Page 1

WHAT’S INSIDE "iM

Conestoga College, Kitchener 29th Year

— No. 41

November 24, 1997

Conestoga teacher elected in Stratford “There were only two things back in the 1950s that my father let me stay up late for,” said Dale.

By Greg Bisch Conestoga College instructor Michael Dale has found a second job. On Nov. 10 he was elected to

“One was hockey,

Dale,

a

his political opinions a great deal.

part-

time teacher of

“My

Canadian history and politi-

vative,”

cal

little

“Stratford

is

a

little

father.

more conser-

you

Either

footsteps

debate.

the oppo-

He would

follow

you

or

end

in

up

their

the

complete opposite.” Dale conceded that, politically at least, he is the opposite of his dad.

left-wing supporters (in Stratford)

have

politi-

argue black was white if he had to. your parents can think “I influence you in one of two ways.

surprised

wiiming.

“I’m a well winger and the core to

“He was a

matter what stance

site just for the

known

have seemed around me.” This is not the

No

you took, he would take

vative,” said Dale. left

was a raging conser-

he said about his now

cal animal.

was a

said he

father

deceased

science at

Doon campus,

at

was

Dale said his father influenced

Stratford city council.

Michael Dale

the other

politics.”

rallied

well, his left-wing stance was influenced by the 1960s. In fact, he said his haircut has just recently taken a shorter, more

As

first time Dale has run for city council, however. He ran in 1 982 but didn’t get elected.

Dale said now was the perfect

together.

conservative style, after he made the mistake of having his hair cut school in at a hairdressing

his

Stratford.

time for him to run again because his personal life is sttuting to come

He has recently finished masters degree in political science at University of Waterloo and landed his teaching job at Conestoga this past September. “I’ve

really

term here

enjoyed

this

past

he

said.

at the college,”

“The students seem to be reacting well. At least that is what I get from their reactions.” He added jokingly that his students may just be good actors.

While running for election in Dale said he decided to keep the campaign simple. He advertised in the Stratford Beacon Herald. “Everybody who votes in Stratford,

reads

Stratford

he

proposals

think so.”

side step the

in politics

goes back a long way.

Famous

for

handling

downloading

provincial

municipalities.

said his interest

Beacon,”

Dale’s campaign concentrated on his

“That could be the case for all I know,” said Dale. “But, I don’t

The 44-year-old

the

said.

He

on said

municipalities could not afford to

Dale

will

problem any further. be one of 10

councillors for Stratford.

’Tis the Lisa Bullock

season (left)

and Sabina Kayser,

with fellow students during the

soldier tells youth to

first

to students at

(Photo by Hunter Malcolm)

workers for the

trouble keeping the

was

of the students, as he

tasks they will be responible for in

most famous

contrasted Canada’s international

major-general

peacekeeping roles to its own domestic issues. Within that context, MacKenzie offered a list of six practical tips on leadership, which he said he has found to be true in his considerable of experiences

your name, by imposing personal standards and style. Finally, MacKenzie said on bad

MacKenzie spoke to roughly 400 high school students about leadership in today’s world, at a free afternoon seminar, at Bingemans, Nov. 13. The hour-long address, entitled Meeting Tomorrow’s Challenge, was sponsored by the Alcohol and Drug Recovery Association of Ontario, and preceded Drug

MacKenzie speaks

fight

(Photo by Ross Bragg)

2.

He had no

Lewis

Retired major-general Lewis Bingemans Nov. 1 3.

1

full attention

Billed as Canada’s retired

design and advertising, enjoy a snowball

watch power-tripping

By Hunter Malcolm

soldier,

first-year graphic

snowfall of the year Nov.

to

be

on the

list,

MacKenzie and

yourself

when

power-tripping

to

said

avoid

assuming

Awareness Week, which ran from Nov. 17 to 21. MacKenzie spoke with the color and presence of a man who, in his developed a has years, 57 considerable and broad perspective of how the world works. MacKenzie, so often seen on the news wearing the flack jacket and signature blue helmet of the

positions of responsibility.

United Nations, was, among other assignments, chief of staff of the UN’s Protection Force in the former Yugoslavia in 1992.

achievable challenges.

Secondly, he suggested leading by wandering about, to keep in touch and be a part of what one’s subordinates are up to. Thirdly, listen to others.

a sign of strength to be able to recognize good ideas from other “It is

people,” he said.

Fourth,

“No one

set

meaningful

ever

doing things that said.

The

days, be an actor.

“Don’t

and

bragged about were easy,” he

fifth tip

on leadership

Being

moody.

be

consistant will alow people to be

more comfortable and more effective,” he said. Tying

responsibility. First

to prepare

ty,

in the idea

MacKenzie

therefore

of responsibili-

cited Canada’s role

in the international

forum as a des-

presupposed by its own good fortune and comforts at home. “It’s both a blessing and a curse,” he said. “Canada is always on the tiny

list

when

a country

applies to the

in

trouble

UN for relief.”

Concluding, MacKenzie said one merely is peacekeeping chapter in developing countries and peace is not just the absence of killing.

“A country

is

more than

constitutional documents. affair

of the heart, and that

just

It’s is

an

what

needs to be sold today,” he said.


1

Page 2

— SPOKE, November 24, 1997

NEWS

MPs get back to basics

Federal

Local town hall meetings mark return to grassroots politics By Richard Berta

She said the deficit stood at $9 billion in 1996-97, which is down from $42 billion in 1993-94. She said the deficit is to almost

“Paul Martin has said he would never allow the country’s finances

of control again,” said

to get out

Karen Redman, Liberal

MP

be eliminated next year.

Redman

for

also said that 279,000

had

been

Kitchener.

jobs

The occasion for this statement was a town hall meeting held in

the start of 1997,

Andrew’s Presbyterian Church

St.

in

Kitchener Nov. 13.

Redrhan

is

currently a

member of

the federal government’s finance

committee, a posting which she says has become all the more important because of the emphasis on fiscal responsibility. Kitchener’s town hall is but one out of 301 in a broader nation-wide consultation process whereby MPs seek feedback from their constituents on the economic progress

made so

far

as

well

created

in the private sector

She pointed out

since

most of them and full-time.

was

there

that

an additional 63,(X)0 jobs created for youth alone. But Redman said there was still much that needed to be done. “Of course, the level of youth

unemployment

still

is

unacceptably high,” she said. “This is why we are in favor of increasing assistance to students

by investing in apprenticeship programs, by better listening to business and industry and by the establishing

education

the

as

endowment

hall.

Redman added that education was largely a provincial domain. But the most pressing questions at the town hall included federal transfer payments to provinces and

recommendations for the 199899 budget. There were approximately 50 participants in the town

The

issues

discussed included

debt reduction, job creation and increasing investments.

One problem which Redman is

being resolved

is

said

the deficit.

fund.”

of

cutting

the

social

meeting held

Andrew’s Presbyterian Church Nov. 13.

increase health care transfers from

$1

1

billion to $12.5 billion.

Most

participants

allocate

the

the

payments

transfer

accordingly.

to

Carl Zehr defeats Christy

spend

how

to

the

provinces

allocated to the provinces should be marked in some way so as to

group representative Derek Nighbor said 50 per cent o£ taLKAb should be allocated to social services and 50 per cent to servicing

designated purpose.

were

participants

the

groups and each assigned to talk abdUt a specific divided

into

issue.

By Rachel Pearce During the municipal elections Nov. 1 0, Kitchener residents voted in Carl Zehr to replace Mayor Richard Christy with a 2-1 resounding vote ratio. The new mayor’s coordinator, Linda Fryfogel, said Zehr was unavailable for comment as he is very busy preparing for his new post. Zehr will officially replace Christy at the

would concentrate on economic development and would work to manage the provincial

community more involved

downloading, with an eye to maintaining services and low tax rates. Zehr also pledged to be a

council will stay pretty

said he

new

objectives,

of priorities

Galloway

much

same, because nine out of

said the 1

members were there last but some things will change.

council

mayor in Kitchener, a some say was a dig at

received

also

Tom Galloway,

local level will

most

likely be a

element

Galloway said Christy did have some style issues and did some

mayor.

think style probably

first

was

a key

because it involves more structural changes than we have seen in the past 10 years.

making expenditures. While Galloway qualified

who

by saying, “these were not big ticket

per cent of the ballots. Christy

eventually saw the necessity of

received

keeping council informed. As for future changes in the style of Kitchener council, Galloway said, “I don’t think you’re going to

1,241.

1

interview

his

after

concession speech, Christy told the K-W Record that Zehr’s campaign attacked him personally and focused more on style than on

items”

see too

he

said

Hennig,

another

we

should for-

representative, said

get about reducing taxes because the debt needs to be serviced.

“We need

to

squeeze

the role of her

party in contributing to the federal

“The country’s economic the

responsibility

party, including ours, like

there

straits

of every

who

spent

was no tomorrow,”

she said.

“This

more

did not refrain

must

all

is

something which we to and resolve.”

own up

at the

of Waterloo as the director of planned operations,

Christy, a former city councillor

a sociology professor at Wilfred Laurier University, based his campaign on a fair tax policy, a to attract

new

said council will retain

its

the revitalization of the

focus on

downtown

core.

He

busi-

said

will take about

it

10

nesses to Kitchener and a pledge to continue downtown

years to get the city in shape, and

revitalization.

that goal.

also

Margaret

and development,”

Redman

from mentioning

University

and

Zehr,

into research

issues,

money

Christy

much change.” who also works

Galloway,

substance.

commitment

spending was necessary. “We must put back more

his

collected 21,970 votes, about 60

an

said,

time,

agreed the reduced

like

Cardillo.

statement about Christy’s spending

In

he

the

things without consulting council,

of former

for Zehr,

months,

in this election.”

This time, the race had a more

outcome

most

are

had

Christy

criticism for his lofty attitude as

city council.

positive

same

“We shouldn’t penalize someone on welfare who’s worked for two or three days,” he said. During the evening’s analysis of

the brain drain.”

the city helm.

.

maximum

for welfare recipients.

debt.

at

on

Dom

and

group representative Julie MacDonald, “so that we can lessen

at

term

run against Christy for the top job

mayor

At

health,

to

research

said

continued teaching

the university during his

city council

seat

cuts

the cost of various services to the

who

Christy

city council for the next six to nine

the

further

education and development.

for

Nighbor also said his group agreed on placing a work incentive

participants

councillor of six years, said, “I

fill

halting

said

technology.

“We’re going to be faced with all the ramifications budget of provincial downloading,” he said. Dealing with the downloading of

major preoccupation of the new

to

of the recommendations

Nighbor

investment returns there should be investments substantial in

term,

a Kitchener

race

Some

put forward by group representatives for the new budget included

the issue of tax allocation,

the debt.

statement

time was in 1994, when Zehr placed third to Christy in the

t

in terms

meeting Dec. 1. It was for the second time that the 52-year-old accountant Zehr had

The

I

and

But

On

“full-time”

inaugural

.

project.

in the

existing programs.”

Participants were agreed on spending the surplus from 1996-97 fiscal year to eliminate the deficit.

the

ensure they are spent for their

Kitchener mayoral race

efficiency and productivity out of

money,” participant Peter MacLean said. “There aren’t enough now.” Redman joked that the monies

Later,

in

(Photo by Corey Jubenviiie)

“There should be more strings attached

were skeptical

of the provinces’ willingness to

services.

Under the pre-budget proposal, government was proposing

at St.

a

former

council will remain committed to

However, he added, the new

city

councillor and regional councillor,

.»••••»• if«***««*<

I

council •

will .

probably, get j

I

.

the ,

Waiting for Santa Ciaus Jen Struck, early childhood education, reads parade at Fairyiew Park Mali .Nov. 1 5 .

to

some

children before the Kitchener Santa Claus (Photo by corina

Hiii)


SPOKE, November 24,

NEWS

1997

— Page 3

Back to the bargaining tabie Negotiations resume with students’ year By Corey Jubenville

$20,000

less,

so

it’s

not going

He

to

“To doubt everything or to believe everything are two equally convenient solutions; both dispense with the neces-

of reflection.”

sity

With negotiators from college faculty and the board of regents scheduled to restart bargaining Nov. 20, deep divisions remain

between the two sides. The resumption marks the first time the two sides have sat down together since the faculty union voted

to

the

reject

management

latest

proposal.

On Oct. 16, faculty unions across Ontario voted by 95 per cent to reject the contract put forward by the bargaining team representing the council of regents.

One of issues

most contentious

the

contract

the

in

is

differentiated staffing.

Under the current system, faculty are classified as either professors

or

The

instructors.

But from the management side, of flexibility. it’s an issue John president, Conestoga’s Tibbits, called it a complex issue. He said he thinks the nature of teaching

Jules Henri Poincare

difference

between the two positions

that

is

can help develop curriculum and receive more pay. professors

is

it’s

not about

Ted Montgomery,

Instructors

limited

are

are classified as instructors,

technique,

or

management

said

was

instructor category.

Ted

said

He added

was important from a

the stu-

dent’s point of view, because of the to

keep costs under control.

To make an

differentiated staffing

even

thornier

issue,

did

difficult to

far

(the

it

John

Tibbits,

point,

sticking

able to use differentiated staffing. “What we’re looking for is more

ing

who

faculty aren’t being

goods

(the union) in Toronto.”

So another problem

rises in the

seems to be trust between the two sides. head Boettger, Walter

process. There

is the word direct. Montgomery said he fears management could implement

Montgomery,

and

little

greater

productivity,” he said.

said

he

sees

wanted

to guar-

antee (job security) he wouldn’t have put in these kinds of weasel

words.

He would have

nobody

will

be

just said

laid off, flat out.”

Boettger, who said he has a good working relationship with Tibbits, said vagaries in the contract were

one problem, calling

me”

it

a “trust

thing.

might be okay with Tibbits as what about the guy after him? Neither side wants to think about

of Conestoga’s union, said the next step to getting negotiations on track is dialogue. But right now, both sides are accusing each other of not moving, and nothing is

numerous

as instructors.

developing.

resolved, and the depth of differ-

He added, “So now I say I am being laid off as a direct result of

discuss anything with

amending the

as

funding cuts to a program, lay off professors, then hire instructors to fill the gap and present the opportunity for professors to

class

be recalled

“We

definition.

Their response is ‘No, you’re being laid off as a direct result of our changing the funding.’”

find

how

unless

to

it

very difficult to

it

make

them

as far

the system better,

involves

more benefits for

members,” Tibbits said. “More job security, more money, meaning the

It

president, said Boettger, but

a strike at this point, but given the issues

which have

to

all

head of the union negotiat-

full-time professor in the bargain-

ing team. “Faculty are not going to

ing unit will be laid off or reclassi-

tolerate this. Instructors get paid

fied as

a direct result of amending

Please give at the next

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be

ence between the two sides, it could become a real possibility. “Both sides, in some ways, are reticent, and I’m not sure how things can get kick started,” Boettger said.

it

The proposal set forth by management states, “No current

make

it

differently.

“If Tibbits really

know our

they’re being sold a bill of

said

use of our teach-

resources

Montgomery

shared his view.”

given the full explanation and we aren’t permitted to go down and

by

The

we

flexibility in the

“I

the class definition of instructor.”

say, to

term,

polite

speak well of Mr. Tibbits’ ideas,” he said. “There weren’t any Tibbits takes a different point of

co-chairman

some people would

the

misinformed the faculty.” Teaching is changing, Tibbits said, so we think we should be

view.

the system better.”

this,

use

contract proposal) and they did not

(faculty)

as how to

classified.

gave them a guarantee in writing,” said Tibbits. “If you and I

incorporates one of this decade’s

their nursing teachers instructors,”

college tried to

said the

all,”

said he attended a

interest in

down

or

hottest issues, job security.

Montgomery.

“One

not about flexibility at about power.”

talk to them,” said Tibbits. “I think

“We

the

to

very

writing curriculum,” Tibbits said.

need acquisition of a manipulative skill

it

discuss anything with

make

issue

union negotiator

find

them, as

looking for flexibility, and the wording of the present contract makes it very difficult to use the

about power.”

“We

been

had

there

said

“We

students.

said. “It’s

“They had no (Photo by John Sawicki)

“The thing is, a professor is somebody who is supposed to be

curriculum and not necessarily developing (it).” Out of around 7,000 teachers at colleges across Ontario, only 40 or

number of

an

meeting held at Conestoga for faculty to hear what the contract was about, and faculty here felt the same as everyone else.

markers and tutors. Colleges are almost all professors.

believe there are a number of teaching jobs where you can have the teaching just people

with

faculty,

Montgomery

lecturers,

He flexibility,

“It’s

John Tibbits

He

being told they would be laid off

years,

three

last

full-time

increasing

he

be

to

between 20 and 25 per cent of

the

lost

seems

quality,

the issue.”

said the union has

In

In

professors, associate professors,

is

higher

misinformation from the union, and he found it very disappointing. For example, he said people were

Montgomery

work on assignments. That’s a examining the situation, the of co-chairman Tibbits, bargaining team for the council of regents, said universities have full

to

management

what

is

its

different kind of work.”

makes no sense

it

the class definition unless

planning to do to generate savings.

changing.

said Tibbits. “It’S

this

“Every situation in life is not the same,” he said. “There’s a big difference between teaching communications and doing marking, as opposed to standing in a computer lab and giving a 20-minute overview and then having students

50

said

amend

fly.”

the baiance

in

everyome

responsibility'

up to someone else to give blood


.

Page 4

— SPOKE, November 24, 1997

COMMENTARY

How cold is it?

Wind

factor

chill

not exact science having

two

1939,

In

explorers,

Paul Siple and

Charles

Passel,

downhill-skiing-

a

naked-on-a-sunny-day

And what

began

research on the effects of

guys

wind speed on temperature. I guess with little else to do

wind

up

riled

factor.

really gets these is

when we

get

mixed up with

chill

temperature.

than think about the cold, the

Getting back to Antarctica,

watched

higher wind speeds meant

two

researchers

cans

of water

freeze

some cans

noticing that

quickly the windier

some cans of water more

froze

faster,

er on windier days.

got.

it

With the publication of

their disser-

the Climate of Antarctica,

C

good to -40

we began

is

good

to -40

is

C

whether you are driving with your hood open into 100 kilometre winds

using the term wind chill factor. And,

we have been talking about wind chill whenever we

or sitting parked inside a meat locker.

for better or for worse,

talk about the

Antifreeze in your radiators that

.

Adaptation of the Explorer to

tation.

froze

but the water was not any cold-

More and more, however, we hear wind

weather ever since.

and actual temperature

chill

used interchangeably. On the radio we might hear, “It is -50 C today with

In recent times, however, people

who know about weather and people who know about thermodynamics (you know the type) have been ques-

Let

— maybe

snow

it

A warm-blooded woman encounters cruel winters By

the time they’re

in

mean we should

tioning the scientific grounds of the

underestimate the effects of wind on

snowfall of the season or plan-

whole concept.

temperature. Higher wind speeds and

ning a ski weekend, but the cold white blanket outside that they wake up to everyday is as much a part of life as having 10 toes.

What

accepted

is

when

colder

it

is

we

that

winder.

is

the

First, the

days mean

is

rounding our body

when

it is

we

and be close

blanket of

warm

Wind

air sur-

have to dress warmer

to shelter.

chill sceptics,

however, want

us to be aware but not misled, prefer-

whisked away

is

become a

deadly combination. Cold and windy

This,

two reasons.

for

chill.”

colder temperatures can

feel

according to Environment Canada,

wind

This does not

ring terms like cold, very cold and

windy.

extremely cold over numerical wind

Second, the wind draws heat away

from our bodies by quickly evaporating any moisture that forms on the

chill readings.

skin.

the average person in the western

For the rocket

Probably

works

like thus: -t-

hour and

T =

in history has

world been so unaffected by the weather. We have moved from farms to well-built homes, we wear hightech fibers and drive in heated cars on

scientist in the house,

T(wc) = 0.045 (5.27V*=»=0.5 10.45 - 0.28V) (T 33) + 33, where T(wc) = wind chill, V= the wind speed in kilometres per

it

at

no time

salted roads.

Our

the temperature in

interest in the weather,

howev-

Simple right? Well the only problem is, and this is what gets scientists’ lab

growing stronger. The popularity of The Weather Network and giant color weather maps in newspapers

many

suggest a higher understanding and

degrees Celsius.

er, is

coats in a knot, there are too

other factors affecting

it

cold

it

more grounded

feels to say anything

than “the

how

more windy

it is,

the colder

growing obsession about weather. Our use of wind chill, as with

humidex,

is

one way

we

exaggerate

weather to play into our weather

is.”

How

you are dressed, how sunny it how much you are moving and even how quickly you are breathing will all affect how cold it feels as much as wind speed will.

obsession.

So having a numerical wind chill factor makes about as much sense as

underwear, and

Maybe when someone

is,

-30

C

below out

says, “It’s

there,” the proper

“My thermomeam wearing long

response should be, ter says

-20 C,

I I

don’t feel quite that

cold, thank you.”

the slopes,

their

most Canadians have long since tired of winter. They may get a thrill from the first

Snow

fascinates me. Until

still

ball before

When

I

February night to look

the

melted.

it was April, the snow condominiums was pretty scarce. But we made the most of it that first evening. We started at toddler level, by admiring our footprints, and moved on to catching the flakes on our tongues, which was difficult because it wasn’t really snow-

snow from

I owned (I already knew the trick of dressing in layers), so I figured I could handle Canadian winters and packed my bags that summer. After all, it must only

in a late-night

snowball

war.

The next morning, walked

suit

first

later,

is

299 Doon Valley

I

decided that

definitely

it

snow ever at the

N2G 4M4.

walk

it

fell.

I

followed

lodge sometime

covered in snow from head to foot and

and

Fatila;

Hill;

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971

my

I

was too cold and

to school in

ing soaps.

time

mace

time

and

our livingroom all day, bundled up in blankets, watchstayed

wrote White Christmas.

Production manager: Alison Shadbolt; Advertising manager: Corey Jubenville; Bob Reid 4B15, Kitchener, Ontario,

who

I

editor:

Room

decided to

wasn’t a Canadian

students of Conestoga College. Rebecca Eby; College life editor: Lori-Ann Livingston; Entertainment editor: Sarah Smith; Assistant entertainment editor: Rita

Dr.,

first

my roommate

We came

and we arrived

the first flakes

bad, like the

upon real snow bank - something we’d only dreamed of before. A glint appeared in her eye. She promptly lay down and began to make snow angels, an instinct that must have been programmed into the human race before the

when

and I decided that it definitely wasn’t a Canadian who wrote White Christmas. After that there were many firsts, good and

to the ski lodge

with a friend.

March or

to early

fell,

we had

formed two camps and were deeply entrenched

December

of a white Christmas.” It was Thanksgiving

ing at the time. Within

Circulation manager: Matt Harris; Faculty supervisors: Jim Hagarty, address

late

they’d have no need to sing, “I’m dreaming

our

half an hour,

Sports editor: L. Scott Nicholson; Assistant sports editor: Corina

SPOKE’s

I

clothing

Unfortunately, as

around

SPOKE is published and produced weekly by the journalism

editors: Barbara Ateljevic, Jamie Yates;

at the school before

Vermont in April. However, I was wearing every piece of

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Photo

I

Then, in my last year of high school, 1 went on the class ski trip to Vermont. You can imagine 30 Bermudian teenagers, many of whom had previously seen snow only in photographs and movies, staring in awe at tlie snow-covered mountains of Killington.

the

Features and issues editor:Erica Ayliffe;

less than a

accepted a place there. The snow was thick on the ground, and it was much colder than

my

Or

the first

forehead froze

was locked into a frowning grifought the wind and snow to the

face

as

1

warm doorway. I’m beginning my fifth and final (at least for now) Canadian winter, and I’m still surprised by the beauty of snow and shocked by the pain of living in a giant freezer for I’ll half of the year. I know one thing next

never look

way

SPOKE

News

came

decided, like most Bermudians, to attend a Canadian one. I arrived in Guelph one dark, cold

decidedly happy. By the end of our five-day crash course on

Editor: Ross Bragg;

the time

year later to apply to universities,

my fingers and trying to form a

it

relationship with

However, hot chocolate (something I seldom drink in Bermuda) and 1 had formed a lasting bond.

was 17, my only experience of it was scraping the frost from the back of freezer with

my

snow was on shaky ground and I was less than enamored with skiing.

twenties,

is

at

winters in

Bermuda

the

same

again.

mainly funded from September to

May

by

Doon Student Association (DSA). The views and

opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a

photograph).


— SPOKE, November 24,

COMMENTARY

1997

— Page 5

Early freeze not popular at Conestoga, survey shows

Students find ways to beat the cold Story and photos

accounting, said she thinks winter sucks but that personal intimacy

by Hunter Malcolm

was

The

first

way

warm

was.

to stay

best,” she said.

is

Melissa Spilek, materials managment, said she has the greatest success against the cold by keeping

and the cold wind and flakey white stuff have brought closure to the season of warmth, which now seems so far away. Conestoga students around the frosty Doon campus were asked about their feelings regarding the early onslaught of winter and what their favorite

the best remedy.

“Sex

blast of winter has hit

her clothes on. “Winter kind of sucks, but I just layer on more clothing to keep

warm,” she said. Matt Gunzel, first year robotics, comes from the

“The best way

Carribean

keep

to

he

consensus

eral

away

far

Overall, the gen-

indicated that this

warm

is

beside a nice

said

absolutely the

despises

early freeze is not

winter here.

popular

with a six-foot, among fireplace

students.

36-24-36 female

However, there were many suggestions on how

companion

“Being with a nice hot toddy by a fire and keeping sweaty

to beat the cold.

out.”

to help

me

all

Rick Eaton, he

said

won’t be able to head south because of her that she

classes.

mechanical engineering

neering technician, said he also doesn’t like the cold.

keep warm is beside a nice fireplace with a six foot, 36-24-34 female companion to help me out,” he said. to

Poessy,

year

first

Yet again, people are talking about Canal’s mail system. But more so than past disputes, discussions

recent

regarding Canada Post and its workers have prompted more people to question the basic value of a national postal service,

As

the postal workers’ strike

have

approached. experts and others who send and receive mail have been considering the implications, if any, of a nation-wide walkout. While Canadians have been entering an era in which traditional values

many

and methods

up to alternative many of us have also

are opening solutions,

familiarized ourselves with alternative

means of communication,

The

telephone, of course, is the

most

common communication

device and rates are dropping as the market

he doesn’t the winter at

Whether people cope with winter with their clothes on or off, the season is Canada’s annual acid-test of spirit, and makes the far-off

becomes more com-

tion.

alternatives

here

are

Courier, fax and elec-

tronic mail are abcHit as

common

Already, courier services are hardly necessary for letters since the advent of the fax

and

its

machine

rapid rise to popularity. the fax is losing

star status as e-mail

its

has become

Murdoch,

materials

the quick connection for anyone ^'

Today’s union negotiators should learn give and take

who is computer literate and can hock up to the Internet # As the paoj of life becomes

We just recovered from

with the paints and Billy

a two-week walkout by

who

Ontario’s 126,000 teach-

does too. You start to argue, your teacher interrupts you and tells you to share, to compromise. Kids learn this valued lesson and then they see their

increasingly insane, tho.se rely

on communication

financial

for their

finding

are

survival

more immediate

links with their

suppliers, partners

and

clientele,

They require a speed

that

no

general postal service provides,

Then

are

there

those

who

communication systems for personal pur^ses.

on

depend

Often,

too

they

desire

the

convenience and even entertamment value of e-mail over the more time consuming monotony of preparing a letter speed,

for the

walk

to the post office

and die wait in postal bins. with so many using Purolator and CompuServe, there remains a demand for 45 cent Still,

pictures of the

queen and

red,

For some, using the regular mail routine to send and receive a hand-written letter just adds that personal touch which so many modem forms of commu-

and faced what may have been an illegal postal strike. Are illegal work stoppages becoming the norm in Canada? ers

If so,

it is

one manner: walking away. Negotiations must be a process of give and take. But, as we witnessed with the discussions between the Ontario government and the teachers’ unions, grownups in this country don’t play by

compromise. These three groups of people, the Ontario government, teachers and postal workers are adults, but most

to

importantly raising

holidays,

Peihaps life could go on minus Canada Post, but it just wouldn’t

be the same witihout it.

children

are

and

because

parents, instilling

morals.

This lesson

bill still

in

paints

children are learning.

You

Take for instance the teachers strike. Millions of children from

obscenities

witnessed

and

striking

teachers

at

taught to

kindergarten. You

want

Ontario

is

country need

this

teaching our young. Perhaps, they need to be taught the lessons our

educators

Workers. The union members want their wage hike and they’re not willing

problems using illegal and accomplish their

means. It didn’t work, the has not been abolished.

to consider the lessons they are

The same situation is unfolding Canada Post and the Postal of Union Canadian with

their

issues.

walk away

tactics to try

us

The people of

across

they

their jobs

ate.

the mles.

beginning to look a lot like Christmas, and not everyone can be home for the all, it’s

from

they can’t learn to negoti-

in

the

Instead, they decided to

from

Ontarians

if

away

walking

friends

Ayliffe

this nation, that disputes are solved

more public support were informed of

parents or their parent’s

Erica

teaching the

of generation next Canadians, who will lead

nication lack today,

After

pony express.

management

spring arrival so sweet.

envelopes,

Now, even

mechanical engineering

woman helps.”

blue and white bordered air mail

as the

Tyler

robotics

wish it was summer all the There are fewer girls wearing skirts around now,” he said. “Snuggling up to a nice warm “I

time.

But the concern most relevant where the postal system is involved is written communica-

The

Matt Gunzel,

like

all.

petitive.

several.

Melissa Spilek,

engineering

Mail is

deadlines

accounting

said.

Editorial

most

mechanical engineering

technician, said

winter this year,” she said. Rick Eaton, mechanical engi-

the

accounting

mechanical

technician student

hope the weatherman is right when he says we’re in for a beautiful and mild

Gisselle

of

Gisselle Poessy,

Tyler Murdoch,

“I just

“The best way

is

idea

Rick Eaton,

keeping warm,”

Chris MacLean, accounting,

night long

my

Chris MacLean,

to play with the

and

Billy

does

start to argue,

too.

your

teacher interrupts you

their

yelling

who

crossed the picket line, teachers who decided that a strike wasn’t 160. Bill to answer These same kids have probably seen fights and arguments on the playground. Disputes that have been broken up by these same

and

tells

you

to share, to

compromise.

the

striking teachers

who

claim yelling

and pushing are not the way

to

What

abolished, been has our children’s ability to realize that disputes can be solved in a rational way, using words not

though,

is

action.

Instead of walking away from their jobs illegally, teachers should

Before any other union in this country decides to strike, they should look at one of the many

one day’s pay,

valuable lessons that are taught to

solve problems.

Nobody can get 100 per cent of what they want. You have to compromise, even though sometimes it

have

instead of two weeks, to publish a

us as children.

hurts.

pamphlet outlining

Disagreements and problems can be worked out using negotiations. It’s a little bit of give and take.

This lesson kindergarten.

is

taught to us in

You want

to

play

ties

sacrificed

their difficul-

with Bill 160.

They would have gained a

lot


Page 6

— SPOKE, November

24, 1997

COLLEGE

LIFE

Broadcasting banquet well attended

World needs broadcasters, says speaker By Barbara

speech was right on the money,”

Ateljevic

said broadcasting’s co-ordinator

Mike Thumell. “He’s a very enthusiastic and very ‘90s manager. I think he gave a lot of inspiration to our students. I certainly found it very rewarding; it was a very good speech,” he said. Before Blackadar’s speech, the guests enjoyed a “country style” meal, which had plates of food on the table so guests could serve themselves. The food included

people 1 20 Approximately at Conestoga’s broadcasting awards banquet, held at the Transylvania Club in Kitchener, that featured awards for excellence

showed up

in broadcasting.

The banquet, held Nov.

had

14,

guest speaker Hal Blackadar, gen-

of Shaw manager Broadcasting, which inludes 102.1 The Edge and Energy 108. “I just want you to know why

eral

broadcasting

why

is

world sort of needs us,” “Conestoga’s (broadcasting program) is as good Blackadar.

as

it

Hal

general

Blackadar,

manager

Shaw

of

Broadcasting.

gets.”

Blackadar said Conestoga’s program is relevant and hands-on, and includes real-life events. He congratulated the 30 students that are

accepted each year from hundreds of applicants.

spoke

Blackadar

to

students

about the different types of media, including radio, television, newspapers and the Internet. He encouraged students to get a head

program in their first program foundation can only take you so far”,

(Photo by Barbara Ateljevic)

potential employers.

nology, and a cash award of $300;

be in the business. The tape

included bad

This included building

and

of

areas

interest

name

out

to

contribution

who

stomach prob-

shifts,

lems, low pay and the station trying to

make you

giving you free “I

thought

feel better

by

Blackadar’s

that

Broadcasting coordinator has

own

standing toward

who

sical

and everything in between. age is music that I just

Conestoga’s broadcasting coordinator has his own new age radio Waterloo’s show on

New

community station, CKWR 98.5. Mike Thumell has been doing the show since he was approached

show, called Music From ^ New Age, on Tuesdays from 10 p.m. to

September by CKWR and asked

Thumell defines new age as a mix of classical, popular, Celtic

in

he would do the new age show. “I’ve always liked new age

if

music,” said Thumell.

music

is all

“My taste of

over the map;

I

like

particularly like.”

Listeners

can hear Thurnell’s

midnight.

blended together. He said it is relaxation and meditation music and is usually instmmental.

and

folk, all

all

with $500 and the

CKCO

Betty

Hotline

519-748-5220 ext 8DSA listen@doonsa.com

E-Mail

WWW

he Sanctuary Hours Monday to Thursday 7 am - 7

By Victoria Long ITie first edition of the peer

preach.”

Thumell said he got his start at when he was 16 and it is what inspired him to go into broadcasting. He had been volun-

CKWR

when he

grad-

my

life

Thumell

said.

like

at

full

Fridays 7 am - 5 pm Closed Weekends and Holidays

of fifth-semester nursing students and feature topics relevant

top-notch

The Nov. 2 meeting dealt with stress management and the Dec.

shows that so far this 68 tutors have been trained. The peer tutor program is a win-win idea that allows students

students

junior

to

to

assist

make

the

grade while giving tutors valuable teaching experience and a part-time income on campus,

peer tutor coordinator said.

Myma

Although

the

tutors receive $8/hour, students

only

$3/hour.

contribute

The

to a large portion of

students.

1

3 presentation will focus on sleep deprivation. Those who

may submit ques-

wish to attend

wish to seminar

they

tions

addressed

at the

have to the

DSA office. Nicholas said she wishes the seminars would get more response. “The nursing students

meet newly recognized needs for general arts and science technology option, and both electronic and mechanical technology and technicians’ programs, Nicholas said. For these

a lot of information on hand,”

another student, or assisting in

Mike Thumell, Conestoga’s

programs, last term’s tutor shortage is being remedied by

broadcasting coordinator

time-tabled tutorials, free drop-

always

“I’ve

liked

ed

new age music. My music

is all

taste

over the

For his radio show, Thumell said he has full executive power and has the freedom to play whatever he chooses. He said there is a fair amount of work that goes into putting the

show

together.

He

not

only hosts the show, but also picks

music

and

puts

the

show

this fall to

in sessions

where

dents can

come by any week

when

nice to be back in broadcast-

first-year stu-

they need help in certain

Nicholas said the schedule was designed so that the time slot allotted to each program is in an open segment of the students’ timetable. Statistics are being gathered on the pilot program’s use by stucourses.

dents

together.

ing, the actual participating side as

signing

in

when

to just teaching.”

they

do a

lot

of research so they have

she said. Students with an

age

who would

Another -new direction peer

A

or

like to

B

aver-

be con-

sidered for a peer tutor position, either

working one-on-one with

the Literacy Lab, should talk to

Nicholas

in the student services

office in

December when

have

an

of

idea

she’ll

how many

positions will be available.

This year’s

OSAP

regulations

limit earnings permitted before

loan amounts to $600 per calendar year. Last year the limit was

$2,600. Nicholas said,“It may impact next term when students total

up

said, “but

their I

pay stubs.” she

don’t yet

extensively the

attend a tutorial. •

opposed •

a

makes up the difference. The program has been expand-

“It’s

is

monthly peer health educator seminar in room 1C6. These seminars are team-led by a pair

the PIT,

college

the

a win-win idea

term,

Nicholas

turned

is

tutoring has taken this year

tutoring information newsletter,

I

features

Coordinator says tutoring

in the broadcasting industry. “It

pm

pm

liked about the

turnout.”

new

offers

five

Closed Weekends and Holidays

I

it

Jim St. Marie (left), a retired faculty member of the broadcasting program, presents the Sony of Canada award to Brent Whitmore.

keeps my finger in the pie,” said Thumell. “It keeps me involved in the broadcasting community and gives me a chance to practise what

LL

4

is that

Peer tutoring program

Thumell said. Thumell came to Conestoga two years ago after more than 20 years

map. -

that

went very smoothly,” said Thumell. “It would have been nice to have had it in better weather but we had a good dinner

(Photo by Barbara Ateljevic)

Enya and Yanni are some examples of new age artists,

in

SA Office Hours Monday to Thursday 9 am Fridays - 9 am 2 pm

Thompson Broadcaster of

Betty

“The thing

creative

but not always.

circle,”

www.doonsa.com

CJCS

program

“It’s

519-748-6727

a

award for creative writing and creative production ability, which carried a cash prize of $250, the Sony of Canada award and the CKCO

award with a cash prize of $250.

from broadcasting Conestoga in 1979.

519-748-5131

won

excellence in radio pogramming with a $500 cash prize.

exceptional

uated

Phone Fax

Brian Zajac

interest.

students and

show

teering at the station

DSA #’s to Remembe

community

television/video producing skills

radio

everything from hard rock to clas-

Ateljevic

in the

included a cash prize of $500; the Sony of Canada award to students

Teacher hosts new age show By Barbara

Telemedia

goodwill,

motivation,

Thompson Broadcaster of the Year

t-shirts.

level; the

consistently pro-

patience, consideration and under-

to

program

Broadcast Management award with a cash prize of $250 to the graduating students with highest academic standing, and the Rogers Cable TV award for programming

CHYM

a

award for out-

be easy. “You’re gonna have to suck up to a lot of people,” the tape said to a it

the

Henry Haderlein won

announcing award for excellent announcing skills and development and $250; the CJOY/Magic EM newsperson of the Year award for student enterprise and expertise in news reporting and $250, and the CHUM Limited award for

behaviour and overall

standing

moted

laughing audience. The “real job”

said.

the Pat Fitzgerald

said potential employers should

not be expecting

lence in related technical skills at

the Year award.

The big winner was Brent Whitmore, who won the K.A. MacKenzie Memorial award to

Blackadar created an amusing tape that spoke about the real world of broadcasting and what it’s really like to

the

Tibbits.

recognize innovative use of tech-

director

creative

start in the

contacts and getting your

The awards followed a welcome by Conestoga’s president John

for

The

year, because “the

he

mashed

schnitzel,

potatoes, vegetables and salads.

the

said

beef,

roast

not only great, but

won

Hodgson

Peter

Conestoga College Mastercraft award for achievement and excel-

know how

OSAP

change

will affect tutor availability.”


Guitarist Gary McGill

wins over Sanctuary crowd story and photo by Rita Fatila

didn’t need to read Spoke to know the Sanctuary houses a tough crowd. He found out first hand at his free nooner Nov. 13, where it took

G"Uit3.ristGary McGill

the talented guitarist half an hour to get the attention and applause

of students.

McGill, who does a Stompin’ Tom Connors tribute act called Bud the Spud, started the show with a rousing acoustic rendition of The Hockey Game that went sadly neglected by the audience. “This is a good stomping stage,” said McGill, who deftly segued into Wynona’s Big Brown Beaver by Primus. After a lackluster response to the song and no response when he asked for requests, McGill switched to his electric guitar and MIDI sequencer which provided back-up music to hundreds of songs, and played Bearcat by David Wilcox. The audience finally began to wake up, and McGill’s playing and David Wilcox impression garnered him spirited applause. McGill, known as “The Rich Little of rock ‘n’ roll,” launched into a Stevie Ray Vaughn song, again imitating the vocals impeccably, as well as the licks. “When in doubt,

play Stevie Ray,” McGill told the cheering

crowd. he asked for requests again, there were loud calls for Huey Lewis, Ozzy Osbourne, Tom Petty and Pearl Jam. One student shouted out for some Santana, only to be told by another student, “Hey man, we only have an hour.” McGill granted a request for Credence Clearwater Revival and Lowest of the Low, as well as throwing in a rendition of One Headlight by The Wallflowers. By the time McGill finished All Along the Watchtower by Jimi Hendrix, all the seats were filled and the back of the Sanctuary was standing room only. After asking for someone to go on a beer run, McGill made a more earnest request for the audience to sing the woos in Werewolves in London. The interaction abilities of the students hadn’t reached that point yet, however, so the back-up vocals for both that song and 500 Miles by the Proclaimers turned into a duet between McGill and Gerry Cleaves, vice-president of student affairs for the Doon Student Association, who briefly bodysurfed during the show.

When

november 24, 1997


On Nov. 12, Brenda Coombs sat inside 2000 making Christmas dolls. As one of the

downtown

the

maintains

Coombs

involved

artists

in

Besides private

the collective that galleries,

to watch over

time.

get something together,” she 1

wanted to make

been

mostly

outside

really.”

said.

Brat’s

angels.”

who

Although Coombs,

murals. Brat has also

and has done work as “It’s

“You’ll

has created

her preferred medium

dolls,

She

slate.

also paints wild

caricatures and

still life,

of

she

the

Since the age of has

ing

find

when

like

how

1

it

other.

she’s

(Sault ^te. Marie,

in

Thunder

when

artists

To me,

1

dif-

that

like

1

can feed off each

they’re very open-mind-

As she finished that thought. Brat was

put myoself through high

interrupted by the sudden beeping of

the virtual pet she was keeping

nowadays tend to

Brat’s customers

be people who want

murals

done

in

her

in

pocket

their

m babysitting my son’s Tamagotchi,” she

homes. funny that way,” she said.

is

come

my god,

1

in

and look

at a painting

said she

is

and in

say,

amazed

‘Oh

my house!

at

Gallery

some people’s

even believe how much money

I

Galleries The three galleries downtown

in

Market

Kitchener’s

Square are run by a of artists looking out for each

collective

The group of

who

about

spend to make

by the

have work throughout the world.”

But you don’t necessarihave to be an international artist to be a part of ly

the

collective.

Anyone

is

made up

16

artists

are local, but are

frequently out of town as well.

“That’s why we’re running it together,’’ said Brenda Coombs, a member since last September. “We take care of an artist’s work while he goes out and gets exposure. Lots of our artists

display six pieces of art for the members to view. At the end of two weeks, the collective will decide whether to allow that per-

son to join.

The work of which

is

also

the artists,

sometimes

featured in local coffee houses, is split between Gallery 2000, Gallery

2000

Plus,

and

up

who

has a piece

in

well as his mother,

as a member.

Whatever he decides,

it

artist” said

Brat

"1

tell him,

‘Express yourself

in

mod-

eration.’”

it

interested in joining has to

other.

nurture

Being an they’ll

2000, can draw as

might sign him

car-

quests for an aesthetically pleasing home. can’t

it

Brat said her 10-year-old son,

asked to do her

usually

walls, is

explained, as she fed

“People

have to have those colors

who

tooning on children’s

“1

the

encountered

ed.”

$100.

Brat,

arts

to

similar

is

ferent points of view.

lights.

school.”

will

liv-

“You’ve got different opinions,

sold each of her popular creations

“Art

city she’s

Kitchener-Waterloo’s

Toronto,

Nicknamed by her customers. Brat

“It’s

whatever

Bay and Oakville.

Coombs created

be seen under black

get up the guts to

as well as getting involved

community

rugs with artwork that could only

for

in,

ones

Brat’s existence started

been

malls for me. I’ve

the arts community there. 6he

in

Brat

the teenaged

Greek

galleries myself"

said

been known through her

art as

to a friend that

Jamaican,

“He was on the road and

said.

gallery in

Coombs

14,

stepped

Brat said she usually joins an art

wide

Coombs.

Brenda

name

due

investigating to

is

however,

would be hard pressed to

haven’t

1

influenced cultural art to

-

would do

although

at her

work,

as Vancouver.

some of her

go to

Anyone looking

in

“Mark Anson would take my art down,”

is

fantasy.

variety

public murals

the United (States.

life,

she said her favorite genre

far

Ontario.

in

and Indian

made up her

material that

we

because^

-

work has received attention across

carried ,

and

with the corn husks, wig hair

done

the border, however,

theatre props, was deflly working

sequined

are so fussy

artists

downtown Kitchener and Algonquin Park. (She’s also had shows in Owen (Sound and Waterloo,

the galleries and to create art at the same

“Tcxday

why

know the people we’re dealing with are just as fussy.”

three

mall’s

week

takes one day a

perfect,” she said. “That’s

Market (Square’s Gallery

artists,

Somewhat Relevant. Opened three years

ago. Gallery 2000 and Gallery 2000 Plus are located beside each other on the level of Market Square, and usually have an artist working nearby. “On Saturday, someone

first

middle to paint and keep an eye on will

sit

in the

both sides,” said Coombs. On other days of the week, the working artist is usually in Gallery 2000, which gives each side wall to the work of one

and

the collective share the back wall. artist,

lets

Constructive art can be

for the artists

found

more

in Gallery 2000, while more abstract works are featured in Gallery

vendors.”

2000

likes

Plus.

Somewhat

Relevant,

located on the upper level of the mall, contains the full range of the collective’s creations.

“Everything upstairs

is

more valuable. tend to baby that one most,” said Coombs. lot

Coombs strange

sees

about

a

We the

nothing galleries

being housed in a shopping mall. “The mall circuit is just as good. People tend to see you more, and are

In

buy from

likely to particular,

Coombs

Market

Square

because of location,

its

downtown

although

acknowledges

that

she the

closing of Eaton’s has greatly reduced the flow of people. ‘This mall works for artists. We can get teachers who bring kids to show them that a mall isn’t just stores,” she said.

“We the is,

accent the mall, and

more diverse the mall the more variety of

people they

attract.” c/3

HD

Hexji

O

PlToto and stories

tg Gta

o>

rafilp


3uda$

THE FIFTH ELEmEDT

Priest goes for tbe throat u>ith Jugulatoit by

Amy

Sonnenbers

finally safe for all

t’s

Icloset

headbangers to come out and actually enjoy something released

album

sleeve urging people to reconsider euthanasia

after 1990. After suffering

from

a

patients’ perspective.

serious metal drought

through the ‘90s, Judas

The

Priest resuscitates us with

also goes a

Jugulator,

than

the

heaviest

loudest,

album

Priest

ever.

brain-dead

a

song

Row

Death

deeper

little

the

stereotypical

your parents” rouabout inmates on death row going through “kill

tine. It’s

Sure, we’ve had bands

while

waiting

like Pantera, Sepultura to

hell

chum

stuff,but Jugulator is a far

execution. The band is by no means, however, sym-

cry from the growling,

pathizing

monotone, vocals of the death metal and thrash

prisoners.

Singer Tim “Ripper” Owens can wail with the best of them. In

even gives us a taste of The X Files in a song called Abductors which is obviously, about being abducted by aliens and having no one believe your story All these and the rest of the 10 tracks were

some heavy

out

genre.

you didn’t know

fact, if

Rob

frontman

original

Halford had

the band,

left

you may have not even noticed

the

You’ll

find

difference.

yourself

Owens’ merits

The

for

with

the

latest Priest effort

.

track, but

by the inseparable Glenn Tipton and K.K. Downing, who have been

his

writing Priest’s material

assessing

the first minute of the

title

once you hear gut-wrenching scream, there’s no doubt that he earned his position

2

called

Stained,

is

Blood no

disappointment to Scott

The drummer

Travis fans.

has the jaw-dropping speed and talent he disstill

played Priest’s

Painkiller,

in

1990 release.

disappoint the fans

who

want to hear about demonic creatures of the

just

(Jugulator)

or

anthems

denouncing oppression (Dead Meat), it

also

who

may are

please those

interested

social issues. Brain is

Not only

their writing

dual

their

guitar

which

approach,

they

somewhat pioneered,

is

heavier than ever.

The release of Jugulator is certainly a ray of hope through the dark clouds of Metallica and Megadeth-type

in

Dead

a song about euthanasia

will integri-

ty as metal gods, or forget

fans,

their

and heavy

metal bands like that are few and far between. Priest has proven beyond reasonable a

doubt

that

they

aren’t

getting older and sappier

from the point of view of

like

a patient

bands, they’re just getting

on

life support.

If the lyrics

and

lots

weren’t

other

heavier.

^

aging

Dallas, a taxi driver, played by Bruce Willis.

As fate would have

it,

Dallas meets up with

the fifth element, Leelo, played by Milla

Jovovich (Dazed and Confused),

As

the movie progresses, they team

ments, which have been

was

every 5,000 years, when three planets are in eclipse, a black hole-type doorway will open spreading terror and chaos. This will occur

300 years. The only thing can protect the world from this evil force

to take Leelo' s place

Zorg

is

sion

that

deliver

man whose misget his hands on the four stones and

them

to

Mr. Shadow,

who could destroy

ated to protect

stones

A

also necessary.

The four elements of life, which are encased in stones, plus the perfect being, are then taken by androids from outer space because they are no longer safe on earth. The androids promise to be back with the stones in 300 years when evil returns, with the stones. It sounds far-fetched, but it is a sci-fiction movie - anything can be made believable. The movie then jumps to 300 years later, in the

23rd century, where we met Korben

an evil being with the stones, the

lost. If

a southern-speaking

is to

the four elements of life: earth, water, fire and wind. fifth element, a perfect being crelife, is

to

world would become a sinister place. An essential ingredient in every action movie is conflict, usually in the form of a villain, which in The Fifth Element is Zorg, played by Gary Oldman (Immortal Beloved).

again, in the next

is

up

find the stones representing the four ele-

the fast-pace

it holds up because of and quick wit of the film.

when she

falls into his cab trying to escape the police.

nomination material,

the evil force

the world.

up to Dallas and Leelo to protect the from Zorg and save the world from The last 30 minutes of the movie is filled

It's

evil.

with non-stop action. Everything imaginable

blown up, shot and destroyed. The elabocostume designs and action make this a movie worth renting. The Fifth Element is your typical is

rate settings,

mind-numbing action flick, filled with quick humor and action-packed effects. It definitely makes a boring Sunday afternoon go by painlessly.

^

JCIN US roc TUE BEST ST4ND-UE)

COMEUy

Vuk's Vuk Oinner Show \A/e.d. Oec. 3 "The Sanctuary

sell-

Judas Priest never has

and never compromise their

The

of action. But even with those elements, good acting is a must. Although the acting in The Fifth Element is not Oscar effects

outs.

While Jugulator doesn’t

night

since day one, nearly 25

years ago.

but

Jugulator, along with track

written

Halford’s

as

replacement.

video,

in 1914, where a professor discovers the hidden meaning behind ancient stone carvings. The stones reveal that

the

in

The newly released home

Fifth Element, has everything a mainstream Hollywood blockbuster movie needs to rack in the revenue. Huge box office names, special

The movie begins

enough, the band added a footnote

by natape Schneider

5:30 PM DnoRS open 6:30 PM All Ynu Can Eat Spaishetti Dinner V:3D PM Comedy

€n

Tickets €nly $1C §ale at the DSA

rock

Licenced Event

Hcxii

Nov.

24

—1997


1

Area concert^ ror flovember and Pecember Mtchener

Massey Hall 11/28 Charlie Musselwhite 12/5-6

Roberta Flack 12/6

Colors

Centre in the Square 1/24

1/25-26 Roger Whittaker 11/27 House of Blues 1 1/29-30 The Nutcracker Ballet 1

12/1

Anne Murray

11/27

Fabulous Thunderbirds 12/10 Jay hawks

Opera House

River

Run

Centre

11/24

The Guvernment Jann Arden/Ron Sexsmith

Guelph

Xmas/Jeffrey

of

Osbome/Melissa Manchester

1

Horseshoe Tavern

Atari Teenage Riot/EC80R/

12/11

Shizuo

Leahy

11/28 Step Beyond 12/6

12/13-14 Burton Cummings

11/27 Acetone/Spiritualized 11/28

One

The Sundays

Adrian Sherwood

University of Guelph

12/08 John Oates Darryl Hall 12/16 Sebastian Bach

&

1/24-26 Step Beyond

1

One

12/21

A1 Simmons

Guelph Civic Centre

The Lyric

1

1/28-29

Andre Gagnon 12/4 Catherine 12/7

12/11

Wheel

Leahy 12/13-14 Burton Cummings

Goldfmger

The Centre in the Square

London

1/25-26 Roger Whittaker Tull 1

Lulu’s 11/28

The

Fabulous Thunderbirds/Mel Brown

Centennial Hall

Raffi Amemiam Theatre 11/27

11/27-28

Alvin Youngblood Hart/Dr. Charlie John/ of Musselwhite/House Blues/Robert Jr. Lockwood

Roger Whittaker 12/2

Anne Murray Spiral Path

iToronto

11/28 Battlefield

Band

12/12-13

Garnet Rogers

tlamifon

The Warehouse Lee’s Palace 11/26

Fu Manchu 12/1

Switchblade Symphony 12/5

K’s Choice 12/26 Headstones 12/31

Mahones

11/25

Blues Traveler/Johnny Lang 11/26 Sugar Ray/3 1 1 1/28-29 Great Big Sea 12/07 Andy Smith Band 12/07 Portishead 12/14 Catherine Wheel

Roy Thomson

Hall

11/28

Alvin Youngblood/Charlie John/ Musselwhite/Dr. House of Blues/ Robert J.

Lockwood 12/3-4

Jon Kimura Parker 12/6-7

John Smith

Copps Coliseum

McDermott/Laura

12/18-19

12/16 Neil Diamond

Leahy/Mary Jane Lamond

Maple Leaf Gardens

Hummingbird Centre 1

12/14 Neil Diamond

1/28-29

Anne Murray/Jesse Cook

Hudson 11/28

Roach Motel


• SPOKE, November 24,

COLLEGE

1997

— Page 7

LIFE

Woodworking

Co-op booth set up at expo By Jamie Yates

out of the

are

woodworking

effectively,

member

a

faculty

the

wood-

said

from

working building. For this reason, a few trades

office at the college, said Buss.

Woodworking

the

at

in the

been there for 10 years and are outdated or not being used

hired

nized

Some of the machines

questions about the woodworking

op program

given the opportunity to be recog-

Little

woodworking building have

program and graduates.” Students in the programs

Conestoga were

By Becky

customers,” he said. “People asked

and work-term Graduates students of the woodworking coat

Good trade means upgrade

Machinery and Supply Expo at the International Centre in Toronto Oct. 3 1 to Nov. 2. A woodworking booth was set up expo which displayed at the brochures about Conestoga’s woodworking program and about

are being worked out to update the technology in the

the qualifications of graduates of

Akhurst Machinery Limited. Conestoga is trading their cutoff saw and double-end tenons

the program, said

The

faculty

one

is

woodworking events, representing more than 400 internaand suppliers and displaying new machinery, equipment, products and ideas in

woodworking

John Buss (Photo by Jamie Yates)

‘The companies that are at the

industry.

Buss said the booth helps co-op employers become aware of the woodworking co-op programs at

train

They

show are who we

our students

hire the students.”

“The companies that are at the show are who we train our students for,” said Buss. “They hire

John Buss, faculty

member

exhibition, said Buss, also

awareness

for

uates,

who

in the

woodworking

are currently involved industry,

co-op students of the

program

and

woodwork-

attended

“There are about two to three job

the

Woodworking Centre of Ontario. Buss said about 1 50 to 200 grad-

the

opportunities per week,” he said. TTiere are currently three

working programs said Buss.

He

wood-

at the college,

said there is a three-

year co-op technical program, a two-year technician program and a

one-year machine setter operator

exhibition.

Students were given a graduate

program.

prospective employers be aware of

Buss said the two- and three-year programs are similar, but the threeyear program puts emphasis on

the graduates’ presence.

engineering-related functions in

button to wear around the event, said Buss.

He

said the buttons let

wood-

the

working industry when graduates walk around with a button,”

the

“It raises the profile in the

woodworking industry while two-year program is more

The

one-year

program,

Buss, trains students for industrial

brought customers to the booth. “The buttons helped bring

maintenance and preventative maintenance of machinery.

the

buttons

summer

Agnes Caddy

be replaced with an updated model by Homag, Mott said. this

to

a moulder multihead be replaced every six months. ; Mott said one of the nice things about this updating process is that industry people can come in for short-term training and it also benefits that will

total

Having a caddy for a day was more or less like having a slave for an afternoon, said Patrick Dobbin. Dobbin, a third-year materials management student, was one of

cost of

fimdraiser in the

APICS

,

Caddy

Doon

APICS’

for a

Day

from 12:30 p.m.

Management,

is

a

international non-profit organisa-

electrical

the equipment.

tion

that

education

provides in

sold raffle

to 1:30 p.m.,

management students tickets for Caddy for a

Day

for $3, raffle tickets for a $20 liquor voucher (refundable at the

liquor store) for $3 and lunches in the Blue

Room for $3.

Materials

management students members of one

involved are also

quality

resource

materials said management, management teacher Ian Gordon. At the Caddy for a Day Nov. 17

Winners of the liquor voucher and Caddy for a Day were to be announced Nov. 20. The next APICS event will be a wine and cheese party, which will be held Nov. 27 from 5 to 7 p.m. in Conestoga’s Blue Room. Tickets are $5 for students, $10 otherwise.

IMMUNIZE AGAINST FAILURE PEER TUTOR

Tues* Nov. 2

4:30

pm

$15.00

Room 1 B23 Please see Johanna If you are unable to ATTEND THE MEETING.

00°""

%

FOR

at their

of APICS’ eight student chapters.

cafeteria.

the Educational Society

for Resource

companies changes. The involved are taking care of the cost of disconnection and

moving

the students runiiing the

.student chapter

only costing the college $2,000 to $3,000 for dust col-

and

to 18

materials

between equipment is $150,000 to $200,000, but it is

lection, pipes,

customers

(Photo by Greg Bisch)

By Greg Bisch

full-time students.

said the

year, patiently await

a Day booth.

Students volunteer as caddies for a day

The third trade, again with Wadkin and Akhurst, will

He

second

Szukits, for

said

also

said

Materials management students (back to front) Matt Gore, third year; Patrick Dobbin, third year; Craig Mavin, third year; and

The second trade involves an edgebmider that was removed

hands-on.

said.

Buss

said Mott.

install

engineering technology

the students.”

creates

computer control for different heads, and another machine that has yet to be announced,

late

for.

Conestoga.

he

involves

trade

point machine that includes

tional manufacturers

ing

first

for a computerized point-to-

machinery of Canada’s

largest

The

industry

(projections that fit into holes)

woodworking

exhibition

the

to

stahdards.

member.

The

building

with

to-date

John Buss, an

technology

engineering

woodworking

keep Conestoga students up-

5

HOURS OF SUBJECT SPECIFIC HELP

APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE

FROM STUDENT SERVICES

Peer Services Suppohad by Doon Student Associalion


Page 8

— SPOKE, November

24, 1997

FEATURE

Animal rights group expresses concern

killing

By Casey Johnson

this law.

Redman’s

In 1996, the president of the CSA and one-third of its executive

vest of adult seals provided an

The International Fund for Animal Welfare has begun its next fight to stop the illegal killing

of

and its mandate also 'includes making people aware that

baby

seals,

some of

their tax dollars are

being

used to subsidize the Canadian seal hunt, according to IFAW’s

October media release. IFAW said that Canadians are subsidizing an industry that kills

baby

seals.

The Ministry of Oceans and

members were charged with

ille-

gally selling the skins of protected

Rick Smith, the said Canadian director of IFAW. Their cases will be heard this year, after a failed attempt at an appeal, said Smith. In total, there were 101 sealers charged that year for selling whitecoats, he added. “The government has a watereddown opinion of what a whitecoat

pups,

is,”

said Smith.

Fisheries said in a statement that

Not only the ethics, but also the

seals taken in the harvest are not

economics of the seal hunt has come under scrutiny. A statement MP Karen Kitchener from

babies, but are self-reliant animals.

The

government did not clarify

what they deem as a baby seal. For example, a hooded seal pup only nurses for approximately three days following birth. After it is weaned, it may well be selfreliant,

but

it

still

possesses

its

white fur coat, which is why they are being killed. Also, a seal may -p-

baby

Stop

be claimed as fair game at the first sight of molting. A seal can begin its molting process as early as 12

“The commercial hunt only

added the

seal penises for

harvesting caught whitecoats have been charged in the past and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans will continue to charge anyone who violates

bound

in

and account

and

capital, the net

value

Canadian

Sealers

are

also

of the seal hunt to

Canada as a whole may well

be

zero.”

meat subsidy in 1997. However, due to the strength and growth of the market, the subsidy will be phased out over the remainder of

October 1997, Dr. Clive Southey of the University of Guelph’s department of ecoIn

nomics, said in his analysis of the seal hunt, “the sealing industry

counts key items to arrive at its estimate of the value of the seal hunt. The best estimate of the gross output of the entire

double and

department of economics at the University of Guelph

legally

hooded

seals

triple

is

Once you deduct

IFAW

claims in 1997, more than

increase

this

year’s

allowable

catch of seals by 18,000. The recommendation by the Seal Industry

taken. were seals 500,000 According to an IFAW rebuttal against a governmental statement

Advisory Council that Fisheries Minister David Anderson increase

concerning the seal hunt, it quotes, “A DFO (Department of Fisheries and Oceans) spokesperson said

the total

of

reports

the

overkill

ed seals available to be killed in around season 1997-98 the

were

301,000.

Although the proposal needs to be discussed with several agen-

‘overblown’ but did not deny sealers exceeded the allowable catch.”

Michelle

would make number of harp and hood-

the allowable catch,

MacAfee

Anderson plans on releasing

cies,

reported in the Globe and Mail Nov. 17, that there is a proposal to

his

1998 seal management plan

later this year.

World Wildlife Fund targets

Canada

$8.96 million. sealer’s costs,

government subsidies for meat and government costs for inspection, support,

were taken from the

allowable catch of 8,000.

Currently,

the decade.”

etc.,

the

net

By Casey Johnson The World

Wildlife

concentrating

on

them protected.” The goal of the

Fund

is

Canadian

have

WWF

by Canada Day 1998. “Canada Day seemed to be an

tected

lion.

Value added by the hunt is a .06 per cent of the gross of product domestic

ing people sponsor

an acre of 14 of Canada’s natural wonders. WWF, which usually concen-

appropriate date,” said Levita.

mere

land

“It is a

on rainforests, is suggesting the $25 a month donation be

date that says ‘this

Newfoundland. The commercial hunt only added the equivalent of 100 to 120 full-time jobs, and if

we

to

help

protect

trates

eliminate seal meat subsidies, in seal penises and account for the true costs of labor and capital, the net value of the

given as an alternative to a Christmas gift to help aid in the fight to save Canadian heritage.

seal

hunt to Canada as a whole

Judi Levita, the media relations

may

well be zero.”

manager for

far as sustainability of the seal

to concentrate on Canada’s natural heritage, she

population

is

.concerned,

the

Department of Fisheries claims that in 1997, 261,354 harp seals were taken from the total allowable catch of 275,000. And, 7,058

It’s

a gift from the heart, said

It’s

a

Prepare

WWF Canada.

way

said.

“We

are focusing

ticular hot spots all

on these

par-

because they are

‘do-able’, meaning they are close to protection,” she said.

sure It is

on

way

to put a bit of pres-

government as well. better to have a confirmed the

is

our goal’,

than to just keep fighting without putting the government on a deadline.”

The 14

sights are: (on land)

Tombstone Mountains, in the Yukon; Muskwa-Kechika, B.C.; DoreAlta.; Whaleback, Smoothstone Lakes Wilderness Manitoba Sask.; Area, Algoma Man.; Lowlands, Highlands, Ont.; Vaureal, Que.; Loch Alva, N.B.; Jim Campbells Barren, N.S.; Little Grand Lake, Nfld. and Labrador; (at sea)

Gully, N.S.; Igalirtuuq, N.W.T.;

been a governmental discussion for 10 to 12 years now. By

Saguenay, Que.; Gwaii Haanas, B.C. All inquiries can be directed to the wildlife fund at 1 -800-26-

focusing attention towards these spots, we hope to motivate the

government

in finally declaring

PANDA.

To Be Aware Body. We needWeyour need ydur Mind Wont See ot Conostogo Purchase a Gift for the Child of Your Choice -

Mon., Nov. 3:

24

The

these sights have

“Some of

M

to

wilderness this year by suggest-

all

What Do

is

14 spots declared pro-

all

potential benefits drop to $2.9 mil-

As

uphold

to

concentrated in Newfoundland, where outport communities have been hit hard by the collapse of the fishery. There was a $1.7 million

stop trade

Clive Southey,

Association, which participates in seals,

meat

the true costs of labor

this regulation.

hunting

we

since the 1980s.

Individuals

The

if

subsidies, stop trade

Oceans said in their Backgrounder report that it has been illegal to commercially harvest whitecoat

Canada

estimated $ 1 1 million in economic benefits in 1996. Much of this is

industry

eliminate seal

days old. TTie Ministry of Fisheries and

seals in

and

full-time jobs,

office states, “the har-

industry in 1996

equivalent of 100 to 120

say activists

seals,

Wish Tree

located outside the DSA Office Nov. 17 - Dec. 5 is


SPOKE, November 24, 1997

Chicopee gearing up By Matt

He

Harris

almost upon us, and preparations are well under way at the Chicopee ski club in

The

ski season is

also said there will be family

Kitchener. Although there are no

match-and-win time races, where family members race each other down a run trying to match the

new runs

this

club’s

other’s time. Ski schools for kids

director

of

Peter

will be run in conjunction with the board of education, Schwirtlich said. He figured they average about 400 kids per day in those

the

year,

skiing,

Schwirtlich, said there are

still

plently of things to do.

“We have programs

teach

to

snowboarding to adults as well as improved adult racing programs,” Schwirtlich said. “Also, we’ll have

programs.

ski schools for all ages throughout

“Hopefully

in

Schwirtlich

club

the

said

renewed its rental agreement on the snowboards it had last season, and the pro shop will be offering parabolic

skis

to

(Photo by Matt Harris)

feared and dreaded by

who

many

dummy

spend

in

time

their

basically the

is

But, generally

first

signs of

winter knocking at our doors,

go with

the flow

it’s

and

enjoy the snow.

One way to do so is

to participate

a winter activity, that does not

same

have some fun and skills with your challenge snowboarding. Before going out to Instead,

“In

snowy

slopes,

know what

it’s

type of

to do.

powder, as opposed to

skiing

where you

sink,

snowboarders are going

be

will

flexing than the

enough

the better trails are

up around the

Barrie area. in all, rang-

ing from beginner slopes to

more

challenging runs for the experi-

the output of snow.”

enced

skier.

Chicopee also features

night skiing, with runs open until

Peter Schwirtlich,

Chicopee’s skiing director

10 p.m. every night except Sunday. Ajiyone interested in finding out

may Chicopee contact Schwirtlich at 894-5501 or schwirt® email at via

The runs first

will not be

part

of

open until December,

on

like

on top

an unbelieveable

for seven years, said snowboarding

can be fairly dangerous at times, depending on what you’re doing. The danger is evident when he points to a picture hanging in the

tail.

store, in memory of a rider who died in Whistler, B.C., last year.

This gives

Safety equipment said,

speeds,” said Jurkovic.

helmets.

“Free riding

is

where

smart about

of

It’s

it.

feeling.”

“Then there are racing boards, which depending on what kind of racing you’re going to be doing, are extremely narrow and fairly

ing

Dave Jurkovic,

normal

freestyle,

free

“A slalom board will be shorter and have deeper side cuts. But

Boards for women are made a more narrow for smaller feet, and they are softer flexing for

lighter weight, Jurkovic said.

a lot

more

fogiving, because girls tend to use

more and guys tend

use their legs more.” It’s important to know that

if

Normal twin

tip,

exactly the

to

you

jumps

you

flexible boots, while with

soft,

Dave Jurkovic, an employee snowboard made by SIMS. Jurkovic. Since a board

for, said

freestyle usually has a

could be a week’s cheque, it’s important to ensure you get the

companies, but there are only something like 14 manufactuers so a lot of Ae stuff out there is the same,” Jurkovic said. Snowboards can range in price

most out of it.

it’s

shaped

the center to

and the center to the nose, said Dave Jurkovic, an employee at Surf Paradise, located at 106 King St. W, Kitchener. freestyle boards

make it

from $199

$850 with bindings. In general, you get what you pay to

Paradise, poses with a

made

in a

few weekends,”

Therefore, it’s important to take care of it. Jurkovic suggests drying

when you’re finished with the board, so the edges don’t rust. Plus, he suggests keeping the off the rails

base waxed.

“Last year, boards.

I

went through three

You can

get boards that

buy a board every year because they keep getting better and it helps my riding. I mean ygu can get a board and keep it for 10 years, if you want, but in four years it’s going to be out-dated,” will last you.

he

I

tip

before buying a board

to trust the salesperson, said

Jurkovic.

“My job is to set the customer up with a snowboard that he, she and I

think

would be

who

has been boarding

the

most useful

for them,” he said.

“Usually they (salespeople)

are

t^e you for a ride. I know Tyler, Mike and myself,

not going to

want people

said.

Jurkovic,

for,” said Jurkovic.

A final

(Photo by Natalie Schneider)

is

racing boards you’ll need hard

meaning same from

at Surf

most

boots, similar to ski boots. “There are about 400 different

the tail

“Normal

doing

need

to the next level.

skiing, to comparison In snowboarding allows you to play around more, said Jurkovic. “You can jump or go both ways on them,” he said. “Parks are built for boarders, encouraging them to jump, which makes it more fun.” “In powder, as opposed to skiing where you sink, snowboarders are going fast enough that they’ll float right on top of it. It’s like walking on clouds, it’s an unbelievable feeling. That’s what boards were

little bit

carving and racing

boards.

it

said Jurkovic.

are buying a board specifically for

There are four different types of

taking

very easy to pick-up, you could be a good-intermediate

snowboarder

their hips

snowboarding enthusiast

is

It’s

long,” said Jurkovic.

are usually

said Jurkovic.

someone along with you who knows what they’re doing. “The hardest thing about board-

said.

little

it’s

it,”

before that suggested attempting to snowboard, a person should take a lesson or have

not meant to be in the air too

boards they’re a

pads

He

and narrow, said Jurkovic. “Free carving boards are really

GS

he and

is available,

butt

as

just

stiff

much,” he

such

“There’s no real precautions, you have to use your head, be

you

it’s at,

of stuff.” Free carving boards are fairly

“They

riding, free

upcoming season. (Photo by Matt Harris)

longer and turning won’t be as

that they’ll

walking on clouds,

boards:

director of

Perter Schwirtlich and his dog, Duke, get ready for the

skiing

nonline.net.

quick.”

float right

Chicopee Ski Club

you snappier ollies and enables you to hold your edge at higher

with

fast

no

far south in the province, saying

The club has 10 runs to triple

is

doesn’t have a which means the have a softer

cliffs, all that sorts

car.

you want

there

style of

can do the big jumps and do the

riding

said

in cross-country trails this

ways. Free

include scrapping off ice from the

the

pond we have. That

money

snowboarding, says enthusiast

hood of your

down

Those who are looking for crosscountry trails will have to look elsewhere. Chicopee only has downhill runs.

it

nose

important to

of the

(water) out

to triple the output

of snow.”

board in appearance.

weather. With the

ride

our

the

directional shape,

in

in the race,”

Schwirtlich said.

constantly complaining about the

better to

pump

we had someone

“Last year, enter an Elvis

riding is

would allow us

more

easier to ride both

Natalie Schneider

Winter

own

to

hill.

More freedom By

make enough snow

have decent runs. “We can only get about 450 gallons per minute when we pump water from the city for our snow,” he said. “Hopefully in the next few years, we’ll be able to pump our own out of the pond we have. That to

walking on clouds’

like

‘It’s

be able

would allow us

at offered Other programs Chicopee this year will be their annual dummy race, an event where people make up costumed dummies on skis and race them

down the

years, we’ll

its

customers.

Paul Burrell, an employee at Chicopee, cleans off the club’s deck after a snowfall Nov. 1 4.

the next few

Schwirtlich said, due to the fact the club can’t

Schwirtlich

the year.”

more

new season

for

fun races throughout the season. Some of those races will include

— Page 9

said Jurkovic.

to

enjoy the sport,”


— SPOKE, November 24, 1997

Page 10

SPORTS

Students get active with intramurals By Corina On

a cold

Kenneth

reach the goal of non-competitive sport better than volleyball

Hill

November evening,

E.

Centre stands

Hunter tall in

the

Recreation

the blistering

The silence of the hardwood gymnasium floor is deafening. cold.

other sports.

“Volleyball

is

a good social team

where

sport

everybody

gets

involved,” said Ford. She said that

with loud music and louder voices.

by playing music all night and having no officials, volleyball is one of the most laid back sports. But don’t think that volleyball is the only sport for intramurals at Conestoga. Students are able to play ball hockey, indoor soccer and contact ice hockey as well. “Intramurals were not designed

After grabbing a volleyball and

for competitiveness,” said Ford,

All of a sudden, a door opens,

bringing with

it

dozens of laughing

looking

voices

to

exercise and have

Slowly, a stereo

gymnasium switch

is

some is

get

some

fun.

rolled onto the

When the power on, the gym fills

floor.

turned

settling into six different teams,

the

weekly session of intramural

volleyball begins.

Conestoga decided to run an intramural program, they did so with the hopes of getting students without the pressure of

competitive sports.

Marlene Ford, assistant director of athletics and recreation at the college, said

some

Although

sports such as

it is

too late to sign up

second

the

for

When

active,

“They’re run for fun.” session

can

students

intramurals,

of look

forward to another session starting at the beginning of January. Co-ed volleyball and basketball will be just two of the sports starting in January.

and

basketball

favorites

among

Both volleyball

are

considered

students and have

the

most number of teams sign up, sign-ups

Intramural

round

of

for

this

were so three divisions had to

volleyball,

popular that

made

be

accommodate

to

all

the teams.

A, the Avengers are Funky Chickens, and Grind and Team 2-4

In division

leading with the

Bump

following close behind. In division B, Athletic Supports

on top with teams Dig It!, Fuzzy Buimy, Reckin U and the are

Spikers trying to take the

title.

Yet in division C Medics 1 are in first place. Other teams in this division include These Guys, the Civil Crushers,

Of

and Demolition.

the six teams signed

up

for

contact ice hockey. Guff leads the

group. Close behind

is

the

Mech

Warriors, the Panthers, the Mighty

PUhUjtM* V'/r'/ /. 'oy/y/////

IhWl

No 'The

Doon

delight

is

DSA

Student Association’s are a gambler’s

-

lots

of prizes but no

In ball hockey however, there is a l^ger number of teams. Dinamo and Ball Busters are fighting for first, both having won all three games played giving them nine points. The Gravel Runners, Mechanical Mayhem, Bearded Clams and Groovy Brats are following close behind. The Blue Crew, the A1 Bundy Fan Club and the Enforcers are also vying for the ball hockey title. In co-ed indoor soccer, Bayern Munich has quickly taken the lead. The team won all three games it has played thus having nine points. Other teams in the league include

The

running

“It gives the student

a

way

gift

T

Deo. 2

-

-

involved without being up on a

'

Twister

Tourna ment

Wed/. Deo. 3

-

Christmas Family Feud

Yuk Yuk's Dinner Show

TKury. Deo. 4 Free Nooner

-

'The

from a variety

NHL

running two pools based on major sports. The NFL pool is a weekly function that merely involves choosing the winners in each week. Weekly prizes can be had in the NFL pool as well as a midterm and a grand prize, which will be won is

Classified

is

a year-long

Boertien also said that the

DSA

NBA pool. the NBA

pool

has planned an

The format of would be similar

Though

DSA

pool

which involved a draft at the beginning of the season, and has over 70 entrants.

non-sports fans to try their luck.

Hill)

final

to the

DSA

running

the

in

pool,

Despite

length

the

of

the

NFL, Boertien said there are roughly the same number of entries each week and its schedule

in the

popularity hasn’t dwindled at

all.

Boertien has a theory to explain the success of the pools. “It’s a

way

having

to participate without

to pay.”

Noting the vast number of expenses placed upon students at the college, Boertien said that

them that is 100 per cent cost free. The lack of an entry fee is also a decent way to avoid criticism from

near

future.

weeks won’t matter anyway,” she said. “We don’t want people to through.”

Length of major sporting league schedules can be a concern Boertien said. With schedules stretching over 80 games in both the NBA and NHL, it can be

the anti-gambling types. 'The

DSA

pools are intended to be a harmless

way

more students, to reach Boertien said, with fun being the

main goal. The only trouble

the

encounters

down

is

the trek

DSA office to fill the

possible

appearing

in

student to the

and embarrassment of in their entry

last

place

in

weekly updates.

ATTENTION Travel free by organizing

New

DR.

WANG’S PATIENTS/ALLERGY PATIENTS

Orleans, Florida and

Mexico.

We

also have great

Ski trips! Call

@

Breakaway

1-800-465-4257 Tours Ext. 310 for free promo kit. www.breakawaytours.com

it’s

intends to get

about the delay. “The season is so long that a few

way

maintain interest over

the entire season.

nice to have something available to

it was supposed to begin on Oct. 27, she isn’t concerned

lose interest half

difficult to

aren’t

details

known, and the it

NFL

pools

& New years

small groups to Montreal,

More information available at the DSA Office

(Photo by Corina

DSA

going, "rhe range of

certificates

although

Spring Break

pru Deo. 5Visit & Photos with Santa

total

does have its merits, the pools enable sports fans to ply their and even encourage trade, Currently the

Free Refreshment?

deflects a

shot during intramural ball hockey. (Photo by L.Scott Nicholson) Below: Players from intramural ice hockey wait at the red line for a face-off Nov. 1 2.

No

#2, the

event,

to get

While personal embarassment

Christmas Movie-a-thon

Wham

Above: A goaltender

the Aces.

prizes include various t-shirts and

Director of Student Life

Becky Boertien said the pools are meant to be a fun way to create

-

Celtics,

Names and

stage in front of everyone.”

'Deo. 1

Group of Losers who have

of locations.

involvement among students.

Mow

the

yet to win a game.

by one of the several “regulars”, who enter every week, and have a

entry fee.

iWfcfl-S.

Justice.

entry fee for

pools

sports

tit

Supreme

and

A gambler’s delight By Dan Meagher

vfv

Drunks

Finishing off the hockey standings

said Ford.

DOCTOR’S HOURS HAVE CHANGED TO:

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS 9:30

-

11:30

A.M.

the


SPOKE, November 24,

SPORTS

— Page 11

1997

MEN’S HOCKEY

Jock Talk

LEAGUE STANDINGS TEAM GP W L T PTS

Coaches are easy scapegoats

4

Conestoga

4

0

0

8

I

heard an interesting recently. Dallas

of losing and did something about it when they feed head coach

tired

rumor

Cambrian

2

Seneca S.S.

Fleming

Boreal

4

0

4

2

2

0

4

3

1

2

0

2

4

1

3

0

2

5

Sault

0

2

4

1

Cowboys owner

2

0

TEAM

GP

CON

Darryl Sinclair

4

CON

4

13

Goodbum

CON

4

11

development when you consider how much Jones hates the 49ers

and Alexander Mogilny

players to perform as well as

JeffKilb

SEN

4

8

Geolf Smith

SEN

4

7

Mike Senior

CAM

2

7

such

victories are acceptable.

Cambrian

Nov. 12

Boreal

11

be on the next train out of Dallas and if I were him, I’d be waiting on the {Aatform soon. There should be a disclaimer on a coach's contract, stating there may te some emotional distress, even if you win more than you lo^. Baltimore Orioles coach

Davey J<rfmson knows ’

well as anyone. Although he

team win a world series title^ for owner Peter Angelbus, the blame cannot rest

was good enough

Nov. 13

S.S.

Fleming 5

Seneca 7

Sault 6

Boreal 3

Nov. 15

that as

publicaily said he felt his

1

no question

he now light a flame under the team? It’s doubtful at best. Even when a coach succeeds, he may not win in the end. Jim Leyland took the Florida Marlins

Switzer,

secure in his post for the time

The sentiment is that Switzer will

LEAGUE RESULTS

Mike

replaced hiih *witihi^« ‘Iron’

“I’m-totin'-a-gun”

Bowl

.

making millions of dollars a year. Renney did as good a job with the players he had as anyone have. could The Canucks Keenan. There

Jones

being; However, Jones himself

t

underachieving

has said the Cowboys' current coach, Barry days.

has said nothing less than Super

Matt

squarely

on

is

World Series

the

to

this

title

Moises Alou was dealt to Houston for next to nothing, leaving Leyland to wonder how he will be replaced. This is not to say the manager is totally

devoid of responsibility is

In

general, owners expect

too

much

of the

men they

possible.

When

hurt, fans

and owners expect the

a player gets

coach to make things all right. The last coach of any significance who could step into the lineup himself and make an impact was Celtics legend Bill who was Boston’s Russell, player-coach near the end of his career.

In general, owners expect

too

much

of the

men

coach their teams. They are But the mistakes are almost always pinned on the coach’s shoulders. to

I’d like to see Jones hire Seifert

Cowboys’ coach for a number of reasons. First, it’s time Switzer left anyway. The players don’t respect him anymore, if

assign to coach their

teams.

They are

fallible,

just like

they ever did. Second, Seifert knows how to coach. He took the

mistakes are almost

49ers to two Super Bowls and has one of the best winnipg percentages for a head coach ever.

always pinned on the

And that just didn’t seem to be enough for San Fransisco presi-

the players. But the

Carmen Policy. Funny how these things work

dent .

^

out, isn’t it?

DSA trips offer Eric Lindros,

“The organizations give us a group on the tickets, which is good for the students. The differential

& the Flyers w

rate

What do

the Toronto Blue Jays,

the Buffalo Bills

and the Toronto

in the prices is about

$5

to $8.”

Raptors have in common with Conestoga College? Nothing really, but students from the college have gone to see these teams play over the past few years,

The DSA usually makes arrangements for trips to professional teams months in advance of the

of the Doon Association (DSA).

the tickets to the Buffalo Bills

courtesy

“We

Student

game

accept the students’ ideas

about

and the response determines whether or not we go,” said trips,

Becky Boertien, the DSA’s

direc-

tor of student life.

“In the past, we’ve gone to Jays games, gone skiing at Blue Mountain, and tried to gets tickets to Leaf games.” Although the DSA does not keep records of who goes with the college

on the

trips,

returning students

date.

Boertien said the

Boertien said

who went on

a

against the

According

upcoming

if

the trip does not sell out.

don’t

make any money on

Usually we break even terms of the cost,” shie said.

Wednesday, Ncveiilber 26 vs Euffale Sabres %

the

/

/

'/Mi,

see the Buffalo

Sabres play Eric Lindros and the the

DSA’s

efforts to get tickets for

Tickip €n Sale Tcdav

high-profile matchups which the

Boertien said.

“We

in

Philadelphia Flyers demonstrates

Students who have registered to go on the trip may bring one guest,

more

Boertien,

to

trip to

enough

bring

to

September. “For something like a ski trip to Blue Mountain, we only need to give them a few weeks notice,” she said.

she said.

may

Miami Dolphins

She also said tickets Leaf games were ordered

play

Boertien said, but they

ordered

in July.

year before tend to go on them a second time. “They tend to remember the good time they had on the trip,” trip the

DSA

aliUie

students want to see.

“In the trips

new

planned because

year,

we have two

to see the

tickets

we to

Raptors

couldn’t

one

get

game,”

Students are expected to follow on a trip, she

certain rules while

There is no alcohol and no smoking allowed on the bus, a rule said.

these trips.

designed, to avoid trouble crossing

in

the boarder. i

«

way

they assign

as the

-

variety of sports

to get his

fallible, just like the players.

to

his shouldersl After

that

Keenan knows hockey, but can

all I never saw him fill in for any. coach’S Shoutders. of his flayers on the field: The Vancouver, Canucks grew

By Matt Harris

hero

on a team. His task

is

Chris Palubeski

Playoff

players like FaVel Bure

too high to have

roll is

Put that must be the way things gO in the coaching ranks these

16

costs.

TomRenney. Only thing wrong about that is the wrong guy is leaving town. The Canucks’ pay-

organiz^ion.

PTS

cutting

Jones has reportedly been in conversation with former San Fransisco 49ers coach George Seifert about taking over as coach next season. An inter* esting

INDIVIDUAL STANDINGS NAME

Jerry

His reward: owner Huizenga is already

season.

Wayne

DSA


Page 12

— SPOKE, November

24, 1997

SPORTS

Short track speed skaters toe into the ice and get ready

for

the starter’s pistol at the Waterloo Recreation

Complex Nov.

1

5.

(Photo by

K-W speed showcase By

Scott Nicholson

L.

The

fast-pace, exciting action of

Waterloo

Recreation Complex, Nov. 15 and 16, as the kitchener- Waterloo

in

pursuit of the leader ^t the Waterloo (Photo by

L.

Scott Nicholson)

Flaim burns for Olympics By

L.Scott Nicholson

hope my training, both mental and physical, peak at the “I just

As he jogged wann-up laps around the track at the top of the Waterloo Recreation Complex, Eric Flaim appeared by all matters of appearance to be just another anxious speed skater. What distinguished Flaim from all

right time,”

Flaim,

that he is a three-time Olympian, on the verge of becoming a four-time Olympian. Flaim said he joined his Boston

compete against other

six

cycling or plyometrics (a series

Eric

Flaim,

Olympic

skater. (Photo by

now

is

to

L.

make

speed

Scott Nicholson)

the

American

national team that will be travel-

of

explosive

jumping

move-

ments).’’

Although briefly retiring in 1995 from competitive ice speed skating, Flaim kept himself busy with other ventures, one of which included competing professionally as an in-line skater and com-

ling to Nagano, Japan, in February for the Olympics. Flaim said he left his home in Boston in August to go to

mentating for the

Colorado Springs, Col., where

in-line skating

American national team. In 1988, Flaim competed in the Calgary Olympics where he was

the national team’s training facil-

a silver medallist in the long track competition and again in

class skaters vying for a spot

When asked if he had a preference for long track, short track or in-line speed skating, PHair said he liked all three, but in terms of training he enjoyed short track. “Short track training is a lot more fim,’’ he said.

skaters.

The

native of Pembroke, Mass.,

Boston, said he started speed skating in 1979 at the age of 1 2, and by 1987, he was on the near

1992 at the Albertville, France Olympics, where he earned a silver in the short track relay. Flaim, now 30, had other things

on his mind winning

in Waterloo.

previous

Despite

Olympic

medals, Flaim said his priority

ities are located.

Flaim said there are 12 world on

the national team, however, only five

or

six

will

be fortunate

enough to go to Nagano. Flaim and other short track Olympic hopefuls will face off against one another in January at Lake Placid, N.Y. for the Olympic trials.

talents weekend went.

well the

“Everything ran smoothly apart from a few technical difficulties with new computer programs and printers that couldn’t print results quick enough,” Flynn said. “Prior planning really helped

Flynn said the meet was a good trial run for the 1999 national championships, which the K-W

ly to coincide with the Oktoberfest

club

However, with the death of one of tlie club’s founding members, Marion Hanje, four years ago, Flynn said he felt it would be nice to pay tribute to Hanje by naming the meet after her. “Marion did all of the scheduling and equipment management for the club,” Flynn said. Competitors at the meet were quite literally of

Hunt, a

member

all levels.

Kayli

of the host

K-W

competed in the seven-andunder Pee Wee category; A1 Rose of Ottawa, who at 74, travels the province in his trailer home going from meet to meet, competed in the Masters division; Eric Flaim, 30, of Pembroke, Mass., who is a three-time Olympian, competed in the men’s Open A division; and Laura Gourley, competed as a Special Olympian. Short track speed skating, unlike its long track cousin, is usually held in a hockey arena, where skaters move at speeds of 50 to 60 kilometres per hour and round corners with their bodies almost parallel to the ice surface. Despite an club,

five-foot,

at

inches, isn’t the typical height of

was

to actually

said.

an Olympian, but makes up for it with immense, tree trunk quadriceps, said his training regime for the Olympics is very intense. “We’re on the ice every morning for two hours of skating and then in the afternoons it could be weight training, stationary

other skaters in attendance

area club for the meet, at the Waterloo Recreation Complex on Nov. 15 and 16, because he was tired of just training and wanted

he

who

skaters

Sertoma Speed Skating Club hosted the Marion Hanje Fall Classic Speed Skating Meet. Club president Doug Flynn said the club has been hosting meets since it was formed in 1963, usualevents.

Showing perfect form, speed skaters round a corner Recreation Complex Nov. 1 5.

Scott Nicholson)

expected poor spectator turnout, Flynn was impressed with how

short track speed skating presented itself to spectators at the

L.

move

things along.”

is

hosting.

“The nationals

will be run similar meet, only on a larger scale,” he said. Volunteers from the

to

this

host club, as well as from other

groups, were also responsible for the meet’s success.

member

of the K-

whose children

are also

Steve Caron, a

W

club,

involved in the sport, spent his

weekend watching compete while he

children

his

also

passed

buckets of water to officials on the ice to

be poured into the comers

prevent further gouging of the

to

ice.

Caron said he couldn’t think of a better family sport.

“You can get involved

in

the

competitive aspect of the sport or just for

he

its

recreational purposes,”

said.

Caron said he was hooked on the sport after watching his children

and

finally

decided to

tie

on a

pair

of the club’s unusually long-blad-

ed skates.

There were a few bumps and bruises along the way, he said, but

he enjoyed every moment. “When skating fast and in control, there is a beautiful rhythm.”

ESPN X-games

segment.

“In short track, you get to train

with a group, where as in long track, the training

was more

and it became monotonous,” he said. vidual

indi-

very Eric Flaim at the Waterloo Recreaction

Complex Nov. (Photo by

L.

15.

Scott Nicholson)

Digital Edition - November 24, 1997  
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