Page 1

33rd Year

What’s Inside

— No.

3

New foundation to raise

money

By Walerian Czarnecki

my is booming and the K-W area is also experiencing a lot of growth.

Conestoga College million to

need $45 provide new equipment will

Ontario,” he said.

dents, as Ontario’s post-secondary

grant applied degrees

education system prepares for a

then

flood

enrolment, said Tibbits.

of students in the next

years,”

SuperBuild Growth Fund, but will

ment.”

Conestoga

he

Tibbits

“If that’s the case

said.

we need

a significant invest-

college

the

said

has

requested $39 million from the

Foundation.

Conestoga Foundation

provincial government to help with its expansion plans, which include a new Waterloo campus.

approached for donations.

technology, both hardware and

Conestoga president John Tibbits says the process of establishing the is underway, so the community can be

It

will

arships

be used to increase scholsaid and bursaries,

This will involve a large network

of volunteers and a specific struc-

meeting to look at Conestoga the establishing first

Foundation will be held Feb.

computer

that

In this respect, fund-raising, both

“The college

grow dramati-

will

cally in the next 10 years for a

out in the cold.

number of reasons,”

said Tibbits.

an increase in the num-

is

ber of 18- to 24-year-olds, as well as the “double cohort”

when

will

both

Grade 12 and 13 students graduate

sector,

become more important to

Tibbits said the Canadian econo-

Tibbits wants to develop partnerships will invest in the growth of Conestoga (Photo by Walerian Czarnecki)

College.

the

will

need

some fund-

to see

ing from the government too, not

he

just the private sector,”

Tibbits

cites

the

Automation Tool Systems that hires many Conestoga robotics graduates.

They invested

giving $1 -million cash to the facilities and

by expand

in the college

by donating new

with vocational companies.

the program,” said Tibbits.

Another example

They

said.

example of

many

hire

Linemar.

is

Conestoga

machining graduates so they donated $450,000, but just as important

they got the college

is

machining equipment for 35 per cent of what it would have cost.

“The

rest

of the 65 per cent

is

way we could double

Linemar says ‘We need more We like what you’re

“If

machinists.

we want

doing, but

make

to

sure

those machinists are trained on the

we

top machines, because

use top

machines,’ they should invest in the college so those wants can be

met,” said Tibbits.

“The principal direction

like a donation,” said Tibbits.

Tibbits said instead of going out

equipment.

is

along

the lines of partnerships,” he said.

That

and asking for money, the college

“When you do

the size of

wants to establish partnerships

ful partnerships they breed.”

“That went a long way.

in 2003.

Conestoga president John with major companies that

college, said Tibbits.

10.

New bylaw sends smokers

There

is

software, changes rapidly.

“We

ture to operate, said Tibbits.

The

Another factor

from the public and private

Tibbits.

B\GE7

Conestoga

possible that

then

the

approved,

could double in size in the next 10

government for funds through the develop

is

could double full-time

it

will not only petition the Ontario

also

FBGE8

this need, the college

in

If Conestoga College’s request to

“It’s

To meet

Louie’s.

Toronto

of

outside

and buildings to meet an influx of an additional 2,000 to 2,500 stu-

decade.

Conestoga students bust a move at Loose Change

the second fastest growth

“It’s

area

establish success-

Former founder, leader and president dead By Pamela Hopwood Conestoga College’s founding presid^ntT'Qr. James W. Church, diei Jan. 8>rt the age of 83.

made

Conestoga

Condors breathe sigh of

vidual

relief in 3-3 tie against

College,” says Jack Williams,

Exsonics.

worked

RAGE 12

Commentary Page 4

Should athletes their

into

sewers. And, the early childhood

one,”

says

education program was in a farm-

most

house down the road. “Church was always

colleges

Williams.

“In

beginning,

there ly

was

scene, morning to night.

real-

there.

Church

was

Church

was president. Jim Church was appointed

in locating the

dent in 1967,

was

when

the college

really just a field of portable

He remained when he

president

until

resigned in the

architect,

building the

complex and also building up the academic stature of the college.” Williams says Church also

the mover, he

was

the

he was the designer and

he was the academic.

the

school, which was paid for in part by the government and donated by

the City of Kitchener.

midst of controversy.

“He was

site, in

helped select the land for

classrooms.

He was

“When

the college started, there

were 21 portables,” says Williams.

“We had

We

spent

when

it

to put in our

own

septic

everything

fits.”

Church went through one of the difficult periods

because the

weren’t defined,

says

“Church probably, as president and CEO, had a hell of a lot more problems at that time, Putt.

The board meetings were every week and we often went until two in the morning. A 70-hour week was normal,” says

because

Williams.

new

first started.

Dr.

very instrumental

presi-

on the

a lot of time at the college

nothing

operations during the time Church

1974,

honour

who

school in finance

at the

system because there were no

rolled

the

“Dr^6tturch was really the indithat

everything

it

was an age of experi“It was really a

ment,” he says.

challenging time.”

With the growing pains of a institution

came

When Church

controver-

resigned from

didn’t

know where

sy.

We

had no cur-

the presidency in 1974, the gov-

riculum and no textbooks,” says

ernment was conducting a study

“In

’67

we were David

we

going.

Putt,

director of physical

Church hired Putt in 1972. “Faculty members coming in today have course outlines, and curriculum, developed detailed information on where

resources.

of mismanage-

into

allegations

ment

at the college.

Many

people related Church’s

resignation

to

the

imminent

release of the findings.

See Church-page 2


Page 2

— SPOKE, Jan. 24, 2000

Church a continued from Page 1

Clow worked

much.”

side of things too

“He (Church) did have “It’s

few

unfortunate,

(staff

but relatively

members) were able

make enough of a case

to

to call for a

good He went on to

career thereafter.

Memorial Newfoundland and

a

University

in

later returned

commission,” says Aubrey Hagar,

to

who worked as

where he taught before he was

director of

academ-

and college planning Conestoga from 1969 - 1986.

at

ic

was a sad day for me when Dr. Church resigned. I thought that he was doing an excellent job,” says Hagar. When Church resigned, “he overwork and said the time

seemed appropriate for the resignaRecord reported.

tion,” the

“I think

he recognized that things

change,” says John Goddard,

who

The college was changing from a new organization that was developing in a lot of different ways to one that was starting to get a little more replaced Church temporarily.

set in its

University of Waterloo,

president,” says Hagar.

ways.

ences gave him a unique perspective

on education.

he really liked the administrative

started

as

an

apprentice and ended up as a doctor.

until

The guy spanned

was taken over by

it

“Dr.

the

whole

started right out of university.

involved

woodworking

He

area,

was

and he

radars, in

Lancaster

building

bombers,” says Hagar. “He never lost

appreciation

the

for

needed for the

was very much

by

“He

says.

basic

trades.

He

in touch.”

Andy Clow, dean of business at Conestoga College, remembers Church as “quite a visionary.”

E.

had met Dr. Church once prior coming to Conestoga, at the

spine, you’ll see miles

taught a les-

I

son on a television apparatus that

“I

have a feeling that he

in

everyone having a

and have

broadcast to

it

many

it

was

great.

I

of

Shawna Bernard. Student

rolled

he

said.

services

at

to

plat-

be upgraded,”

“The Novell servers had

to

be upgraded.”

tastic

whom

to his sup-

he said did a fan-

job preparing for Y2K.

“My

staff

was

for a certain

survived by four chil-

Doon

However, he that

was

some

showed rolled

it

was addressed

“The biggest problem was

in over the holidays

Y2K

prepara-

September 1998 by organiz-

a four-person committee

first

that

assessed what the

at the critical

all

the

systems

the heating, air condition-

have heat and the essentials,” he 2-&02-).

said. at this

ing,

critical

systems

like

Y2K.

“We

network-

computer and desktop systems

were then considered, Pimenoff

said.

many

didn’t anticipate too

serious, critical issues

out

possible problems, said Pimenoff.

looked

College

spent about $20,000 preparing for

college began

college

the PCs,” he said, adding that

Conestoga

we

it

turns

haven’t encountered any,”

said Pimenoff,

aside

and

the

who added

first

few

January to deal with

he

set

weeks of

Y2K

issues,

but none have filtered up to him.

Other colleges ilar results

with

Bob Botham,

in

Ontario had sim-

Y2K.

1900,”

was

Botham

comput-

ing and network services at

Humber

in

Toronto, said nothing of

major consequence happened the

new year

at

Humber.

after

said,

adding the date

fixed manually.

Mohawk

College in Hamilton

all

Y2K

no

problems

software and hardware

was updated before Christmas, said Shannon McDaniel, a college helpcomputer desk attendant in services.

With the

Y2K

problem

Conestoga College

is

fixed,

preparing for

another possible computer glitch

February because

in

this is a leap year.

“The problem there

is

basically

certain systems. If they’re not

Y2K

compliant, they will not recognize that

director of

College

the fax

machine, which went to the year

amount of time prepar-

Altogether,

to be

fixed.

because

properly,” he said.

some software

when 2000

errors

computers.

lem, but because

said,

tested for glitches

experienced

all

1987 he moved to

in

is

around and the problem had

Pimenoff gives credit port staff,

director of infor-

He

trouble at “There were some software

new millennium

Hunter retired

ing

Less

also

dren and two grandchildren.

When

Santa Cruz, Calif.

they upgraded approximately 450

Services.

He was

ation centre.

ever built,” reported the

ing and lighting, ensuring that we’d

time, please contact

at the college,

highest-flying jet

“Not because there was no prob-

workshop but cannot attend

Through Hunter’s 13 years

enrolment increased dramatically.

,

assessed millennium issues.

STUDENT SEP-VI6ES (ROOM

tion.

saw parts America,

instrumental in raising support for the recre-

technology

first like

who

stepped in temporarily after Church’s resigna-

in 1963.

South

1971.

in

president of Conestoga in 1974,

Germany, Turkey and Japan, took photos and collected art and artifacts. Under Hunter, Hycon worked on cameras for Apollo 1 3 and for the SR-7 1 “the fastest and

Shawna Bernard

in a

company

In his travels he

Hycon

left

He became

went smoothly when the year turned

“We

in

Hunter

over.

The

77

of

following a short term by John Goddard,

of the

implications would be with

are interested

age

at the

Hunter became president

Conestoga College, said everything

ing

“He was made the rest

vived,” says Williams. really the engine that

eras.

Conestoga College.

The

Conestoga

him,

Globe and Mail.

ByTannis Fenton

tions in

to stu-

called Hycon, which manufactured reconnaissance (or survey) cam-

No Y2K

mation

and

third president

Santa Cruz

in

staff

of the train go.”

company

the

“Without

before.”

didn’t

“His door was

agrees.

College would never have sur-

of what position they had

less

was

listen to people,”

dents.”

chance to get an education, regard-

classrooms. “I thought

Hagar

always open to

favour of,” says

in

Goddard.

Tony Pimenoff,

If >fou

he was

that

rela-

he says.

be in locked step

believed

After a lot of anxiety and prepara-

Eliminating time wasters?

to learn

He had good

to learn.

always willing to

quite a

on regular paper

at

Please register

to

forms that needed

treating schedules and "To Do" lists?

was

that

above a table which allowed teachers to write notes

around without any major problems

Facilitator:

30 years ago,

with everyone else was something

apparatus was a camera situated

tion,

Workshop

television,” says Putt. “At that

“Not having

Williams recalls Dr. Church’s

He travelled the world surveying for Newmont Mining Company and working for a

Prioritizing tastes?

“He encouraged people

novel approach.”

he had developed.”

MA

\MITH

he says.

time,

television. In fact,

1949.

N66D H6L?

of ability

develop new ideas themselves,

by

who was a geophysicist engineer. He attended the

Poom ZDl4

people, given lots

tionships with the staff, and he

University of Toronto and obtained his BA in science in 1948 and his in geophysics in

11:30 - IZ:30

and miles of

if

had

by

for Hunter,

FemJAPY 1™

believed that

innovative in the area of teaching

Hunter, died Nov. 11, 1999, at the age of 77. The Doon campus recreation centre is

MONDAY,

to

blue television cable that was orig-

he was

’60s,

James Church is the second former president of Conestoga College to die recently. Conestoga’s third president, Kenneth E.

WORKSHOP

He

the opportunity,

how

mid

the

in

Hunter passed away

TIM6 MANA&eM6NT

themselves,” says Goddard.

mechanical

in the

whole

to the

idea of people being able to better

that

is

inally laid in the ’70s, for teaching

time,

Dr.

and aerospace-

up

in the panels

of Waterloo. At that

Compiled by Pamela Hopwood

named

and really devoted

says Putt,

out,”

had trouble embracing some of Church’s modem ideas. “If you ever get a chance to look

Conestoga loses Kenneth

didn’t pan

spend time

to

them learn. “He was all for helping people

to help

faculty

ence with Church’s innovation.

says Church, as a teacher, was

and he was prepared

adding part of the reason

Williams had firsthand experi-

“I

He

very responsive to students’ needs

television.

just

homes

able to learn from their

late ’40s. at

of teaching

in the area

at

the University of Toronto in the

for

“He had some ideas that were way ahead of his time, but they

envisioned things like people being

University

designing

Clow

easier

developed

really

lot

Conestoga

of people could under-

lot

to

the

Not a

Church was probably beyond

what a

was much

“It

people to see and observe.”

the

tion of Church.

“He had a wider grasp of what was happening than people who in

says.

college in 1969, under the direc-

spectrum of the system.

was

1965

in

Goddard studied under Church

have to write on blackboards,” he

Waterloo

through their televisions.”

Church

“Jim

skills

“They were also starting to look more at the financing of issues,” says Goddard, “and I don’t think

experi-

the

at

Adult Education Centre

stand at the time,”

many

Putt says Church’s

“It

cited

the

‘visionary’

this

a

is

leap

year,”

said

Pimenoff.

Computers

that

don’t recognize

Feb. 29 will switch over to

one day

early,

he

won’t be a serious

said,

March

1

adding this

issue.


c

SPOKE,

Jan. 24, 2000

Adaptive software available By Pamela Hopwood

the open house

was

really two-

fold.

for

nologies,” said Casey, “but we’re

needs equipment. The Disabled

equipment, by the time the

words onto the screen as type. Another was Kurzweil 3000. Birch said this program is valu-

more

able for visually impaired stu-

Conestoga’s

also hoping that if

Jurchuk

of

Kitchener

some of

the software.

been very valuable

to find

makes

more

it

come

(to

adaptive tech-

counsellor for

liaison

needs

Conestoga

its

in

International

second annu-

Women

at

honour

of

student gets here, they’ll be

Casey said buying software buying a car. “You want

like

take

services

special

Conestoga

at

College, said that the purpose of

Dinner service is at 6 p.m. and the cash bar is open from 5:30 to Tickets are limited and

may be

Doon

and alumni services at the campus. They are also available

at

C rf

' '

/;>>

'

\

y

:

h ov}##

pisri n<£-

Po

'r' -

s

O\

,

own equipment

ing equipment.

on the program.

take

Chad Allison and Jeremy Birch (ATS).

how

dents

r

'

a

& v^rY

to use

train

any

*

equipment

that

es counsellor.

will help them,” said Allison.

<S

v

,

:

.

;

V,

;

Women’s Resource Group,

of the

which she believes

women’s

about

Conestoga

will

and

activities

Nancy

safety for

lives

professor

Hamacher, a general

arts

and

sci-

The

entertainment starts at 5:45

The event was one of

the things

6.

Allocation of provincial fund-

women’s resources and

By Adam Wilson

configuring and operating

data communications systems as

analysts in the near future, said

Pimenoff. is

employment of databases

in

offered at the

The college’s Web site describes the program as a traditional systems analyst program where the

when they

That way, says Mainland, “a student can say to an employer,

have

this disability, but I

I

need

‘I

come do

to

the job.’”

smaller one this semester,” said

Pimenoff.

The

full-time

program runs

is

a

maximum

enrolment

program

is

future.”

university

graduate

or

of security services.

One hundred and

said Hunter.

“Students come in all the time saying the lots have vacancies and are only half full,” Hunter said.

“But it only seems so right now because some students are away

semester

either because they are in school

parking decals for lots 3 and 11

part time or because their classes

were sold before the Christmas

start in

Students

fifty

The lots are locatnew woodworking

ATS building. who park in illegal

areas such as fire exits and close

February,” he said.

Hunter added some students start earlier

than others, such as

students in the trades and

the

apprenticeship program,

began Jan.

which

3.

hydrants are given $15

“We’re also expecting 100 nurs-

parking tickets, with every penny

ing students in February,” he said.

fire

know

going to the City of Kitchener,

“But

said Hunter.

have extra space.”

I

for a fact that

we

Free Skating

@ the Rec. Centre

have

work experience

in

the field.

Tony Pimenoff, technology services

They must have programming education or experience with writing languages

acquire in this

ity

using

The

Q Basic or Access.

college offers courses in

and Visual Basic for students

“C”

require the courses before starting

systems.

the systems analyst program. in

a

“C” is on the

also offered Internet.

6:30pm

to

7:30pm

who

successful so

far.

Wed. Feb. 2

such as “C” or

Visual Basic or programming abil-

starting

they

Students taking this program

director of information

intake

when

were leaving the college either permanently or temporarily, parking would be better regulated, according to A1 Hunter, supervisor

$3,200, which

equivalent

September and are

notify the col-

does not include other expenses

are required to be a college or

full

would

These individuals will be conafter Jan. 21 when lot vacancies have been surveyed,

tacted

for

shortage of systems analysts in the near

a

for people to sign so secu-

can notify them of future

28 weeks and has been designed

such as books or supplies.

skills students will

list

parking vacancies.

to

on Feb. 11 in the Sanctuary between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Johanson will speak about safe sex and healthy relationships.

there would be a

“We had

Security has since issued a wait-

to the

DSA

program, which has been very

gain experience in troubleshoot-

their

they get to

with them

campus shouldn’t compare

centre and the

munications, programming and

says students will

special

graduate.

rity

ed behind the

for this

Designing, inputting, extracting

site also

is

Doon

Sue Johanson, a sex educator, who has been asked to speak to students by the

it

and formatting are some of the

The

for

of 30 students per intake. Tuition

when became apparent

offered

students will learn business and

com-

it

needs bur-

who have

Finding a parking spot on

also decided to sup-

port guest speaker

There

“The course was

technical background in computer applications, database, data

Sajfert

break, he said.

cussed.

gram.

Information Technology Centre in Waterloo.

promote campus

as a post-graduate certificate pro-

various business environments.

Tony

which began in September 1999, was offered when it became apparent there would be a shortage of systems

The course

well as modifying programs for the

to

women and to prevent against women was dis-

meet demand

to help

ing,

violence

displays an motivate her group. (Photo Donna Ryves)

The group

quartet.

New program

course,

The good thing

with the equipment

lege’s security office

.

Y->.;

,Y---

inspirational poster,

ing for

technology services.

servic-

Toronto on a Saturday night.

w'rth CHit&iren*

't

has written books and essays

Pimenoff, director of information

a peer tutor in the

Marion Mainland, co-ordinator

'

held Jan.

to

open, there

by a special needs

If students r

Entertainment includes Donna McCaw, an author/comedian who

according

ATS and

is

Students must be referred to

the lab

T.

?

discussed at the group’s meeting

College has been getting positive

an

stu-

for-

?\w

charities.

Conestoga

is

the lab

parking confusion in downtown

p.m.

analyst pro-

Whenever lab.

i

and entertainment. Donations from the proceeds will go to local

The new systems gram offered by

gram helps

Entire textbooks can be loaded

*

Sweet Adeline

The

saries, however, and special needs services is lobbying to change this.

ing

and Waterloo campuses.

feedback,

Using highlighted words and even speaking out loud, the pro-

helping visitors and demonstrat-

“We’re here to

for

deficit disorder.

needs students

ists

qualify

to get special

,

ence faculty member, and her

price includes tax, gratuity

must

Students

is

By Anna :

the Cambridge, Guelph, Stratford

The

$7,000.

users keep track of what they’re reading, Birch said.

the literacy lab

in

special

Student Bursary can amount to

were

work

purchased for $22 and after Feb. at the registrar’s office

who need

set for celebration Conestoga parking shouldn’t be chaotic

Joan Magazine,

8:30 p.m.

students

to

who

students

and clos-

OSAP

for a test drive.”

it

Two Conestoga

as opening

dents or students with attention

prepared.”

Women’s Day.

The dinner will be held on Tuesday, March 7, in the Waterloo campus dining room.

14 for $24

someone buys

Women’s Resource

holding

Celebrating

al

the

hands-on

are adaptive technology special-

Rick Casey, secondary school

--

is

people get

to

this

Conestoga).”

Group

giving

special needs students.

likely that Brian will

By Donna Ryves

“We’re

available in the literacy lab for

this facility is here

is

about special bursaries available

is

what adaptive software

and see how he interacts with them” Jurchuk said. “Knowing

Group

allows the user to control com-

mands such

ing programs as well as speak

“It’s

Hopwood)

services,

experience with adaptive tech-

community

the

out about the different programs

P.

needs

special

informed about 15 people who showed up for the open house

to

testing out

(Photo by

of

members of

found the open house an “ideal opportunity.” His son Brian was

nology specialist, checks software at Jan. 16 open house.

in lab

opportunity

Paul

Allison,

3

An open house held Jan. 16 provided a good chance for learn

Chad

One program they demonstrated was Dragon Dictate, which

— Page

The by the college

brought to you by thejjr


.

— SPOKE. Jan. 24. 2000

Page 4

Athletes are not

above any law Professional athletes and their sports are good for a community. They bring in lots of money for surrounding business, give a city prestige and add another facet to the city’s culture. Most important of all, sports are great

entertainment for fans. The sports business exists to entertain fans. Its commitment is to the fans, who are the customers. Athletes get paid for the entertainment service they provide, not just for showing up to play the game. Sports, whether looked upon as entertainment, a product or a service, is

dependent upon the fans. In the past few years, sports and its athletes have become more important than the fans. The sports business makes claims to its own importance so much that it can blackmail cities for new facilities.

Athletes use their popularity to extort millions from who need them to play to draw the fans, which raises the costs astronomically. Something has to be done. Some athletes who are paid millions to shoot a rubber puck on ice believe they have no commitment to those

owners

fans that pay and that they can do whatever they want to meet their own needs. Alexei Yashin of the Ottawa Senators signed a $3.6million contract, but is holding out for more than $12 million, according to Maclean’s magazine. Instead of playing and making that money

and honour-

ing his contract for fans that paid to see the star play, he’d rather sit out the season and wait to be traded. Keith Primeau of the Carolina Hurricanes is another player who also shafted his team by sitting out this season to hold out for more money. He is seeking a four-year, $17 million US contract from

“JudqemeM is -for 4* pW* Miffs. icG^sir Qe+ your W++ back

the Hurricanes. Both players’ teams have told them that they won’t be welcomed back for the rest of the season and there is no

chance of a

Violence

trade.

players’ agents support these renegade players. Primeau’ s agent, Don Reynolds, told Canadian Press he

The

believes the player’s suspensions are a way to impose a salary cap. $27. 5-million suit has been filed on behalf of Ottawa Senators season-ticket holders against Yashin for loss of

The nature

is

unacceptable

crime should horrify everyone

of

A

When

was up

I

enjoyment. The Superior Court of Ontario ruled on Jan. 5 that the lawsuit against Yashin can proceed. This is the first time fans have been allowed to sue a player who did not honour a contract with his team. If this lawsuit is successful, it will be a good thing for

growing

fans.

one know we

No longer will

athletes

my

do what they want, just because

could put the athletes in their place. If the fans win, athletes will realize they are not bigger than the sport, above the law, or so important they can ignore fans. This lawsuit could stop many from making ludicrous contractual demands. Athletes who are sued could realize that they have some responsibility to uphold their part of a contract. They may even learn how to act like decent citizens. this lawsuit

let

19-year-old,

who

hasn’t

attacked by acquaintances,

was

whom

she had allowed into her east end

any-

cleaning powder, liquid

mouth and rubbed into her hair. The attack ended when the victim’s roommate returned home to find the group in the apartment.

The reason

for the attack

Seven other people were

in the

you are alone.”

apartment during the three-hour

The precautions became much more serious as I got older. Being female, I was overloaded

attack but only four have been

charged because of their involvement.

The victim was punched

in

the attacker’s friends in an earlier

incident

The

downtown. it was a woman

fact that

who was attacked What does matter

doesn’t matter. is that

lent nature of the

the face, hit with a frying pan,

horrify

kicked in the neck and stomach and had her head slammed

against both genders

unknown

me

led

terrors take over

let

doing what

The

I

my fear stop me from

I

want

to do.

recent attack on a 19-year-

woman

fears

life

to the conclusion that

shouldn’t

old

my

I

didn’t

home

in her

know

I

had.

raised It

con-

but

She had recently found out she was pregnant and suffered a miscarriage because of the

had taught

attack.

violence

She had a mixture of whiskey.

I

wish

me how

myself and sometimes ers

exists,

still

why?

Sometimes

against the wall.

Violence

everyone.

but the risk of being

stories,

the vio-

crime should

overly paranoid and letting these

abuse

was

one of

that the victim didn’t help

Kitchener apartment.

with horrible rape, abduction and

Comet

dish soap and salt poured into her

the victim of a sexual assault,

and

and

out

are

this includes athletes.

The outcome of

The

“Don’t talk to “Don’t

that the issue of vio-

been named because she has been

me,

strangers,”

me

lence doesn’t go away.

parents

warned

of the high price tag attached to their skills. Sports are big business. In business contracts are to be honoured. Whoever signs one can’t change things on a

whim and

cerns

had taught

my

parents

to

defend

I

wish oth-

their children that

unacceptable, whether

is

you are a man or a woman.

SPOKE is mainly funded from September to May by the Doon

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not

in

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

SPOKE

DSA is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Nicole Furlong;

News

Editor: Tannis Fenton;

Circulation Manager: Mike Raddatus; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz address

is

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room 4B14,

Kitchener, Ontario,

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by

Student Life Editor: Talisha Matheson Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Production Manager: Adam Wilson; Advertising Manager: Walerian Czamecki;

SPOKE’s

logo.

N2G 4M4.

Phone: 748-5220, ext 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or

MS Word

tain

file

would be

Submissions must not con-

helpful.

any libellous statements and

may be accompanied by

illustration (such as a photograph).

an


Smokers By

Osment

Sherri

A majority Conestoga

Jan.

College

13, at

say

that

Waterloo Region’s new no-smoking bylaw has had a positive

on them.

effect

The bylaw

prohibits

smoking

in

bingo halls and

coffee shops.

ment studies bylaw permits is allergic

bars

more

his girlfriend,

who

often.

about time,

“It’s

says the

student,

smoke, to go out to

to

a step for-

it’s

ward,” Olinski says, but adds that in

some bars

bylaw

the

is

not

being enforced. “If they

enforcing

going

bylaw),

(the

it

it’s

materials

manage-

student,

non-smoker,

is

a

people

are

“Quite frankly

mind

much,”

says

because

business

I

when

hate

it

people

Lesley

Bott,

Jurisic

I

“If

have one so

a

lot

is

too

her.

public areas

unjust, I don’t think

it’s

fair.”

smoke,

it

I

“It

Anna

the people that

of Spoke regarding the Inc., discrepancies

Wes(|

1

Rudy

He

the bars don’t

people are smoking in the

bar.

it’s

a

OVERCOMING PUBLIC SPEAKING ANXIETY

dent,

really notice the

bars she has gone to there are

ers

DO

says that in

who

bouncdon’t

you...

feel anxious about Public Speaking?

Button

enforce the bylaw.

avoid doing speeches at all costs? accept a "0" in the public speaking part of a course rather than make a speech?

Experience physical signs of distress

before or during presentations?

Climb any mountain

siness Technologies

Unbound

a letter from

iri

engineering technology.

want to be a more effective presenter?

THIS 4 SESSION GROUP IS AVAILABLE BEGINNING THE WEEK OF JANUARY 31 st

states:

The

students running the

supply him with a phone

echnologies

m

Unbound

customers could

them or inform him that they w< The cabinet Bob Coons and and they were not searching for ried on by Technologies Unbound,

rill

did not

call to

reach

to the

IEEE

DAY A TIME TO BE DETERMINED BY TIMETABLES

in business.

Facilitator:

opened belonged

And he

says the

Carol Gregory

ipts relating to the business carter claims they

were

To register bring a copy of your timetable and

identify-

in .

EEEE room was locked

from use by the Solar Car team back to

an orderly

hours

transi-

will

be selected from submitted student timetables.

functions.

mmimm party W

IN

Viral the

THE SANCTUARY.

nmi wo

tie

one

on the ElG

SCREEN

„ SUNDAY

/AN. 30 4:30PM TO IO:OOPM

ucU&d ^0 OD the

sign up

Student Services, Room 2B02 on or before Jan. 25 th Common

ing the assets of the IEEE.

tion

own

administration stu-

Bott

gets to me,” Bott says.

our attention

Hofer, a professor in electr*

if

easier,”

in

the Dec. 6 and Jan. 10 issues

ci

Weber

I

Angela Button, a

people are just going to have to wake up and realize it

were brought

not

Weber adds that he doesn’t think non-smokers who go to bars care

law and security

“I think

Sajf<

it’s

really care.”

Correction In articles written by

hasn’t affected me,”

Westley says.

be

go out

I

Weber

says, “especially at bars because

good because

is

a

want to quit smoking. It helps. If I’m in a bar or a restaurant I can’t

and

will

bylaw)

and

student

being enforced.

hoping to kick

(the

a

design

bylaw hasn’t had a big impact on him because

I

actually think

Weber,

smoker, says the

Kathryn Westley,

it

says she thinks the

Jurisic says. “I think the

is

says.

smoke so

a nursing student,

I

either,” she

Jeff

going

like

it

graphic

student. hassle,

Ihe habit as wel!

they’re

can’t

of

said.

says the bylaw

I

their lot

them don’t agree

outside to smoke.”

is

“Even people that don’t smoke end up smoking

Downton

a

don’t

out

not

“It’s

job and a

general

the

“It’s

smoke in my face Downton when I’m eating.” However Downton doesn’t agree with the bylaw when applied to

bylaw good for

in

bylaw.

no point,”

there’s

understand

asthmatic

bars.

bylaw

totally

I

Bowman

“When I go

“In restau-

rants

nursing student,

who

smoking

don’t

Emily

drinking anyway,” Jurisic, a

still

has helped her to quit smoking.

student

when

get

to

Marko

says

leisure

bars.

don’t start properly

worse.”

ment

affects a lot of people.”

says,

Jon Olinski, a business manage-

the bouncers should enforce the

with

Downton, a recreation and Sheri

bars, restaurants,

Button says she doesn’t think

Has the smoxing >an affected you?

of students polled in

random survey on

a

aren’t worried

FREE to Doon Campus Students '

Sufeebowe

Poof

00-™* QUESTS

^


-

— SPOKE, Jan. 24, 2000

Page 6

the year

First vehicle theft of Osment

3y Sherri The it

first

main

targets of

vehicle theft on

campus

are pickup

trucks and sport

utility vehicles.

services, said the

vehicle theft of the year

Conestoga College occurred the

Hunter said there doesn’t seem be a pattern of specific days

lay

students returned to school

to

ifter

the Christmas break.

with either vehicle thefts or break-

A

pickup truck belonging to a

Conestoga student was stolen from 12 between noon and

^king Lot 5

p.m. on Monday,

;tolen

had been

from the Brantford area was

behind

eft

that

They can occur on any day of

the week. However, that

“If

Jan. 10.

Another vehicle

ins.

in the lot.

was stolen from

seem

to

we had

we had

most

two

lots

activity,

I

where

os out of the vehicle. There are

more instances of vehicle break-in than vehicle theft on campus and

security patrols the lots

program

was

rity staff, said

10 and

later

CBSA

patrol

them

valuables

left

in

he thinks the stu-

dents from the walk-safe program

good job.

and about and

they are suspicious at

all

of some-

one’s activities, trust your instincts, let

us

said.

“They have probably prevented a

might

sight

increase the risk of a break-in. “If students are out

to 10:45 p.m.

John Tribe, of the college’s secu-

are doing a

lot.

A1 Hunter, supervisor of security

iy

Campus

vehicle

from Lot

lular phones, in a vehicle.

between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.

from 6:45 p.m.

eturned to the

he

suggested taking precautions like

ing removable faceplates for stere-

1999 there were seven vehistolen from various lots on

ampus.

difficult to pro-

He

the walk-safe

tolen

it is

added most of the thefts occur

say 10 and 12.” Hunter said.

during the day and students from

Another

Hunter said

tect against vehicle theft, but

Hunter also recommended tak-

>een burned.

les

“With preventative patrols

you don’t know whether you’re accomplishing anything or not except by what doesn’t happen.”

would

The pickup that he campus was found Jan. 1 1 outide Brantford. The vehicle had In

of things happening,” Tribe

said.

not leaving valuables, such as cel-

be targeted. to pick

the

there are lots

lot

alert

know

right away,”

“The best protection and look out for each

Hunter is to

be

John Tribe lots to

of

security, patrols the parking

Conestoga’s college

help prevent thefts. (Photo by Sherri Osment)

other.”

buys $5,000 Power Point projector a

Tannis Fenton

experience and a good

great

opportunity.

The

Conestoga

xecutive iurchase

Nominees must declare

Business

CBSA

(CBSA)

Association

Itudents

office

attending

members announced the of a Power Point projec-

CBSA

the

at

by Jan. 27 and

start

meetings.

Elections will be held Feb. 10.

neeting of the association Jan. 13.

The business awards banquet, or which will be held on April 13, was also discussed at the

The

meeting.

or to the class representatives in

ttendance

the

at

projector

bi-monthly

was purchased

1

in

1

CBSA

comPower Point

$5,000.

Andreas Kyriacou,

'onestoga College donated the

puter liaison, said a

omputer needed

slide presentation will be used to

Jctober

ictor, }r,

and

cost

to use the pro-

show award nominees, which

which consists of a moni-

Plans for the year’s

Grant McGregor, college princial

will

save time.

keyboard and hard drive.

first

Biz Bash

were discussed. The bash, which

and dean of academic research

Day and swing

nd educational services, organ-

has a Valentine’s

ted the donation.

dance theme, will be held on Feb.

Only business students can use Power Point projector, which is

10

known

Iso

CBSA

Students have to sign out the pro-

te

with their student card from

CBSA office

in

Teresa Bricker, ons co-ordinator,

1D14D. promosaid the Power

CBSA

oint projector will

be useful for

In other business,

te

Lisa

CBSA

executive members are shown with Grant McGregor (right), college principal and dean of academic research and educational services and the new Power Point machine. McGregor helped organize the computer donation The CBSA bought the Power Point projector. CBSA members are, left to right: Katie Henhoeffer (vice-president), Andreas Kyriacou (computer liaison), Teresa Bricker (promotions co-ordinator), Trevor Topping (treasurer), Christa Bilton (communications co-ordinator) and Lisa Cashmore (president). (Photo by Tannis Fenton)

CBSA

tudents’ presentations.

ent

Stages nightclub

CBSA

presi-

Cashmore announced

opening of nominations for the

CBSA

in Kitchener.

announced

also

plans for the Chocolate Blitz, a

as a digital video pro-

nto r.

ictor

at

The

te

Executive

executive.

Cashmore

said the entire

CBSA

president,

positions

include

vice-president,

com-

executive will be replaced because

munications co-ordinator, promo-

they are

tions co-ordinator,

all

graduating.

computer

liai-

son and

treasurer.

on the

CBSA

ly

sold

from

November 1999

September

CBSA

as a

and said being

executive council

is

Those

still

interested in purchas-

ing the bars can

do so

or $5 for three at the

for

the San g" UARY

I rsi A

s

CS

Admission 7 ^ Doon Students $5 ' Guests $ 7..

t

'

,CeN s

eD

Event

Tickets on sale at the DSA office Three Live Indie Bands! Catch them HERE BEFORE THEY MAKE IT BIG.

*

$2 each

CBSA office.

Blast 8:OOpm

Indie

to

fund-

raiser.

Cashmore encouraged everyone to run for a position

fund-raising event to sell

remaining chocolate bars left over from a fund-raiser, that took place from Jan. 18 to Jan. 20. The chocolate bars were original-


SPOKE,

Bylaw a daunting task Some

“He

The new no-smoking bylaw

is

was from a commu-

said he

country and the bylaw was

nist

ways: turning a blind eye to the

smokers or putting them outside.

in Kitchener, said

Restaurants visited by Spoke

it

he believes that

used to the bylaw, but eventually

eliminated their smoking section,

will

has done

little

to hurt the

business in the restaurants.

Joanne Taylor,

be no big

Derek

it’s

Rousey,

people yet.

They

at Phil’s

on Jan. 14 and was one of many people smoking in the bar.

“So many people This

bars.

still

at,

smoke

every bar

is like

Rousey

said that

when

walks by he might

tell

a bouncer

you

to put

most of the bouncers

it

no-smoking law has done nothing but improve the atmosphere of

places,” he said.

pretend they don’t see smokers.

the restaurant.

restaurants to eliminate

Whitman

said

it

was

easier for

at

only one

isn’t the

he said.

this,”

ask for smoking tables and hard to get out of the habit of

National

a

Grocer’s employee, was

being able to smoke in public

out, but

“The bars

are not responsible

has

sections because they deal with

and don’t get fined so all they can do is tell people they aren’t

more clean environment. Nobody is blowing smoke on you and I don’t go home stinking like smoke every night,”

food and families, but bars will

supposed

have a real hard time enforcing

Some

better because

it

it

created a

she said.

smoking

more

the bylaw.

“At the Walper Pub they have

smoke and when he was asked put

out

it

became

or

to

go outside he

DSA

offering a package

is

outlining policies and procedures

who wish

ed for the

to

be nominat-

of butts in that bowl,”

heard that 19)

come Wednesday

“With the number of people go out to bars, it is impossi-

bylaw

officers will

be

crack down,” Taylor said.

“People in bars will eventually get a surprise ticket for

he said.

when

they get a

smoking. Right

now

it

sounds unlikely, but in a few

months maybe,” Whitman

Robert Craine goes outside of Kelsey’s Restaurant at Fairview Mall in Kitchener to smoke a cigarette. The new smoking bylaw eliminated smoking sections in eating establishments. (Photo by Mike Radatus)

said.

PSYCHIC EXPO

on the

executive will be held Feb.

15-17.

applications for nominees

The

There

“I

DSA executive.

Elections for positions

new

monitored in the

Guelph’s Largest international

By Mike Radatus

for those

lot

election

packages ready

The

were a

that

irate.

DSA

they had bowls with

around the candle.

all

started to

strictly

future.

going into places and starting to

candles in the middle and sand

man

said.

New Year’s)

but a few people think the bylaw a violation of their rights.

smoke,” he

(Jan.

harder.

Taylor said one

to

think the bylaw will be

more of a night scene so it’s When I was there (after

The majority of customers are good about not smoking inside, is

to enforce

sure people don’t

Kelsey’s in Kitchener, said the

“I like

for president,

vice-president of

*«****'

V-y*;y. .‘Aol :-y.V '/VtV *V’V

’\Y\ W.V > ’Iv/'.’,'. S:

;'

r

i-:

\'.V,*A-A-A%

operations, vice-president of stu-

dent affairs and vice-president of

education were available at the

DSA office beginning Jan. The deadline Jan. 28.

V.'i'.V

•.*

'.'.-A*

>' V»*i,

V’* V'V* v*v

17. .-.A-

for nominations is

Any nominations after that

date will not be eligible.

A

candidates’ meeting will be

held Jan. 26 at 4 p.m. in the meeting

room

in the Sanctuary.

In order to

become a candidate

for president, a student at least

must have

one year’s experience as a

DSA director or officer. To

qualify for the other positions

on the executive, a student must submit an official transcript showing his/her current academic standing and a 65 per cent average or better in previous semesters.

Posting of campaign materials

and campaigning will begin Jan.

28

at

2:30 p.m. and finish Feb.

1 1.

All campaigning must be done in a

manner

that doesn’t

harm

the

DSA, Conestoga College or any other reputation or property.

Any

28, 29, 30

January

reference to race, creed, colour or

College Inn

sexual orientation will not be tolerated on any

campaign

material.

Slanderous material or remarks will result in disqualification.

All students are eligible to vote for the

new

7

said.

people smoke

deal.

“It hasn’t hit still

a bartender at

it

he

light up,”

will take time for people to get

have obeyed the bylaw and have

make

ble to

After he went out for a

worse.

smoke he was better,” she said. Ryan Whitman, a host at Casey’s

being enforced a couple different

it

— Page

eatery owners turn blind eye

By Mike Radatus

and

Jan. 24, 2000

executive Feb. 15-17

between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

S on t

r>

R cl

.

o

i

>

U 3ot don


Page 8

— SPOKE, Jan.

24,

2000

Entertainment

DSA

Letters to the Editor Spoke welcomes topical letters that include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification.

They can be brought

to

By Mike Radatus The

DSA

held their

first

party of

Loose Change

Louie’s Jan. 14.

For $2 students could take a bus

room 4B14.

from dence

e-mail letters will be accepted

liked the idea of having a dance

the

at the

residence

to

Loose

return to resi-

end of the

priority at the club that night

they

late

were not

guaranteed entrance because the club cannot exceed

its

capacity

who was

club,

and

presented their student

cards, they didn’t have to wait in

party at Louie’s. “I like

and

it

it

here because

gets packed.

interviewed before

the event, said he hadn’t expected

crowd than normal, but more

much

hate a

as

fun as she did.

Adam

Romagnoli, a construc-

said the energy should be

tion engineering technology stu-

present since

dent, said he

is

it

an organized

event.

“When

fun the

DJ

says something

if

event

the at

about Conestoga there will be 100

McDonald’s

more energy,” he

all

said.

Claire Jacques, an early child-

hood education

student, said she

would’ve held the

a different bar.

people screaming so there will be

“It’s

would have had more

DSA

The Conestoga College students’ VIP status didn’t last all night. The majority of students came on were the attended

small I

problem tonight,” she said. However, not all students had

line.

the bus, so they

it’s

Usually

waiting in line, but that wasn’t

Pat Powers, a manager of the

a larger

night.

Conestoga College students had if

who came

allowed by law.

Change Louie’s and

No

guests.

Students the millennium at

All letters must be signed.

party gets ‘Loose’

like

they

turned

a

into a night club, and

the people that

come

here think

they’re too cool for coco-puffs,”

he said.

Step into a rewarding career with Peel Regional Police Be a part

of

an organization

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Investing in training you

Peel Regional Police

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accepting applications from young

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Batman makes a

special appearance at Conestoga’s party at

Loose Change Louie’s Jan. 13 (Photo Mike Radatus)

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College™

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meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

and communities.


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Finish your education at Fanshawe...

92 % of our grads get jobs! Broadcast Journalism

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-

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your class does not have a DSA Class Rep., Please send one to the next meeting in the

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Cross Roads Meeting

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O


— SPOKE, Jan. 24, 2000

Page 10

Alumni: building positive relations By Nicole Furlong

world. She cited examples of stu-

who

dents

With over 30,000 alumni who alumni

the

association

Himmelman es

great lengths to track alumni

is

said alumni servic-

accessible to students and

will react

and respond

to students’

and be of assistance to students

and grads’ needs whenever possi-

currently enrolled.

ble.

Monica Himmelman,

She would also work

the found-

the range of

ation and an alumni services offi-

ciation

most important serv-

her department

ice

building

provides

with graduates and students,

my job

ambassador

Himmelman added with

important

said

association

ni

to fly

to

be

about

how

to

they need

it

knowledgeable help

attain

if

college’s

offer

The

much out to

many

students, as

alumni

services

which

lives, as well as

Convocation

for

is

the primary

money “We

said.

to build awareness.” all

profits

made

are

radio

specifically in the school of busi-

Jeff Hutchison,

ness and health science programs.

AM.

had 322 grads available

The alumni

work

to

number 251 found jobs

ed

to

courses

they

recognizable selling items such as frames for diplomas and roses.

The alumnist of

college

the

is

distinction

host of Canada

association publish-

biannual magazine called

Connections, which profiles grads

and faculty and promotes aware-

took

at

ness of the services available to

Conestoga alumni. the

health

The magazine

science

is

mailed out to

situated

Conestoga

grads to stay abreast of success

related work.

stories of

These are impressive numbers by any means, said Himmelman

lege.

alumni and

is

a great

way

all

over the

is

a

Claiming a prize

award

nomway to

recognize successful graduates graduates. IEJ

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Are financial pressures creating

Finances

ficult to

stress for

you?

Is

it

dif-

concentrate on studying because you’re not

sure if you can pay the rent or buy groceries this

month? There

are a

number of

things

you can do

to

help ease your financial worries. If

your financial situation has changed, check with the

Financial Aid office to see entitlement reassessed.

if

you can have your

They

OSAP

also have information on

The Conestoga College bursary is available students. There may be some other bursaries and

bursaries. to

all

scholarships available

for

students

in

specific pro-

grams. Scholarships and awards available for students in

each program are listed

Guide you received

at the

in the

Student Procedures

beginning of the school year.

Another way to relieve the pressure is through parttime employment. Opportunities for employment may be available

at the

college through the work/study pro-

gram, including working as a peer

tutor.

Service clubs

and churches also provide supports.

more immediate needs, Student Services can provide a limited number of grocery If

you’re having

vouchers and provide access

to the

College/DSA-spon-

sored food bank. If

I 1 1 1 k 1 i k i 1 1 N l 1 m 1 1 1 m

you would

like to discuss

any of these options or

other ideas, please ask to speak with a counsellor in

Student Services.

A Message from

Student Services (Room 2B02)

Craig Nowak picks a prize during a raffle Jan. 1 1 The was put on by Tanya Foubert, Cory Watson and Keith neering technology students. .

i i 1 1 1 1 1 1

i fSJSMSISMSMMSMSJSMSJSMSMSJMSMSJ 01 0

raffle

was

Ward

for their fellow electronic engi-

just

one

Blood Donor Clinic

Pi

of the

events that

(Photo by Laura Czekaj)

6

Friday February 4, 2000 1 1 :00am to 3:30pm

fr In the

for

former classmates and keep a connection with the col-

receives

inations in February,

all

department had 289 graduates available for work, and 237 found

also presented at convocation.

The award, which said

a

Of

Conestoga. Similarly,

a

is

relat-

after receiving their diploma.

that

es

station

way

produc-

1

i i 1

She added

quite high at Conestoga,

in the

0

1 1 M m 1 1 i i 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 m i I i i 1 i

little

Himmelman it

Conestoga graduate, as well as

is

semester of school.

alumni services makes themselves

grads.

Gj

mainly do

very

study

For example, Val Cole of the

avail-

do

to

transcripts

are

this,”

CHYM FM

required to pay a one-time fee of

and providing insurance coverage and resume

gra grads ds

sells carnations.

“We make

uated from the college.

The graduation rate for students finding work within their area of

students aren’t

even aware of the services

after

keeping track of what former

Himmelman

Day, which stands for sealed with

from

saries.

able to them, although they are

Conestoga students go on

service

for

name

its

first

referral

SWAK

of

grad-

for

organization does as

ices such as grad tracking,

ing

The association holds

number

who have

Conestoga’s coop and enter

$24.75 for alumni services

with their

serv-

them and make

department provides several serv-

is

Award.

there are a

they are getting ready

as possible to get

leaving Conestoga.

The

said to date a grad

from Conestoga has not received

ment

outstanding grads

bur-

For 1998, the school of business

the provincial level.

the Premiers

who added

way of sponsorships and

the real world.

alum-

order

in

nominees for the Premiers Award, which serves the same purpose at

given back to the college in the

contacts.”

when

help

she wants students to feel comfortable with the staff of the

let stu-

students to learn

btcause after gradua-

become alumni. She

tion they

stu-

Himmelman added it’s a way who to go to

incredibly

is

we can

initial

the relation-

students

and

know what

dents and parents ices

Then they become

association.

alumni kisses, where the depart-

like to get out there

graduates of the college,” she said.

ship

high school

school students,” she said. “We’d

as

college and

the

with

“Initiation really starts with high

as being a positive

for

broaden

dents.

is

well as acting as a liaison. “I see

like to

the alumni asso-

does to include making

contacts

relationships

positive

Each year a nomination commitby alumni services and a recipient is chosen from each program. They receive an award and recognition from the tee is created

Himmelman

ing president of the alumni associ-

cer, said the

*

show

students have.

The volunteer organization goes

.

to

the diverse possibilities Conestoga

has their work cut out for them.

to

in Africa

and Third World countries

have graduated from Conestoga College,

working

are

Sanctuary


Top 10 1

.

T

Lake Placid

3.

Mystery

as

much about chance and about having power

it is

At

and control.

:

2.

is

irony as

Affair

message

least this is the

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Makes you go

Anderson’s film Magnolia.

The

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cast includes

all-star

Cruise (Eyes

Wide

Tom

FREE

Shut), Julianne

4.

American Pie

Moore (Boogie

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General's Daughter

Robards, John C. Jeremy Blackman.

6.

Mickey Blue Eyes

described

Jason

Nights),

call toll free:

1-888-270-2841

and

Reilly

information

package,

The three-hour movie can best be vignettes, 7.

Entrapment

8.

Summer

plots tied into

The of

one

have to

The movie

says

Deep Blue Sea

Tarzan

of Echoes

Feb.

1

Feb.

1

the plot’s turmoil.

fronts his father.

a dying father, a strungout gold digger, a cop looking for love and a whiz kid on a game

Feb.

1

show.

They all encounter experiences that seem highly improbable. For instance, Frank T.J. Mackey, played by Cruise, is a pumped

Blue Streak

Feb. 8

The Astronaut’s

Feb. 8

while

Wife [

New

who

coaches

men

on how to seduce women. He seems like the type who believes women are mere objects,

men

are the superior sex.

Wrong, he respects women and hates men, especially his father. In the end Mackey has an emo-

Doyle

CD

hance your resume/portfolio.

IMPRINT, tional

infomercial host Chill Factor

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Mood-setting music is consistently used to reveal the depths of

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An Linda Partridge (Moore) kisses her dying husband (Robards).

us.”

Characters include an infomer-

Rogers

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

it

“We may

be through with the past but the past ain’t through with

best:

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

story.

characters attempt to correct

face their past.

9. Instinct

Stir

of

collection

their future but first they

Sam V

10.

a

as

but there are several

experience

when he con-

is

is

sweet, genius

there’s the

boy (Blackman), who wants noth-

Robards plays Mackey’s dying father, who walked out on his wife and child. This forms the basis of Mackey’s resentment. Robards is married to Linda Partridge (Moore), a beautiful, younger woman, who at first is interested in her husband’s money.

She

Then

also a dramatic

woman who

dependent on prescription drugs.

ing

more than

but

is

to please his father

Blackman is forced when he is continue the game show

ignored.

to disappoint his father

made

to

after urinating all over himself. It’s

interesting to

watch

the

all

characters connect and intensely unfold.

The

same time

you to and at the

film forces

examine your own

life

pity theirs.

The pack-

nicely put together with

In the end she finds love for her

age

husband.

clever graphics, photography and

Officer Jim Kurring (Reilly)

cop who

is

a

love while on the a young woman addicted to cocaine and ends up

job.

falls in

He meets

its

melodic sounds. But the best has been saved for last: an unforgettable ending featuring a bizarre natural disaster, that

caring for her.

is

makes you go

hmm?

the

UW

Student

newspaper is looking for a fulltime, one year contract, salaried employee for the school year commencing March 1/ 2000 to March 31, 2001. As Editor-In-Chief you would be responsible for organizing volunteer staff, overseeing ail production/layout for all sections of the paper and be familiar with IBM compatible computers/desktop publishing. If you enjoy a challenging, fastpaced environment, please submit letter of application,

resume and samples

of writing to Katrina DiGravio, Staff

Relations Co-ordinator, Human Resources. University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 by February 1 2000. ,

personal,

reveals naked emotions By Laura Czekaj Damhnait Doyle is on a path of self-discovery and she’s determined to bring everyone along.

The 24-year-old singer/songwriter

reveals her

naked emotions in her soon-to-be-released

CD,

Hyperdramatic. The CD is a mixture of urban-inspired grooves and romantic overtones, which incorporate a variety of instruments, all of which add to her soulful lyrics. to the

music business. Her

previously released album,

Shadows Wake Me,

Doyle

is

no rookie

earned her a Juno nomination and five East Coast Music Award nominations. Besides her unforgettable name, (pronounced Dav-Ven-net), her songs are one of a kind. Her title song Hyperdramatic, as well as the other songs on her album, are derived from her past experiences and demonstrate a private view into

her innermost thoughts. “It’s really honest,” said Doyle of her album. “I shudder to think that people are going to be able to buy this record in the store, because it’s like

my private journal.

I felt like I

was writing these

songs for me, and only me.” Most of the songs are based on love, ranging from gooey, in the song Sleep Past You, to the lustful Tattooed. Doyle explains her obsession with love by saying, “Love is the basis for everything. These songs are not all love-lust relationships, some are just love in terms of soulmates, friendships.”

The name of the album, Hyperdramatic, was inspired by a comment made by Doyle’s brother,

matic.”

when he

referred to her as “hyperdra-

Doyle describes herself

as positive,

peaceful and yes, dramatic. Trying to pinpoint her particular musical style is next to impossible. She said her music is a cross between Ben Harper and the band

Garbage, yet unlike either of them. She mined not to adhere to stereotypes.

is

deter-

“I have no idea how to describe my music, which I think is a good thing because I don’t

pigeonhole myself. God knows people are going to do that for me,” she said. People who listen to her new album will be

moved by such songs as Maybe A Son and Learn To Crawl, and will hum along to (Because Love Myself, an anthem of independence feawant to be the one by which you count your worth. I’ve been owned since the day of my birth. And I say to you, I can love you more, because I love

I)

turing such lyrics as, “I don’t

myself.”

Remixed

versions

of

Tattooed

and

Hyperdramatic are also available for those who enjoy a more techno beat. Hyperdramatic, which is Doyle’s first record release with EMI Music Canada, is a personal achievement for Doyle. Compared to Shadows is a showcase of

Wake Me, Hyperdramatic

^ Bebt Goes On

Doyle’s vocal talents and a testimonial to her growth as a singer/song writer. Her songs contain lyrics that are extremely revealing of her personal experiences and at the same time sound

oddly familiar to the casual listener. In her song, Sleep Past You, she claims, “I don’t know what I want,” but this CD proves her wrong. Damhnait Doyle knows exactly what she wants, and she’s well on her way to getting it. Damhnait Doyle’s CD Hyperdramatic will be released in

music stores in March.

CAMBRIDGE (Atross

from McDonalds)

622-7774

KITCHENER (Canadian Tire Plaza)

8934464

WATEEMLOO (Between Harvey's

&

Burger Kingll

8847376


— SPOKE, Jan. 24, 2000

Page 12

Condors equal Exsonics By Ray Bowe The

aware that time was dwindling. They unloaded with an all-out

Conestoga

escaped with a 3-3

Condors

offensive

against the

tie

of

leagues

the

offered at the Kenneth E. Hunter

The Condors, considered

a var-

team among the other recre-

ation

league

strong in the

Lopes

came out

teams,

first half,

blew

as Terry

by

shot

a

(win-loss-tie)

Exsonics goalkeeper with less than two minutes remaining in

27,

there

nine-team

will have a rest Thursday because they are

not scheduled to play, but Jan. the

Condors

will

Alianza for an 8 p.m. game

tie.

is

the

The Condors this

a 3-3

in

league.

loose ball and over-powering the

game to salvage Under the rules,

sin-

With the tie, the Condors improved their record to 4-3-1

scramble, Lakoseljac

the

no

meet at the

recreation centre.

the

Exsonics goalkeeper.

The extremely vocal Exsonics knotted the score at 1-1

We DARE you to take the PLUNGE

before

they began getting into penalty trouble.

The Exsonics quickly men down,

found themselves two largely

due

to the

1

team’s constant

verbal tirades directed at the referee,

because they

felt the

9th Annual Polar Plunge asm

penal-

he called were one-sided in favour of the Condors.

1

ties

On

Condor power

the ensuing

play, striker Ilias

bower-play

Tsatsas netted a

goal

to

give

half.

>oals

scored

eague,

came out strong

against

in

the

to start

he second half determined not to )e outworked. player

was

from a fallen Exsonics player played on Jan. 13. The

uncovered

in

front

of

the

left

rebound, making no mistake by depositing the ball into the upperleft

corner

sprawled Sherifali.

of

the

goalkeeper Sherifali

net

(Photo by Ray Bowe)

Doon Pond

clear the rebound.

The goal gave

was out of

position after saving the initial

the Exsonics a 3-

2 lead with less than four minutes

Limited entries available,

to play.

past

Levent

2 noon

Thursday, January 27

game

Condors’ net and swallowed up a

The defensive-minded Exsolics, having the least number of

An Exsonic

Idzik steals the ball

a men’s varsity indoor soccer game ended in a 3-3 tie. in

the

Condors a 2-1 lead going into the second

Condor Marek

Sherifali played a strong

game

Register at the

DSA office.

between the posts, making key saves in the late stages of the contest.

shot and the Condors could not

The Condors were

Proceeds to the Heart

relentless,

with

&

Stroke Foundation

DJ Dancing!

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i

gle point in the standings.

crashed the net, picking up the

Recreation Centre.

sity

mad

In a

overtime period to determine

decisive winner, but Lakoseljac’s

late-game heroics ensured a

the

positioned himself in front of the Exsonics’ goal.

indoor soccer, the highest level of

competition

on

The Condors’ Zlatko Lakoseljac

men’s premier division

in

barrage

Exsonics’ goalkeeper.

second-place Exsonics on Jan. 13,

soccer

in

.

Digital Edition - January 24, 2000  
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