Issuu on Google+

31tstYear

— No.

8

#

Candidates address issues By

Lisa Wilhelm

two candidates running for vicepresident of education.

The candidates

Boon

ing

upcom-

for the

Student Association

elections delivered their speeches in

The Sanctuary on

less

than

Feb.

attentive

to a

1 1

crowd of

Conestoga College students.

Mike

Harris,

officer,

chief returning

candidates for this year’s election.

The

first to

give her speech was

who

is

your

are

is

“My

issues,”

is

a student in the general arts and science program, wh'o is switching to the computer

programmer

analyst program. She has repre-

began by introducing the

Jennifer Harron,

Harron, whose slogan issues

one of

sented her class by sitting on the college’s

board of directors. She has also been involved in

many

DSA

events over the past

year.

Harron said she

is

concerned

that tuition increases every year

Former Conesti^ student' gets children’s book

and OSAP does not reflect this. She said she is also concerned

fished.

that students cannot earn more than $600 if they have received

OSAP

funding.

Harron said she

feels

she

is

qualified for fhe position because

made

she has

Gettiag romantic at

tiie

Biz Bash.

Valentine’s

(Photo Lisa Wilhelm)

PAGE 16

'

education.

who wanted to

fan for vice-president of student

Graphics students design

and pin for Skills Canada

>vinning poster this year’s

competition.

1,

to

that he

on

Feb.

would not be allowed

mn.

Laacoseljac approached the

submit a

^o list

DSA

and was told to of 50 signatures

before the speeches were held

CtoMMElsriARy Page 4

and he could run. But, according to

Mike

Harris, chief returning

officer for the

DSA

elections,

Lakoseijac was misinformed.

Are

Levi’s

a valid

“Anybody caa

fun,” he said, “as

long as they follow the

defense against

DSA

ratesL’’

president Kristin

said the

rape?

by Lisa Wilhelm)

childhood education student, gave her speech in the form

allowed her to get to know the people on the DSA executive and

tions

of a story book, which told of her

this led to

Slaughter and Harron then answered questions about the

experiences and reasons

why

she thinks she would be the best

person for the position.

Slaughter said her difficulties

The book revealed how she gained independence as an only child, but works well on a team.

OSAP

and getting involved such things as the board of

in

governors

at

the

college

has

her decision to run for

vice-president of education.

Slaughter said she wants to

work

election

appropriate

and meet the guidelines. These

did

rules

not

specific guidelines are published in the

Conestoga student hand-,

book'

included Steve Coleman, vicepresident of student affairs, Brian

Bambrick on behalf of Jenn Hussey, vice-president of operaand Ellen Menage, presi-

dent.

issues they plan to deal with, if

Conestoga students to improve their, and her, future. The acclaimed candidates then

Harris ended the meeting by reminding everyone to go out and

gave short speeches. These

vote.

for

elected.

mishap

for

Jan.

Mirphy

EKSA consaitntion sets out

position, but because

he did not

18 at 9 a.m. until Jan. 27

like

was

college.

told

it

was not possible

for

him- to run.

began and his discussion with members of the DSA executive created a

nomination

signatures

election speeches.

students

the

at

college.

The

of the

commotion Sanctuary

Lakoseijac,

to

is sincere and would do something for the

saw someone would make other people get more involved” “I think if people

Lakoseijac was told he could

noon. To be nominated a student had to aquire a list of 50

from

he says he

follow the election process, he

not run just before the speeches

Nominations were open from at

two weeks

PAGES

told just before the

election sjieeches, held 1

-

early

strict

First-year accounting student

was

-

,

with

Lakoseijac

affairs

-

elections spark controversy

By Lindsay Gibson

Zlatko Lakoseijac

,

.

MIscommunicaflon blamed

DSA

-

-

efforts to research

problems that students encounter. The second of the two candidates running for vice-president of education spoke next. Rebecca Slaughter, who is an

life

Jennifer Harron, first-year general arts and science student, addressed OSAP funding in her speech.

Rebecca Slaughter, first-year early childhood education student, presented her candidate speech in the form of a story book outlining her life and her desire to become DSA vice-president of

who

is

at the

back

during

the

a

member of

like

me on DSA,

it

he said

According Lakoseijac ’s

Harris,

to list

of signatures

would not have been he had gotten it

valid even if in

the deadline because the

before

names

would then attend a candidates’ meeting on Jan. 28 and could begin their campaigning Jan. 29 at 4 p.m. Campaigns ran until Feb. 1 2 at 4

said he just wanted a chance to

were not accompanied by student numbers, something required to

run.

validate the

p.m.

zero votes then

successful candidates

Lakoseijac

came

to school Feb.

with a prepared speech and 36 posters r^dy to run for the 1 1

the Condors indoor soccer team,

“I just

name on

want them the ballot I

to put ray

and

do.

I

if I

just

get

want

the chance,” he said.

Lakoseijac said he didn’t think the

DSA

took him seriously, but

list.

“If you want to be on student council you have to be somewhat

organized” did not

said

know

Harris

Lakoseijac

who was

interested in running until the day

of the speeches.


— SPOKE, Feb.

Page 2

22, 1999

Executive looking into installing

cameras

security By Melissa

DSA to

Sanctuary

in

help group

with transit problem

Dietrich

The Doon Student Association

By Melissa

considering installing surveil-

is

was

lance cameras in the Sanctuary

DSA

and the

office to stop theft

and vandalism. Jenn Hussey, DSA’s vice-president of operations, said they

money

suspect

meeting.

DSA’s

has been stolen

tion

Keys

the

for

DSA

Student

that

ing and the area that holds the

however,

money was found unlocked.

talking stage.

who

appioachod

DSA

had

bolli

arc looking into

remains

it

Jack

Flctchei,

Hussey said Rowley believes she had done more sales the day

that

last

before than the cash balance that

were unsuccessful Ulempts to get the

indicates.

supposed to be in the

“We

said.

sure that

till,”

stolen or

how

Jenn Hussey, DSA’s vice-president of operations, discussed the suspicious thefts and the increase in vandalism in the DSA office and Sanctuary where the change machine has been broken into.

the

DSA

also

was

stolen

much.”

Hussey

said

suspects alcohol

the office between Feb.

(Photo by Melissa Dietrich)

from 4 and Feb.

show. The television converter

is

also missing.

broken.

executive heard a noise similar

machine

prevent any further

“People are just being too rough

executive meetings, which are

with the equipment,” said Hussey.

held in The Other

to

the executive discussed bolting the change

DSA

During one of the Tuesday

DSA meeting,

Room,

the

an aerosol hairspray can going

to the floor to

Four bar stools were stolen 19, the night of the DSA’s spaghetti dinner and comedian

Jan.

Another concern

Sanctuary after 7 security locks

out the pressure,” she said.

is

Vandals also do damage to the

the

is

who

of students

coming from the lounge. “It turns out somehow, somebody kicked off or removed the thermostat box and it was pushing off

theft.

foose ball and air hockey tables on

a weekly basis.

weekend of the outdoor camping event. The lock on the change machine in the Sanctuary was also found 8, the

During the Feb. 9

was a good cause

this

Wasilka

and he would be

also

they

he agreed

Fletcher said

of

wilting

two mayors but to

their

in

cities

support Wasilka and

to

group, ' :

Fletcher said he agreed ‘tihiv

she

can’t say exactly for

money was

on six walk safe

program.

the

iliiectoi

told

tear

$700 the

oK!o0ciestoga

was

that

approximately jackets' for

spend

to

systeim

exact

the

cities

student and rocicdlum services.

approiuilied Uic

motion

a

Kristin

the day before.

the

DSA

During the meeting the passed

issue,

in

president

jammed, Rowley had been unable to do a printout of the sales done

“We didn’t know amount of money

tliis

referendum question on the

election ballots.

she repre-

Murphy and

day

A

dental plan will appear on the

,

sents

until

on Feb.

election

18.

would

which Rowley locks but two weeks ago she came in one morn-

DSA

after the

in the

of the office are kept in a cabinet

register

from

support

for

concerned citizens

Because the cash

agreed with

should wait

plan

dental

the

fonn of a presentago before and Kitchener the both Cambridge city councils. Wasilka said the group of

areas

different

this plan,

that further consideration of the

end of the day, she takes the money and puts it in a designated spot and then locks it.

of

(DSA) meeting on Feb. 9. Maty ami Wasilka of Kitchener asked

at the

has been looking into the

details

the remainder of the executive

sible for the cash register in the

and

of

Gerry Cleaves,

AssociMon

Doon

Hussey said the administrative assistant, Janie Rowley, is responoffice

who

vice-president

student affairs,

and Cambridge was among the items on the agenda for the

DSA office.

from the

A guest speaker who discussed system between Kitchener

students,

to

also discussed during the

the possibilities of a linked transit

offered

currently

Dietrich

get

number

into

p.m.,

the

when

aU the doors and

sets the alarm.

“If

you’ve got six kids hanging

out in the Sanctuary after hours, easier for

them

to

it

walk out

with things,” she said.

exeuiUxe aNo decided

I'he

to

was a good cause andjie w'uuld tlf»ndle S9.'5 to the Meningitis tti mlar iurtvi t'anada. he wilhng to suppi»vt'*WasiilIS*^‘' R cse who are having a 'Backstreet aiul her group Boys and .Spice Girls tribute Other i turns on the concert at Lhlu’s in Kitchener on included an update on soto i

March 20, Becky Boertien, the DSA’.s

by DSA’s entertainment manager

possible forthcoming events ’

Patty Stokes.

T"

-

< ^

Iho,

is

looking into holding

Walper Hotel

in

^

Kitchmer

on Mardh 24Another possible year-end event the DS.A is considering is bnnging in hypnotist Tony Lee who was at Conestoga last year.

The

possibility

direetta-

of the

DSA

«

offering an opt-out dental plan, similar to the opt-out health plan

of student

office

money

ban#; ^i^;Sltokes

DSA

.

the

fhe

is

life,

personnel

reported

suspect

DSA

missing from the

office,

Sim

said

believes

she

iL

happened over the weekend

of. 1

Feb, 6-7.

The executive

r is

installing security

looking into

cameras

in the

Sanctuary following icports of theft

and vandalism.

The next DSA meeting take place on Feb 16.

wilji

Doon Student Association Annual Awards Awards

Criteria for

Certificate of Appreciation to college life has

been

-

The Recipients of

this

award are members of the College Community whose contribution

significant.

of Distinction - The recipients of this award are members of the College has been outstanding.

Award life

Award

of Excellence

-

The

highest award presented by the

outstanding leadership and involvement in college

Community who

Doon Student Association

contribution to college

PEER TUTORS in recognition

and appreciation of

life.

CAN HELP! Doon Student Association Award Nomination Form Phone

Name of Nominee: Cilv:

Address:

o Student o Faculty

Award Nominated

Postal Code:

Program: School:

Staff/Administration

Year:

CHECK INTO HIRING A TUTOR

COME TO STUDENT SERVICES (2B02)

Dept.:

for:

Peer Services

Certificate of Appreciation

D Award o Award

#:

of Distinction of Excellence

The above named nominee has made

the following contributions to College Life at Conestoga:

,


SPOKE, Feb.

Even

22, 1999

Page 3

gone

after you’re

Tax return may catch up with you By Jacqueline Smith who

Students

from

the

work, said Walsh.

money

receive

Ontario

Students in their final year are

“The feedback we are getting is, ‘Why should I bother to work?’” While Walsh is not sure if the

Student

Assistance Program often find a student loan is not enough to cover

ministry will increase the amount

needs while they attend

the start of the next school year,

their basic

Many

school.

work

she

at

part-time jobs to supplement their

hoping the $600 will be

is

“We

requesting

however,

amount

discussions

can affect then-

student loans.

OSAP

receiving

were allowed a of $1,500 for

each school year without their loan being affected.

According financial

to Carol

aid

Conestoga,

Walsh, the

administrator

at

are now maximum of

students

allowed to earn a

only $600 for a two-semester year.

Walsh said once students go over the limit their loans are affected.

She said earnings in excess of

$600 are considered to be a resource by the government. “The maximum students are allowed to work should be a lot higher,” Walsh said. Even students with families are permitted to earn only $600 and this

limit

almost removes the

incentive for students

on

OSAP to

with

them

students

try

OSAP,

Walsh

said,

but

on

application

earnings return,

form,

on

their

OSAP

but shows income tax

their

that information will

captured,”

Walsh

be

said.

period of the year. “If the

student earned

money

to

whieh

all

viewed as a

is

dollar-for-dollar

Walsh

RRSP

students receiving

are expected to declare

contribution,

said. if a student

has a

$1,000 GIC, $1,000 would be deducted from their OSAP entitlement,” she said.

Students are allowed to claim a vehicle to the value of $5,000.

Anything above this amount will be deducted from their entitlement with the exception of married students, sole support students

on

students

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

someone and

support

sole

Carol Walsh, Conestoga’s financial aid administrator, wants to for OSAP students increased.

see the maximum earnings allowable

and

students with a disability.

“Married,

She said these students will receive a letter from the ministry asking them to provide proof of income earned within a certain

decide

a car or a

it’s

“For example, hide

Revenue Canada conducts income verification every November. “So, any student who did not declare earnings

Whether

OSAP

to

affect

continue their education.

assets,

income when applying

their total

who

students

for

ongoing

more

an

said

graduating students entitled to a loan forgiveness or future funding

contribution,

increase the

to

Walsh would

exempted. overpayment

ministry

something Walsh said.

Some for

the

to

realistic,”

Prior to two years ago, students

maximmn income

having

are

These students must keep track of their maximum earnings it

can earn for

increased to at least $1,500.

incomes.

since

OSAP

a student on

not

allowed

disability are

to have a vehicle to the value of

to use the red

$10,000,” Walsh said, adding this is not done automatically on the

The red book

loan application form. She said these students have to meet with

application

form,

their

OSAP

entitlement for the following year will be reduced,” she said.

DSA An

room, a quiet

exercise

some

of the ideas the Doon Student

come up with

Association has

for spending the surplus

of funds

acquired over the years.

DSA

The

has

Transportation’s offiee. She said the red

Money

that

DSA

idea to provide something for students

came about because

excess funds have been accumulated and because there

new

space available following

A

space allocation committee

has been struck to negotiate uses

SELL

for the

“We it

is,

Suigj-;- Ki's'

a

small office. The

but there

is potential

41S

Hes|iisr P-aa<i.

GAMBRIOCE i',A.,;re!.s

•’aim IteDcnjirs'

23 Wsilmglan Road

for

“We

The DSA developed to administer

weeks

number

a

(in the

round.”

main

GUELPH Itcro

622-7774 823-5341

Currently,

first

two

vacation,

but

the

it

after the

of

circumstances

“Hopefully, the plan

form.

probably

it

is is.

The red book (value) is probably one that no one wants to know,” she said.

cafete-

the

DSA

to

is

do

Since the college already

future.

campus

Hussey said the

if

it

tile

moving

kind of like backup

we know

we’re

in the right direction.”

DSA

determines the

students’ needs, .the executive

will

evaluate

situation.

their

financial

Extra maintenance and

repair costs

would be considered

at this point, said

Hussey.

“Then we would take

money and allocate

it

to

students want and what

the

what the

we

want.

Then we will set out the steps to do it,” she said. The steps may include coming up with a three- or five-year plan

would be

could plan

w’c

Hussey.

so

of a

a more

is

reasonable expectation.

implement

“It’s

possibility

room

study

quiet

through

us.

a

is

questionable option.

(admini.ster the surv’eys) at the

for

Doon

at

are restrictive, a bar

“Ideally, it

in the rcc

and regulations

beginning of next year," said

summer

the in

it

really cool

something and

September, but

chances of that arc pretty

slim,”

said

“We’re

Hussey.

dealing with getting .space and

could take five years."

that

Hussey said the main issue of getting more space for any of

their ideas

the fact that

is

they are taking classroom space

from faculty and students. The is to have a complete strategic plan concerning what to do with the space, so the DSA idea

allocated

isn’t

and do with it,

space

a

know what

doesn’t

to

she said.

“We

want to

sit

on

our hands. In the future,

we

don’t

spend the excess money. This process has been put on hold

could get this space and if wc do,

until next year, said Hussey.

we

to

“We

don’t

want

something for the

away

the survey

before Christmas and intended

that’s

ria)

E,.

the worst idea.”

age room that we do have is pret-

and we were thinking of having a used bookstore year

FOR TOUR USED CDS

OUTLET mrjjvs 4

worth more than

centre,

It’s

don’t have a quiet study, the stor-

ty far

WE OFFER THE MOST

884-7376

have

other things,” said Hussey,

AT THE AREA'S LARGEST SELECTION OF USED CDS

WATERLOO

newly acquired space.

Sanctuary can be used for wiiat

TRADE

f-tei

new addi-

tion to the technology wing.

BUY

T-:s

new

the

is

i»3-2484

vicer^

president of operations^ said the

the construction of the

KITCHEiKR

the lowest

OSAP

think that our vehicle

all

think

After the

Jinn, ^Hussey,'

LOST THEIR STING

N.,

“We

has a bar, the Roust

years ago.

S!rB«

book provides

declaring the value

“Maybe wc ihmk a bar would be cooL but students (might)

reported

would be used for such a project has been accumulated this year and last year, and also from about five

4Ci2

available at a

is

when

of vehicles on the

retail value.

prevented that from happening.

surpluses of $30,000-$40J)00 in past years.

St.,

book

value that one can receive for their vehicle

plans for excess funds

a bar or a con^uter lab arc

Road

aid

public library or at the Ministry of

study lounge, a used bookstore,

P&inm

financial

during their study period that was not declared on their loan

By Jaime Clark

33S

the

in

and file an appeal. Walsh said students are advised

office

not

fair, it’s

to

get

only

affect

That preparation would involve

the students’

being aware of the rules and reg-

the

classes,” said Hussey.

present

“We want

ulations

governing

lounge, exercise

campus. “I

hope we can

start

the

all that this

year

to

beginning of the semesters.

students.”

coming

The DSA will conduct a survey to determine what students want,

The possibility of a new bar was also an idea if the DSA is

information gathered. it’s

said Hussey.

given additional

Hussey.

for

all

th"

space in the

study

a

room or bar on

holds a used book sale at the

do something

said

it,”

DSA because

money. And, we don’t want to throw a big concert party that will

are prepared for

Hussey.

foundation of

an

and idea,

it’s

get

all It’s

the

a plan,

a hope,” said


Tobacco companies suck performers blew smoke

Hindsight

North

at

generations of

American audiences each night as viewers welcomed them into their homes, nightclubs and hospital

smokers.

beds.

must be a hard for

thing

weed on

to them.

Today’s young puffers

apple pie, but, unfortunately, our

much

know

smelly sweetheart was sucking the

packages.

from moms, dads and kids

Canada’s

it,

not

but smoking

was

life

and sexy in the black and white

when

Hearts sank like the Titanic

Cancer

Canadian

Society

however,

still

found

blew

themselves standing on crackling

haze

made

gurus

challenged

exhaled grey smoke rings across

psychological power.

money but never

the big screen, they curled around

Even

adoring men’s ears. Television

victims

really

addiction’s

the

one-iunged hoarded the

cancer killer

lacks

Today,

Despite Health Canada, tobacco

to

its

when second-hand

cool

was unborn

proven

lethal

enough

spouses

fetuses,

and total strangers. Armies and of non-smokers united smokers became lepers overnight. Defeated, they now huddle malls outside shopping Tim shops and Horton’s

hope

parents

kids

them.

care

than

other

the

sponsorships

of

harmless,

when

sporting events

same

those

will

tobacco

decide

to

companies’

haze

uncertainty’s

after

health

governments, would be arrogant

perish like brave old

learn right from their parents’

wrongs,

Who,

savings.

legionnaires.

toddler’s

a

precious

revenues,

tax

exceed

still

all,

quit,

to

as

Puffers

Quit-smoking

Arguments”

“Big

courage

flair.

tobacco.

easy

Unfortunately, Health

Tobacco

a

lingers above the battlegrounds,

packages singing the praises of

of early Hollywood’s “dames” and dapper Dans. When starlets like Marilyn Monroe

cigarette

burn

health care dollars.

Diehards,

cigarette”.

savvy and an undertaker’s creative

linked lung cancer to smoking.

Cigarettes were the crowns and

on

suffering

of

“freedom

bittersweet

the

the

crutches

pastes

lacking

dancing Lucky Strike cigarette

middle of deep lakes.

now

some, with the

be ignored but

smokers

dying

nicotine

the

for

end,

broken

television era. They’ve never seen

ice in the

Occasionally,

bleak promises of early death and

department

everywhere.

cool

hot,

cigarettes cannot

“fits”

Canada

and the taxes from

addiction,

miss.

few people sing of their addiction Health

merchants don’t

jingling coins

their deathbeds.

Cigarettes don’t dance today, and

Tobacco was as “in” as mom’s

may

out of smokers

life

is

sponsors

admit

tobacco kills?

instead of repeating Meanwhile, why do

Ironically, as

pink

non-smokers’ baby

lungs

exhale

songs,

hearty

tobacco

legislators designate storeowners

victory

as

smoking monitors? If selling to shouldn’t is wrong, lawmakers ban tobacco crops

industry’s

teens

blow

altogether?

decades ago, which proves some

Obviously, deficit reduction

smokestacks puff and

brazen harmony. Honesty,

went up

seems,

it

smoke

in

things really do stink worse than a

is

-

government’s

federal

the

in

the

smoker’s breath.

Falwell hilarious again less a

Jerry Falwell

continues

me up.

crack

Like

tle

groundhog

for millions of viewers to follow

the

sees his

has

Falwell

follow

his

God

of

without

jeans

painted-on

money

would require her consent. So, if you are wearing

away

on useless self-defence

courses. Instead,

Hr mm;

your

invest

Thomson

In order for your self-defence to

work, you must buy a pair so tight lie

down on your bed

your stomach to zip

in

According

an Italian court of appeals,

women

liquid

So

court’s

decision

on the

fact

cannot

possibly

that

of gay pride, atop his head. And, oh yeah, Tinky Winky

help the assailant does this not

count? Does

of jeans and

rape

if

it

the

still

not count as

helped to

victim

threat

is

in

a

ness based on the proportion of height, weight

The hypothetical

trial

of a person

would have involve the victim coming of

the

tight to rape a It

seems

and brand of jeans

woman.

like a pipe

rape

courtroom

wearing

the

tight to allow rape.

be done?

How would this

And been

agencies

that

their

denim

chastity belts.

ter

than

law wouldn’t be

woman

any bet-

her slim-fitting jeans

would.

owned

News

Editor: Lisa Wilhelm; Student Life Editor: Sarah Thomson;

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca address

is

I

laughed

show character or whether or Winky would make a I’m more good role model. concerned about an alleged “man of God” discriminating against

anyone not on his bandwagon

gay,

rather

than

welcoming

all

of

God’s creatures with open arms.

But what else would you expect fat old man who watches

from a

preschooler shows

around the

all

day long

looking for overt signs of sexual

much

references?

SPOKE is mainly tunded from

Keeping Conestoga College connected

comedy.

not Tinky

idea that a gay person could ever

possibly be a role model,

that’s

kid’s

it

his hill-billy intellect

Entertainment Editor: Brent Clouthier; Sports Editor: Rob Himburg; Features and Issues Editor; Julie van Donkersgoed Photo Editors: Melissa Dietrich, Judy Sankai"; Multi-media Editor: Neven Mujczinovic; Production Manager; Jeanette Everall; Advertising Manager: Janet Wakutz; Circulation Manager; Jacqueline Smith; Faculty Supervisor: Jim Hagarty; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz.

SPOKE’s

was

when you

In Cincirmati

I’m not concerned over some orientation of a

TV set my

in the ’70s

me

loved you on

alleged sexual

these years.

had rabbit-ear antennae in the shape of an (gasp!) upside-down triangle. I guess Falwell still can’t wrap because

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

Editor; Jaime Clark;

Now

of his considerable

guess that means the

I

for weeks.

spokesman, apparently. I

won’t

I

was about communism.

investigative

all

Jerry,

one can make

said John Leimon’s song Imagine

didn’t even know what the heck Tinky Winky was in the first place. Some sort of gay

too,

could prevent the crime of

reality is the

WKRP

has

Falwell

No

laugh like you can.

I

dream

women

The

think

worry,

forget you.

some kind of purse.

detection skills for

parents

forever with

to

depriving

would be as near as our dressers and closets. Worn snugly enough, in any situation, 24 hours a day,

able to protect a

the jeans she

also carries

tight-

the one solution to preventing rape

court of law?

Spoke SPOKE

measured

pair of jeans be

into

of

to determine if the jeans are too

And, how can the tightness of a

to

their scale

Don’t

an a symbol

triangle,

But rooms. apparently

devil wrote rock lyrics.

sprouts

would win. Another possibility would be a guidebook, which would measure all current brands

evaluate whether the jeans are too

remove

If

jeans and being raped at gun-point

based assailant

help.

victim’s

The

day.

is

the

deliberately

the

rape

wear your

feel free to

denims 24 hours a

without

was wearing at the time of the rape and the defendant’s lawyer would have to

wearing tight jeans cannot be raped.

because the Teletubby character

One method would be

upside-down

accused to a recent ruling in

to have

the lawyer try to take off the pants

unsuccessful then the defendant

of force?

of slim-fitting Levi’s.

Falwell

tight

remove the jeans under the

cash in a pair

you must and suck them up.

victim,

or being forcibly threatened to

Sarah

hard-earned

the

the

which

help

an

forbid

It seems to me Whatever. someone was looking for a little publicity. Not everyone remembers you in the ’80s, Jerry, when you had the idea that the

In an article written for National

Journal,

of a

sport a triangle.

latest

poo-poos Tinky Winky as an acceptable role model for children

okay

androdynous children’s character should carry some sort of bag and

discovery.

Liberty

its

man of the cloth who

by-the-horu: motel

You can expect six more weeks of stupidity and to

guess

has affairs with teenaged girls in

Clouthier

progression.

hilarity

I

“religious” teachings

heterosexual

Brent

popped up in the media again to put an end to any signs of positive social

Women, qmt

about role

talk

to

models, FalweU?

shadow,

throwing your

anyway?

black,

You want

the

proverbial who

Jeans: the only defence you need?

human being.

Just who’s the pot calling the ket-

to

September to

May by the Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are t^ endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain tH

DSA

SPOKE

logo.

shall not

be

liable for

out of errors in advertising beyond the

any damages amount paid

arising for the

space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:.10 a.m.

Monday. Submissions are subject

to

acceptance or

rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS Word

tain

file

would be

helpful.

any libellous statements

illustration

.and

Submissions must not con-

may be accompanied by an

(such as a photograph).


SPOKE, Feb. 22, 1999

CAMPUS QUESTION

Letter to the Editor

Last game at the Gardens

Students say

is

it

— Page 5

the loss of a landmark

"lau

matter Mr. (Carl)

was

invited

:he

DSA to

here]

the student •ecided to take in

:^|.oung€

Ms p4n Expecting to be entertained,

I

was shocked and ^palled by apparent

his

disregard

for

some moral and legal responsibilities

v^cli~we as educators

try to foster in our. students,

however

indirectly.

humorous

Topics- used -for

The Leafs said goodbye to the Gardens on in their new Air Canada Centre

Rob

Venditty, first-year general

arts

and business student.

3.

They can only hope

have as much success

to

purpose.s

included

and vpnld hav^no prob-

top^

with |hese

“and

marked the end of an era for Toronto Maple Leaf fans and hockey fans everywhere. The doors to Maple Leaf Gardens closed for the National Hockey League as the team and its fans prepared to move to the Air Canada Centre. The Maple Leafs faced the Chicago Blackhawks in the last game, losing 6-2. The Leafs also played the

Hawks

in the first

game

Gardens in 1931.

at the

Students at Conestoga College

Second-year

Amy

student

Stevens said

sad but

the beginning of a

money

in

if

were upset because Canadians were losing a landmark and part of our history.

Kim

Kilimnik, a second-year

law-and-security student, said

would have been great

it

then

it

sad to see a

era.”

also

a

was bringing will

be

a

civil-engineering

contr^t, Mr. Strong glorified

a

administration

“It’s just

win

too bad because if they

the (Stanley)

Cup

this year

won’t be in the Gardens,” she is

positive about the

says

upsejt

“It’s

because

it

is

a

we must

on,” said Schmidt.

Sperle said,

“It’s

Venditty,

she

it

said.

hopes

move, but the

old

disclaimer,

unacccpUiblc and

facility attracting

new

other-

that

The

illegal.

received from

I

it is

okay to have sex with your daughter or drive

if

you are

drunk and taking drugs I

think that

upon whoever

it

i.s

her or

student.

wc

liis

with

i>

cool

incumbent

invites an enter-

Mr

oui institution to

tent

a

"^oi

the performance wore that

fans,” said the first-year nursing

damn shame.” who admitted

implied

taiimer suoh as

neat to see Toronto putting

up a new

in stark

wise, that the.se behaviours are

messages

building gets used.

Rob

come

an end.

Sperle said they were upset to see

move

second-year

student said everything must to

However

these behaviours without any

Kate Drexler, micro-computer

students Jeff Schmidt and Chris

building but

sary in order to be socially responi^ble.

general-arts-and-

Carrie Barnes, on the other hand,

Third-year

am

of history

first-year

downfall.

“I

lot

neces-

leave the Gardens,” said Venditty a

student, said she didn’t really have

an opinion, but

historic

said they

new

general-business

survey conducted at the college

The majority

was

am

han-

if

litfed in thd'delicate tvay

science student.

Jacqueline Klobuchar,

second-year

the Gardens close.

11.

it

exciting to see

it’s

were asked how they felt about the Gardens closing in a random Feb.

“I

general-business

sad to see the era end. “It’s

Leafs leave.

kinda sad.”

it’s

drinking

jahd drivic^, taking-togs

a loss of tradition,” he said,

“It’s

Saturday, Feb. 13

first-year

1

(Photo by Charles Kuepfer)

By Lindsay Gibson

Carrie Barnes, nursing student.

Feb.

Sirong.,to

(.stablisti that

attitudes are consis-

the

icsponsibilities

aic Iryinu to instil

m

our

students

Photos by Lindsay Gibson

Taylor /omer.

being a big fan of the Maple

faculty, ^ectronics

Leafs, said he’s sad to see the

engineering tcdiiiulogy

it

to attend a

game at the Gardens because of all the history there. “It is

kind of sad because

been a landmark

it’s

to sports fans,”

Computers

she said.

Michael Dale, a

political science

teacher at the college, said closing the Gardens takes the tradition out

Auction

Bar Fridge

of hockey. “It’s all

about

glitz

and glamour

now,” he said “The tradition

is

for the Heart Sweatshirts

lost.”

Gowing,

Chris

a

third-year

&

Stroke Foundation

construction-engineering student, Jeff Schmidt,

third-year

civil-

said

he

felt

a

little

hurt

T-Shirts

and

disappointed.

engineering student.

Roots hat

Wed. Feb. 24 10:30

am

- 1

:30

pm

The Sanctuary

Items to

civil

Kim

LASA

Kilimnik, student.

second-year

Monday

will

be on

February 22, 1 999 All proceeds will be directed to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. display

Chris Sperle, third-year engineering student.

be auction


6

- SPOKE,

Feb. 22, 1999

FEATURES AND ISSUES ]

Writing centre

and homework club available

new

Special needs offers By Julie van Donkersgoed

The Learning Opportunities

Project

$2.7 million, four-year project, which i:> anil

college’s

needs services have developed a

special

student services

wi'ung centre and a homework club, landing from the Learning w;;h Uppo! tunities Project grant.

a

is is

determine the kind of services colleges can provide for students with specific learning disabilities to

be successful.

The writing

Room

centre,

which

is

2B22, does not require a

feels

he/she needs assistance with

liaison via a referral

Students accessing the services of the drop-in writing centre will be provided with

should

which they are experiencing

and

The writing centre does not have computer equipment, but will provide a

issues relating to writing.

information relating to the area of writing in

located in referral

accessible to any student of the college

is

who

to

services

difficulty.

to the

literacy

lab

computer software be

specific

required for a student using the services.

The centre will be staffed by a peer but the level of staffing will increase

tutor, if the

number of students using the centre justifies more assistance, said Lynn Gresham of special needs services.

Gresham

If

you're

is

by giving them information

about proper writing techniques, be used for editing purposes.

it is

not to

,

concerned about the

The

writing centre, located in |

i

Room

2B22, does not require a

and

referral

is

accessible to any

i

student of the college.

2000

Year

also said that while the centre

to help students

I

“We

don’t write for a student.

with the

details,

but this

she said.

service,”

“It

We

help

I

not an editing has to be the

is

! '

student’s work,”

Bug...

The writing

]

centre

is

open Mondays from

4:30 p.m., Wednesdays 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Thursdays 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Fridays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 9 a.m.

]

till

The homework service,

is

club,

available

a

to

second new needs

special

i

i

i f

J

students.

This service will be extended to the generpopulation if a need is shown,

al student

said Gresham.

The homework club was designed to encourage students to gather informally to express concerns and gain knowledge about topics such as proper note taking, study habits, resource use and other skills in

No one

has

all

which students are interested. While Gresham will be the primary

the answers.

But we can help. Your computer When the year 2000 rolls around, your personal computer could get confused. It could start to read the year 2000 as the year 1900. Essentially, that's

the Millennium Bug. Lots of other electronic

devices could catch

it

too, but your

computer

is

the most vulnerable. Hardware, software, operating

systems, data printers,

how

all

difficulties.

club, she said she

hopes students will take a

role in educating their peers.

She added the club was designed

But timing devices could be a problem on some VCRs, fax machines, security alarms,

digital

thermostats, answering machines, and video and digital

cameras.

We

to allow

students to share their ideas and suggestions

with other students. For further information on either of the services, contact Lynn Gresham at (519) 748-5220 extension 627.

can help you to get Year

2000 information supplied by appliance

staff

responsible for facilitating the

retailers

and manufacturers.

could be affected. So could

modems, and

to test your

member

scanners.

computer

We

can

show you

for possible Year

And we can help you

to find out

Your car

2000

Manufacturers say

which

will

products and suppliers are Bug-free.

it

is

highly unlikely that the

Bug

cause car problems. We can show you what several of the major car manufacturers have to say about the Bug and

their products.

Your finances you have a problem to begin finding

Canada's banks, other deposit-taking institutions

Don't wait

and related organizations such as VISA, MasterCard, and the Interac Association expect to have their technology fully prepared. They are developing back-up systems and contingency plans to deal with any unforeseen events. If you have questions, you should contact your financial institution.

out about the Year 2000 Bug. Start now!

Your household appliances You probably don't have to worry about your appliances. The Bug will hit only those that depend on dates to work properly. If you can unplug an appliance and then turn it back on without having to reset anything, it should be OK. None of your equipment should stop working altogether.

until

Watch

for the Millennium Bug Homecheck guide your mailbox. For more information call:

1-

in

800 - 270-8220

TTY: 1-800-465-7735 Or

visit

us

at:

www.canada.gc.ca Charlie Matjanec, employment advisor Learning Opportunities Project, examines resources that are part of the new writing centre located in Room 2B22 that opened Feb. 4. for the

Canada

(Photo by Julie van Donkersgoed)

'


STUDENT

new

*Cafeteria’s By

Cariy Benjamin

money on

they spent the

“It’s

brand name

a

product

people recognize and are happy

second stove

“I put the

into the

with,” Chappell said.

healthy appetite for the

next business year’s budget, since

services offered at the college.

things have been going so well,”

Mr. Sub are no different than the

he

prices at any other Mr.

The Market

Grill

located in the

main

and Mr. Sub cafeteria are

additions to the choices available to students at the college

and they

are both showing profits.

The

Deli

Bar

was

which

relocated to Dooners lost business

but that was expected. The overall effect has

college,

been a plus for the according to Tony

He added

said.

Chappell said

it

essential to

is

achieve

fran-

Deborah O’Donnell, a Trent

He said some

this.

Sub

by

chise.

have variety and the Market Grill tries to

the prices offered

University biology graduate,

is

the

items aren’t as popular as others,

supervisor

but he can’t offer the same thin g every day.

various colleges and one hospital

“Anything with chicken seems to be the favourite,” he said.

The Market

Grill’s

home

office

grill’s

food

menu

Aurora

Food Services which runs Mr. Sub in at

in Ontario.

According to O’Donnell, they independently owned and operated. The Conestoga contract is shared between Beaver Foods and Aurora Food Services. Mr. Sub at Conestoga employs are

Chappell, food-service director at

designs the

Conestoga.

programs. They

According to Chappell, the Market Grill has been prosperous.

and test them and then these ideas are presented to ChappeU and his team decides on a rotation sched-

three full-time employees, includ-

xile.

ing a manager.

“Things are going well and are looking at introducing

new products,

we

some

like hot wraps.”

second stove will be added. There is

currently

only

one

stove

because they are expensive and food services wanted to ensure the grill

make

“If it goes, then

If the grill continues to flourish a

would be a success before

doesn’t

we just

it

the recipes

and

goes,

stop doing

it

O’Donnell said students are

he

often concerned about sanitation

if

it,”

said.

The

Page 7

22, 1999

services add variety

another

grill.

Conestoga students have had a new food

SPOKE, Feb.

LIFE

Sandra McDougall cooks up a

the Market

stir-fry at

open from

grill is

until 1:30

p.m.

1 1

a.m.

reassured after learning there

is

a

Mr. Sub was a welcome addition and has also proved successful.

hands

their

sink with a hot and cold reservoir

daily.

Grill,

(Photo by Cariy Benjamin)

because a sink isn’t visible, but are

and

gloves

are

mandatory,” she said.

An

tank under the coimter.

“Employees continually clean

assorted eight-inch sub ,and

pop combo

be on special for

will

$3.99, beginning next Tuesday,

Feb.

The

16.

special

be

will

offered every Tuesday following for the rest of the school year.

Students secure smooth running of Nokia Cup By Neven Mujezinovic really a great opportunity

“It’s

Approximately

40

law

and

(LASA)

security administration

students helped provide security at

quality people with

the job

we

LASA

student Theresa Godfrey.

did,” says

second-year

received nothing but praise.” satisfied

the

think

I

college because

widely

fairly

j\

::

Cup

in

inter-

view prior to the event. Hunter also stressed the people leaders in their business

Nokia

the

h;

media,” said Hunter in

who

next

liie

nme

bemg

ii

covered

did they want them to do security the

s

some u an .mg good exposure i'or

it’s

with the job Conestoga students at

nities

are involved in curling are

and

it

commu-

would be beneficial

to

Woodstock two years from now,

students to be associated with an

says Godfrey.

occasion such as the Nokia Cup.

A1 Hunter, head of security at Conestoga College, was approached by the organizers of the Nokia Cup several months

Hunter and student team leaders went to Brantford for an orienta-

before the event about whether

tion session on Feb. 6 in order to

LASA program students would be

themselves v ith the and to speak to other security staff working there. The six team leaders were in charge of organization and scheduling. Godfrey, one of the team leaders,

interested in participating in this event.

Hunter says the event sounded like a

one,

good opportunity for everyso he approached Don

Douglas,

of

co-ordinator

LASA program.

(Photo by Neven Mujezinovic)

great for

cup, because they are getting

and

The organizers were so

showcasing Conestoga College,

field experience It’s

onships in Brantford, Feb. 12-14.

“We

display,

for the students.

the Ontario men’s curling champi-

“Everybody was so pleased with

Chris Scott and Theresa Godfrey stand beside the panel which they took with them to the Nokia Cup.

and a worthwhile

the

Hunter says the response from

was extremely

students

posii-ive.

acquaint facility

also put together a display board

showcasing Conestoga College and the LASA program. The display

was put

prominent

in a

spot at the entrance to the arena.

Godfrey says the experience was

Post-graduate programs for the real world.

a very positive one. “Actually

were honoured

The students who volunteered

May

their

1

News

-

Digital Applications

-

Television

Electronics Engineering Technology

-

Business Administration - Marketing Corporate Communications and Public Relations Court Administration Tribunal (Pending Approval)

Dental Hygiene

Recording Industry

l

guaranteed consideration date)

Educational Assistant (Pending Approval) Electronics Engineering Technician

-

Web

the

Crime

Loss

stipulates

closely,” said Hunter.

Digital Applications

Hunter says he was impressed by

System Analyst

the students’ initiative and energy

Biomedical

www.fanshawec.on.ca

in

Prevention

which

level. In fact, students

519 ) 452-4277

will

work

ment during the semester. “This ties into the program very

responsible

(

event

they must do a security assign-

-

-

for

Strategies course,

Biomedical

Fund Raising and Resource Development (Pending Approval) Organizational Learning and Development (Pending Approval) Photography - Advanced Photography (Advanced) Digital

(March

time

receive credit for their their

Broadcast Television

we

be asked to do a

high-profile job like this.”

Don't miss the guaranteed consideration date of for these full-time fall programs. Broadcast journalism

to

A

FANSHAWE COLLEGE Hf

development

for

have been

almost

process

all

on

particular project, he said.

the this


Page 8

— SPOKE, Feb.

22, 1999

STUDENT Skills

LIFE

#

Canada gets new look

Students design winning concepts By Jeanette

Everall

Vagha was awarded $250, a jacket and a plaque, which will be formally presented at

and pins for

Posters

year’s

this

Canada competition have turned

Skills

into

a

arts and Vagha and Heather Miehm whose designs were chosen in

piece

portfolio

graphic

for

advertising students Jug

who

Vagha, a third-year student

who

Miehm, a

designed

first-year student

designed the pin, presented their work

at the

board of governors meeting on Jan.

26.

Canada presents skills competitions, where young people demonstrate their skills in technologies and trades across Canada at the regional, provincial, national and international levels. year. Skills

Conestoga College will be hosting the

Run-Off Competition who will go onto

in June to determine

the

World

Skills

Competition to be held in Montreal in

November.

Vagha

the National

won

Miehm

the 10th Anniversary Pin Contest with her handdrawn pin design. (Photo by Jeanette Everall)

It’s

open

to all

Poster Contest, which

was

high school and college students

in Canada. “I didn’t all

the 10th Anniversary Pin Contest and she

was awarded $50. Canada

across

Canadian

enjoy national recognition, said Vagha.

“At the stage that I’m it’s

Vagha.

getting

as far as graphic

at,

my name out there,”

“People

hear

your

says

name and

remember it - it gives you a little edge.” Miehm,' whose dream it is to work in Toronto, said she only had to make minimal changes to her design.

On

the other hand, Vagha said have to be some technical

there will

changes

to

design

his

Advertising, the

because

Day

company which judged the equipment than

the college.

Vagha

said he doesn’t

mind making

the

changes as long as they don’t change his

it

was going

to

be printed

across Canada,” he said.

But, he says, “I think they can (change the

concept) because that’s

why they picked it.”

Jug Vagha won the National Poster Contest with his computer-generated poster design.

(Photo by Jeanette Everall)

scrapbook,

1

blank next to the statement

want

I

to

be:”

is

“When

I

written,

author/illustrator.

Henderson, a former Conestoga graphic

is

doing

well.

300 in two months,” she Henderson has sold most of the 300 books during readings at elementary “I’ve sold about

said.

schools

in

her

hometown

area

near

design and journalism student, wrote and

Listowel. She has also done readings at the

The November

Chapter’s stores in Kitchener and Waterloo where her books can be purchased for $14. She sells the books directly for $10 and can be contacted at 519-291-4508.*

illustrated

her

first

children’s book.

Dreaded Day was published

in

last year.

features

dream

lives out

eating unidentified berries.

Lynn Henderson’s Grade

grow up

Roger the Webberbumple, a

character she created

who

lives

underwater

and rides a seahorse. The book delivers two lessons to children

in a coral cave

in

annual

concept.

know

Henderson said The Dreaded Day

It

fifth

story time at Chapter’s

By Janet Wakutz

in the

be distributed

Skills Competition, the students

Former journalism student In

will

promote the

to

events, has higher quality

said he didn’t realize the calibre of

6.

pin design, drawn completely by

hand, was chosen as the winning design in

design,

Every

Heather

Miehm ’s

Because both items

recent competitions.

the poster and

an awards banquet on June

an entertaining way. The lessons revolve

around keeping your room clean and not

Henderson,

who works

part time at the

Listowel Banner, a weekly newspaper,

is

currently in the process of sending the sec-

ond book in her series to publishers. Henderson hopes to publish a continuing

Lynn Henderson shares a reading ered

for storytime at

of her first published book with children gathChapter’s Book Store in Waterloo on Saturday, Feb. 13. (Photo by Janet Wakutz)

of children’s books featuring Roger Webberbumple, named for his webbed feet and bumpy face. She is also illustrating a children’s Christmas book written by Gwyneth Whilsmith of RR 2, Zurich, who is publishseries

the

“I

want

to get

my

story out so

other people can relate to hopefully

it

will

the

who

and

help someone.”

ing her fourth novel.

Henderson,

it

Lynn Henderson

published 1,000 copies of

book with her own money,

said she

faced challenges in publishing her book.

“My

illustrations

were on water colour

paper which didn’t reproduce well but

it

to the college. Photo by Melissa Dietrich

“It will

said. “I

be primarily based on

want

to get

my

my life,” she

story out so other

was overcome by experimentation,” she

people can relate to

said.

help someone.”

Henderson says she lives by the motto: “Live your dreams while you still can.”

Henderson suffered with anorexia ffor^ age 14 until age 16.

“People have encouraged

Mike Wolf purchasos a rose and chocolate from Monica Himmelman, of alumni services, for $2 on Feb. 12. The money raised from the event, held for the past five years, goes towards the alumni association who then gives

it

positively to

my

my

choice to

me

and reacted

move ahead with

goals,” she said.

She

is

currently researching a short novel

about her experience with anorexia. The novel will be aimed at adolescents.

Henderson,

who

it

and hopefully

it

will

A

has fully recovered, said

mental health services in Listowel gives her

name and phone number

to people

anorexic and need someone to talk “I

am just

who

are

to.

a friend to inspire and encour-

age recovery,” she

said.


,

STUDENT

SPOKE, Feb. 22, 1999

LIFE

College In need of space

New technology

,

— Page 9

/

building

scheduled for mid-April opening By Lisa Wilhelm

Putt said two factors

must be

considered in deterniining

new

The

-

two-storey

infill

addition to the technology wing, built being opposite the machining wing on the south side of Conestoga College’s Doon campus ihaih building, is oat schedule and should be finished during the second or third week " of April. “The reason we built this building is because we’ve run out

required for faculty offices.

The second thing Putt said needs to be looked at is the number of students admitted into the technology program each year.

of space,” said David Putt, director of physical resoiuces. Construction of the additional 42,000 square feet began August last year. An extension of 3,500 square feet was added onto the machine tool centre operator workshop on the ground floor. The second floor extension also consisted of 3,500 square feet

may

and

be

used

for

“We should not add more than 300 students a year (if we use the figure of 1,000 students) because they have to go on to their second and third year. If we added 1,000 in one shot, then we’d be foil right away,” Putt said. Putt

The new addition to the technology wing on the south be complete the second week of April,

side of the

Doon campus main (Photo by

building should

usa wiiheim)

a two-storey addition, the to existing technology wing. It has not yet

been decided how be used.

building.

capacity

^tt

is

we

‘The reason

that space will

built this building is

David Putt,

-

^

because we’ve run out

of space,”

director

the

number

of

students the college

decides to admit this fall should be one-third of the capacity of the

new

The remaining 36,000 square adjacent

said

additional

classrooms. feet

how

the»space will be used. If the college increases enrolment by 1,000 students, the size of the bookstore and Dooners may have to be increased or space might be

The

building

is

1,200 students.

said

installation

of the

almost complete and ceilings and carpeting should be installed beginning in two weeks. interior walls is

ofphysical resources

Spreading community warmth

Students and faculty working side-by-side By Janet Wakutz

various

for

such tasks

One day each

semester, social

services students

and faculty come

service

social

They performed

organizations.

as

stuffing

filing,

envelopes, typing and sorting sup-

In order to promote interacbetween students, they were divided into groups of six, three from first year and three from

plies.

together to share information and

tion

perform community service. To this end a panel presentation was held at the Waterloo Campus

second.

and a question and answer period

Madeline Poynter, a member of most of the jobs were mimdane. “The purpose is to offer a service

followed.

to the

on Feb.

11. Several representatives

from organizations involved with social services presented material

enjoyed of

social services faculty, said

community not to

learn

new

the

Red

panel people

skills,”

working in the community echoing what we’re doing in

Cross,

several

blankets

m the small confines of a

“I

really

discussion

school,”

said

the

Paula

Silva,

second-semester student.

“We

didn’t

if

we

have the people

In one placement,

basement Waterloo.

wouldn’t be able to

do what we do

she said.

to

at

students

on King Red Cross

folded

Street

in

volunteers

run the blanket program. Judy Zieske, of the KitchenerWaterloo branch of the Canadian Red Cross Society, said the blanket program is valuable because the donated blankets are given free to people such as single

KIttel, second-semester social services, and classmate Rebekah Wergeland fold and sort bedding as a community service project in the basement of the Red Cross building in Waterloo on

Shelley Feb.

1 1

(Photo by Janet Wakutz)

.

moms and street kids in the region.

volunteer.”.

Zieske,

Judy Zieske

Canadian Red Cross Society

volunteer

resources

co-ordinator, said she appreciated

the student help.

“We wouldn’t be able to do what we do if we didn’t have people to

Simon B Cotter "He's Funny"

volunteer,” she said.

Nicole Donachy, in her fourth semester, said

The semester’s

theme of this program day was Our

Youth in the

New

Millenium and

speakers included representatives

from

Family and Children’s Services, Waterloo Region District school board, Lutherwood, Madison Receiving Home and Hope Manor. The second half of the day the students performed public service

it

felt

good

to

"And He's Back!" And He has a Big Head

be

helping people. She said last semester all social services students gathered at the Waterloo

Region Food Bank and spent their afternoon packaging food items. “Blankets keep you warm on the outside and the inside and it encourages me to keep others

warm

as

well,”

said

second-semester student Rebekah

Wergeland.

Tues. 1 1

March 9

:30

am

The Sanctuary


— SPOKE, Feb.

Page 10

22, 1999

Psychology teacher By Wayne

polygragh

likes

Collins

MA from the University Windsor and an honors from McMaster. Augustine

an

of

The

introductory

college’s

psychology

BA

Barb

teacher,

about lying, but she can’t hide her

of some of my early students,” she

After 30 years at the college,

includes videos,

generation.”

handouts,

Of

most notably, an

and,

it’s

mix

experience

practical

with the largely, theory-oriented

self-help

psychology lessons.

demonstrate

the

of

dream

is

misnomer

a

because polygraphs don’t detect

changing heart

muscle

rates, perspiration,

body

and

tension

temperatures.

measures

“It

a

subject’s

physiological changes to emotion-

responses

al

results

In

and displays the on a graph,” she says.

lie

a student

class

number

about

it.

Everyone

given a

is

and must

to think about

in the class

all

of

exam,” says Augustine, “but some students think

Psychology teacher Barb Augustine says the polygraph machine, which is one way of giving students a hands-on approach to psychology.

is

her favourite instument, (Photo by

wayne

Coiiins)

measure

they

Instead,

lies,

methods but not

exercise five minutes before an

Wheeling the sizeable machine from a closet, she explains that detector”

and

students

“Once a social services student wanted to do a self-relaxation

to

students.

“lie

Some

analysis.

like her

methods,

meditation

them.

physiological

emotion

her

that

relaxation

biofeedback,

She says she began borrowing the polygraph machine from the former biology lab 27 years ago to

components

impression

the

methods are all “truth or dare.” She is also passionate about teaching stress management,

one of her favourite ways

says

course, she doesn’t want to

give

old polygraph machine. Augustine

to

“and maybe even the next

says,

she has developed a teaching style

lectures

the

polygraph to hundreds of students. “I’m now teaching the children

professional dedication.

that

now demonstrated

says she’s

Augustine, knows a few tricks

knows

number

the

She

except

who questions who then lies about

method

one

calls

the

Augustine

the

“pucker

student,

the

of the anus muscles to increase blood pressure and produce

number.

Augustine

pinpoint the

tries

to

on the polygraph’s

lie

a

factor”,

inaccurate responses.

clenching

Old psycho-

cent person

may be

about

being

just

frightened

questioned,

or just angry.” Students, she says, are always

fascinated with the machine and

it

(it’s)

for the birds,

or boring.”

The passage of time, however, has not dulled her dedication to teaching psychology. The

“GSR part” is broken on the machine and Augustine grins as she puts in a plug, saying she

wishes the college would acquire a

printout. Polygraph test results are

logical theories, says Augustine,

helps them connect psychology’s

newer

inadmissible as court evidence,

didn’t distinguish

between emo-

theories to physiological realities.

she says, because practised liars can fool polygraphs and they

tions like fear

“They are compatible with Windows ’98,” she says, “and I’m

intimidate innocent people.

anxious,” she says, “but an inno-

“Sociopaths

and anger. might not

be

Students can see the relationship between mind and body in the printouts, says Augustine,

who has

modem version.

LASA

sure

might even be one of those.”

interested in using

Special needs service helpful, student says readers, tutors, peer mentors, tesf

my teachers giving me permission

proctors and print-based materials

to

in alternate print form.

class,” she said.

take a career in nursing.”

Feswick said while there are many job opportunities after she

Feswick said with special needs backing her, she will

Because of Feswick took at

her

disability,

three

electives

Conestoga prior to enrolling

in the nursing program.

“The reason to

did that was

I

my

lighten

workload so

much work

wouldn’t have so

I

in

used a tape recorder in

finishes her two-year

their

program

at

think practical

“I

stable,

and

both learn a

Conestoga, she hopes to get a job

two years

in a hospital. She said since the baby boomers are getting older,

but

there

is

a

demand for nurses.

that’s

why

lot

nursing I

and enjoy her

at the college.

“I don’t believe

and

I

it will be easy, be an interesting smooth ride,” she said.

think

fairly

it

will

the first semester,” Feswick said.

She said she

happy she took

is

the electives last semester because

she finds her workload hectic this semester.

“If I had those extra courses added on, I would be too overwhelmed or it would be too much for a special needs student,” she said.

Rena Feswick, a

needs student, said being dyslexic doesn’t prevent her from pursuing a career as a registered

Feswick said her

special

(Photo by Jacqueline Smith)

can

“College

me

life

a sense that

thing

good.

is 1

am

gives

It

doing some-

myself,”

for

“Whether

says

Rena

Feswick.

Feswick who is dyslexic has abnormal difficulty in reading and spelling. She talked about her

it

is

extra

time on

program.

far,

have not come across

1

any problems,” Feswick

The 43-ycar-old

said she finds

Conestoga’s special needs servic-

her

difficulty with spelling,

would

it

1

notes in class.

the special needs department,” she

“If a teacher

am taking notes,

According to Rick Casey, special needs transition counsellor, the

word

that

the time

I

is

speaking and

is

said.

I’ll

figure

it

would be another

ahead of me,” Feswick

the testing

test

have

who

questions to students difficulty

material,”

Casey

The counsellor

Check your personalized income

reading

we read

who print

said.

said the office

es to be very helpful, and that she

supports students with disabilities

uses most of the services.

by providing note-taker services.

TELEFILE

invitation.

minutes

five

said.

She said anyone with her kind of getting

tax package for a

By

learning disability will agree that itself,

and available seven days a week. fingertips,

out, the teacher

services including extra time for

“Beyond

your

I

come across a

hard to pronounce.

special needs office offers several

hire one-to-one proctors

said.

of

It’s free, at because

said

tions,

cific learning disability.

in the

the

be a waste of time for her to take

accommodawould highly recommend

cal nursing student at

week “So

in

or any other

test-taking to students with a spe-

College after

difficult

tests,

experience as a registered practi-

Conestoga completing her first

get

classroom.

She

By Jacqueline Smith

does

Easier tax filing and faster refunds for students

not affect her day-to-day tasks, but it

practical nurse.

disability

words on paper

is

For more information, our Web site at:

visit

the

biggest problem.

“Otherwise

we

arc pretty bright

www.rc.gc.ca/telefile/

students,” she said.

She said math

related subjects

arc no problem, but she

is

hoping

to use a tape recorder for lectures. “1

have to get forms signed by

Revenue Canada

Revenu Canada

is

decided to

L-/3Xl£lCl2t


SPOKE, Feb.

22, 1999

99 per cent effective

Birth control

‘The shot’ eliminates hassle of taking By Judy Sankar

which reduces the

tions,

risk

of anemia.

A

method

of birth control approved in Canada may be just what women are

Provera

looking

and using

of

remembering

pill

every day, and one injection

take

to

a

months as opposed

lasts three

infant

the hassle

Approved

Canada

in

to

Depo Proyera which

similar

Despite

hormone

women

that

monthly

Depo

make

effective

is

not but

immediately after

taken (although

many

is

physicians

week

Depo

Provera, often called ‘Ihe shof months, relieving the hassle of taking a

is

,

pill

injected every three

every day.

cautious).

there

The most common

side effect of

viewed by many as a benefit. During menstruation,

the injection

A

services

WLU Feb.

24,

University

Copp

will

College’s

Do you

lors

Karen

want to learn to and

Jut

a

Bates hav'C

out.

who

is

open

topic

a

An

to

entitled

interactive

examining

a

WLU

history

said that Copp,

who

Laurier

and

to all s

and

a

member

of

Disarmament

Studies,

is

probably one of the best military

week of March It

to

is

be held

at

No

in the

conduct the

the

the

Provera

woman’s body receives

first

are

the

1

through

available

Conestoga’s health serviees.

“Another Provera

not like you ean

stop taking

just

Depo

with

thing

is that it’s

says Hall,

it,”

which is the most commonly used method of birth pill

control.

The biggest downfall of Depo Provera, however,

why

explain the

it

is

could ftuther

not as popular as

pill.

long time to regain

says Hall.

fertility,”

After stopping the injections, getting pregnant takes

months and

some cases years. The average pregnancy

in

2 weeks pass, the levels

enough

isn’t

both

maintain birth

to

lO

is

months, but the range

months

control effectively.

rate after

Depo Provera

stopping

is

four

to 31 months.

lecture,

which will take

place in the college’s StudentClient

Building

Services

rooms 214 and 215 from 7-9 being

is

the

p.m.,

by

co-sponsored

Highland

Laurier

in

Centre

Fusiliers,

for

the

Military

Disarmament

and

Strategic

Department of History and the University of Waterloo. The admission for Studies, Laurier, the

this event is free

parking

is

and

free visitor

available in

Doon Valley

Lot 8 off

Drive.

CLASSIFIEDS

to other

history,

Arts

College

received his Master of

June 11-13, 1999

McGill University in

Whitewater Rafting on the Mighty Ottawa River

420 BRiDGEPORT

regarded

well

&

Church of the Lord Jesus Christ APOSTOLIC

at

Montreal.

Hayes in

said

is

military

Whitewater Weekend

Oniy $150

!!!

+

GST

now to reserve or Become a Campus Rep Caii

ROAD LET THERE BE PRAiSE CONCERT

and earn commission! Wiiderness Tours 1-800-267-9166

to

wi^^am

MARCH

6/99 7

PM.

ADULTS $10 CHiLDREN $5

email:

wt@wildernesstours.com

cl

breathing and

m

of Depo

University who

Copp,

and

Rittinger

nitiaes

'if

it

campuses.

participatfe

^

journal

history and to extend

groi^ wili take part in

“We’ll be using

As

The cost of using Depo Provera roughly the same as the pill and

is

Price too High.

sessions using alternative rneth-

'help students co| stress ” said

with

nurse

Hayes said that the lecture is to inform people about military

of tibree sessions the same time each

who

she

The

and an author of numerous books about Canadians and the Second World War. He was also the consulting historian on a film series entitled History

Military

will consist

week. Students

stop menstrua-

the editor of the Canadian

/

15.

to

drop off and after that time, there

ting completely after three injec-

a director of institution at

the Centre for Military Strategic

are feeling stress

The group

campus

Geoff Hayes, a is

dents

Conestoga

Canadian operation in Holland, October 1944. professor,

Conestoga College to help

to

exercise

tactical

Terry

professor

Woensdrecht: out?

and

historians in Canada.

Wilfrid Laurier

come Doon

on

speak stressed

loss

at

“It takes a

levels

when

occur

regulates periods.

professor to lecture at college

Lisa Wilhelm

On

little

blood

Some women

He

feeling a

The

can lead to and spotting may any time, whereas the pill

lesson in history

By

Arc you

less

is

menstrual cramping,

is

Student Wmm

have

injection.

1,000.

During one year, the likelihood of a woman on Depo Provera becoming pregnant is three in

health

are highest in a

(Internet Photo)

be

to

a fear of

you

and

Program.

suggest other methods of birth control for the first

pill,

Waterloo Regional Sexual Health

is

it

the

as

on time,” says Mary Hall, a

only it

Depo

sure to get the injections

public

Provera

unlike the

injections

produce

effective,

control

“Some people have

the

cycle.

Provera

extremely

effectiveness,

not as popular a method

of birth

during the final two weeks of their

its

is

however.

is

progesterone,

to

may improve premenstrual

Provera

shot” contains a medicine

called

weeks old, form of birth

this

syndrome (PMS) and depression.

1997,

in

Depo

long as the

as

safe

at least six

is

control

the Norplant five-year injection.

“the

is

Depo

pill

irregular periods

Breastfeeding while on

recently

for. It relieves

— Page 11

visi

wdl as^oga

stretth

MATT GRAHLMAN

exercises

Ritting^^d Bates say th^ do es experts are open to

todr s^d share ideas of

copy

of

their

ather Elaine or

stn^mt|^rvices in

Bat^ ^rill

then

nfaceordance t^lcs.

Tues. Feb. 23 12:30 pm In

The

Sanctuary

PROBABLY THE ONLY GUY AROUND THAT CAN MAKE VELCRO SHOES AND A BOWLING SHIRT LOOK SEXY! MATT GRAHLMAN FACE IT, YOU WILL NEVER BE ME!

TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH 5days/40 hr. (June 2-6 Gueiph) TESOL teacher cert, course (or

by correspondence) 1 ,000s of jobs. Avaiiable

Free

NOW!

info pack, To!! free:

1-

888 - 270-2941


— SPOKE, Feb.

Page 12

22, 1999

SPORTS What a rush

From

the cheap seats

Paintball Leafs bid farewell

By Rob Himburg

Maple Leaf Gardens

to

more of the army type

Nestled behind a stack of

tires,

you cautiously peer out across the scene. Bushes, buildings and the

Out

with and

share with Toronto’s basketball

team, the Raptors.

with the

in

a

padded

Following growing

The

Toronto Maple Leafs have said

home and spanking new

to their old

Canada

find

the

,

more

Centre

hello to a brand,

thing

trying to recreate an atmosphere similar to the one

they had created at the Gardens.

hockey house.

They

may

comfortable but will they be any happier? It will be a tricky

the

goodbye

more washroom and more private

fans

Air

professional sports,

features

it

boxes.

of

world

to

seats,

facilities

trend in the

ask

Just

leave behind

Chicago

the

^

mini-projectiles travel at speeds of

“It’s a lot more real than Laser Quest, but you can also do

230-250

more.

sound of a carbon

dioxide canister dispensing as a

stream of paintballs head your way. They splatter on your chest,

and arms, forcing you out of But you’ll be back. Unlike real warfare where bullets legs

the game.

you can always come

are used,

back.

The

ever-growing

paintball

is

m

stay

won

Cup

Stanley

home

has failed to provide the intense

atmosphere that the old ( hicauo Stadium prodiiCLd

times on

eight

a feat they can only

ice,

hope to repeat in home, made more the

the the

NHLs

their

new

diflieult in

posi-exp uision era

The Gardens

is

the last of the

arenas to be discarded by the league’s

original

six

Boston,

Detroit,

New

Chicago and Montreal

made

York,

liave all

to

now

but onc...can

only

the

facilUic.s.

teams.

.switch

M

wonder how long will be .before they become The Gartkms qpdned for

'business in 1931

losing

its

first

Toronto

game

Chicago Blackhawlc^ as histoiy began, the

to the

And jusf closed,

it

same way, with Chitago

Opponents

no longer play hodu\ in

are

inliniidalcd to

prominence

in

a

made

the trek to

Chicago when

die Kl.iekhawks played

m

die

old stadium

The Air

[

LMts arc

( aiiciJa

bam

moving

C tnlre

into the

a S26*i

million monsfrosilY they

will

But

year-round

when

shell

Nielsen.

“It

Scott,

who

takes the

a

little

is

said

evident by the almost $1,000 he’s

depends on their

spent on various items of equipment since he joined, said

hits,”

it

on the at

124 for

a club rudely jolted

may become of the

never be another Gimieris will

only

be

lond

to the outdoor

hasn’t

business which

familiar surroundings

is

year of operation.

may

not

said.

deterred the

now in its fifth Many people, know the arena

even exists due to

its

location.

more likely to visit the much more visible Laser Quest, a are

down from the old factory where the arena is located.

block

Nielsen explained to find

it’s

21,000 square

really hard

can get that offers that

tuUiIled and legends were boi n

space,” she said.

“We have

The

we much

to take whatever

arena, however, does not see

Laser Quest as a competitor, just a different clientele

Laser Quest

Games Week -

18

f'Oosball

kids;

“With

game,” she

said.

knowing

they want to get out and blow off

some steam

going more for

come

for

it’s

now evolved

no longer a

fiin

“They’re coming

that they’re

going to get

at lunch,

we

find

it’s

popular for people that here.”

The game

fun,

may

paintball, it’s

“We have more suit-and-tie guys as the ye^ goes on,” she said. “If

really

said.

to a sport,

She also explained that the game a good stress reliever.

is

and preference.

are going

adults

Nielson

is

Scott Groves, a law and security graduate, makes sure his is in working order before he ventures into battle. (Photo by Rob Himburg)

weapon

feet.

memories of a place where childhood dreams were

itself,

due

security

she said.

“A

lot

Tournament

the

and

You need

to use

more

“It’s

of your senses such as hearing, sight

and

feel.

You’re always in the

no place

is safe.”

that you’ve

walk off the victorious

going, you don’t want to get

said

law

graduate.

fast-paced.

Now

“You’re scared, your adrenaline

line,”

hard core,” Conestoga College

to its nature,

increase the level of aggres-

bottom

game is more fun and exciting.

“It’s

action,

sion released in a player.

is

the

field,

team

the

of

begins and the

referee’s

hit,

you

to stake its claim

at superiority, then,

it,

been

waiting for the

once again, as

whistle

blows

Board of Directors Wednesday, February 24 4:30 p.m. The Other

Room

Sign

Agenda

Items

will

include: dental plan,

budget approval, election

results.

it

game commences.

Pool

up at the DSA Office

game

seriously than Mike, as

event

site

summer,” she

that

trom

March 15

more

Kitchener, offers the

“Most players go

They

There

some people will welt and some people will even bleed from ing,

if

to.”

for everyone,

of an old factory

fields in the

ftir

w ill

in the Leafs’

you want

Arena manager Tashelle Nielsen is particularly busy

disaster

defcjung Toronto

at the old

people will walk away with noth-

the

not as restricted. You’re

It’s

allowed to run, duck and dive

said the arena

however,

Leafs and their new digs, iheie

game

some

entertainment.

wlueh they find thcmsehcs among the league s top teams It may be a move tihat spells in

Wliatcvcr

will bruise,

during the winter months.

As for the will tell'^ how quickly they can adjust to their now home The move interrupts a season

Its

feet per second.

“Some people

Paintball Arena, an indoor

public

oiK-e again spoiling the party b\

final

The

Crowd

real

Mike.

into

social

paintball facility located

St. in

a

“I like the adrenaline rush,” said

these

as

war.

Charles

wits

the

game

a

It’s

third floor

noise

the

suffered

from children to adults, who wishes to go out and experience a scenario somewhat similar to a

Chicago, especially since they can now hear themselves think.

problem for visiting teams who

be

both

of

sport

coming

region.

their

want the atmosphere,” she said. As with any sport, there are

tolerance or skin type.”

Imitcd Centre, a

During

Mike and Scott Groves, members at the arena, enjoy game for various reasons.

Brothers

the cracking

to life in the

Gardens, the Leafs

adrenaline going, they

game,

scene in the Kitchener-Waterloo

big-cavernous building, which

physical

this

are stilT adjusting

to last any

any

avoids

confrontations in the arena.”

to

playing

The Hawks

lifetime.

get the

want

can

Blackhawks.

memories

that

serious. play, they

that

a building

lingering

little more “They want to

injuries

loaded with history and enough

hockcv fan a

.

old Gardens,

the

new.

Compared

they

are a

come in open-minded, know what to expect so

players

scenario.”

Nielsen also said her customers

moving shadow are visible, but all is silent. You think it’s safe to move forward, but as you step into the clear, you hear occasional

the old

shoots adrenaline


SPOKE, Feb.

SPORTS

Condors By Brian Smiley

tie

Alumni, lose player

women’s indoor soccer season

the

Ford concluded the scoring, but the drama

scoreboard through most of the match.

Conestoga opened the scoring

As

winds down, Conestoga may have to settle for second spot in the playoff round after playing to a 2-2 draw against the Alumni on Feb. 9 at the recreation centre.

a breakaway pass from the keeper and had two opportunities to score. After Papazotos’s first attempt went off the keeper, she grabbed the rebound and scored into a vacated net.

heap.

when Ang Papazotos took

While the Alumni retained their first place and undefeated record, they showed there may be a crack in their

the half and the Condors were lucky to be

armour.

holding the lead, thanks to a flurry of great

The Aliunni and Condors played evenly throughout the game, but the Condors did

the period.

saves by goalie Stephanie

Beginning the second

more than we could ask

tie is

considering

how many

players

we had,”

for,

said

Sanjeeve Dhanapala, the Condors’ assistant coach.

Since there are only a couple of games left in

regular season play,

it

offs

begin to see

if

momentum

kept their

play resumed.

Alumni

Conestoga finished the game short-hand-

going and evened the

scored

After the game, Dhanapala wasn’t certain

Conestoga’s Jenn Melynk and the

the

at

Alumni’s Andrea

by a

control in

goal.

After that it seemed as though the Condors would upset the Alumni, but it wasn’t meant

(Photo by Brian Smiley)

to be.

to a teammate. Ford

went

With just under five minutes remaining, Marlene Ford was awarded a free kick

the

the previous weekend, the Condors were

of the

close to the Condors’ goal. After passing

comer of the

all

the chips are down, we’ll take

able to hold onto

still

control

Conestoga College basketball coach Terry Upshaw would to see

more

like

entertairanent out of

game than

a basketball

the giune

itself

go his way and

things

If

the Coniiors get a spot in the

Collides

Ontario

Athletic

men’s basketball league next season, he has plans Association to

make

basketball

games

at

the

recreation centre an “event.”

Before

he

can

make

that

h^pen, Upshaw has to deal with/ the funding Issue.

Upshaw ':^ost

said^the

of gaining a

^

^pmxtoate basket-

just

net,

outside

to the front

the

crease

The Condors see action again on Feb.23

Melanson may miss

said. “1

want to

and get

provincial playoffs By Brian Smiley

in time for the championships.

“She’s hopeful she’ll be back for

Conestoga

Karen

forward

the may miss Melanson Ontario women’s indoor soccer

championships

after suffering

an

team by raising money the cost of the team.

The parlies would be on a Tuesday night, not a nonnal pub

have chipped a bone in her ankle,

night.”

coach Geoff Johnstone

James (manager of athletics and the by $5,000 recreation) middle of March,” he said, “just .so he really has a lund time saying no when we’re giving him to got Ian

is

half of the budget.” If and when

the

more

Upshaw W'ants to game .something fans

i)f a

The games special

try

party atmosphere such

pre-game or

tailgate parties.”.

also

w'ould

events

for

the

have

crowd,

of

a

said.

Alumni with

hoped the

of the team would pick up the

slack if she

was out

for an extend-

ed period of time. “It’s a chance for the

rest

a

come in, have hats and

shoot-out,”

halftime

a

lot

said

it’s

of legwork.”

So Condor

basketball

if she’s

gone,”

Johnstone said

if this

injury

campus and the

the party will be for you.

if the

try

sity at the time, the

team would

have been in a tough spot. it was this time last year, would be an absolute disaster,”

“If it

Johnstone

said.

fans

dream comes true,

pc^are,

Upcoming

Intramural

Games Ice

Feb. 22

-

26

PI

Hockey

Playoffs

Ci

of the

team to step up, Dhanapala said.

the squad’s lack of offensive diver-

to

and

T-shirts

connection between the ^core athletic facility,”

may

rest

Melanson went into the comer to and corral a loose ball and injured the leg when she stepped on an opponent’s foot. Johnstone said Melanson is hoping she will be back in action

want the fan

“1

just

nmch

the

injury occurred in a league

against the

Sanjeeve Dhanapala, the Condors’

had happened a year ago, with

really easy to put into place,

“T1here’i"*^ttot

damaged

the

play.

Upshaw. “All of these things arc

remember.

game

currently

assistant coach, said he

9.

ligaments in her leg and

The

is

aways.

make will

Melanson

on Feb.

Melanson

Condors’ leading goal scorer, but

just under three minutes left to

varsity team,

the

injury to her leg

Ontarios,” Johnstone said.

such as halftime shows and give-

free

Condors get a

at

the recreation centre.

net.

;us

goal

if

injured.

our leading goal scorer,” he said.

and

college to accept his bid for a

“My

playoffs

the

in

out for a long period of time because she’s

of

he

to offset

chances

Melanson was seriously

team is about $10,000. He is hoping to persuade the

\ I

Condors’

blasted the give-and-go into the bottom

Coach wants games to be more entertaining ball

the

repercussions could be devastating to the

“She’s going to be sorely missed if she’s

Party for the fans

By Rob Htmburg

knew

about the extent of the injury, but

Heroux battle for a game on Feb. 9, at the

14-minute mark to put Conestoga up

recreation centre.

“When

was slapped

their players

Melanson.

However, Papazotos and the Condors On a nice cross from Karen .Papazotos

after

The dispute centred on why no penalty was called on the Alumni player for injuring

net.

Melanson,

them (in the finals),” Dhanapala said. Even though they were missing several key players and coming off a tournament

one of

with a penalty for arguing with the referee.

until the play-

Dhanapala.

end

Andrea Herox caught DenHaan out of position and scored easily into an empty

they can smash that that doesn’t bother

half, the

to

ed

responded.

armour completely, but

DenHaan

score at the eight-minute mark.

looks as though

Conestoga will have to wait

Melanson had stepped on the player’s foot and rolled on her ankle. The game was suspended for about 10 minutes while Melanson was attended to by the trainer. She was helped off the floor and

Papazotos’s goal was the only marker of

so while playing short-handed.

2-2

continued.

the

at

With just under three minutes left in the game, the Condors leading goal scorer, Melanson, went after a ball in the comer. After an Alumni player chased her and came out with the ball, Melanson lay in a

18-minute mark

standing

“A

— Page 13

22, 1999

Responsibility...

Tuesday, February 23 4:30 p.m. A vs. B Wednesday, February 24 4:30 p.m.

B

vs. 1st.

during Spring Break Top two teams advance in

March.

to finals


— SPOKE, Feb.

Page 14

22, 1999

Warren takes music to war-torn countries By Elizabeth Sackrider

never been overseas previous to his tour. “In Israel

For most singers playing

sweaty club,

small

a

gig involves a

of beer and no

lots

chance of danger. country

student, decided to take his act across the

ocean, he could have faced

many

gun According

played

for

it is

show

five performers

on

road

the

for

found out

seven years

if

he

you

who

Warren,

at night,”

who went on

trip

who wouldn’t

When

be seeing

admitted

wasn’t until you sat in the audience you knew how unbelievably strong the emotions were,” said Warren. “They were

somewhat starved

for entertainment.”

was

tour

goodbye.

summer camp

leaving

like

Warren

over,

difficult to say

Sales are a

keyboardist

Canadian Armed Forces and the overseas troops before Christmas last year. “The land mines were the scariest,” said

was

the

sluggish but

little

CMT

has aired three of his videos.

Tim Louis, said he and the other performers were allowed to do things

the

played more after the show

the it

was

“It

I

whole time,” said Warren. Back home, Warren is working on sales of his current album Just Not The

After each gig, Warren and the other performers were encouraged to have a few

with

think

“I

“It

he said. the

than during,” he said.

that

“In Egypt they don’t drive around with

on

beers with the soldiers.

With Christmas right around the corner, emotions were riding high for the crowds of their families for the holidays.

Warren, Egypt, where they people, was a really

to

experience to see that side of the world.

military personnel

in prison.”

1,000

their headlights

Warren was one of

I

at clubs,”

bizarre place.

threats in

war-torn countries.

their

said. “It wasn’t until later

music

vocalist and former Conestoga broadcasting

took

with their machine guns, even lose your

When Jamie Warren,

the soldiers walk around

all

'

Warren. “You never never

left

that the civilians will never see

do.

camp alone and you

“We went on

on anything unpaved.”

left

patrol for six hours and

even wore the helmets and rode

Playing in places like Bosnia, Egypt, the

and never

-

in

armoured

vehicles,” he said.

former Yugoslavia, Israel and Italy was a change of perspective for Warren who had

The

singer

because he said

decided it

to do would be an

the

tour

amazing

Cfiaiie

Gignac tnrougn

Sanford

team they

Auk,s, a

d cuvctcu pjuyuu

The Condors won

the

game

I0C Conoots fiTSt blood dficr Sean Murray banked a shot out tn front of

2-i.

A^’

Stretching their wtnniag stteak to

fhe

games and

banged

tu. the

tr, in

vaulting

thmi

Ontario

into third place

Colleges

knew it was going to be a tough cfeing in ” said Hunke. "(Our) boys wanted it more than they did.”

improved

^unke

still

Hunke

is

Conestt^a down two men. The Condors effectively killed oft both penalties and hung on to win the game. Conestoga-forward Corby Purdy, who

work cut out for become a logjam.”

confident his team will

the boys can

do

it.

There’s

Md vrin/’ saidJhifdy':^laicTO#trondors expected a’ physical “^^e andflf^s. Both tei^:

isaty

probably the best goalie in

seizing every possible

in

the first

came

out

periodj^both hitting

S

'

He dso praised Gi^ac who tihe

he said

in his studio.

final game is on the road Humber Hawks on Feb. 25 at 6 p,m. They have won five out of their last six games and too trying to nail down one again.st the

'

is

(Photo by Sarah Thomson)

comedy

Strong’s

act

league.

The Condors

opportunity to fatten their opponent

teams

Jamie Warren practices

grew up in Lindsay, was happy to get a win in his hometown. “It’s a really good feeling to come here

no

question in my^mind,” said Hunke. “I’d put

^ent fe^^ening

in

and the Ariks failed ip of how to beat Gignac,

^er Scott Taylor took an illegd Mck penalty late in the period, which put

finish in the top four.

T know

s

even

got our

said Hunke. “It’s

Yet

solve the pnzjsle

the

said they aren’t a shoe-in.

“We’ve

-

the third period

Condors have post-season hopes but

their

14:48-

remained 1-F at the end of the period. Mike Traynor put Conestoga ahead

^aihe

the, win,

the net and

The Auks tied the game at the mark of the second period and the

Ckmdors' assisUmt coach Bob Hunkc impressed with his team’s effort,

„^,^With

«rded

own rdbound wifti just over

five mimites left in the period.

Association’s Sbekey standings.

-just

goaftendrati

in his

produced few scoring chances.

creates controversy By Brent

Clouthier

The applause was enough

to

prompt

Strong to return to the stage twice after his

Comedian Carl Strong brought his ribald brand of humour to Conestoga’s Sanctuary Feb. 10, but not everyone was amused. Taylor Zomer, a member of the

drug use.

electronic

well as Bill Cosby.

engineering

technology

program, voiced his concern over the Chicago-born comedian’s show in a letter addressed

SPOKE’s

to

principal Grant

editor,

McGregor and

college

the

Doon

first set

featured strong

comments about

“Cosby, Carlin and Pryor were biggest influences; Pryor

who

know he was going

be a comedian.

Condors have now

to

his appar-

some moral and legal which we, as educators, try

Whitewater University

Zomer

veteran,

who

holds a masters degree in psychology from

appeared on numerous

foster in our students,”

the

admits he didn’t

1

was shocked and apalled by

my

was probably

biggest,” said Strong,

ent disregard for

wrote.

“I’ve

in

Wisconsin, has

HBO specials.

worked with The Temptations, Paul Anka and Chaka

Smokey Robinson, Khan.

I

usually do about 10 to 15 minutes

with your daughter or drive if you arc drunk, and that taking drugs is cool.”

on

While Zomer didn’t appreciate Strong’s humour, the near-capacity crowd

he said of his college shows. Strong visited Conestoga as part of a

who takes a shot at the Auks' net during their 2*1 victory The won four games in a row. (Photo bv chariet

imitated James Brown, as

The 2 -year entertainment

“The messages 1 received from the performance was that it is okay to have sex

left,

He also

responsibilities to

Darren Dillon,

finished.

language, racial slurs and

Student Association. “I

was

Strong’s performance

gathered

watch applauded to

in

Strong

the

laughed

throughout his

Sanctuary

and performance.

their act.

“This

is

a bit of a stretch

when

I

do

this,”

DSA-sponsored nooner while between shows

in Las Vegas, where he opening for Gladys Knight.

is

currently


SPOKE, Feb.

ENTERTAINMENT

# She's All That

best

‘Bottle'

predictable yet

By Ken Groulx

and begins

Garrett

bearable teen-flick

screen

a

plus

talents,

legend.

tual love story. Unfortunately, in

difficult

assembling a

grieving

cast,

the

with

screenplay

argue over Taylor’s new boyfriend Brock (internet Photo) She’s All That.

By

The key

Eileen Diniz

She’s

AH

That, the latest teen

Laney

to

the

as

Blake

unable

is

Robin Wright stars as Theresa

to

his

deceased wife.

with a sense of emotion that

is

more eloquent than any words

in

predictability that even the fine

performances of its cast can’t save

featured

from bubbling under

into

murky

Luis

Director

a

alcoholism,

housewife' battling but

the

romantic

depths of melodramatic medioc-

turmoil of Message In a Bottle

rity.

undermined by formulaic cliches

The film unfolds

as Theresa

to

is

complicate the relationship. a

Osborne, played by the underrated

She’s

Robin Wright Penn {Forrest bottle discovers a Gump),

townie. She has a son; he’s never

an

been a

big-city

a

father.

girl;

he’s

These are legitimate

suddenly

to understand

has

she

the

She repeatedly

attention of Zack.

his

resists

with the

woman life,

initial

with

A

“G.”

little

divorced

passion in her

film

touched by

its

honesty and

contemporary

a

After suffering a critical and public lambasting with his last

The

advances. Eventually they go on a

stars

What You Did Last Summer, 1998) as Zack Siler and Rachel

better but he doesn’t realize that

uses her Chicago Tribune research

Postman, Costner has thankfully moved out from behind the

Leigh Cook {Strike, 1998) is Laney Boggs, in a movie written by R. Lee Fleming Jr. and

he may

skills to track the letter’s origin

camera and opted

by Robert

The movie

it

nothing

is

is

know

to

her

be falling in love with her.

Laney’s in for some embarrass-

letter’s

and

poetic sentiment, she

Her

author.

incredulous

search leads her to Garrett Blake

queen.

North Carolina sailboat builder,

Kevin Costner), a

(played by

lost in

a solitary existence, apart

with

from his bantering relationship

ending.

with

The film is a modem day spin on

My

bearable.

the

by

moments though with Taylor Vaughn who is sure she’ll be prom

ing

The movie progresses fi-om there a somewhat predictable

about

to rave

but

Iscove.

Zack gets

date and

lost-love heartache. Intrigued

Fair Lady,

1964,

In

Harrison.

starring

cantankerous

played by Paul

The

father,

Newman.

relationship

between

(Prinze)

most

the

is

popular guy at a snobby, rich school in Los Angeles.

He has the

third highest grade point average

in his class

and

is

also the captain

He

lower class

this

lady.

Costner

Cook

an

not

is

Lyn

girl at school.

Taylor ends up breaking up with

Zack after her trip to Daytona Beach where she meets Brock Hudson (Matthew Lillard). Brock is the star of MTV’s The Real World, where kids are cast to act as themselves.

on

He

is

so into him-

he has a tattoo of himself

self that

The only straints

little

and now Zack has five weeks

make over a

girl

and turn her

girl that

Their conversations

barely

Dean (Walker) picks

man racked with

obsessive guilt.

It’s

invite

a role that

maudlin overtures.

along with such slug-

gish calculation, the film

an

exercise

in

becomes

unimaginative

connect-the-dot plot devices.

you

If

missed

on you probably

didn’t catch this film

Valentine’s Day, then

the

small

window of

opportunity to actually this

drivel.

sit

through

Fine performances

Message in a Bottle is best 1 2 3 4 5 on the beach.

aside. left

Prizes

60

than

longer

lasted

is

nothing to rave

bearable.

it is

The film

PJ Contest

doesn’t fade or get boring in the it

is

made

for

a

younger teen audience.

Once you

realize this

movie

isn’t

about entertaining teenagers, you

for

home with the

script crawls

seconds.

into

She is not your typical student. She is a cliunsy art student who spends most of her time in her basement painting. She has a bad attitude, dirty hair, no friends and definitely the wrong clothes.

the bet.

clearly at

however, are fleeting. Instead, the

their

utilize

characters.

about achieving perfection but

most popular girl at school. Laney (Cook) turns out to be the

flawed

life.

it, which made it Laney and Zack to

to

the

the

move on with his Moments such as these,

tragedies and

Entertainment

fully

soon realize

it

NeiTve

wasn’t a complete

waste of time. She’s All That is now playing at Fairway Cinema in Kitchener, Cineplex Odeon in Guelph, in Stratford and Cambridge Cineplex. It is rated PG and has a running time of approximately 97 minutes. 1 2 3 45

Premier Cinemas

Tues. Feb. 23, 7:00

pm

The Sanctuary Sign

Up

at the

the

help his son deal with his past

put on

difficult for

middle but

prom queen with a

in

Newman and

problem with the

real

Walker) saying he can turn any

His friend takes him on,

between

film was the script and the con-

about but

work.

genuine

fun

likeable,

Zack then makes a bet with his best friend Dean Sampson (Paul girl into

as

more

performance as a

would

scenes

of

particularly

actress but her character

The movie

his right arm.

moments

exceptional

always.

dating

’s

Shaw’s

Bernard

shallow

is

(Jodi

is

Pygmalion, written in 1912.

O’Keefe), the prettiest but most

Vaughn

Taylor

work in Nobody Fool. Message in a Bottle is marked

fine

My Fair Lady was based on

George

Laney is and charming. Prinze as Zack was magnificent as

of the football team.

to tread

material and delivers an effectual

a high-class

girl into

waters

effort.

everyman that characterized his acting work in such films as Bull Durham and Field of Dreams.

professor bets he can transform a

Zack

sharp sense of wit in a moving performance reminiscent of his

Rex and movie a

Hepburn

Audrey

his

starring-directorial

familiar

radiates

articulate,

Costner as the father attempts to

legitimacy.

she obsessively pours over the

letter,

lacks

Newman

each scene with his

sentiment,

Know

directed

Dodge.

father.

with

pushes him off and (/ Still

out the character of Costner’s

contrived and familiar that the

ents. Jr.

Kudos must be given to screenDiPego for fleshing

writer Gerald

concerns, but they’re so clumsily

why

Freddie Prinze

the script.

apologetic,

seem

a

but Costner inhabits his character

containing

can’t

in

the

betray

memory of

romantic message, signed only

Laney

Message

(Internet Photo)

only truth and

art.

in

Bottle.

himself

allow

doesn’t care about appearances,

new comedy by Miramax films starring some of Hollywood’s new teen tal-

release, is a

that she

is

becomes

Mandoki has explored similar themes in When a Man Loves A Woman, which

it

Lillard) in

dinners,

Hence, the dilemma.

and an undeveloped cliches narrative. Message in a Bottle meanders with such plodding

Hudson (Matthew

steak

to

Bogged dovra by romantic genre

(Jodi Lyn O’Keefe)

and

sailing

increasingly

emotional impact.

Vaughn

midnight but

believable

Siler (Freddie Prinze Jr.) with ex-girlfriend Taylor

with

enough,

ingredients for a mature, intellec-

producers forgot to assemble a

Zack

innocuously

Message in a Bottle would appear necessary all the to have

first-rate

— Page 15

on beach

left

Theresa

Based on the best-selling novel by Nicholas Sparks and starring two of America’s finest acting

22, 1999

DSA Office


.

.

SPOKE,

Patie t6

Feb. 22, 1999

reate

collection

a^rt

By Elizabeth Sackrider and Eileen Diniz

technique to produce works that thick with bright primary colours and texture. are

On one

wall a massive crimson

bull shoots out

Standing six feet away from the uses an abstract painting style similar to the

from a vivid jade

On

background.

another,

canvas, Griffin

a

suntlower bigger than a person

abstract style of the expressionists in Germany.

reflects the sun.

This is the interior of artist Christopher Griffins recently

opened

painting

Kitchener “1

s

studio

downtown

The

Matisse’s

Red Room and

the diver-

worked

Griffin

as

book

a

designer for a year and a half and then started painting full time in 1 990. His works were displayed at

Maryhill.

the

Homer Watson He also

1994.

was enthralled with images from his trip to Griffin said he

Gallery

two months and

took Griffin and his wife into the remotest parts of India. He said he

was disturbed by development that would destroy the

would

plans

outside

culture of the area.

warmer.

There are people there who have never seen white people and they are Just going to wipe them out, he

his paintings to corporations

who have

never been seen before,”

Griffin said.

own

culture

“It’s

and

a loss to thenit’s

really

a

shame.” Since the inhabitants had never seen white people before, they

Money By

were curious and amazed with

He started painting them and it was an excellent icebreaker. The whole village watched as Griffin painted.

The brutal edge and raw power of the people is reflected in Griffin’s depiction of them in his

private

Using a paintbrush on a broom handle and an artist’s spatula he avoids any sense of

paintings.

refinery in his images.

He

has dozens of portrait-sized

of himting and nature.

“They

who have lots of feathers and bones through their noses,”

people

said Griffin.

paintings of these people in the earth tones of brown and green

College’s

and a touch of vibrant red. The eyes capture a world unknown full

takes advantage of the texture of oil paint and a subtractive

the wheel for a chance to

win a

prize.

The Conestoga Business Student Association raised approximately

$500 at their Valentine’s Biz Bash at Sammy’s Garage in downtown Kitchener on Thursday, Feb. 1 1 Approximately 350 people were in attendance.

The

first

200

ladies also received

a rose. the

I

feedback we’ve would say everyone had

a really good time at the dance,” said Laurie Campbell, the CBS

A

communications co-ordinator and

Everyone received a ticket for the W^eel of Love at the door. Lucky ticket holders spun

Offspring,

Britney

Spears, Will Smith, Maestro and some oldies like Hey Mickey.

keeps the crowd going. If the music is all the same thing people tend to get bored,” said Campbell. “It

“From received

including

The 1988 graduate of Sheridan illustration program

The raisers

CBS A

holds

a third-year marketing student.

funds)

Music was provided by Sammy’s DJ who played a variety of music

business programs.

They

fund-

primary source of for equipment for the

(a

also raise

money through

almond sales and bake sales. The association usually holds a back-to-school Christmas bash,

bash

and

an

bash,

a

awards

banquet

bash. Tliis

Halloween

bash

and

the Nicholson and

Gage fundraiser which raised money for a memorial to Const. Dave Nicholson and Mark Gage

living, the artist sells

collectors

and from Toronto

Bash

who

died at the Parkhill

dam

last

summer. This year the

CBSA has held two

more than usual because they have borrowed money to upgrade the

year they have also held a

work

to

weather gets

a bonus.”

a

Valentine’s

the

and the United States. His studio is open by appointment only but he doesn’t mind people walking by and dropping in for a moment. “I have the windows so I can put some work in there,” he said. “If people walk by and come in that’s

are just visually beautiful

for love at the Vatentine Biz

Eileen Diniz

prefer

when

To earn a

Griffin’s artist supplies.

“Just the tragedy of these people

computers in the business

lab.

The

bash will be on Stages Nightclub in downtown Kitchener following the annual awards banquet. final biz

April

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

13

at

Learning Disabilities

There has been considerable attention paid to the term “Learning Disability” in the past few years as educators become increasingly aware of the individual needs of students. The term

was coined

in the 1960’s to describe people

average or above average

abilities,

who, while having

exhibited difficulty learning

in one of the basic academic areas such as reading, writing, or mathematics. Since that time, considerable research has helped us to identify and classify what a learning disability is, how to

diagnose

this

how

problem, and

to help individuals

who

have a

learning disability.

Research has taught us that

:

Learning disabilities affect about 2-5% of students. •Learning disabled students show a marked difference in what they are capable of learning and their achievement in certain areas.

•Learning disabled students do well in college and university programs given the right kind of support. •There arc tests and procedures that can help identify the exact nature of the disability.

•There arc

strategies that

can be used

to help

overcome

a

learning disability.

•While everyone has disabilities are

and Chad

in

Winnipeg, Guatemala and Honduras. “I have put on a lot of exhibitions,” he said. “It’s just a matter of finding the space.” Like most artists, Griffin likes his free space and said he

working on.

said.

May

in

exhibited

Toronto,

eastern India and they inspired the entire collection he is currently trip lasted

for

of Picasso.

sity

Griffin and his wife have moved back to Maryhill after living in Toronto for a couple of years.

The

influences

arc the roughness

the

outside of Toronto,” said Griffin is

work

of Van Gough’s The Starry Night, primary colour usage of

core.

we (Griffin and his wife) would come back here and see if we could make a go of it thought

whose hometown

obvious

Griffin’s

in

early

Christa Bilton, Jennifer Rawlins, Fatima Carvamo, Kristi Mason, Laurie Campbt wheel of love at the Valentine Biz Bash. (Photo by Eileen Dini

Allison stand in front of the

different leaning styles, learning

marked areas of difficulty.

BlMBlglBJBIBIBlBJBIBMBIBlBfgiBlBIBMgiBIBlBIBigiBIBIBlBIBMgnB


Digital Edition - February 22, 1999