call 1-888871-7201, extension 7100.

Study

Skills

Nov.7, 3:30 p.m.

ere

is

always (imtf

Workshops

Time Management

Oct. 2

11:30-12:30

3A621

Listening and Note-taking

Oct. 16

12:30-1:30

3A616

Multiple Choice Tests

Oct. 25

12:30-1:30

Oct. 30

12:30-1:30

3A621 3A616

Effective Textbook Reading

Nov. 6

12:30-1:30

3A616

Multiple Choice Tests

Nov. 15

11:30-12:30

3A616

Dec. 4

12:30-1:30

Dec. 6

12:30-1:30

3A616 3A621

Preparing for Final

Exams

services

site is far beyond anything they had expected. “We’ve received calls from therapists and other members of the community who think what we have done is great,” said Robbins. “We’ve also had calls from other departments in the school asking how we did it and if we could do it for them.” Student services had a lot of help from computer services (specifically Rafa Abdul, a second-year computer programming student) and would suggest anyone who would like to update their portion

it

Twenty-eight hospitals in the Kitchener/Waterloo and Hamilton regions are below quota on all blood types, especially Types O and A, den Ouden said. One blood donation can save four

but also

houses are from the campus.

groups and Workshops FAIL SEMESTER 2000

easier for everybody to do their work,” Punnett said.

are look-

map how far away the

Waterloo.

it.

Kirsten

Room, across from made things easier

the

has received about the updated

it.”

tion for student services,

shows

and surrounding area of Conestoga College Doon

The feedback student

Lynn Robbins

In the past landlords

also thinking

streets

listed

they

little

knew about

The

a

look up on a

student population

application

is

about hiring a cartographer to add

lives.

blood, 22 were first-time donors,

needed

can do to help peo-

Alycia Punnett, the executive

“Last year

family

I

ple,” Fifield said.

said.

Of

doesn’t take a lot of time and

schedules, peer services; special

so students can check

Students Inc., said moving the clin-

donation.

“We

needs, housing and contacts in

“It

of den Ouden, Annmarie Canadian Blood Services (CBS), said Conestoga achieved only 70 per cent of its goal of 75 units of blood. One unit of blood is one

workshop

group

site

only get the housing

for the

would have

skills,

to

ing for housing will be able to not

counselling services, learning and

study

be a more adaptive phase as would like to add a link to the Grand River Transit is

campus in detail. This way students who

“We realized how much we were

to advertise in student housing lists

do.

goal.

to stu-

soon all they’ll have to do is log on to the student services portion of the Conestoga College Web site to view the lists.

doing

site.

fourth phase of the project

Web

who

who wish

Web

student services

lists.

and how little they (the students) knew about it,” said Robbins. “Now they can see what we do.” Students can now find out about

and broadcast journalism student and a second-time blood donor, said giving blood is easy to print

The blood donor clinic held at Conestoga College on Sept. 27 fell short of

short of goal

The

bus schedules. Student services

“We realized how much we were

falls

some from

Thunder Bay, ask-

doing for the student population

Students not willing to bleed

not to be posted on the

were usually mailed out

of the services offered to students.

involved.”

as

lot

advertised housing by landlords)

committee was formed in which staff at student services took

office

it,”

of

vice-president

away

ing for housing

A

student

Kit,

disclaimer for landlords

of calls from students,

housing next year need to look no further than their computer as student services has added housing to its newly updated web site. “We are very excited to be

club, as long as 10 people sign up

people.

“Unfortunately students aren’t

Students looking for adequate

said counsellor

form

to the school.”

Student services receives a

those clubs don’t interest a

If

come

Please inquire about and sign up at least one

week in advance for the above free groups or workshops in Student Services, Room 2B02.


SPOKE, October

Expansion New

building

be

will

built

the college’s grounds and

The college had originally asked $40 million to build a

By Paul Kostal

new Waterloo campus, but project was turned down by

on the Doon

government.

tre

campus to the rec cen-

that

the

Roger Farwell, a representative from the Walter Fedy Partnership, said the Superbuild expansion is a “milestone in the evolution of Conestoga” at the Sept. 25 board of

resubmitted and the government approved a new building on the Doon campus. The money will go toward creating

1

,430

new

including 71

governor’s meeting.

it

was

untouched.

The proposal was revised and

without stepping outside.

— Page 9

laboratories

decided that the “wooded mall” between the main building and the support buildings would remain

for nearly It may one day be possible for a student to walk from the bookstore

2000

towards rec centre

new classrooms and 8

include 71

will

10,

spaces at Conestoga,

new classrooms and

next year, and ground

on the

site

is to

for completion

slated

2002 Also discussed

at the

the launching of the

director of physical resources.

made

be a stand-alone structure, with a walkway planned as a con-

ness.

casting

will

in

July

is

of

.

At about $100 per square foot, the new building will be about 100,000 square feet and will cost about $14 million to build, according to David Putt, the college’s It

be broken

The building

mid-year.

radio station.

New

meeting, was

new Condor

station

manager

Paul Osborne said the station

is slat-

ed to go on the air in December, but a number of test broadcasts are to be

He

before then to ensure readi-

an architectural and engineering firm that has been responsible for

plan to expand programs in information technology, engineering

nector to the main teaching build-

the design and implementation of

technology, advanced manufacturing, multimedia communications, health sciences and police, fire and emergency services. The most favourable site on the Doon campus, according to

centre has been considered for the

be broadfrom the nearby Global TV tower and will have the largest reach of any college FM-radio station in

future.

Ontario.

The Walter Fedy Partnership

is

the college’s expansion in the last

10 years. Last April, the provincial government awarded Conestoga College

$14.22 million as part of the Superbuild expansion fund. The fund was set up to help post-secondary school institutions prepare for what has been called, “the double cohort”, the year both Grade 12 and OAC graduate because of secondary school reform.

new

eight

Farwell,

laboratories,

is

the

with the

grassy

knoll

ing.

David Putt

is

Conestoga’s

director of physical resources. (Photo by Paul Kostal)

be classroom space and, according to Kevin Mullan, the college’s vicepresident of finance and administration,

it

will allow the college to reg-

more

an additional 1,300 students. College president John Tibbits said he has seen the campus grow from

Farwell said a conscious effort to preserve the beauty of

“a gravel pit” 30 or 40 years ago. The design for the new building should be completed by February of

centre.

plans can be made.

of that area used to be

building will

ister

pies

Part

link to the athletic

The bulk of the new

between the School of Business and Parking Lot 12, between the main teaching building and the rec

marsh-like, however, and soil sam-

A possible

must be taken

to determine the

best spot to build before any

was made

said the station will

The board of governors also introduced three new members during the Monday meeting: Stephen Case, John Reid, who has been the chair of the Grand River Hospital board and

member of the Edmonton Chamber of Commerce, and a

Michael Harris, the vice-president of education for the Doon Student Association acting as Conestoga Students Inc.

Conestoga

College™ *

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improver, ent to Conestoga College rp

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

and communities.

iO>


Jacksoul takes over Lyric nightclub By Tracy Ford

their

distribution

first

Downtown Kitchener was on on Sept. 30 when Jacksoul arrived to perform songs from their third album, Sleepless, at the fire

Lyric Nightclub.

band members played at a concert club filled with 300 fans,

The

six

a small

number

for the large club

which can hold up

to 1,000 people.

The Toronto-based band made

hip hop, funk and soul sound nor-

and their second album, Absolute, was released in 1997. Even with four years and three albums under their belt, the band still hasn’t penetrated the mainstream market enough so the average person will recognize the name Jacksoul. But don’t tell that

mally associated with independently produced albums and free bands not chained down by record deals or pushy censorship. It’s that type of sound that drew crowds to the centre of Kitchener to feast on 3 ft hours of nothing but Jacksoul. The singer, Haydain Neale, sang with such ease it appeared as if the words just melted in his mouth

to the fans

who

of

my

good

at

somehow

and

that

a

re-incarnated

in

MacLeod says moments

capturing the

good

song

captures

means you have loads of

moments. “A good song just communicates.” And iix listening to MacLeod’s current release Close and Play, it’s obvious that not only can he move a song effortlessly through the different chords weaving catchy and interest-

to help you,” he said in refer-

ing tunes, but his lyrics are thoughtful

Canada. But hearing

is

in reality,

what you’re

the musical genius that

is

Paul MacLeod.

The 30-year-old MacLeod taught himself to play the guitar

when he

17.

“But

Yet as a songwriter,

that

ence to when he learned

how

to play

and

insightful,

making

listening

one of his songs a

Those friends must have done a lot because the Kitchener native can

smart pop in the vein of the Beatles or

moment. Working out of Toronto, MacLeod says he lets his songs go where they go and he would rather let the music happen than try to direct it. “I think it would be arrogant to think you have control over it

XTC,

(music).”

draw music out of his guiAnd he does it with a big smile on

tar.

his face.

MacLeod, whose music he

calls

says as a musician, he loves his

But

truly enjoyable

listening

in

to

his music,

it

would be hard to agree with MacLeod’s self-assessment regarding his own music. His performing makes it seem that being a musician is second nature to him and he is in complete control of the moment. Though he admits to not having any lyrical influences,

MacLeod does conWho, and

cede he’s a big fan of the

Townsend in particular. “You could look through my music

Pete

and pick out the influences.”

by

Yet

to

on his own.

effortlessly

His smooth and rhythmic tone rang through the concert club and electrified the audience with famous songs like Can’t Stop and Somedays, both songs which have received a ton of air-time on local

later pro-

radio stations.

Neale

cotton candy.

like

voice

Neale

compared

often

is

to

d u c e d the

for

Batman Forever

sound-

track. is

sometimes

another black vocalist, Seal, the

dubbed

British singer who sang Kissed

“Canada’s

Rose

a

for his

by own album and

CD

Seal.”

cover

reminiscent of McCartney and Lennon

is

limitations.”

he’s

Mends

at their

sense of chord movement, but “I hate

To hear him play, you’d think Paul McCartney or John Lennon had

was

gathered

in

Kitchener concert.

all

been

irresistible

1996

MacLeod’s music By Jody Andruszkiewicz

The band harbours an

deal with

Vik/BMG Music Canada

MacLeod

his

said

it

own

admittance,

hasn’t always been

“I

said

had two hard years where I had friends,” he said about his

good

friends

who

helped him during the

rougher times.

He

said the hardest thing in being a

musician

is

creating the ability to not

care about what other people think

hard getting good

it’s

at

also

not want-

albums of 1999 according

But MacLeod said once he decided

says he’s surprised at

being a musician was what he wanted,

But he also can measure his success in other

he dove

ways.

in

and did

it.

music industry works, ed

how the not how I want-

educated myself on

“I also

Even though sometimes, cess.

“I’ve

two songs

written

much

enjoy as

as

I

that

enjoy

not been easy

it’s

MacLeod

has had suc-

He’s played with Canadian

While he wants

work Tom York

to

of the British band Radiohead and

Canadian music guru Neil Young

MacLeod

super-band the Tragically Hip as

the future,

well as the Odds, the Rheostatics,

himself being a musician forever.

the Skydiggers and

name

Our Lady Peace

He’s also had Close and Play entertainment

writer John List twice in

His as

Sakomoto’s Anti-Hit the past two months.

first release,

Band

“I love

and

a few.

make Toronto Sun

Tell the

to

a live

CD

called

Go Home made

it

one of the top 10 independent

To

I

do

so

it it

I

do

when

Travel

when I’m poor money is com-

it

the

ing in.”

When he’s not or touring

working

in

Canada or

Toronto

far

their flights

MacLeod can be found playing Thursday nights at the Walper Pub in downtown

Kitchener.

During Christmas

All students are therefore

Travel

385 FAIRWAY ROAD

402 KING STREET

W.,

$.,

N.,

KITCHENER FOOD BASICS PLAZA

KITCHENER CANADIAN TIRE PLAZA

from

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886-0400

USED CD OUTLET

370 HIGHLAND ROAD

airfares are available exclusively

University Shops Plaza, 170 University Ave. W.,

UTS www.beatgoeson.com

later.

TRAVEL CUTS

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the

away

places like Brussels or Austin, Tex.,

to the consolidation of airlines, there are fewer

seats this year.

in

says he sees

All Students Planning to

Due

I

my

favourites.”

to be.”

it

his financial success.

URGENT NOTICE

QUALITY GUARANTEED!

FM-

to

radio station 102.1.

MacLeod

ing validation from being on stage.

to

easy.

He

about you and your music.

Canadian Federation of Students.


SPOKE, October

Men’s soccer team By Derek Lester The Conestoga Condors had some tough luck and missed opportunities in a 1-0 loss to Humber College Sept. 26, in

men’s college soccer.

About 20 fans watched the Condors control a lot of the game, yet be unable to connect on good chances to score as their record

went

nine or 10 good chances to score a couple goals, he added.

better

the

after a

Humber Hawk passed

get

right

across

the

Condors’

Condors outworked the opponent, only to fall short by one goal, Geoff coach Condor said the

Johnstone.

Lack of scoring has been a problem all season for the Condors as they have only scored three goals in five

field,

the defensive it is

a

we’re not getting the ball to them in dangerous positions,” said

side

whole other

of the

story.

The

is

superb played Johnstone said.

me

to take

added.

season,

all

it

impossible for

him out of

“He has been

Team

goal,” he

out of this

world.”

is

seeing a lot of posi-

spirit is

work

URGENT NOTICE

coming along

we

he

how

the

To

All Students Planning to

habits are great

their attitudes are right.

will get better

and

Travel During Christmas

said.

Johnstone

covering well and the goaltending has been excellent giving up just five goals in five games. Goalie Lev Sherifali has played four of the five games and has

team

said he

nicely, their

is still

team

optimistic about

>

will finish in the

standings at the end of the season.

we

can win those three ingames against St. Clair, Lambton and Fanshawe, we’ll “If

On

“Lev has made

games.

“I don’t think it’s the strikers. It’s

He tives.

better,”

better.”

— Page 11

the season.

“I think

the

crease for a one-timer into the net. It was the second game in a row

just

and

will

Geoff Johnstone, men ’s soccer coach

game came

early in the second half of play

ball

we

to 1-3-1.

The only goal of

Johnstone thinks the team is now and should do very well in the second half of

coining together

and

think

“I

2000

short

falls

Johnstone. “The last pass, the telling pass or telling buildup that creates the chance is not there.” The team created a couple good chances to score, but it takes about

10,

division

Due

to the consolidation of airlines, there are fewer

our divi-

actually finish first in

sion,” he said. “I think we’ll

win

seats this year. All students are therefore

this division.”

On

Condors hosted George Brown College and lost 10 in a game where the Condors again controlled a lot of the game, but could not capitalize on good Sept. 23, the

their flights

NOW to avoid disappointment

Student Class™ Travel

CUTS,

urged to book later.

airfares are available exclusively

from

Canada’s national student travel bureau.

chances, said Johnstone.

The next game

for the

Saturday, Sept. 30, against

Condors

in

is

Ancaster

Redeemer College.

II1RAVEL0U1S University Shops Plaza, 170 University Ave. W.,

886-0400 Owned and operated by

Movie

of the

the

Canadian Federation of Students.

Week


SPOKE, October

Men’s By Trevor

Andruszkiewicz

With just one week left until Conestoga was to host the annual men’s fastball tournament it was decided that the tournament would be cancelled due to lack of interest. As of Sept. 29 there were only two teams, including Conestoga, signed up to compete on Oct. 6. The decision was made on Friday, one day after Conestoga Condor head coach Jody Andruszkiewicz “It’s

disappointing that

play this year because

we

can’t

I really felt

we had

a shot at winning,” said Andruskiewicz. “All my players

played for the city rep teams in the past, so

we should have done well.”

a

final

players

how

when

to hit

and throw, but

not

from 40 to 15. “It was still a tough decision since I was looking for 15 ball players who could play fastball and were intelligent players.” Some players cut themselves due to their jobs or school workload including Andruszkiewicz who

Andruszkiewicz chose the players by the positions the players had requested to play and went from

ter

couldn't play because of tendonitis in his wrist. “I

wish

I

recommended

that

I

Pitching and catching are the most important positions so he made sure he had enough strength

each position. he chose the top infielders and then the outfielders. at

After that,

Talent wasn’t the main concern

Andruszkiewicz when choosing

“I

would make or break

because

I

for smart can teach the

On

Hilker

Conestoga

Last season, Conestoga had two teams in the tournament and could have done the same this year. However, Andruszkiewicz said the second team would not have been competitive and he didn’t want to field two mediocre teams. Even if Conestoga had had two teams, it would not have been

practice

much choice out in the outfield because there wasn’t an extensive

they had to go to work before the tournament was over.

cuts.

pop

it

the

going to

hit

up.”

n’t

fails to

for

Humber Hawks walked

allowing nine goals, Beitz kept the

over the Conestoga Condor -women’s soccer team 9-0 on Sept.

Condors from a double-digit score. Throughout the game, the Condors fought hard in front of

all

27.

Not only were the Condors held scoreless, but they also failed to

record a quality shot on goal, giv-

Hawk

goalkeeper

Tina

Trombetta an easy shutout. The same could not be said for the Condor goalkeeper as Holly Beitz faced a barrage of shots, most of which she stopped. Despite

their

own

net.

Every loose the

Hawks

ball

was a

battle

and

didn’t have an easy time

scoring.

The Condors could have given up went down 1-0 in the first 30 seconds of the game, but they fought through the cold and gave it their all. early as they

Aprile

scored her

shortly after, as she in front

was

and shot the

Beitz’s hands.

head.

by Andriane.

The Condors’ only chance came at the end of the half when Nicole McKee was given a wide-open pass from Teresa Hussey, but

through

a head-butt goal off Sinisi ’s pass in

left

ball

game on

alone

lone

goal,

(Photo by Trevor Hilker)

second goal came late on a blast from atop the goalie box over Beitz’s Vitale’s

in the first half

missed on the head-butt attempt. Vitale opened the second half with her third goal of the game on

that tipped off Beitz’s fingers.

final

and the upcoming

Vitale faked out Beitz to score her fourth goal late in the game. Read scored just minutes later on a

record a quality shot on goal

Joining Vitale on the score sheet were Rosa Andriano, Filomena Aprile, Allison Read and Lucia Sinisi. Read scored two goals; the other three scored one each. Vitale opened the scoring early on a blast past Beitz. Just minutes later-Read followed up with a goal

team, explains the

a 9-0 victory

a four goal effort by Joanne

Vitale the

ing

most of the players

they lost a lot of players because

a ton or

is

Hawks soar over Condors By Trevor

said

signed up for infield positions.

Andruszkiewicz said there was-

it

was mostly looking

of candidates.

Jody Andruszkiewicz, head coach of the men’s fastball

it

said. “In fast-

ball, the batter is either

the team.

ball players

— Page 12

enough to save the tournament. With two teams last year, Conestoga still lost the tournament because both teams weren’t as good as they could have been and

outfield

the team’s success since

weakest position,” he

didn’t.”

for

to hit or throw.”

there.

“Our

could have played, but

doctor

list

He

practice on Sept. 28 to trim his ros-

my

set his roster.

held

2000

tournament cancelled

fastball

Hilker

10,

front.

Thursday October

blast

from above the goalie box.

The

final goal

came

The biggest play of the game for was a late save by

the Condors

Beitz who grabbed the loose ball on the goal line after the ball hit the crossbar and bounced off Vitale’s head.

Aprile received the only yellow card of the game for her aggressive play in the second half.

2000

$12 per Person Sign up

in

late in the

a blast over Beitz’s head

the CSX office


Digital Edition - October 10, 2000