Page 1

3 1st Year

we

Lest By Beverley Grondin Nov. 11 marked 81 years since World War.

the end of the First

After that war,

known

as the

Great War, Canada fought in the Second World War from 1939 to 1945 and again in the Korean War, which began in 1950. Each year on Nov. 1 1 at 1 1 a.m. Canadians take a moment to

winning logo.

FKGE 9

DSA vice-president of education, Tom

com-

Oliverio, second-year

programming

puter

analyst,

second-year

Sperling,

in hopes of preserving the quality

television broadcasting.

of

Accompanying the readings was a Power Point presentation including old war photographs,

moments

remember

the

Remembrance Day ceremony

during the summer. is

to hon-

who

fought for us,” said Coleman. “(We must) not forget the sacrifices they've

made.” In order to remind people of

some of

the lives that were lost

and the

sacrifices

soldiers

adding a visual to the story. Coleman said he wanted to

make this ent

year’s

from years

ceremony

differ-

adding

past,

it is

important to present things in a to

keep

it

interesting for

students.

This year, instead of having

someone read it, Saywell sang poem, In John McCrae’s Flanders Fields.

“(Remembrance Day) our those

Saywell, second-year radio and

new way

Steve Coleman, Doon Student Association’s vice-president of student affairs, started planning

these young

made, the half-hour cer-

emony

FAGE11

The readings were done by Coleman, as well as Mike Harris,

management and Janice

silence was held, to our fallen soldiers.

in Spanish.

pen.”

business

Sanctuary. In the final

it

“As years go by, it gets further and further (in the past),” said Coleman. “With ceremonies like this, it reminds people it did hap-

Jessica

of the ceremony, two minutes of

Voodoo Glow Skulls doin’

forget

commemorate the men and women who served our country life of their descendants. This year, students and faculty at Conestoga College’s Doon campus took the time to reflect in the a ceremony held in

— No. 42

consisted of letters, poems and essays written by soldiers.

Coleman succeeded

in his goal

of reaching the audience. Those in attendance listened attentively,

many with

their heads bent in thought or with eyes riveted to

the stage.

At the end of the ceremony, Coleman led a group of students and faculty to the back of the main building, by the pond, to finish planting the DSA’s yearly memorial tree.

DSA

vice-president of student affairs Steve Coleman chose a plant as this year’s memorial tree for the (Photo by Beverley Grondin) celebration.

Red Maple tree to Remembrance Day

College surpasses campaign goal By Beverley Grondin

“This makes

This year’s Conestoga College United Way campaign has surpassed its $30,000 goal. As of Nov. 4, the total money raised was $32,347.

Eleanor Conlin, chair of academic research and co-ordinator of the United Way campaign at the college, said

she expects more

money

to

end of November. was a wonderful effort,” said Conlin, who mentioned about 68 per cent of college employees donated money this year, up from about 46 per cent last year. Conlin said some money came from the sale of about 80 Conestoga College employee cookbooks and Beaver Foods spaghetti and

trickle in until the “It

Condors fall prey to Humber Hawks.

FBGE12

Pizza Pizza luncheons. “In the province we’re one of the top contributors

among community

said

colleges,”

Conlin, adding Conestoga has exceeded the United Way’s $25,000 cornerstone status for the fifth year.

“We

believe that giving to the United

means giving

Way

to agencies that our students

employees (sometimes) have

Way

access a United

and

to access,” she

said.

According to United Way statistics, about one in three people in the community will

all

it

agency.

a valuable

way of helping

of us,” Conlin said.

Anne MacKay, for the

United

director of development Kitchener- Waterloo and Area

Way

campaign, said the campaign

had raised over 63 per cent of

its

$4.65-

million goal as of Nov. 5.

She said its

last

year the region surpassed

$4.45-million goal by $1 10,000.

Although the city’s campaign officially ends Nov. 12, the money keeps coming in for a couple of weeks afterwards, said MacKay. The total, which will provide funding for next year’s programs, will be

announced Nov.

When

asked

if

26.

she expects donations to

surpass this year’s goal,

MacKay

said

she’s cautiously optimistic.

“You work

as hard as

not to think about

it

you can and

try

too much,” she said.

MacKay said the people who run the campaign, as well as those who donate, are trying to do a little something for people they haven’t met and will never meet. Ann Wallace (left), president of Conestoga’s “The United Way is the invisible thread support staff union and Eleanor Conlin, chair of between the donor and the individual who academic research, add to the United Way needs the support,” she said. (Photo by Beverley Grondin) donations.


— SPOKE, Nov.

Page 2

15,

1999

Two students win new award By Anna

Sajfert

he actually likes, and then worry about fitting the pieces on that

Two woodworking

technology

students from Conestoga College

won

the People’s Choice

Award

at

Woodworking Machinery Supply Canadian Student Furniture Design competition, held in Toronto between Oct. 29 and 31. Mike Miedema, a first-year student, and Tim Scholman, second the

first

and

the sheet.

Scholman

said

project required

the two-week more work and

less sleep.

“But ting,”

we he

never thought of quit-

said.

and a sheet of Wilsonart high pres-

Blair Tullis, publisher of the Canadian Woodworking magazine and the contest organizer, said the jury, which was comprised of three prominent Canadian furniture designers, Michael Fortune, Esther Shipman and Willy Ewafschuk, had a tough decision. “Conestoga’s project was an excellent and very interesting

according to the

piece,” Tullis said. “Interestingly,

impressed the

year,

facturing industry

wood manu-

by designing a

two-level occasional table using

only a four-by-eight sheet of onehalf

sure

MDF (Medium Density Foil) laminate,

contest rule.

The two

ed to be involved in the project because it was an enormous learning process, as well as a challenge.

They effort.

said it was a co-ordinated While Miedema invented

the model, the engineering plan

was Scholman’s he took

it

responsibility and

a step further by render-

ing the design.

“At the

Columbia and Conestoga College had the the University of British

students said they want-

start, I

didn’t really visu-

3-D table in my mind,” said Miedema. “I used the four-by-eight layout and tried to fit a bunch of pieces into that spealize a finished

same design pattern.” Only 12 of the 28 Canadian woodworking and design universities

and colleges participated, he

said.

The

Selkirk

College’s fine

Community

woodworking pro-

gram, from Nelson, B.C., took home the gold for their design of a yellow and black occasional table. Michael Grace, a head instructor in the fine

woodworking program

at Selkirk, said the

dents,

Micha

winning stuand Tim

Forestell

knew how each piece looked, and how it would fit together. So I guess I sort of did it

Duplessis, based their “unequalat-

backwards.”

catching.

He said the next time he will concentrate on creating a design

now,” he

cific area.

I

eral” table

made

on four triangles, which

the design abstract and eye-

“Selkirk

is

Mike Miedema, a first-year woodworking technology student, designed the occasional table, which won him and his classmate, Tim Scholman, the People’s Choice Award at the first Canadian Student Furniture Design competition on Oct. 31 in Toronto. (Photo by Anna Sajfert)

very ecstatic right

said.

The

victory

came

as a surprise to

everyone because Selkirk doesn’t promote itself as a school of design like Sheridan College, which placed fourth, said Grace. Selkirk took home $250 and two power tools by DeWalt. Peter Findlay, a woodworking instructor at Conestoga College, said he is very satisfied with the People’s Choice Award and proud of Conestoga’s woodworking the best one in Ontario,” he

New year will end smoking By Beverley Grondin

public establishment as of Jan.

2000

Smokers in Waterloo Region won’t be able to smoke in any

1,

ing alleys will not tolerate smok-

ing on their premises. Or, at least

.

This means all restaurants, bars, bingo halls, pool halls and bowl-

that is

what the bylaw

is

meant

enforce.

to

CNC

and

Findlay said Conestoga’s table turned out a lot bigger in size

compared

to other tables

because

the students carefully looked at

how each

piece

fit.

Mike McClements, dean of technology

at

Conestoga College, said

show was

because

gratifying overall

there

are

a

lot

of

have

common

stan-

dards for the region. Prior to 1996, each municipality had different bylaws regarding smoking in public establishments.

phase-in,

when all public will become 100 is

planned for

January 2000.

participate

in

next

the

held in 2001.

places

fined $245,”

said Close. “The same fine will be given to individuals smoking in public establish-

ments.”

fined.

Close said

if

an establish-

ment or an individual continues

to

violate the bylaw, they will have to

appear in court and can face a fine of around $5,000. Don Huras, general manager at

Whiskey Jack’s

restaurant and bar

in Kitchener, said

it

will be diffi-

bylaw because the region doesn’t have enough cult to enforce the

involved are the cities of Waterloo, Kitchener and Cambridge and the

people to enforce it. “We’ll be the ones to put out the fires,” he said, adding he doesn’t see being able to stop people from

townships of Wilmot, Woolwich, North Dumfries and Wellesley.

will try to enforce

The

seven

municipalities

smoking

Close said the bylaw has been enforced through an awareness

rant.

campaign by the health department. There is also a tobacco

in

information hotline for people with questions or complaints to

She said there have been about 800 calls per year to the hot-

in the nightclub, but

“We want

it

he

in the restau-

to follow the law, but

a nightclub

I see it almost impossible to try to enforce.” He

added tions

that he is open on the best way

call.

the bylaw.

line.

the

to suggesto enforce

“Many (of the calls are) regarding companies not complying to

Close said only 25 per cent of population Waterloo in Region smoke, and many smokers appreciate the bylaw because

previous expectations, (and)

it

com-

from customers regarding not enough smoke-free areas,”

plaints

(ext. 607)

will

Canadian Student Furniture Design competition, which will be

they don’t comply they will be

to

per cent smoke-free,

Room 2A118

Choice Award. The design was and artistic,” he said. “However, we can’t be too competitive in the area of design because we teach manufacturing.” McClements added Conestoga creative

established with seven munici-

establishments

Writing Centre

are

now working in the industry. “It’s great we won the People’s

People get a warning if they are caught in violation of the bylaw. If

final

...

the

Susan Close, manager of the and cancer prevention program with Waterloo Region, said the smoke-free bylaw was passed in 1996, at which time an agreement was heart, health

Some establishments have been smoke-free since then, and the

Get some free help (No problem)

Conestoga graduates from woodworking department who

in public

palities

Writing Problems?

(computer numerated

control).”

the

facility.

“It’s

said. “Let’s not forget we’re not a design school and the capabilities of our facilities relate to AutoCAD

said Close.

She added the region has 20 enforcement officers who will monitor whether premises are complying with the bylaw. “If owners don’t have signs up alerting their customers of the non-smoking bylaw, they can be

will eliminate the temptation to

smoke. Although Huras said the growing pains of the new bylaw will be difficult to deal with,

he believes

it

will eventually work.

“The one thing

to

compare

it

to,”

he said, “is nobody ever thought Tim Horton’s would become nonsmoking, but it seems to have increased their business.”


SPOKE,

— Page 3

Nov. 15, 1999

In brief

DSA

buys laminator

By Beverley Grondin

Menage said the laminator should be ready for students’ use

Waterloo Region approached the

by Nov.

Conestoga

DSA

15.

during the

summer

Gafeteria reopens

College’s

student

By Anna

compared to 2,350, said John Kast, manager of Beaver Foods. Windows have been installed in the dining room, which was previously a room with four walls and the room now has 18 tables and

Sajfert

organization would want to pro-

Keeping the past

The Doon Student Association purchased a laminating machine for students to use. It will be located in the DSA office in the

alive

something from the Conestoga College community. One idea brought forward at the executive meeting, held Nov. 2,

vide

has

DSA wants Doon students submit their ideas for the Millennium time capsule project The

to

Sanctuary.

Each laminated page $1.50.

DSA

will cost

Becky Boertien

told the

DSA

The

it

must be

their

tribute gifts to the future.

discussed.

DSA

DSA

of colour photocopies, she said. That price is $1 per copy for orders of 31 to 100.

president Ellen

Beaver Foods and Conestoga

Menage

Menage 2 Our

said

and dining room, which now has a

Get the

money

Sajfert

Storelmage, a Brantford-based

will

donate some

Millenium representatives from

depending on the need.

HEPATITIS B VACCINE

likely

to the project,

CLINIC

manufacturer of department store

and design, said Peter Findlay, a

year woodworking technology

woodworking

selecting the top five furniture

program category, the first draw is due at the end of December or early January and the money will go towards his/her winter semes-

designs and Storelmage chooses

ter tuition for

the winner.

For the contestants in the second-year woodworking technolo-

instructor

at

for

displays and fine images and which also has a representative on the program advisory committee for the woodworking program at Conestoga College, has introduced two $1,000 scholarships for students in the woodworking

dent’s tuition, Findlay said. “The only contest restrictions that apply are no yachts, pool

programs.

tables or canoe designs,” he said.

The scholarships will be awarded to the best furniture concept

“It’s

DSA bus By Anna

trip

The money goes toward

Student Association’s executive meeting Nov. 9 began with discussion of an amendment to the bus trip policy. The concern was raised after the DSA announced an out-ofprovince trip to the Buffalo Bills vs. New England football game, scheduled for Nov. 28.

Some members

felt

was

it

the

the

cy that supports appeals for these people in cases of offences such as drunkenness and rowdiness. “Let’s eliminate the non-stu-

dent population,” said

ter

son, said

DSA president Ellen

for

the series of 3 shots

The shots are covered under the DSA Drug Plan

for $4/shot

drawings.

also disputed

looking into contacting other Ontario colleges to determine

what

Doon

week of Nov.

at

$55,

students

In other business, the basket-

Doon campus, asked to use the gym at

Hunter Recreation Centre for games and was then told to pay an hourly fee of $88 for hours booked outside school hours, is E.

open

to

other

20

at the centre

According

to the letter, the

home game

able to hold one this

semester, because of the

cost.

Jenn Hussey, vice-president of student

affairs, said the

definitely needs a policy.

members

shouldn’t have to pay the addi-

because they have

already paid the mandatory ath-

which covers the use 9 a.m. and

gym between

4 p.m.

Menage and Michael

DSA

Harris,

vice-president of educa-

tion, are

looking into

why

stu-

rent out the

gymnasium

of school hours.

outside

the memgym mem-

The remainder of bership policy

Discount wanted

DSA

membership

ing to Menage,

said the club

hold a

on Nov.

Policy needed

bers agreed that a

She

to

.

asking for a discount, accord-

dents must pay $88 an hour to

21.

All last-week ticket sales

the college’s basketball club,

basketball club will only be

their policies are.

club

let-

from the Doon Diamonds,

Georgian College on their bus trip policies and is currently

of the

ticket price

their atten-

game

letic fee,

passed, the executive agreed to

to'

they received a

which needed funds

tional charge

said.

when

Menage said she consulted with Fanshaw College and

Conestoga alumni. Before the bus trip policy was

be

AutoCAD

Menage,

possible ticket discounts for

will

$60

tuition

Prescription

was brought

limit of three tickets per per-

and clubs.

side community, let’s serve the

until the

-

and fees

Ramy

“Instead of serving the out-

available only to

include

It

Michael, promotion assistant

keep the

Only $20/shot

Findlay said the three-year woodworking students’ project must

tion

which has Kenneth at the

The executive

4:00pm

-

The Blue Cafe

for 2000.

as well as non-students with a

who is not a student at Doon campus because

he

1

2001.

go toward his/her summer

Conestoga College students,

ball

students,”

lues. Nov.

9:00am

gist division, the scholarship will

sense.”

imperative to exclude anyone

executive does not have a poli-

common

the stu-

For the participants in the three-

policies

Sajfert

for residence

&

7

1

executive discusses

Doon

The

Wed. Nov.

new scholarship Conestoga College. Findlay is responsible

then get the vax

a not-for-

Woodworking students By Anna

facts,

Our

that

told the executives Nov.

offered a

a joint investment

create

to

is

organization,

profit

made

College

time capsules was also

Millenium, which

for the project.

108 chairs. “It looks more presentable,” he said. Although the Waterloo campus cafeteria has no fast food restaurants yet, it now has a shortorder section and a cook.

in the expansion of the kitchen

organizations

own

The cafeteria at Waterloo campus of Conestoga College, which has undergone two months of remodelling, was reopened on Nov. 1.

Another idea discussed was a major cleanup of the pond.

and building plans

T-shirts

activities

Encouraging faculty and other school

planning to use

is

from past and pres-

members and

they have held.

considering con-

old Spoke stories, as well as old

to that

DSA

to the Our Millenium program, a nationwide effort to encourage Canadians to con-

The executive

price is reduced for orders

of 30 pages or more, according to DSA president Ellen Menage. The

be similar

is

to create a time capsule con-

taining items

the

tributing

at this cost.

price will likely

in

ent

DSA

The

executive at their meeting Nov. 2

used 236 times

office

Sanctuary.

in order to cover the initial cost of

the laminating machine,

DSA’s

the

at

business manager

was

area of 3,000-square feet

total

to see if

is

necessary to

clarify

student’s rights,

doms when

and

free-

responsibilities

using the recreation cen-

which is also open to the outside community. Michael said he was surprised by the dollar figures outlined by Ian James, director of athletics and recreation at Conestoga College. Michael said he has used the gym after-hours, borrowing whatever hockey equipment and gear was available, but was never charged an additional

tre,

fee.

1

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v

,

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;

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|

n

2 i ,

sra a i

(tooss frnm MrllnnnHO

622-7774

BURLINGTON

,

(Canodian

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Tire Ploza)

aul— M^M(Belween

GUELPH

a imlb .Burger King)

884-7376

893-2464 •

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LONDON


— SPOKE, Nov.

Page 4

1999

15,

Commentary

on tax breaks offside

NHL

The provincial government must not subsidize professional hockey teams by offering tax breaks on

their arenas.

That's the message that should be

ernment

response to

in

its

owned sports facilities. The plan, announced

made loud and

clear to the gov-

plan to provide tax incentives to privately

Oct. 28

by Ontario Finance Minister Ernie

Eves, would reduce the province’s share of property taxes from these

by as much as $16 million annually, with the proviso

sites

that

municipal governments must match the reduction.

The proposal ly affects

creates a new. narrowly defined tax class that potential-

only four professional buildings including Toronto’s Air

Canada Centre, Maple Leaf Gardens and SkyDome. The Corel Centre in Kanata, home of the Ottawa Senators, is the other building affected. Toronto Mayor Mel Eastman, understandably fearful of losing prop-

from the three Toronto properties, has voiced

erty tax revenue

approval of the proposal, saying

“We

it

money even

don't have enough

.

.

'

v

L

Till

*£$*,'*

Tv

:

.V

WV VVW

:VV.V''.;V.

.

....

' ' .

.

V.,:

V

.

f -

kids,

.

-

.

.

city.

and for

for the homeless

*»<-

M

1

his dis-

jeopardizes the plan in that

Vi..

.

;

;

'

..

v

:

' '

V'Vcv

'

i .

Mv

' ' '

:

south

if

'

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government assistance

is

V

vw.:

vv

:

v

not forthcoming. iv?

V/i'VV:

V

-

iv.

V

v vi

:i

:

leer pi ole

om

f

i health care '

rii

more of

'

vv

.

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.

:

v.v

vv;v

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men’s

Government

.....

'

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.

urrcct a

vvvvvviv

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'

Smoking

:

=

.

:

Conestoga doesn't have a team simply because the funds aren’t available, said James. s

v

VVWVV'VV

V.VV

may

benefit amateur

teams as well

“The province helps the higher-end teams, because

it's

v

teur level," said James. But this doesn’t give

Conestoga the money

to

fund a \arsity men's basketball team.

NFL in

its

In the

NFL, small-market teams, such as

effectively

the

-

was reduced by almost half. But all the anti-tobacco legislation the government has introduced contradicts the tobacco tax

identification.

Since

the

is

among

all

teams

of the provincial Tobacco

trying

to

lighting

who

to

deter adults

already do.

it sounds simple, selling such a scheme to the union could prove to be an uphill battle.

NHL play-

hibits

anyone from

rettes to

salaries increasing annually

selling ciga-

people under 19 years old.

has implemented, because

in

hibiting

$2,000 to $75,000 were created for

places.

“1 think it’s the

worst example of corporate welfare. This to an industry that pays its players multi-million dollars

saying

is .

.

.

that

we’re going to subsidize them.”

tals,

hockey parlance, the unpopular tax break plan would merit a game misconduct for the government in taxpayers’ eyes. In

at least

smoking

nursing

pro-

in schools, hospi-

homes and shopping

malls.

Pushing the envelope

Spoke

it

is is

a difficult task by pro-

smoking

in

many

so

The government doesn’t want want anyone

it

doesn’t

else profiting

people’s ultimate demise.

rettes cost

I

about $3, but

to impossible for

it

was next

me to buy

them.

smoking eight months ago five years and now I realize

quit

after

anti-tobacco legislation

a good

is

thing, because 14-year-old

smokbecoming as abundant as

ers are cars.

Since

I

won my battle over nicohow much effort the

tine, I realize

government puts into the smoking campaigns. I

government not

suggest the

this issue

from

and make tobacco as

illegal

can’t

heroine.

Face

it,

they’re

addictive and they will both

so endorsed by the government.

you.

Now, before you

label

me

anti-

waste another breath on

think of another lethal substance

further, all

public places in Waterloo Region

the other

same government

people to smoke, but

The Tobacco Control Act hibits

making

selling tobacco to

minors.

On

adamantly against smoking and

proves more profitable than the current scheme. Perhaps Ontario NDP leader Howard Hampton summarized the opposition to the tax break best in a Toronto Star article of Oct.29.

anyone caught

Canada.

hand, the

To ensure tobacco vendors are held accountable, fines from

it

is

ensure profits remain

pocket by keeping tobacco

its

sales

lot to

After the Tobacco Control Act was implemented, a pack of ciga-

I

one hand, the government

10 to 15 per cent beyond the union would not be receptive to revenue sharing unless

inflation,

it

sending mixed messages.

doing a in

pro-

it

On

prevent minors from

up and

The Tobacco Control Act

Although

With player

governments.

government has been vigorously

regardless of market size.

ers

$7 for a pack of cigarettes and they were easy to get without

cut

evision contracts, for example, is evenly distributed

I was 14 years old when I started smoking. In 1993, I spent about

smuggling. The price of cigarettes

Control Act in 1994, the Ontario

tel-

sides of the coin.

Scotia and P.E.I. in 1994 to stop

tion

Green Bay Packers,

Brunswick, Nova

must realize I have the unique perspective to see things from both

and

NHL should incor-

compete with the larger teams because revenue from

New

Quebec,

next collective bar-

gaining agreement in 2004.

on tobacco by Ontario,

tax cut

implementa-

an alternative to the Tory plan, perhaps the

porate revenue sharing similar to the

free as of Jan.

.

provincial

federal

more prof-

,

This legislation follows a drastic

that,

including the

:

teams. James said the plan

As

1

Everybody knows

become smoke 2000

will

kills.

v-vw

i

smoke

just blowing

varsity basketball team.

as

one

of those avid non-smokers, you

The sooner everyone

as

both kill

butts out,

the better.

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

is mainly funded from September to May by the Dooii Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions

expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in

SPOKE

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. News Editor: Nicole Furlong; Photo Editor: Talisha Matheson; Production Manager: Tannis Fenton; Advertising Manager: Phil Wright;

Editor: Beverly Grondin;

Assistant Advertising Manager: Walerian Czarnecki Circulation Manager: Adam Wilson; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz. SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4.

Phone: 748-5220

ext.

691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for anv damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the

amount paid

for the space. Unsolicited submissions

sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m.

Monday. Submissions

ject to acceptance or rejection

or typed; a WordPerfect or

and should be

MS

Word

file

must be are sub-

clear ly written

would be

helpful.

Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph).


Remembering not important By Nicole Furlong On

eleventh day of the eleventh month people around the world paused for a moment of silence to remem-

who gave

ber those

their lives to

ensure a better future for society.

This sacred day

supposed to be

is

a memorial for soldiers in both

Campus question: What impact does Remembrance Day have on you?

hour of the

eleventh

the

who

died

world wars, as well as a

impact

his

Remembrance

war, but he

Day has on

it.

their

The

not personally affected. Faculty

said.

said

it

mean

much

gone for another year and

become shockingly day

is

of

little

Lemay dif-

Paul Mouradian, a second-year construction engineering student,

or no importance to

said the day doesn’t

mean much

to

“I

Conestoga

don’t

know anyone who

day gives people a chance to reflect on those who gave up their

fought in the war,” he said.

Responses from other students

College.

Students

varied a

polled in a ran-

students

dom

survey on

hold a special place in their hearts.

were what

Chris Garstin, a third-year com-

Nov. 9 asked

but the majority of

little,

the

said

agreed the day doesn’t

“It

makes me

immigrated to Canada from the Caribbean where he was bom. “For me the day is about my father putting his life on the line for my mother and I,” he said. “For that I’m very appreciative.”

people allows

did

me

Dan

to

my life the way I am today.”

he remembers

who

the peo-

died by wearing a poppy

and thinking about the good things

Nova

Scotia during wartime, he

remembers a German ship, which had surrendered, being escorted into the harbour by Canadian destroyers.

they did for us.”

“It’s

a time to

remember

For some college faculty and employees, the day has a lot more

really

relevance.

of our history,”

Douglas, program co-ordinator of the law and security administration/police foundations program, said his father fought in the war with the Canadian Armed

Sharma

about the

Fisher said because he lived in

saying she celebrates

Remembrance Day. “It’s a time to remember ple

details

war.

student, suit

teaches in the

probably means more to him than it does to a lot of people because

u s t y n a Masiuk, a second-year marJ

keting

who

Fisher,

broadcasting program, said the day

live

Don

lives for us.

puter programming student, said

Forces, and ultimately his family

happy to know that what those

followed

female students who were polled took a more sensitive approach to the question. Kiran Sharma, a first-year general arts and science student,

him.

at

a

Two

ferent opinion.

has

the majority of

students

them

to

clear that the

it

not affected by

members, however, shared a

dents

doesn’t

because they are

men and

is still

Lemay,

Steve

majority of stu-

celebrate the life that has been the

women. Remembrance Day has come and

grandfather took part in the

second-year broadcast student, took the same attitude as Garstin, but thought a bit more of the day. “When the time comes I think of my family members who might have been involved in the war,” he

lives.

time for present-day generations to legacy of those fallen

Conestoga

at

Letter to the Editor:

a

bad time

he said. “We have to stop and

remember things

like

that.”

Letter to the Editor:

Roost patrons and

staff

members

have just finished reading an article in the Nov. 1 issue of Spoke, titled, “Students Need to Practise SelfRestraint at School” written by Walerian Czamecki. As a member of the wait staff of the Condor Roost Sports Bar, I am offended by the whole article. I recognize Mr. Czamecki as a patron of the Sports Bar. On the day that he is referring to in his article, he was at the Roost with a friend. Yes, they were watching rugby and drinking beer themselves. What I

a hypocrite!

That day, he did not interview any of the students were at the bar. How would he know that they were first-year students? I know for a fact that one entire group was second- or third-year students, most of them with averages of between 80 and 90 per cent. It is also my opinion that the students who come up to the Sports Bar do not drink because of peer pres-

that

sure.

practise self-restraint

They

are just letting loose a

little.

Some

students come to the Roost to play pool or foosball and do not order alcohol of any kind. Do not assume that the students are so stupid that they are incapable of making their own decisions. They are, after all, in college. Do you also assume that this is the first time they have ever drunk? Do you assume that the staff of the Condor Roost is so stupid that we don’t know when somebody has had enough to drink? My mistake was assuming that a journalism student (assuming Mr. Czamecki is indeed one) would attend

the

class

that

explains

you assume nothing.

Remember - ASS-U-ME.

ilways credit

to give

due

t

ed i

of his

own

and asked

free will

this les-

way

the other

around.

:

In his article in the Oct. 25 issue ol Spoke, he reported that

jumping

Doan Student Association (DSA held the pond jump. Just to give credit, the DSA, while

mendable and should be given a standing ovation !t‘s too bad that Adam Wilson didn’t spend the

being a great group working for students, did not organize the

story such as this one,

the

>

jump

in the lake {as

k

;

dingy as

iS ,7.,:

time to get the facts right for a

It was actually by The WAVE

in the lake.

together

Radio Station.

:

::

sri

:

l

iuli

'

id

'

’if

bre

Condor Roost Sports Bar

Loiters to the Editor

STUDENT SERVICES WORKSHOPS FALL

it’s

was due. Apparently Adam

Wilson was not taught

put

Renata Collins Staff at

Give credit where

of the

welcomes topical letters that include the phone number for verification. All letters

1999

No

e-mail letters will be accepted.

THE FOLLOWING WORKSHOPS DO NOT REQUIRE ANY SIGN UP. DATE

TIME

ROOM

PRESENTATIONS

MON. NOV. 1 THURS. NOV.4

11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30

3A620 1D17

STRESS MANAGEMENT

WED. NOV.23

3:30-5:00

2D16

PREPARING FOR

MON. NOV.

FINAL EXAMS

THURS. DEC.

11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30 12:30-1:30

3A620 1D17 2A411

TOPIC TIPS

ON MAKING

MON. DEC.

29 2

6

HAVE YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE CHECKED

THE FOLLOWING WILL BE CONDUCTED IN A DISCUSSION AND NETWORKING FORMAT. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE COME TO STUDENT SERVICES. GAY, LESBIAN, AND BISEXUAL DISCUSSION AND NETWORKING -Please see

Barb Kraler

in Student Services

ON TUESDAY, 23 NOVEMBER 1999 0815H - 1145H DOON CAMPUS, 2nd FLOOR OPPOSITE DOOR #4

BY

MULTICULTURAL STUDENT SUPPORT GROUP -Wednesday, November -Sign

up

3,

1999

@ 9:30 -10:30 a.m.

-Room 2B02 Lynn Robbins or Shawna Bernard

in Student Services

-Please see

in

Student Services for more information

NURSING/PRACTICAL NURSING STUDENTS SEMESTER 1

\


Page 6

— SPOKE, Nov. 15,1999

Student Life-

LRC By Adam Wilson Doon’s

they provide more information than the databases the LRC has.

Resource

The new databases, Newscan,

Centre is currently testing three new databases for student use on

ProQuest and Infotrak, are being used on a trial basis now. Newscan is a Canadian database that consists of 17 English lan-

Learning

their computers.

The new programs tage to

many

are an advan-

students because

Volunteers

Needed

some French language papers. Newscan will be on trial until March 2000. guage

newspapers

ProQuest except

Friendly

needed

volunteers to provide

are

com-

panionship to people who have Alzheimer’s disease. Two hours a week

commitment.

Training

provided (with certificate upon completion).

Alzheimer Society at 742-1422. Call the

new databases

tests three

it

is

and

Newscan, an index of magazine

is

similar to

on many different topics ranging from business to technical areas. ProQuest is on trial until

much

19.

Infotrak, the third is

new program,

similar to the other

two pro-

many difon many topics,

grams. This index has ferent

articles

including business, social sciences

and computing.

It

will

be on

trial

Dec. 1. All of the new databases are well organized, faster than any of the until

currently has and

faster than the Internet, said

Cathy

Potvin,

co-ordinator

information services for the

The new databases

of

LRC.

are not going

any of the ones the has now, said Potvin. to replace

LRC

“The programs we have now are used a lot, and we think they’re good. These new ones will just be in addition to what we already have.”

The

articles

Nov.

LRC

others the

“Each database would cost a few thousand dollars if we decide to keep them.” cally,” said Potvin.

decides whether or not

The Newscan database alone Potvin said the prices change

they will keep the

new programs

based on feedback from faculty and students, she said. Feedback on the new programs has been good so far, but Potvin encourages more feedback so the LRC staff can decide whether or

new databases are useful. Potvin said price is always a consideration when deciding whether to keep a certain database. not the

“The prices vary quite dramati-

catalogue and links to businesses

themselves must always be renewed. “You have to keep renewing your subscription to the database each year. It’s a lot like a magazine.”

new

libraries

databases,

The

has a data video pro-

In

1

999

1

,

RMA

(Robert

Annual

on as many as 600 businesses. is a way to benchmark your business compared to oth“This

ers,”

ware, and linked to the Internet so students can show articles or

Bradstreet

by the

is

tion

The projector is loaded with Power Point, a presentation soft-

she said.

The

second is Dun and (D and B), which is

almost the same as the RMA. D B provides industry norms

while doing

DVP is

one

Associates)

CD-ROM provides different types of informa-

tions.

Web

Conestoga

the

Statement studies. Potvin said this

Student Association, the DVP is used by students doing presenta-

from the

by

first

Morris

(DVP) which is found in group viewing room 5. Partially funded by the Doon

Potvin said the

NOVEMBER

LRC

their students.

jector

objects

local

universities.

Business Student Association for

and and

a presentation.

NINTENDO DAY

and

Two new resources were given to the

different tools.

LRC

K-W Record,

in the area, the

LRC is offering many new and

The

in the services

The LRC’s home page has information, including a partial library

yearly and the programs

the

home page

link.

will cost $2,000.

In addition to the

LRC

linked from the Conestoga

site is

College

also used

ratios

and can be found on

microfiche.

LRC staff while conducting

Potvin said the

LRC

is

trying to

their instructional sessions at the

fit

beginning of each semester. The LRC staff has also codesigned a LRC home page. The

the technology area, so we’re trying to bridge the gap.”

everyone’s needs.

“We need more

information in

Frosty returns. ..brrr

the Sanctuary

MW Sat. Nov. 20 Wm.

This snowman, the first of its kind this year, after its birth on Nov. 4. Fifteen centimetres Waterloo region over Nov. 2 and 3, but all gone by Nov. 5. (Photo by

shortly fell

on

were Fenton:

v

P|l|t

A

Permitted

t

guest

Full-Time, One-Year Post-Graduate Program 2000

Starting January,

Includes transportation Call for

Purchase your at the

ticket

DSA office

more

information'"

519-748-5220, Fjfrfibcial

Tnp

ext. 656.

assistances available

Conestog College

ri

<•


SPOKE,

College wants piece of By

money

make

the college to

Province opening up purse-strings for post-secondary institutions

for

a push for

applied

degrees and increased investment from the provincial

applications,

lege’s board of governors at their

graduating class from high school because of the elimination

Because of the anticipated growth, competition for further funding from universities will be

quality of faculty.

meeting Oct. 25.

of Grade 13.

intense

government

now, Conestoga

is

president John Tibbits told the col-

The time

Though he

believes the effect of

making a

significant investment in post-sec-

ondary education, said Tibbits. In an Oct. 18 press release, the

government said

In that year, there will be a double

because the

right

is

provincial government is

expansion of the infrastructure of Ontario’s colleges and uni-

come

“You don’t

Universities

to the

table with everything.

You need your winners.” Conestoga president John Tibbits

by moving ahead with the SuperBuild Growth Fund. The fund is investing $742 million versities

year for post-secondary institu-

tions of

which $660 million

marked

for

Tibbits

new

told

investment

is ear-

capital projects.

the

board

necessary due to the

is

anticipated growth

in

the double cohort

first-year

as

Sajfert

The Ontario Association of

Fire

program, to be offered

time at Conestoga College’s

campus

beginning

in

September 2000. has 552 lecture hours, will offer

Tibbits told the

“This way,

next

now

gram, bring him into the depart-

we’re hoping to

ment

and off he goes,” said Hancock. The difference the pre-entry pro-

get an approval

the

Ministry

of

gram will make is

Training,

firefighter practice, role

of firefight-

community, hazardous

ers in the

and

(also) part

he

The college will

students in the program. instructors

will

Jim

Hancock,

Kitchener

Offering the program at the college will definitely give

them the

fire

chief

of

the

department,

said

the province.

He added

cut the costs of training, saving the

emergency Jeffrey,

behaviour and

fire

calls,

according to Bill

dean of health sciences

at

Conestoga College.

The

paramedic and nursing programs and decided the program should be

by the college because

Kitchener

fire

spending too

department

much

was

time training

Offering the program at the colis

a better opportunity to

the program will definitely give them the cutting edge, said Jeffrey. Jeffrey said the college is expect-

Correction In the Nov. 8 edition, Spoke

John Tribe’s name

incorrectly in a page 3 arti-

said Tibbits.

he

“You don’t come

to the table

with everything,” he need your winners.”

“You

said.

the universities oppose

fire services

Menage

Student

Ellen

told the board that she

would meet with the three dents

such a move, the decision to grant applied degrees is ultimately a

Doon

president

In other matters,

Association

who

stu-

staged a protest about

Doon campus. The next board of governors

tuition increases at

meeting

is

to

be held Nov. 22.

new program

needs a stronger

train-

Trask said the City of Waterloo has just approved 40 acres of land

ing path.

on Erb

you can attend a school of health sciences if you want to be a nurse, but the fire services has never had such a clear

a training

applied course and the college

career path,” he said.

the applied business.

“In Ontario,

“Conestoga College has are

new

interests

services program,

which

money, competent teachers and

student employment,” he said.

Street,

which

will

be used as

Conestoga

is partici-

facility.

Jeffrey said

pating because the program

is

“Conestoga is serving its mandate and mission as a college,” he said. “We’re expanding our mission and building an academic reputation.”

money. “It’s

becoming very costly to train

firefighters,”

up the

he

said. ‘Training ties

firefighting staff. Besides,

they are of no use to us until they

Hancock said the Conestoga program would mesh with what the fire department teaches firefighters on

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DSA

an

is in

department a significant amount of

Spoke apologizes for the

mistake.

degrees,

said.

a high school diploma.

help promote Acapulco,

cle.

for applied

program would

tie

candidates with the jobs because

spelled

mended

the

firefighters.

lege

from the large readership more than compensates for the $5,000 it cost for Conestoga to contribute,

are out doing the work.”

association likes the college’s

offered

plement, the exposure resulting

programs such as nursing, electronics, robotics and information technology would be initially recom-

in the

Trask, director of training at

Ontario’s 25

the pre-

The Kitchener fire department approached Conestoga and proposed the pre-entry firefighter proabout

similar to the dif-

Though only 18 of

colleges were included in the sup-

there is a shortage of firefighters in

entry firefighting

dates

board.

to

select vocationally oriented

ference between an elementary and

Don

initia-

Guide

entitled, a

Ontario Colleges.

for part-time

cutting edge.

gram, which would teach candi-

Only

included in some Sun Media

newspapers

Chamber of

support such an

mem-

also seek funding

OSAP

iour rescue.

course

Kitchener- Waterloo

In other business, board

ber John Sawicki circulated Sn Oct. 23 supplement that was

time in January 2001,”

approval from

The

degrees, local organizations such as Communitech and the

degrees.

said.

materials and psychology of behav-

include local firefighters.

program

colleges question of pursuing applied

the Kitchener fire department, said

we would take the fire-

fighter off the shelf once he has gone through the pre-entry pro-

September.

Though some the merits

enrol in

the job.

35 students to

the

Though

wannabes can

Colleges

behaviour, fire ground operations,

said Tibbits.

ties,

also dramatically increase college

number of

Universities to offer the

fire

and would support the need

despite the objections of universi-

emergency

responder,

The ability to offer applied degrees would enhance the value of colleges to high school gradufor increased funding for colleges,

courses such as communication, first

overall value of degrees.

18-

from

The two-semester program, which

grant degrees would dilute the

able increase in the

“Right

faculty’s representa-

on the board, said enlisting the help of faculty would be valu-

would ultimately upgrade

tive, Tibbits told the

to

Applied-degree powers would

enroll

Bob Evans, tive

and

qualified to teach degree-granting

programs and allowing colleges

first-year

anticipated,

political one, said Tibbits.

Tibbits,

Commerce

not be as dramatic

ing between 30

Chiefs has approved the pre-entry

said

siz-

to

Doon

on

argue,

board he nevertheless expects a

Firefighter By Anna

may

will

said

Tibbits, that college faculty is not

ates

enrolment

such

and colleges lack the “immense lobbying power of universities,” said Tibbits.

committing

it is

to the

full

pie

able in the pursuit of applied

students in 2003.

to 24-year-olds attending college.

firefighter

— Page 7

Wright

Phil

The window of opportunity

this

Nov. 15, 1999

office.

are to purchased by Mon. Dec, 6


Page 8

— SPOKE, Nov.

15,

1999

r

Former Conestoga teacher goes home By

A

Phil

Wright

former Conestoga College journalism

ambitious project, Hagarty said 90 per cent of the writing in the book is his own. As an exercise in self-discipline, Hagarty

instructor discovered writing, researching

vowed

and publishing a book is not only an exhausting and educational process, but

ing to the

when

graphs.

the subject matter

is

intensely person-

make

at least one phone call relatbook every evening of the week. The book also contains nearly 300 photo-

to

can also become a labour of love. Km Hagarty, a journalism instructor from

Conestoga journalism instructor Jason Gennings took on the enormous task of

September 1994 to August 1999, just book entitled Home Again, an

photo editor, a job that included restoring photographs that were nearly 100 years old. The enormity of the task forced Gennings to improve his computer skills.

al

it

released a

Emigrant Family Returns to Ireland. What began as a lifelong interest for Hagarty evolved into a personal commitment to tell the story of the discovery of an ancestral Hagarty home and its long line of inhabitants.

When

he discovered the ancient

County Cork to

be

at least

home

in

which is believed 200 years old, was going to be in Ireland,

tom down, he decided

to

make

the neces-

sary repairs and recover his outlay by sell-

ing a

book based on

the

home’s storied

his-

tory.

However, the process of documenting a home took on a life of its own, said Hagarty. “One day I sent 800 e-mails to find a descendant,” said Hagarty, “and it didn’t family history from a distant

tep up

anything.”

information from a source suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

was

difficult,”

“Fortunately, he

Although

tor.”

In one particular case, a photograph

tom

in half

was

said

Hagarty.

lucid at the time.” relatives contributed to his

was

and Gennings seamlessly com-

bined the two halves. Gennings was also confronted with a photograph where a subject’s eye was missing

and another that was covered with droplets of spray paint.

Adobe to damaged pictures.

In both cases, Gennings used

painstakingly restore the

Despite being a book largely devoted to history,

Hagarty hired an American genealogy company to find the descendant and they discovered he married in Nashville in 1858, but found little beyond that, he said. In one case Hagarty needed important

“It

200 hours on this project,” I must have doubled my knowledge of Adobe Photoshop and Quark XPress as a result, so the project had an enormous benefit for me as an instruc“I spent at least

said Gennings, “and

the photographs selected for the

book needed

to

meet

specific criteria, said

Gennings. “Jim tried to avoid pictures of old people, tombstones and babies,” he said. “He tried to find pictures of subjects in their prime, and they also needed to tell a story.”

While writing the book, Hagarty made

it

students and his knowledge obtained while teaching at Conestoga, the book wouldn’t

at night and checking the stacks of books he has stored in his home.

have become a reality. The lesson he wants passed on to students after completing such an ambitious project

“Not only was it a labour of love, it became an obsession,” he said. The book, which is selling for $50, is not

is

simple.

“If you

want to do something you feel passionate about, you just have to do it,” he

a

point to periodically update his students of his progress.

said.

Though

the book is now completed, Hagarty occasionally finds himself waking

In fact, said Hagarty, without the help of

available in bookstores. Instead. Hagarty selling the 1,000 copies printed

Stratford

He

home.

anticipates,

due to the personal family from

value, that sales will be derived largely relatives.

Management Workshop

Stress ilpP

1 1

-„„y

Wednesday, November 24 3:30

-

5:00 p.m.

Room 2D16 Learn about: recognizing your reaction to stress

symptoms of stress exhaustion vKSBI

ways to deal with stress mpniniii

is

from his


SPOKE, Nov.

Student Life

1999

15,

— Page

Winning logo

unanimous cap symbolizing officers and youth working together, was choball

By Nicole Furlong

sen for various reasons, accord-

The

Committee

Officers

the

for

of Youth Province of

Rob Mayea, of the Hamilton Wentworth regional ing to Sgt.

Ontario is getting a fresh look, thanks to one of Conestoga’s graphic design and advertising

police.

students.

contemporary, simple and it included traditional colours including red and blue with

Alice Vellema, a first-year student, competed against 29 of her classmates to design a new logo for the organization on Oct. 27.

Her design won

Mayea said they chose Vallema’s design because it was

green.

The committee

especially liked

10 members of the committee considered the

emphasis on friendship between youth and officers sym-

decision.

bolized in Vallema’s logo. Mayea, along with Det.

after

Vallema said she is excited about winning the contest, considering she only had one day to work on it. “I didn’t think they were going to

pick

my

design,” she said.

Conestoga’s first-year graphics class was presented with the challenge of creating a new logo to be used on everything from name cards to T-shirts. to complete

their logo design

and prepare a speech on reasons for choosing that type of logo to present to the committee on Oct. short

28.

design,

entailed a police hat

which

and a base-

Doug

Alice Vellema touches up her winning logo which Province of Ontario.

she designed

for the

Committee

of

Youth Officers

for the

(Photo by Nicole Furlong)

Turner of Peel regional police, to Conestoga on Nov. 3 on behalf of the committee, to

came

Student wins $500 award

announce the winner. They also chose two other students’ designs by Sasha Drumond and Starla Wick, which will.be used solely

who

teach-

year-one students, said he agreed with the committee’s decision, adding they had a tough time judging the designs.

money

Getting the

on posters. Vince Sowa, a member of the graphic design faculty

The students had

Vallema’s

the

encouragement to go on in her

By Nicole Furlong

studies, she said.

es

“It

was between Alice’s logo and

another student,” he said. “In the end, though, it was a unanimous vote for Alice.”

help a great deal

will

self-sufficient is

The Zonta Club, a world-wide

A

management

stud-

Conestoga has

won

third-year

ies student at

a $500

which works advance the status of women, has been donating this award to single mothers who are working to better themselves for about

from the

scholarship

two, said she is enthusiastic about wanning the scholarship. The money will help her a great deal, she said. “Most of all it’s a real validation for me,” she said. “It’s a challenge being a single mom, and

winning

my

this

award

award

five years.

average in school, being enrolled in a non-traditional program, such as engineering and being a resident of Cambridge. Zonta offers the award to

young women

vate

given

to

Conestoga students only. Students are required to apply scholarship, which is

better

for the

themselves, says Cora Fritzley, club treasurer.

nice

“It’s

has

to

see

awarded each year, usually at the awards banquet for the program in which the winning student is

somebody

going back to school and better-

her

all

Criteria for winning the scholarship include being a single mother, achieving at least a B

The volunteer club, which has been in operation for approximately 48 years, began this scholarship fund in order to moti-

really boosts

what we want

do.”

to

self-esteem.”

The

women to

service organization

Zonta Club of Cambridge. Rose Cherri, 27, a mother of

ing their lives,” lives she said. “Being

enrolled.

0

COUNSELLOR'S CORNER: Unsure About Your Program Choice? 1 1 1

At

this point in the fall term,

beginning to students

This

is

the event

you have been waiting

!

feed you; have you begging for more!!

We'll We'll

for!

clothe you;

we'll

Mil

1 1 I i i 1

Sign

up

in

the

1

7

1,

Jpf office

What

they have chosen the course of study

did you think would be interesting about the program? Try to

identify -

How

what you were hoping

do your courses

differ

to leam.

from your expectations? Are they not

challenging enough, or are you lacking some prerequisite skills or

knowledge

What

different -

be successful?

to

aspects of your courses are you interested in? Are these areas to in greater

depth

with school?

Do you

that

may be

Why

more closely

related to a

interfering with your involvement

spend more time thinking about your socihl

your family, sports or other -

or are they

later,

program of study?

Are there other issues

did you decide to

life,

activities?

come

to college?

qualifications for a specific career goal?

Are you looking Are you

living

up

to gain to the

expectations of family and friends? -

Did you come

to college

because you weren’t sure what else

to

do

after

high school? Talking about these issues can help clarify you clarify your goals. If you

would

i

if

are having these thoughts, try asking yourself the

I -

1 1 1 1

wondering

1

be examined

1 1

you

following questions:

-

1 i

I 1

and

are settling into a routine

of familiarity with their classes. However, some

feel uneasy,

best suited to them. If

-

Wed. Nov.

feel a sense

may

most students

1

I

like to discuss questions

about your college and future career,

please drop by Student Services and ask to speak to a counsellor.

A Message from

Student Services (Room 2B02)

i


W

1

nr

I

A CANADIAN INSTITUTE of MANAGEMENT Grand Valley Branch

Leading The

Way

For Over 50 Years

ADVANCE YOUR CAREER IN

Learn about the

MANAGEMENT

CIM

program

in the

Conestoga College

Continuing Education Catalogue

or

Contact: Jay Moszvnski

Room

I

B49 6} Boon Campus

1-51 9-748-5220 Ext. 492

4:30pm

or

CANADIAN INSTITUTE of MANAGEMENT National Office

1-800-387-5774

Wednesday November 24 fife-

e-mail: officegjcim.ca Internet: http://www.cim.ca

The Cross Roads a*

Meeting

Room

B

PI

B

with

O-, ht

y Game

ill

DJ Dancing!

<o'

Westmount PlaceShopping Centre, 50 Westmount St., Waterloo (519) 884-8558 100% CANADIAN DWNED,OPERATED ANDTAXEDI

V

OAKVILLE BURLINGTON BARRIE HAMILTON WATERLOO. .

.

.


SPOKE, Nov.

15,

1999

— Page 11

)

Rascalz:

Global Warning ByTalisha Matheson

groups represent

move you

will

three as skill-

all

fully as the Rascalz.

The CD, Global Warning,

Finally, the wait is over.

anticipated

hit the streets Oct.

Global Warning boasts a plethora of tracks and interludes that showcase precise lyrics over remark-

26 and proved

able beats.

Global Warning

is

Twenty head-bobbing, bodyshaking tracks will make you get out of your seat and shake all that is within, while the tantalizing

an

exceptional CD, but

lyrics stick in

Cash Crop

superior.

is

Featured

your head.

Canadian Choclair,

artists,

Cash Crop had

hop

hip

Kardinal

and K-OS, mixed with Rascalz style will leave you mesOffishall

hop MVPs. MCing, DJing and break-danc-

the Rascalz are hip

merized.

ing are the three elements of hip

CD, but

New album By Brian

its share of feabut Global Warning went overboard, with more than 50 per cent of the songs featuring

tured

artists,

popular

With

Global Warning

hop and not many Canadian rap

Crop, reigns superior.

is

an exceptional

their last release,

Cash

artists.

Global

Warning

able to

rhyme on

their

own. At the

make your

will

the

Rascalz lost their credibility to be

CD beginning of the

CD

the Rascalz

promised to, “leave your body numb” and by the end, you won’t be able to move. Be on the lookout for their

skull

art

embrace of the three elements that hop culture: MCing, DJing and break-dancing. This is what Global Warning and the Rascalz are all about. represent hip

glow

Gall V"

Voodoo

Glow

Skulls’

release, Exitos al

Carbon,

new not

is

just another greatest hits compilation.

Only two new songs appear on what makes it so

the album, but

awesome done

is

every song

that

is

in Spanish.

amazingly

Voodoo has been called Latinopunk and has recorded Spanish

new

whom

ter,

makes an appearance on

2000)

last three

by Epitaph.

November

originally

tour of Europe

skull glow.

Skulls.

band contains

six-piece

three Casillas brothers.

and Eddie the

CD

It’s

hard to find a

band than Voodoo Glow

Even fans with every Voodoo album should buy Exitos al

Frank the

Carbon.

guitarist are

releases for Nov. 16

Various Artists:

Bob

Marley: Chant

Down Babylon Big Punisher: Endangered Species Celine Dion: Ail the

Y2K

way

Kurupt: Streetz Iz a Mutha

Raekwon: Imobifarity Gov’t Mule: Live

.

.

.With a

from our friends Korn: Issues

Run-D.M.C: Crown Will Smith:

Willennium

little

teacher certifica-

help

(or

by

corre-

available

NOW.

FREE

information package,

from Riverside, Calif., the band has been together since 1988. And they’ve been tighter

English:

(Janl7-21,

spondence). 1,000’s ofjobs

Originally

practising.

hr.

tion course

includes shows in London, Paris

have been translated to English. Randy Gordo (Fat Randy), first released on Firme, will make your

vocalist

albums were

and Copenhagen.

were

day/40

TESOL

A

recorded in Spanish but a couple

This

5

Voodoo’s

they toured last win-

tunes

TRAVEL-teach

Exitos al Carbon was released on Grita! Records of New York City. released

Exitos al Carbon.

Most

Classified

horns.

Every other tune originally appears on either Firme or Baile De Los Locos. Not one track from The Band Geek Mafia, record.

with

by

A

saxophone and a trombone are also thrown into the mix, molding a jumpy punk sound with killer, funky

songs on all of their past four albums. Two tracks from their first record, Who Is This Is?, appear on the

complemented

Jorge, the bassist.

free 1-888-270-2941.

CD

art

toll


Page 12

— SPOKE, Nov.

1999

15,

Crash

kills

CART driver Greg Moore’s career comes to a tragic end was a tragic to end the

CART

day before the race. But both Olvey and Dr. Terry Trammwell, an orthopedic sur-

as

geon, cleared

It

way

season, well as a

career.

Canadian

I

Greg Moore, 24, was killed on Oct. 30

when

his

car

spun

out

of

Marlboro 500,

3

at

at

a men’s hockey game on Nov.

cautions already in place, but sometimes a driver loses control

(Photo by Nicole Furlong)

car rocketed sideways off the track, on to a grassy area.

and just becomes a passenger, said Mauricio Gugelmin, veteran CART driver, in an interview

Hawks dine on Condors Excess penalty minutes cause Conestoga team lose their second game of the 1999 season 5-

Humber had a

five-to-three-man

an unbelievable number of penalty minutes, Conestoga was defeated by the Humber to

wound down in the game. Coach Ken Galemo, however,

Hawks 5-3 in their fourth league game of the season on Nov. 3 at

was fine. “A winning team doesn’t blame their loss on the refereeing,” he

home, taking

said.

(win, loss,

their record to 1-2-0

tie).

Darrell

Conestoga served 71 minutes in the

penalty

box,

opposed

to

Humber’s 43. Although the action was in Conestoga’s end for the majority of the first period, the score was tied at 1-1 by the end of the period. Kyle Boulton scored for

He was

assisted

for the

The last period followed suit as Woodley scored his second goal for the Condors making the score 3 halfway through the third.

by Dave difficult

still win, Humber scored the final goal of the game, leaving the score

Galbraith and Shane Neil.

The home team had a

Woodley scored

Condors with assists from Greg Thede and Boulton.

were made by Ian MacDonald and Boulton. With time left on the clock and a slim chance the Condors might

Conestoga about 16 minutes into the game.

said the refereeing

second period as Humber scored three goals, two of them off the top of the period, while Conestoga netted one.

Assists

3.

Convening was tedious throughout the game, especially in the final minutes.

Galemo added he was

disap-

lost

control

crete

Sign

up

in

the

with the Toronto

Racing by

The car and slammed head-

retaining

wall.

The

car then

pieces,

finally

shattered

coming

to

its

gerous sport. involved that

on into the wall at 370 kilometres per hour. Moore’s head took most of the force of impact.

aware race,

Star.

nature

is

a dan-

There are risks all

drivers

Moore acknowledged

those

into

Accidents, as unfortunate as they are, happen. This was the fourth driver fatal•

stop

ity

CART’s 20-year

in

history,

yet the second in two months.

Jim Hickman was killed in Milwaukee in 1982. Jeff Krosnoff was killed at the 1996 Molson Indy in Toronto. That crash also killed two comer

internal injuries.

practice in

It is believed that Moore brushed the wall at the first turn and that caused a right-side tire

to deflate,

game. “We’re straggling with a fair amount of unnecessary penalty minutes,” he said. And Conestoga’s key players are the ones collecting most of the minutes in the box.

control and the accident.

which caused

loss of

Gonzalo Rodriguez was

There are many theories as

why Greg Moore was

workers.

to

killed.

killed

during practice on Sept.

11

at

Laguna Seca Raceway.

There are claims that the cars are too fast and should be slowed down. There are claims there are not enough safety measures in

occur. In such a dangerous sport, safety should be a priority before

the sport.

someone

“We took ourselves out of the game,” Galemo said. Goalie Jamie Taylor, who played the entire game for the Condors,

been allowed

faced 46 shots on net.

injured in a previous accident.

The team’s next game will be Wednesday, Nov. 10 at 7:30 p.m. at Conestoga College.

His left-hand ring finger was broken and he had suffered lacerations in 0a scooter accident the

One of was

that

the

more controversial

Moore should

not have he was

to race, as

shameful that safety issues

It is

are raised only

when

accidents

gets killed.

unfortunate that such a talented driver’s death should cause It is

people to question safety. These issues should be addressed before someone dies. It is

a costly mistake to learn

from.

Bus 1rip 28,

1

999

& Oto Tickets $55 w/ Includes coachline transportation

Permitted o ne guest

are

Just days before the

of.

risks.

upside down on Moore’s head. Dr. Steve Olvey, CART director of medical affairs, said Moore died from massive head and

m^{jnday November -

of

The wheels dug into the grass, sending it into a sideways spin about 10 metres before a con-

pointed in the team’s play this

Bufftilo Bills Vs. New gland En]

at the California

in Fontana.

then flipped

to

advantage on the ice as the minutes

Thanks

Moore

himself was a professional driver. If he felt unable to race safely, he would not have raced. The fault does not lie in the doctors’ hands or Greg Moore’s.

his

4-

By Nicole Furlong

believed

Reynard/Mercedes-Benz while coming off the second turn. The

Moore Woodley faces off against a Humber Hawks player Conestoga. The Condors were defeated 5-3.

do not believe the doctors

The drivers in CART and Formula One are highly skilled and there are a lot of safety pre-

Speedway Darrell

for the race

made a mistake. They Moore was fit enough.

control and crashed into a wall on the first lap of a restart of the

Condor

Moore

after a 15-lap test.

9:00am departure from Door 4

Digital Edition - November 15, 1999  
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