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VOL. XLI NO.9 April 5, 2012

Schurr High School, Montebello, CA

PARTAN SCROLL Watch through the eyes of students and their families as they face challenges in new film.

Learn how companies track searches and use information for advertisements.

OPINIONS

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ENTERTAINMENT

Follow Emilio Melendez as he pursues a bodybuilding profession and participates in competitions.

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SPORTS

Choir performs ‘Once Upon This Island’ Speech, debate members place, go to nationals BY MARIEA SEKIJIMA Reporter

TREVOR QUAN

UPON THE STAGE: Junior Kimberly Morales and seniors Talina Murillo, Albert Guerrero and Kevin Bermudez practice “Some Say” during their daily rehearsals in preparation for their upcoming performance in May.

BY GENESIS DIAZ & IRENE WONG Reporters

BRIEFLY

Bringing a twist to the fairy tale of The Little Mermaid and the classic story of Romeo and Juliet, Vocal Ensemble will present the musical “Once Upon This Island” May 2 and 3 in the auditorium. “I think this year’s musical is very different from last year’s because of the harmonies and the choreography. The sound is very African and tribal, with a lot more dancing involved,” said Choir Director Leslie Ziff. The story revolves around two lovers, Ti Moune (double cast by juniors Brittani Alberto and Lanakai Saavedra) and Daniel (played by freshman Elmer Guardado), who together with the power of love, help settle the social differences of the islanders. Piano accompanist Randy Guiaya introduced the idea for the musical to Ziff. “The musical is a combination of the love story of Prince Eric and Ariel and

• Spring Break No classes will be held April 6 because of Good Friday and April 9-13 for spring break. School will resume April 16.

Romeo and Juliet with a huge calypso theme,” said Ziff. The performance is expected to last about two hours with an intermission. However, due to the restriction of food and drinks in the auditorium, accommodations during intermission are still undecided. The musical will open with a dramatic and spirited song entitled “We Dance,” followed by other musical numbers that will help tell the story. Much of the musical is run by students, including choreography and direction, and will feature an accompaniment with members of the jazz ensemble on select instruments. “We’ve been working all month on memorizing our songs and choreography. Everyone is working hard and will be giving it their all to make it an amazing show for everyone,” said senior Nanci Navarro, who will be playing both Mother Earth and Agwe, the goddess of water. To prepare for the musical, vocal ensemble will hold assembly performances during second and third

period May 1 and 2. Rehearsals are also held during and after school every day of the week for stage direction and script readings. “I think that everyone who attends will have a great time. The students have put in a lot of work and time to create a spectacular show filled with wonderful songs and beautiful dances for their audience,” said Ziff. Tickets will be sold for $5 for students and $7 for adults. Funds raised from this event will go towards purchasing props and a possible trip to a musical for the choirs.

FAST FACTS WHAT: “Once Upon This Island” WHEN: May 2 & 3 WHERE: Auditorium ADMISSION: $5 for students, $7 for adults

• NHS Inductees Seniors Stacy Chan, Alex Ideguchi, Ryan Kang, Gayane Kechechyan, Billy Miyata, Patricia Quan, Liliana Ramirez, Daniel Wu and juniors Alex Aguilar, Joeson Chiang, Taylor Honda, Sarai Jaramillo, Matthew Lin, Jenny Lu, Anthony Preza, Luzdary Ruelas, Benedict Salvanera and Sandy Tang were inducted into the National Honor Society during the March 22 assembly.

Preparing for state and national tournaments, speech and debate team members look forward to ending their season strong. At one of their most successful years at the Berkeley tournament, the team broke 10 members into either octo-finals, quarterfinals, semifinals or finals. Junior Matthew Kartanata placed first in Original Oratory, as the top ranked orator out of approximately 200 other competitors. In the same event, senior Serie Sekijima and sophomore Morgan Kuwashima advanced to semifinals and quarterfinals, respectively. Sophomore Tyler Tippings advanced to semifinals in Humorous Interpretation, while junior Chloe Romero and seniors Jasmine Delgado and Jude Garcia moved into octo-finals in Dramatic Interpretation. In Extemporaneous Speaking, sophomore Joyce Kunishima went to quarterfinals, while juniors Zachary Grau, Kartanata and senior Forrest Lin advanced to octo-finals. Grau also broke to octofinals in Impromptu Speaking. To qualify for the national tournament, individual competitors must be ranked in the top three of their event. Sekijima and Kartanata both qualified in Original Oratory, while Tippings and Romero both qualified in Humorous Interpretation. At the congress and debate national qualifiers, Lin ranked in the top five in Congressional Debate event and will also be going to Nationals. “I knew I wanted to qualify for Nationals from the start of the very first tournament of the season back in September, and I kept telling myself I was going to do it,” Romero said in response to securing one of three spots in her category. “Qualifying just reassured [me] that all the past three years of work was more than worth it. I’m very excited to be representing Schurr High School at [Nationals].” With only a few events left, including the national and state tournaments, the speech and debate season is coming to a close. However, with four national tournament qualifiers, nine state qualifiers and a first place winner at the Berkeley tournament, this year’s season has been one of the most successful. “At the beginning of the year, [the team] set up a goal for ourselves. It never really hits you how well you’ve done when you’re there, but looking back at our year, we really have met our goal and then some. It’s a whole lot of work and a whole lot of fun,” said Jason Kwong, sophomore co-captain.

• Band & Orchestra

• USB elections

Symphonic Band received a unanimous superior and Orchestra received a superior during the Southern California School Band and Orchestra Association (SCSBOA) Montebello Music Festival March 28.

Voting for USB officers will be held April 17 during history periods for juniors and sophomores and freshmen studies or AVID periods for freshmen. However, senior class elections will be held April 20 to accommodate junior candidates who were not elected to USB positions.


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O pinions

Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

STAFF EDITORIAL Stepping over misconceptions Finishing math homework is great, but writing it neatly is even better. Attention to detail is what separates excellent from mediocre work. The extra time put into assignments should reap greater rewards, if not grade-wise then definitely in terms of improving one’s character. It starts in kindergarten, where students learn to compare themselves to others, learning basic skills such as the correct association between letters and sounds. More complex skills are developed throughout elementary, middle and high school, when work ethic and personality seem to be established. Getting good grades on tests and finishing assignments are what students usually have in mind. However, students can grow further by focusing on their education in greater depth. It is not only about learning the material to get a good grade; although it may not be apparent, a student’s demeanor also matters. For instance, imagine two students who get the same grades: one student may show up on time to class, while the other is usually late. This may not seem to matter all too much in school, but what about in the work force where tardiness is grounds for a manager to fire a worker? The finer details about school are often missed by some students. School is not just about learning the subjects; it may cover the same concepts from kindergarten on up. Students in high school are still learning to balance their academic work and social life while meeting certain expectations. Whether students are preparing to get jobs after high school or go to college, the way they conduct themselves really matters. Writing neatly, being on time, paying attention in class and being friendly are details that some students may forget. A manager would want a worker who can do the job, is rarely late and is sociable with customers and coworkers rather than someone who merely does the job. Forming good habits in high school will help us in the long run, and paying attention to these details can help build character that will prove to be a valuable asset in the future.

BY JESSICA APARICIO Editor in Chief

Just so you know, every individual has his or her own path. There is a long curved path made of different colored stones that stick out jaggedly. This uneven road is a small venture that I walk on my way home when a day’s worth of stress fills me with anxiety. When I walk the pathway, I do not look ahead; I have to keep my gaze on the floor to make sure my foot is in the right placement; one wrong move, and I could tumble down and scrape my face against the stones. It is almost fun walking this path, though; I never know when it will end. In the meantime, I take cautious steps on each stone, and I can hear every trouble reverberate down to my core. “What do you mean you didn’t get in?” I step on another. “Really, you’re going to that college?” I step onto a small stone in which I spread my arms out for balance. “Ha, you’re going to that school that sucks!” I nearly trip on that one. However, I still make it safely across the next stone. Every remark squashes beneath my feet, and it no longer affects me as much as it did before. I had told a few of my peers when certain colleges did not accept me. My peers gave me their condolences that something better would come along. However, their encouragement began to change as I had set my mind in attending a California State University. I did not understand their sentiments, and I became stressed by the entire dilemma of choosing the right college. Second thoughts halted my every movement of opening that portal and pressing that acceptance button. Was I making the right choice by attending a Cal State?

As I began walking that stone path again, I began to rationalize. I stepped onto a faded blue stone surrounded by grey ones and could hear my sister’s voice. “At that moment when you get your college diploma and get a job, it does not even matter anymore; the job does not look at your transcripts and only look to see whether you are qualified. College is there to help you find yourself.” I smiled at her words. With both feet and in confidence, I jumped onto a large stone, where I could declare with much assurance, “There is nothing wrong with going to a Cal State.” I think the misconception of Cal States comes from society’s preconception that it is a prestigious university or nothing at all; do not even mention a Cal State or worse yet, a community college. As certain as those who say this might be, they are all wrong. All colleges have something different to offer. When my peers tell me that they do not believe in the Cal State system, I ask them why, but many cannot give me an answer. I ask, “Do you know the difference between a Cal State and UC?” Again, they cannot give me a reply. The answer is that the UCs are research universities, which means they are better funded, have graduate education and are likely to offer more opportunities in research earlier in one’s education, while Cal States are teaching institutions. I look down at the stone path and see the end, where the tree that always sucks all the tension away stands. However, as I look up, I realized that the tree is gone and only a large pile of dirt remains. The tree is not there, much like the acceptance letters I did not receive, but I know it is not the end; it just means that my path will lead me a different direction, to something much more worthwhile.

Jess’ So You Know

10 Second Opinion

Do not skip over the fundamentals.

G U E S T

PERSPECTIVE BRANDON SERPAS GLSEN National Ambassaador

About two weeks ago, I was invited to go to a screening in Beverly Hills for the new movie “Bully” and talk on a panel representing the Gay Lesbian Straight Education Network (GLSEN) because I am the National Media Ambassador for the organization. I was familiar with the film through articles I had read on the controversy surrounding its rating. I signed a petition not knowing how involved I would become. I arrived at the screening and watched the film in anticipation of talking on the panel with the film’s director, Lee Hirsch; GLSEN’s Executive Director Eliza Byard; Silicon

GAYANE KECHECHYAN

Valley Representative Mike Honda; and comedienne Kathy Griffin. Apparently I did well and was informative, as I explained that treating bullies like criminals by suspending them instead of counseling them would not stop bullying because that method does not attempt to get to the root of the problem or educate the person about why bullying is wrong. After the panel, I was greeted by a producer for the Southern California Branch of National Public Radio (NPR). She gave me her card and asked me for my information. She explained that she would love to have me on a segment with Hirsch the following week. I would be broadcast nationwide with one of my favorite NPR hosts, Patt Morison as well as Hirsch and Representative Honda. The time for the segment to be recorded came, and I spoke as eloquently as I could. I thought about all the intelligent commentators I had heard on the show in the past, and truly tried my best. I was confident, gave all the information and life examples I could about how to deal with bullying and informed listeners that “Bully” is a powerful film that has and will help many people, especially youths, talk openly about why bullying is wrong.


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Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

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Online advertising prompts concern over privacy Companies admit use of tracking programs BY WENDY LAM Opinions Editor

As American culture continues to place more emphasis on technology and the Internet, we leave ourselves susceptible and exposed to the watchful eyes of online marketers. According to Google’s private policy, the company uses AdWords, AdSense and AdMob programs to help them strategically place advertisements of interest on users’ sites. Even when one is not signed onto a Google account, their searches will be followed and used to place advertisements of related topics. However, when one has signed on to their account, searches are documented, so ads are not just relevant to recent searches but past searches as well. The content of personal e-mails is also open for inspection by Google through Gmail. Personal messages provide further information to matters that are pertinent to us. While not all ads are selected specifically to match our interests, the company does personalize them when they feel that they will be of help to users. Google also partners with third-party sites and services to further record our online history. Our “interest categories” are determined by all visits and activity on any site that uses the AdSense program. YouTube is one such partner that relies on Internetbased ads. They use the DoubleClick cookie so that video searches and uploads on the video sharing site can provide additional information to identify matters that appeal to us. Yahoo and Bing also keep track of search information for marketing advertisements. According to community. microsoftadvertising.com, the companies use AdCenter to manage their advertising to help advertisers save time and simplify their campaigns. Although companies use these tracking programs to help users and make ads more relatable to them, the level of online privacy is called into question. Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and Apple’s Safari web browser have control settings to preserve user privacy rights from these monitoring programs. However, according to appleinsider.com, Safari users sued Google in February when they believed that the company had sidestepped these control settings. Computer users in Missouri and Illinois believed that Google had been tracking the web surfing habits of Safari users by placing online ads and cookies on the web browser and violating their privacy rights. According to latimes.com, Yahoo sued Facebook in March for 10 patents that included ways of advertising on the web. Patent fights have been emerging, as technology giants have been taking their fight for superiority to court.

Obama’s administration has been pushing for a privacy bill of rights so consumers will have more control over their personal online information. In response, Firefox has implemented a “Do Not Track” option to let users decide how they want to be seen by advertisers. If users do not want Internet-based advertisements when using Google, they can select the “Opt out” button on the Ads Preference Manager, though ads may still be relevant to the page on which they appear. According to internetretailer.com, Yahoo also plans to implement this. While online tracking is not intended for any use other than selecting ads more relevant to users, many still feel uncomfortable that their online activity is being followed and possibly documented. As Washington continues to pursue a bill preventimg online tracking, these programs may soon prove to be an invasion of privacy supported by the law.

Yahoo recently announced that it will add a “Do Not Track” option, which Firefox already offers. It will allow users to decide how they want to be seen by Yahoo advertisers. Google offers an “Opt out” button on the Ads Preference Manager.

Responding to online ads

Online advertising is the second biggest budget priority for advertisers worldwide, surpassing radio and print advertising.

Internet Explorer and Safari protect user privacy from advertisers.

How do you usally respond to online advertisements?

Which of the following do you have? (Check all that apply) 89% Facebook 19% Google + 73% e-mail 8% none

63% Ignore them

Have you ever purposely clicked on an online advertisement?

13% Glance over the

24% Yes

18% Ta

76% No Do you see a relationship between online advertisements and your recent searches? 16% Yes 63% No 21% Somewhat

SOURCE: 323 students were polled March 29. Some figures may not add up to 100% due to incorrectly completed polls.

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ke a look but never click on them

d 5% Follow a link when intereste

Did you know that Facebook and Google place online advertisements based on your searches? 35% Yes 65% No Search

2008: web pages started using in-text advertising. which double underlines key words in a website’s article and leads the reader to a relevant ad bubble. 2007: Facebook started to use behavior-based advertising, which specifically targets users’ social interactions to select relevant ads. 2006: YouTube began lauching online video advertisements, which included participatory/interactive video ads, pre-roll ads and invideo ads. SOURCE: historymatter.gmu.edu

ALEXIS JIMENEZ

Photos by CHERISE WOO Graphics by JESSICA HSU Modeled by SPARTAN SCROLL STAFF


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News

Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

Cheer, song teams place at Nationals BY CONNIE CAI Reporter

Varsity cheer, song and JV song teams all made finals at the United Spirit Association Nationals/ Championships in the Anaheim Convention Center March 31-April 2. The JV song team placed second, varsity song third and varsity cheer fifth at the competition. “Going to Nationals was an exciting experience that is filled with many emotions: one may feel nervous, excited, anxious and scared all at the same time,” said Elizabeth Lozano, varsity cheer captain. “There is never a moment of calm. The one thing that teams have to do is to be prepared for the unexpected, because anything can happen; we can never be sure of what the judges are looking for. I think all the teams did very well; we gave it our all, and I know the team will do even better next year.”

To qualify for Nationals, teams have competed four times all season and received a score of at least 75 points once. “Even though we [varsity song] didn’t win the title as National Champions, I still think we did really well. We competed against 19 other good schools, and we’re the top three finalists,” said junior Samantha Luu. “We are really proud that we got this far.” During Nationals, routines must be performed in under two minutes. Song routines consist of only dance, while cheer involves dancing, tumbling and flips. Gametime routines are short cheers that combine both tumbling and dance moves of cheer and song. All teams have been practicing three times a week since Photo printed with permission from SAMANTHA LUU September and even more during March, with each practice lasting JUMPING FOR JOY: The JV cheer team performs their routine on the first day of the United up to two hours. Spirit Association Nationals at the Anaheim Convention Center to qualify for finals.

History Day participants compete at state finals BY ARCELIA MADRID Reporter

Advancing from the county level, three History Day teams will compete in the National History Day state finals April 28 at the Riverside Convention Center. Four teams competed at the History Day L.A. competition held at Azusa Pacific University March 10. Teams submitted websites based on this year’s theme, “Revolution, Reaction, Reform in History.” The following teams will head to state finals: “From Sawdust to Pixie Dust: The Making of the Magic Kingdom” created by seniors Rio Djiwandana, Jordan Kwon, Jeanette Liu and Judy Wu; “Rated ‘M’ for Minor: Please Ask for Parental Consent” created by freshman Edmond Liu and seniors Christian Navarrete, Shirley Wu and Cindy Yu; and “Franco’s Spanish Civil War and its Consequences” created by

juniors Christina Ibarra, Selina Morales and Darlene Zambrano. Competition is held on a total of three levels: county, state and national. According to historydaycalifornia.org, each competition entry is judged on its historical quality, clarity of presentation and adherence to the theme by professional historians and educators, including those from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, Occidental College and University of California, Los Angeles. Adviser Stephen Anderson has been preparing students since the beginning of November. He makes sure “that the history is accurate, the research is done correctly and the project relates to the theme.” “I’m really excited because I have been doing this for three years, and it is the first time I have gone to state. The state level has more contestants and more prestige than the county level,” said Ibarra.

Local homicide case under reinvestigation • Brenda Sierra, who attended Schurr 10 years ago, was abducted and murdered while walking to school Oct. 12, 2002. Her body was discovered the following day in the San Bernardino Mountains near Crestline in an isolated wooded area. • No arrests were ever made in the case, despite a widespread search by the police and Sierra’s family and a $150,000 reward for the capture of the killer. • Authorities are now seeking assistance from the public to identify two men, who were named “persons of interest” in Sierra’s murder at a March 30 press conference. • Because Sierra and her family were not associated with gangs, and gang members were unwilling to reveal information, the case has been difficult to solve. • Detectives have released sketches of the two men. They are also seeking a third person of interest, George Barraza, 32, also known as “Trooper.” • Two women may have also been involved in Sierra’s case, and police believe a dark SUV was spotted near where Sierra’s body was found. • People with information about this case should call the number to Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s Homicide Bureau: (323) 890-5500.

Senior, junior girls New Mr. Schurr High chosen, crowned play at Powderpuff

SOURCE: latimes.com

BIG PICTURE

BY BLANCA FERNANDEZ Reporter

ALYSSA MIDDO

‘KING OF THE HILL’: Fellow contestants Sal Chavez and Nolan Luevano lift Damian Gray into the air in celebration after he is crowned the new Mr. Schurr High, following the March 16 competition.

As a fundraiser for the Spartan football program, senior and junior girls will participate in the annual Powderpuff game April 20 at 7 p.m. on the Ken Davis field. More than 175 players signed up to be a part of the Powderpuff Game, and each girl will have the opportunity to participate. Many spring sport athletes were not able to be a part of Powderpuff due to potential schedule conflicts. Schurr football players are coaching both the senior and junior girls. Ray Brecerra, Eduardo Ceja, Brandon Chavez, Nelson Contreras, Edgar Jimenez and Willie Torres will coach the seniors. Tristian Casillas, Kalani Fujiwara, David Garcia, Jose Gutierrez, Ivan Lezama and Rudy Madrid will coach the juniors. “Powderpuff gives the girls a chance to meet new friends and show their class spirit, all while learning how to play the game,” said Torres. Seniors practice Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays while juniors practice Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Every team member is required to attend practices. So far, the girls have practiced six times for two weeks and anticipate more in preparation for the game. Every girl participating is selling tickets, which are $6 presale and $10 at the gate. Students, parents and community members are encouraged to attend.


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Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

Girls’ League holds annual ‘Sadies’ dance BY JORDAN KWON Reporter

Themed “Mathletes vs. Athletes,” the annual Sadie Hawkins Dance, hosted by Girls’ League, will be held April 27 from 7-11 p.m. in Byers Gymnasium. “It’s a dance where the girls are supposed to ask the guys instead of the other way around,” said Michele Nakano, Girls’ League adviser. Tickets will be sold in the Student Store during both lunches for $6 with USB, $7 without and $8 at the door. A student I.D. is required to purchase a ticket and will be required to enter the dance. “This is our [Girls’ League’s] only dance of the year where the whole school is welcome to attend,” said Nakano. Refreshments, such as pizza, drinks and shaved ice from the Get Shaved food truck will be sold at the dance. Students will have the opportunity to have their pictures taken by a professional company, Sanford Photo Studio. “Everyone should go to Sadies because it’s cheaper than prom, more casual and people can get creative with their outfits,” said Patricia Quan, secretary. Girls’ League members suggest that couples wear “nerdy” costumes, jock/athletic attire or both simultaneously. As Girls’ League’s largest fundraiser of the year, proceeds of the dance will be donated to City of Hope’s breast cancer awareness program. The Get Shaved food truck will also donate 20% of their profits from the night to Girls’ League. Only Schurr students are allowed to attend the dance, and no guest passes will be issued.

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Folklorico honors ‘Dia de las Madres’ BY MONET TRUJILLO Reporter

In celebration of Mother’s Day, Folklorico will host a performance May 4 at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. With 16 members in the group, there will be a total of 16 different dance numbers and a guest performance. Performances will include different Folklorico style dances from nine different regions of Mexico, including Jarana Yucateca and Jalisco. “The Jalisco dance is typically performed by the more advanced students of the group, but I wanted to push my newer students to do the harder dances as well,” said Daisy Mendez, Folklorico adviser. Teresa Mendoza, Folklorico president, will perform at the Dazantes Unidos Festival, the cultural network of Mexican folk dancers and artists that will take place March 30-April 1, in Fresno. First held at University of California, Los Angeles, in 1979, it was incorporated to promote and support the Mexican Folk experience through performing or visual arts in 1994. “Students should attend the Folklorico performances because it is the best way to learn about Mexican Folk dances. We have brought back many new dances that are fun and fast-paced,” O WO said Mendez. ISE R E CH Tamales and other foods will be sold before and after the performance. Tickets will be on sale for $6 presale and $8 at the MOVES THAT FLOW: Co-Captain Alejandra Hernandez door. Raffle tickets will also be sold, with different practices for their Mother’s Day perfprmance. prizes such as a free performance by the Schurr Folklorico group. “This is one of our very few fundraising events during the FOR THE year. We would love to have a full house to raise money and show our audience more about our culture through our dancing,” said Mendez. Sarai Jaramillo’s name was misspelled last issue.

RECORD


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Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

‘dye’ o f t o s r r o l o c r i a H

BY ESMERALDA CERVANTES & TAYLOR HONDA Reporter & Features Editor

With the use of hair chalk, henna and Kool-Aid, non-permanent, vibrant hair colors can now be created without the risks of split ends and dry hair. Hair chalking is a new way to add some color that lasts for 1-2 days in a person’s hair. Soft pastels work because they have a thickness and color vibrancy that transfers reasonably well onto hair. Sidewalk chalk also works but is not as visible. To avoid damage to the hair, apply the chalk in only one direction, down the hair strand. One should wear gloves while applying chalk because it can stain the fingers, and one should place a towel on the shoulders of the person who is receiving the coloring. The color will wash out easily with shampoo. According to hubpage.com, hair chalk looks best in colors that stand out against the person’s natural hair color. For example, those with light hair should use colors such as blue or black, and those with dark hair should use colors like orange, red and green. Hair chalk also looks best on the tips of hair, bangs or in streaks running down the person’s hair. Hair chalk is not meant to dye the entire head because it is not permanent. Though normally used for drinking purposes, Kool-Aid can be used to dye hair as well, according to healthandthebeauty.blogspot.com. Due to the different, colorful flavors, Kool-Aid can create several different shades of colors according to one’s preference. To dye the hair, pour some unsweetened Kool-Aid into a bowl. One should not use artificially sweetened Kool-Aid because it will make hair sticky. Add just enough water to make a paste, not a liquid. Add some conditioner to help the paste spread onto the hair more evenly. Mix the ingredients until it is a paste consistency. Then massage the paste into the hair, while avoiding contact with the scalp. If dying the entire head, once it is colored, cover hair with a plastic shower cap. Leave your hair covered for

at least 30 minutes; if more vivid color is desired, leave the Kool-Aid paste in your hair for longer. After, remove the shower cap and rinse the hair with cold water. Do not shampoo for at least 24 hours; conditioner is recommended after the hair has been rinsed. Once dried, the hair will contain the desired color. Dark hair will only show a tint of the color, but the more saturated the paste is, the more the color will show. According to sophisticatededge.com, Kool-Aid hair dye will last anywhere from a few washes to four weeks, depending on the saturation of the dye paste. Henna is a plant used for dying purposes and comes in a variety of colors. Unlike chalk or Kool-Aid, henna semi-permanently dyes hair, but still does not damage it. According to hennaforhair. com, some brands of henna may contain metalic compounds that can react with other hair dyes, forming disasters such as green hair or brittleness. In order to dye the hair, pour about 100 to 500 grams of powdered henna into a bowl. Add boiling water gradually, and then mix until the ingredients are creamy yet grainy. Let the mixture sit overnight at room temperature so the dyes can release for long-lasting effects. When the henna is prepared, apply the mixture generously onto the hair. Once finished, wrap hair in a plastic shower cap and wipe off any excess henna that may have gotten onto the skin. Let the dye sit for two to four hours and then wash it out using shampoo. Conditioner may be used as well. To tone down red colors, coffee can be used as a substitute for the water in the henna mixture, according to hennabycynthia.homstead.com. Black Chinese Tea will add gold highlights to light brown henna. Red zinger tea enriches red tones to burgundy, sherry, mahogany and red henna. For neutral, blonde or marigold blonde henna, chamomile tea can be used to brighten henna and add highlights to hair. Two tablespoons of cinnamon can be used to brighten and add highlights to red tones. Two tablespoons of lemon juice can be added to lighten blonde shades. Alternative dyes can add “Kool” new colors to create a whole new spectrum of hairstyles from to choose.

THE GIST

Many temporary hair coloring alternatives are found at home and will only last for days. Hair can be dyed with chalk, soft pastels, coffee, henna and Kool-Aid. Henna can be mixed with a variety of liquids to change the effects of the dye.

Features

Do-It-Yourself: Hair Chalking

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Apply the soaked piece of chalk or pastel onto the desired area of hair. Do not comb through the hair with your fingers or a brush because color will come out.

Wet the desired hair chalk or soft pastel with water. Soft pastels create a more vibrant effect of colors.

2 Use a hair straightener to set the color in. Make sure to do this step gently to ensure that the color does not come off.

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Continue throughout the rest of the desired areas of hair. Try different colors to add variation. Use hair chalking to experiment with highlights and lowlights before a permanent dye.

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SOURCE: collegefashion.net Photos by CHERISE WOO Modeled by SARAH CHAIDES


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Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

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Fitzpatrick ‘taps’ into Irish roots

BY THERESA NAKAMURA Reporter

Shannon Fitzpatrick is not the ordinary sophomore; she has been leading a double life for more than seven years. Her secret life as an Irish dancer has kept her up for grueling hours and caused injuries, but it has also allowed her to travel around the country. While wandering around the Orange County Fair, Fitzpatrick and her mother came across and group of Irish dancers performing, and she became immediately enthralled by the intense and rhythmic stomping. “I was hypnotized by the dancers. It was what I could only describe as intense ballet,” says Fitzpatrick. In 2005, she enrolled in McCartan School of Irish Dancing in Long Beach. She began competing nationally soon after learning how to dance. After doing her homework, she prepares for her 9 p.m. practices. Most nights that she has practice, she does not get home until 11 or even midnight. On weekends, she practices for four hours or more. In Irish dancing, there are two types of dances: soft-shoe and hard shoe. Soft shoe dances are balletlike, whereas hard shoe dances are similar to wooden tap dancing. For every competition, girls have to wear a knee-length dress, usually with thick panel-like skirts and sleeves. “Being an Irish dancer gets pretty expensive,” says Fitzpatrick. “For each competition, we need new dresses, shoes and wigs that match the girls’ hair colors and tight curls that bounce with each movement. It totals up to a few hundred dollars.” Competitions have allowed her to travel around the country and perform for thousands of people. “I think Shannon’s dancing is really cool. She even got to perform on the ‘Ellen DeGeneres Show’ for St. Patrick’s

Day, which they filmed on her birthday,” says junior Leslie Valle, close friend. After injuring her leg in the fall of 2010, Fitzpatrick was unable to compete in the 2010 Irish dance nationals. However, she quickly recovered and returned to practice for the 2011 U.S. Western Regional Oireachtas, which is also known as “The O.” On Nov. 19, Fitzpatrick competed at Disneyland for “the O” nationals and placed 29th in the 15 and under prizewinner/ preliminary division. Nationals usually take place in November. Contestants participating in nationals are rated according to a point system based on technique, costume, timing and posture. Technique is where the majority of the points are either given or taken away from. Costume refers to how appealing the costume is, the length of the dress and whether the shoes are properly tied. Untied shoes result in point deduction or even disqualification. Another way the majority of the points are determined is based on the dancers timing and posture. If the arms move or if the contestant is not in time with the music, they would likely lose a lot of points. Though she no longer competes in small events, Fitzpatrick plans on continuing to practice for and participate in nationals. Currently 16-years-old, she

Fast facts about Irish dancing

-There is evidence that some of the first practicioners of Irish dancing were the Druids, who danced in religious rituals in honor of the oak tree and the sun. -In the 18th century, the dancing master appeared in Ireland and taught dance to peasants. -Group dances were developed in order to catch interest of less gifted dancers; solo dancers were highly esteemed.

FANCY FOOTWORK: Fitzpatrick performs a common step in Irish dancing in which her upper body is not allowed to move. plans to engage in her Irish dancing until she reaches adulthood, two years longer than what most dancers normally pursue. Not the typical sophomore, Fitzpatrick continues to explore her Irish roots through dance.

Hershey’s factories make millions of kisses a day, but I’m only asking for one. SOURCE: funny2.com

SOURCE: irelandseye.com

MICHELE WONG Photos by TREVOR QUAN


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College cuts hinder graduation BY DANNY VASQUEZ

Alumni Guest Perspective

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-The Community College Administrat community colleges for the fall of 20 Community Colleges in California, w taxes, not funded by the state, will re current-year funding.

-Students in K-12 who are taking com in apportionments.

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No matter what college students go to, the words “budget cuts” never seem to go away. They cause the price of tuition to go up, while the students that want to attend college suffer from the lack of opportunities given. College is a place where students experience and learn new abilities to go out into the workforce. However, with the budget cuts slamming many doors in their faces, it becomes harder for students to have hope for their futures. The budget cuts have become so ridiculous that classes are being cut from colleges, leaving only a limited amount of space in a couple of classes. Due to the cuts, classes from many community colleges and cal state universities are being cut, which diminishes the chance of graduation. Because of the lack of classes provided, it is harder to meet the graduation requirements. Through my experience in college, I’ve seen many classes closed, while others are over crowded with students still trying to add the class. The reason why they are packed is because of the limited amount of classes available. Only

a certain of number of people can add a class if they’re lucky. Students from community colleges also have it bad with getting classes. With the over flow of students, it becomes a hassle for the students to get the classes required to transfer to higher educational facilities. Having to transfer in two years is one the hardest things to do while being in community colleges because classes are fairly limited. It seems like a long process to getting the units needed to graduate when competing with others that have been waiting for years to get the same classes. Along with the cutting of classes, the tuition increase brings even more of a worry to college students. In cal states, the price of tuition have gone up to a extreme high, and it’s hard to get any support from the state to compensate. Which leave many of the students to transfer to community colleges instead because they are cheaper to attend. This leads to more overflow in the community colleges and makes it even harder for students to get their opportunities to move on to the next level towards their future.

SOURCE: www.cccco.edu

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-For the spring of 2013, Calif enrollment at most campuse pending the outcome of a pr

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PLAYER ONE: GOVERNMENT

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-The university is moving to r already made in the year 20 tax proposal fails.

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-For the spring of 2013, the fo hunded students transferring Bay, Fullerton, Los Angeles, SOURCE: calstate.edu

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Q&A with Andres Castillo Applied Technology Center College Counselor

Q. What should underclassmen do to prepare for these cuts? A. Now, more than ever, competition for UC or CSU admission will become intensified to the point that students who do not plan early enough about going to a four-year college (at least 9th grade) could only speculate about attending a state college here in California. In other words, “A-G” grade point averages will need to be a 3.2 or higher, with total SAT scores at least 1600 or higher, if a student wants to be competitive. In addition, many higher-tiered colleges rate you according to your own class standing at SHS and not the entire applicant pool.

-UC Davis: Their ac supplemental supp to help meet the ne

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Q. Do you have any suggestions for current seniors? A. Unfortunately, current seniors' hands are tied as far as the admission cycle goes because the news of the enrollment cutback was determined after the Nov. 30 application deadline. It seems that the effect of the admission cycle for seniors is fairly minimal, since the CSU system is cutting back on community college transfers for the fall of 2012. However, the most important thing to remember for seniors and since enrollment is being scrutinized; earning passing grades is definitely something all colleges will be looking at when they receive final transcripts. Remember, just because you are accepted to a four-year college, colleges can be that quick to withdraw their admission. Toying with “senioritis” is not what you should be doing during the senior year!

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tion is proposing a $215 million reduction for the 108 013. A 3.66% cut will be in effect this fall for all which in total is $97.5 million. A shortage in local property esult in a $38 million reduction in

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mmunity college classes will face an $80 million reduction

They should really think about their future, because you don’t want to get off track and suffer later.

ifornia State University Cuts

fornia State University officials announced plans to freeze es and to wait-list all applicants the for the fall of 2013 roposed tax initiative on the November ballot.

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reduce enrollment to deal with $750 million in funding cuts 011-12 and an additional $200-million cut next year if the

GABRIELA SALCEDO Senior

Stay on track with all your stuff and don’t slack off.

ollowing California State Universities will only accept a few g from community colleges: Channel Islands, Chico, East San Francisco, San Bernardino and Sonoma.

Do not procrastinate and do not hang out with the wrong crowd.

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ROMAN NINO Senior

Every grade you get on your report card can affect which colleges you get accepted to; study for SAT and do not procrastinate with your college apps.

ss sizes have increased by 33%.

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KATIE KAWAGUCHI Senior

College Breakdown

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On the nation's average in '76-'77, annual fee for college tuition for a full-time undergraduate student: $617 for a four-year in state $283 for a two-year in state On the nation's average today, annual fee for college tuition for a full-time undergraduate student: $8,244 for a four-year in state $2,963 for a two-year in state This is 8.3% higher than the '10-'11 year. *Dollars are adjusted for inflation

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cclaimed medical center has eliminated all state port for clinical care. Four sports have been eliminated eed to make $106.5 million in cuts in four years.

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and in the following five years, pension costs alone will annually. If there is no increase in either state funds or ime, campuses will have to find the equivalent of taff or 3,900 faculty to fund these expenses alone. e current cuts are as follows:

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What advice would you give to underclassman who are thinking about at-

SOURCE: collegeboard.com

Photos by KAYLA ICHIBA Graphics by EXECUTIVE BOARD & CINDY YU


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Features

Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

Another ‘egg’cuse for candies Egg-topia

Typically used to fill Easter baskets, Peeps are popular candies that sell more than 700 million each holiday. These marshmallow chicks were first made by hand in 1953 in approximately 27 hours. Today, however, they are massproduced by the Just Born Co. in about six minutes. The name “Peeps” was coined for the original shape of the candy: yellow chicks. Now, they are produced in many different colors, such as pink, lavender and blue and in various animal shapes, such as bunnies. They also come in shapes for different holidays. However, Peeps are only available in the U.S. and Canada.

In ancient times, the Egyptians, Persians, Phoenicians and Hindus believed that Earth began as an enormous egg; thus, the egg came to symbolize new life and rebirth. Easter, a Christian holiday, allowed Christians to enjoy eggs and meat after abstaining from eating meat during the Lenten season prior to Easter. In Christian faith, egg coloring was a result of the symbolism and legends associated with Christ’s death and resurrection. Egg-painting became popular in 1290 when King Edward I of England ordered 450 eggs to be gold-leafed and colored for Easter gifts. Before they were used in Easter activities, eggs were traditionally dyed or painted chicken eggs used for springtime festivals and exchange with others. However, it is now custom to use chocolate eggs or plastic eggs filled with candy. It is part of the American tradition to hide eggs on Easter morning for children, who are told that they were left by the Easter bunny, to find.

Peeps-land

Bunny M&Ms

Peeps Wreath

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Stick toothpicks into the plastic wrap and attach Peeps onto the toothpicks to make them stay. Use a variety of colors to add to the decoration.

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SOURCE: ourbestbites.com

Buy some straw (found in the floral department) and form it into a circle. Then envelop the straw in plastic wrap.

M&M’s were offered in pastel spring colors for the first time in the early 1980’s in honor of the Easter spirit. M&M’s “Speck-tacular Eggs” are speckled miniature chocolate eggs available for Easter. The “Bunny Mix” has rabbits, chicks and lambs printed on the chocolate pastel candies. M&M’s also offers candyfilled eggs and solid chocolate bunnies for the holiday.

2 Continue until the wreath is covered in peeps. Decorate the wreath with a ribbon. Be wary of display location: Peeps are perishable and may leave sugary residue. Photos by CHERISE WOO

Jelly Bean Road Boston candy maker William Schrafft developed the first jelly beans made in America. He urged people to send jelly beans to soldiers fighting in the Civil War. Jelly beans became an Easter tradition in the 1930’s. In America, 16 billion jelly beans are consumed at Easter. Photos by ALYSSA MIDDO SOURCES: marshmallowpeeps.com, infoplease.com, homecooking.about.com, m-ms.com


Entertainment

Geeks & Nerds:

From outcasts to ‘in’ crowd BY CHERISE WOO Photo Editor

If the status of “The Big Bang Theory” as the No. 1 show on television is any indication, society is becoming increasingly accepting of the once ostracized “geek” and “nerd” subcultures. People have always sought ways to identify differences between themselves and others, synthesizing labels based on anything from skin color to social cliques. In the case of the intellectually inclined, a distinction between two subgroups known as “geeks” and “nerds” has arisen, causing confusion in those who are not familiar with the innate qualities of each. Dr. Seuss’s 1950 children’s book, “If I Ran the Zoo” is noted to be the earliest appearance of the term “nerd,” though not in the context that is known today. Some theorize that it exists as a mutated version of “nert,” a slang term from the 1940’s and that it developed into a synonym for yet another 1940’s slang term, “square.” While the etymology may be contested, it is easy to see that the stereotypical nerd image was crafted by the likes of the character Steve Urkel from “Family Matters,” and the cast of “Revenge of the Nerds.” Suspenders, pocket protectors, bow-ties, and thick-rimmed glasses have all becomes integral to nerd fashion; similarly, social ineptitude and a predisposition towards being bullied by those more physically imposing have seemingly become essential components of their character. In addition, they have often been depicted as harboring a fascination with the obscure and the esoteric in a variety of fields;

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Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

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this can manifest itself as anything from an interest in astrophysics to owning a collection of Japanese video games. The term “geek,” on the other hand, was originally a word used in the 18th century to describe circus performers who bit the heads off of live chickens, among other “freak show”inspired feats. It was not used to describe obsessive-compulsive technology buffs or pop culture enthusiasts until the 1950’s, and even then the term was not in wide circulation. Following the invention of the Internet and the financial rise of programmers and computer innovators, such as Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, geeks began to become more widely recognized as a cultural force in the world, creating an explosion of “geek pride” towards the close of the 20th century. The Geek Squad, for example, is comprised of such individuals, who dress up in a quirky fashion and relish their jobs, repairing computers for a living. Common geek interests now range anywhere from cutting-edge technology (usually the latest Apple product) to the TV show “Glee” (affectionately referred to as “Gleeks”). Today, both geeks and nerds are generally considered highly intelligent individuals, but differ in that geeks exhibit obsessive interest in certain topics, while nerds tend to be more diverse in their hobbies and are characterized by varying degrees of social awkwardness. Coinciding with the rise of modern technology and the integration of once nerd- and geekexclusive interests into popular culture, the popularity of both groups has skyrocketed to the point where it is almost impossible to say that being called either is necessarily a bad thing.

If I Ran the Zoo

CINDY YU

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SOURCE: Geekwire & Dictionary.com


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Entertainment

Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

delivers powerful message to audiences

BY ALEX KANEGAWA Entertainment Editor

As the title implies, “Bully” is a documentary about bullying that aims to both educate and inspire those who watch it. After hearing years of lectures from parents about the virtues of playing nice and treating others the way you would want to be treated, coupled with experiencing the passive reaffirmation of these principles by special interest groups and school authorities, the message that “bullying is not okay” seems overemphasized and, perhaps, something that no longer needs to be said. After watching “Bully,” however, it becomes clear that this is not the case. Director Lee Hirsch illustrates the lives of five bullied youths living in the Bible Belt of America, who have all been subject to extreme abuse and neglect from peers, administrators and other members of their communities, bringing them all together to craft a message that is shocking, profound and moving. “Bully” opens with a crude, early ’90s home video footage of a toddler innocently playing in the backyard, his affectionate parents chuckling fondly as they film his adventures. Cut to the present-day, Mr. and Mrs. Long are teary-eyed and alone in their kitchen. Their son, Tyler Lee Long, would have been 19, had he not taken his own life in 2009. He was

subjected to relentless bullying prior to his death, and, according to his parents, decided that suicide was the only escape. He was found by his younger sibling, hanging in the closet. Eleven-year-old Ty Field-Smalley is a similar case, having committed suicide due to an inability to cope with the bullying. His best friend laments towards the end of the movie, “Not that many people liked Ty. But to me, he was the coolest guy in the world.” Fourteen-year-old, straight-A student Ja’Meya Jackson was incarcerated after pulling a gun on a bus full of her classmates, having endured numerous indignities ranging from verbal insults to physical assaults. Her response is painted in a sympathetic light, illustrating the extent to which bullying can ruin a person’s life in a long-lasting fashion. Kelby Johnson, a 16-year-old from Oklahoma, faces intolerance due to her sexual orientation. She is ostracized by her schoolmates, as well as the whole town, including parents, teachers and businessowners; they regard her with either thinly-veiled disdain or outright disgust. At one point, she was run over by a minivan full of hateful peers. Despite this, she remains strong in the face of adversity, and chooses to take a stand against the bigotry, serving as a strong, but equally sympathetic, contrast to Ja’Meya. While none of these kids can necessarily be considered as the film’s protagonist, 12-year-old Alex Libby is undeniably the heart of this movie; he

is a sweet, good-natured boy full of character with an endless amount of love in his heart, but almost nobody to share it with. At school, he literally has no friends, and spends the majority of his time isolated, though not of his own volition. Every day, on the bus to school, he is punched, kicked, choked and even stabbed; worse, his tormentors are completely aware of the fact that they are being filmed. “All I did was get on the bus, and sit in the back with my camera,” said Hirsch. “Sure, the kids noticed I was there, but because I wasn’t an authority figure, they ignored me and continued to beat him [Alex]. I was just some dude with a camera to them.” Because of the use of profanity in “Bully,” coupled with the violence towards children, the MPAA originally declared that the movie was to be rated R; however, The Weinstein Co., the movie’s distributor, remained adamant and fought to get the film a PG-13 rating so that it could better reach its target audience. Since neither side was willing to relent, the film has been released as NR (Not Rated) to make it available to any age group. Bullying is still a serious issue plaguing today’s society and, while it seems impossible to defeat a psychological trend through the repetition of a familiar message, we can still begin the rehabilitation process by creating a peer-crafted environment that will ultimately stigmatize this kind of behavior. “Bully” premiered on March 30 and is currently playing in select theaters only.

Logo printed with permission from THE WEINSTEIN CO.

Commentary:

Local youth find artistic niche BY KEVIN SOTO Staff Writer

Suppose art is a teenager; what then? I am standing outside an apartment complex, cold breeze spraying my face. The art show would not start for another half hour, so I paid my entrance, had someone scribble on my hand with a Sharpie, and wandered around in the empty lot behind the complex. The air smelled deliciously of paint, cinnamon (candles? incense?), and creation. The artists, each in his domain, were setting up the canvases and pieces that were for sale. Others were doodling away to kill time before the bands started playing. Alumni Scarlet Peralta and senior Waldo Ricardo decided to curate a show at the latter’s house, showcasing local bands and artists. Ricardo, a good friend of mine and an outstanding artist in his own right, invited me to what he assured would be a great night. Despite the gig shutting down early by police due to curmudgeonly neighbors’ noise complaints, the night was inspiring in its own way. Had I not spent my money on the $2 entrance fee and a couple of suspicious-looking tacos, I surely would have bought several works. Most of the artists were seniors at Schurr, with a couple of alumni and others I did not know. James King was painting away at a canvas with a focused determination that more or less alienated him from the others. I watched him whip up half of a Warholian piece before wandering around to talk to the other artists.

Victor Martinez painted a gas-mask-wearing specter on an unhinged door with “SAVAGE” written across on it. “It’s abstract,” said Vic (as we all affectionately refer to him), “I want to convey my vision of society as a terrifying place with an underlying beauty.” Looking around further, I was intrigued by the art of senior Marcos Aspeitia. First off, his art stood out for not carrying a heavy street art influence a la Banksy or Shepard Fairey. Instead, he made use of bright, primary colors and eerie, surreal subjects. I noticed a portrait of a skeleton dressed in Mexican attire. Asked what influenced him, Marcos said, “The Mexican aesthetic and the whole ‘Day of the Dead’ thing was an inspiration, sure, but I’m pretty much inspired by everything: music, things I see in the street… Inspiration is everywhere.” I also noticed an obsession with the eye, which led me to suspect influences from art brut or Bataille. Were these young students at their artistic maturity, like Rimbaud, creating masterpieces at a tender age that probed the nether regions of the soul? Perhaps not. The pervading influence of street art proved detrimental to several of the artists’ works. Yet, most of the artists were able to filter these influences through their own unique and surreal visions. With some training and further artistic exploration, some of these young painters could reach blinding heights of artistry. Still, it is a beautiful thing to see: a community of young artists supporting each other’s work, feeding upon the collective creativity going on that night.

“My favorite Guatemalen dish is called pepian, which is comprised of chicken and vegetables, along with rice, covered in a delicious sauce mixed in with a lot of other ingredients that my mom adds. I love the chicken, especially the sauce. It tastes great when you mix it together.” Sulema Gomez Sophomore

Photo by CHERISE WOO


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ntertainment

Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

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Forecast calls for ‘shaved snow’ storm Nearby Locations Phoenix Price range: $5.50-$6.50 Address: 500 N. Atlantic Blvd. Monterey Park Hours: Monday-Sunday 11 a.m.-1 a.m.

Salju

Price range: $3-$6 Address: 35 W. Valley Blvd. (Suite B) Alhambra

SNOWY DELIGHT: Mango shaved snow provides abundant flavor and refreshment on hot days.

BY KATIE NISHIDA Entertainment Editor

Fluffy and light with a creamy texture and topped with various ingredients, shaved snow has enthralled the taste buds of many people. Unlike Hawaiian shaved ice, which consists only of ice and either flavored syrup or condensed milk, shaved snow has a snow-like texture similar to that of ice cream rather than the icy texture found in Hawaiian shaved ice. The flavor is also much more pleasant compared to shaved ice, since milk is incorporated into the snow, creating a more flavorful taste; various ingredients, such as fruits and pudding, can also be added into the snow, making it more appealing than shaved ice. Often called bao bing, shaved snow originated in Taiwan and has drastically evolved over time. The original Taiwanese shaved ice consisted of just ice and toppings, finished off with a drizzle of condensed milk.

However, with the creation of shaved snow, which contains sweeter ingredients, the Taiwanese dessert has become much more enjoyable, compared to the original plain ice that was used to make the dessert. Previously prepared by using a block of ice and an ice shaver, it is now made by freezing milk into the ice and then carefully shaving it to produce the light, fluffy texture. It is available with a variety of toppings, such as sprinkles, mochi, Oreo crumbs and chocolate chips; however, fruits like mangoes and strawberries are the most popular. To add to the taste, different flavors, such as strawberry, green tea, chocolate and mango, can be added into the snow itself prior to shaving the ice. Local, popular shaved snow locations include Fluff Ice, Salju, Phoenix and Pa Pa Walk. Fluff Ice and Phoenix are both conveniently located at Atlantic Times Square, but Fluff Ice has more flavors, compared

to Phoenix, and is more reasonably priced. Salju, located in Alhambra, has six different flavors of snow and 30 different toppings to choose from, but compared to Fluff Ice, the texture of the snow is much less thick and not quite as sweet. San Gabriel’s Pa Pa Walk is most known for the size and taste, offering large portions and sweettasting snow. However, it does not offer a wide variety of flavors to select from. Although the growing popularity of shaved snow is easily comparable to the popularity of frozen yogurt, the sweet and light texture of shaved snow differs tremendously from frozen yogurt. Whereas frozen yogurt is a bit more striking in taste, shaved snow is faint on the tongue and easily delectable. Not only are there many shaved snow locations in the area at reasonable prices, the soft texture and the large array of toppings and flavors make this a dessert that is worth trying.

Hours: MondayThursday, Sunday 12 p.m.-11 p.m. Friday- Saturday 12 p.m.- 12 a.m.

Le Arbre

Price range: $4-$9

Address: 8508 E. Valley Blvd. (Suite 101) Rosemead Hours: Monday, Wednesday- Sunday 12 p.m.- 1 a.m. Photos by KAYLA ICHIBA & CHERISE WOO

BY KAYLA ICHIBA Managing Editor

Committing toward goals

The wind bites at my face as I race through my neighborhood; my surroundings blur as I pedal down the

street as fast as my feet can take me. I slowly ease off my pace and lean into the curve, so that I can precisely stop right before I hit my driveway. I can picture myself riding a bike. Yes, it is only a fantasy: I cannot ride a bike. Yes, I know I am a senior. Yes, I know I’m going to college soon, where riding a bike seems essential. Riding a bike seems to be a prerequisite for childhood; everyone has experienced the signature childhood moment: parents riding alongside their child and accidently “letting go” so that the child can realize that he or she is riding all by themselves. Majority of children have had this memory, but this idea is just something I cannot recall. I have always wanted to learn, I just never got around to it. Thus, I have been on the bike-learning journey for the last 12 years. I began on the road of bicycle mastery like any other child: with training wheels. My grandma spoiled me with a sparkling violet and pink training bike, complete with streamer handles, a basket and even a working bell. I easily mastered the three-wheeled contraption, but on the brink of graduating toward taking off the training wheels, the bike broke. My dad promised my 7-year-old self that he would fix it the following week, but it remained broken for the next 10 years. I continued on and the bicycling priority slipped my mind as I focused on school and basketball. My younger sister soon learned how to ride a bike, accomplishing the feat years prior to when I ever would. Before I knew it, I was a high school student that did not know how to ride a bike.

I admit that the thought of learning how to ride a bike scares me a bit. Although I am, at times, embarrassed at the fact that I do not know how to do such a simple task and desperately wish to change that, I am hesitant to learn. The older I get, the scarier the task seems. I have attempted to ride a bike only once, and I was rewarded with a scraped elbow and bruised knees (My relationship with gravity is not the greatest) and have not tried again since. However, with college and moving away from home looming in the distance and approaching in the next couple months, I have come to the realization that I will be forced to learn, even if that means against my will. I am set on learning before the start of the fall school year. I have said countless times before that I will learn, but I have never followed through. My friends have attempted to helping me learn, but I was always able to find an excuse or somehow avoid the situation. Walt Disney once said, “The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing,” and that is exactly what I intend to do. The discussion of learning how to ride a bike will not help me learn; I have to go out and do it. I have to back up my talk with actions. I will actually get myself on the bike. I will learn this time. By making this commitment to myself, I know I will be able to accomplish my goal. So, by the end of spring break, I am expecting to have gained a couple of scrapes here and there, but also the of accomplishment and satisfaction of at last knowing how to ride a bike.


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Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

Mittmen make ‘runs’ for victories BY DIANA MORALES Sports Editor

CHERISE WOO

OUT OF THE BOX: Senior Jacob Ramirez dashes toward first base while playing Montebello at home March 23.

Going into today’s home game with a league record of 2-4, the varsity mittmen will face the Bell Gardens Lancers for the third time this season. The Spartans defeated the Lancers, 2-0, April 3. On March 30, they faced the Alhambra Moors but were defeated, 10-4. Within the game, the team made three runs during the sixth inning and one run during the seventh inning. The Spartans played the San Gabriel Matadors and lost, 5-0, March 29. On March 23, they lost against the Montebello Oilers, 5-1, but beat the Mark Keppel Aztecs, 3-1, March 20. They made one run during the first inning against the Oilers. Against the Aztecs, the Spartans scored two runs in the sixth inning and one in the seventh inning. “We have been having trouble scoring runs. You can’t win a high school varsity game without any runs,” said Head Coach Kenneth Marrero. “What we need to do is start winning some games in order to make it to playoffs. We are currently 100 points lower than what we had during the last season.” The Spartans played their first league game against the Lancers March 16, losing 8-4. They scored one run each during the first and second innings and two runs

during the third inning, allowing the Lancers to win. The JV mittmen will also play against the Lancers away today. On April 3, they won against the Lancers, 10-5. They suffered a loss against the Alhambra Moors, 96, March 30, but beat the Matadors, 16-1, March 29. The Spartans tied with the Oilers, 8-8, March 23 but defeated both the Aztecs, 4-3, and the Lancers, 142, March 20 and 16, respectively. “They [the team] are playing with heart. I expect them to win every game from here on now by practicing hard and playing hard,” said JV Coach David Torres. The freshman team will face the Lancers today. They had previously won against the Lancers, 8-5, April 3. On March 30, they lost to the Moors, 9-1, but they beat the Matadors, 10-0, March 27. The Mark Keppel Aztecs forfeited March 20, since they do not have a freshman team. The Spartans won their first game of the season against the Lancers, 9-2, March 16. They lost their preseason games against the Whittier Cardinals, 5-4 and 11-0, March 13 and 10, respectively. “We only have 11 players, and they’re playing very well,” said Freshman Coach Frank Gonzalez. “I expect them to get better by the time they face Alhambra and Montebello again.”

Netters experience unforseen difficulties BY MICHELE WONG Cartoonist

Competing in their first home game of the season with a 1-2 league record, the varsity netters will face the Mark Keppel Aztecs April 17. The team fell short 9-9 (83-76) in their match against the Alhambra Moors in an away game March 29. Singles No. 1 Matthew Lin contributed the most set wins, 6-3, 6-0 and 6-4. Singles No. 2 Zachary Grau and No. 3 Nicholas Hanashiro each won a set, 6-1 and 6-3, respectively. Doubles No. 1 team of Joshua Grau and Saul Tejeda won two games, 7-5 and 6-2. Doubles No. 2 team of Brandon Fujishima and Derrick Lieu won one match, 7-6, while Doubles No. 3 team of Miguel Cortez and Taylor Honda won one set, 6-4. “For singles, I feel like I need to rely on my own ability,” said Z. Grau. The Spartans toppled the San Gabriel Matadors, 11-7, March 22. Lin dominated his opponents, 6-0, 6-0 and 6-1. Z. Grau posted three wins, 6-1, 6-4 and 6-4, while Hanashiro contributed two points, 7-6 and 6-3. J. Grau and Tejeda won two sets, 6-3 and 6-2, while Cortez and Honda won one set, 6-3. Beginning season, the varsity netters faced the Montebello Oilers March 20 and were initially victorious, 17-1, but violation of a CIF rule led to a forfeit of the contest. Because a sophomore team member transferred from Montebello High to Schurr this school year with uncleared CIF paperwork, an unnoted disqualification to participate in varsity matches led to the forfeit. However,

the previous preseason matches will not be relinquished. Although the student is now under limited eligibility to play only as a JV member for this season, he will have complete eligibility to play for varsity next year. “I expect us [the team] to go undefeated and win first place in league regardless of the forfeit because of all our preseason victories and win against San Gabriel High School,” said Head Coach Andrew Lee. Ending preseason on a good note, the varsity team conquered the La Serna Lancers, 13-5, March 15. Singles No. 1 Lin won all three sets, 60, 6-2 and 6-0; No. 2 Z. Grau also obtained three wins, 6-1, 6-3 and 6-4, while No. 3 Hanashiro contributed one win, 6-2. Doubles No. 1 J. Grau CHERISE WOO and Tejeda also won three sets, 6-2, 6-1 and 6-0.; No. 2 Maxon Earl and Fujishima defeated two POWERFUL RICOCHET: Senior Joshua Grau returns the opponents, 7-6 and 7-5, while No. 3 Cortez and ball across the net against Arroyo High School March 12. Honda won one set, 7-6. The team defeated the South Pasadena Tigers, The team prevailed over the Moors, 12-6, March 29. 13-5, March 13. Singles No. 1 Lin won all three sets, 6-0, Singles No. 1 Maxon Earl defeated his opponents, 6-4, 6-0 and 6-1; No. 2 Z. Grau also won all his sets, 6-4, 6-2 6-0 and 6-1, while Singles No. 2 Benedict Salvanera won and 6-1, whereas No. 3 Hanashiro defeated his opponent two sets, 6-0 and 6-1. Doubles No. 1 team of Gary Cheng with scores of 6-1, 7-5 and 6-4. Doubles No. 1 J. Grau and and Andy Lam and Doubles No. 2 team of Justin Lee and Tejeda beat two opponents, 6-2 and 6-0; No. 2 Fujishima Tony Lee bageled all of their opponents, 6-0. The Doubles and Lieu snatched one win, 6-1, while No. 3 Cortez and Earl No. 3 substitute players Billy Chu and Christopher Ngov contributed another point, 6-3. contributed another win, 6-1. Striving to improve their 3-4 record in their eighth Competing with the Matadors March 22, the JV players match, the JV netters will also compete with the Aztec lost 12-6. The team defeated the Oilers March 20, 13-5. April 17 away. Against the Lancers March 15, the team lost 10-8.

Linksters work to better overall scores BY TREVOR QUAN

Assistant Photo Editor

TREVOR QUAN

ON COURSE: Sophomore Lexi Guerrero tees off at Rio Hondo against Downey March 29.

FOR

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Last issue, Sprints/Hurdles Coach Michelle Odono was misidentified as Lauren Odono.

Seeking to improve, the linksters will face the Warren Bears at Rio Hondo Golf Course April 17. The team lost to the Montebello Oilers at the Montebello Golf Course April 2, 215-267 (low score wins in golf). The linksters compete in three different groups. In the first group, senior Ryan Kang scored 43, and junior Travis Quan got 48. In the second group, sophomore Lexi Guerrero scored 53, and senior Thomas Sun, 54. In the third group, junior Trevor Quan scored 69. “I would like to have better overall scores, but we are getting better every match,” said Head Coach Ben Negrete. “Hopefully at the end of season we will be able to compete at the same level as the other schools. I am pleased by the effort the team is making and it shows in the end.” The Spartans lost to the Downey Vikings at Rio Hondo Golf Course March 29, 196-278. They lost to the Gahr Gladiators at La Mirada Golf Course March 27, 197-272. Starting the season, they were also defeated by the Vikings at the Montebello Golf Course March 19, 212-262. “We are a very young team that has a lot of room for improvement,” said Kang. “So far, we have been getting better, but we have lots of things we still have to learn.”

“The day before a meet, it’s good to eat lasagna because it gives you high carbohydates.” Swim Coach Jordan Lee

“Don’t eat pizza because it weighs you down and you achieve little by eating greasy foods.”


15 S Melendez ‘builds’ himself into icon ports

Spartan Scroll April 5. 2012

BY JOESON CHIANG

To prepare for the West Coast Classic, Melendez plans to work more on his thighs and calves. He will also start toning more on his upper body and work on Honing his appearance, senior Emilio Melendez his poses when spring starts. He follows the bulker’s poses through bodybuilding contests, such as the West workout, in which he eats excessively to gain weight and Coast Classic, striving to becoming like his idol, Arnold then cuts down during the spring by following a strict diet and workout routine. Schwarzenegger, during his prime. “I enjoy the time you put in and the sweat you “I got inspired by bodybuilding at age 16 because I wanted to get bigger, leading me to quit football. I knew go through to look great after your workout,” said it was what I wanted to do after I stayed up one night to Melendez. “There are times you just want to quit but you don’t because of what you can lift. There’s see a bodybuilding competition,” said Melendez. “I much to love about it.” started doing my research on bodybuilding and Melendez trains every day, except from then on, I felt that it was meant to be.” weekends, at school in the weight room. Melendez found his motivation through He takes a variety of over-the-counter Schwarzenegger and James “Flex” Lewis. supplements, including prohormones, According to Melendez, Schwarzenegger’s which enhance the strength of hormones determination is an inspiration that helps already present in the body, and liver drive him to his goals and gives him an detox to relieve the liver from the incentive to keep going with his prohormones’ effects. He also takes bodybuilding career. amino acid supplements to Melendez has competed in the control the proteins his muscles Muscle Beach Venice Classic intake, especially when twice, placing fifth and first. drinking protein shakes. He also placed 15th in the Melendez’s daily workout Mr. New Mexico competition includes five sets each of and won the 2011 Amateur flat bench, incline bench, Pose-Off competition in curls and hammer curls. New Mexico. In these “It [bodybuilding] contests, judges decide changed my life the winners based completely,” said on the participants’ Melendez. “I wouldn’t pose, technique, have had anything else size, definition and to do, and I probably proportion. In June, would get in trouble a he plans to compete in lot,” said Melendez. the West Coast Classic. Although he typically “My most memorable enters competitions at the memory was getting invited to the amateur level, Melendez plans to West Coast Classic competition compete at a professional standard as a professional and not as an more often so that he can become amateur,” said Melendez. “It felt CHERISE WOO an icon for youngsters, like I was finally doing like Schwarzenegger was what I always wanted FIERCE FLEX: Displaying his physique, senior Emilio to him. to do with my life.” Melendez poses as he does during his competitions.

Sports Editor

CHERISE WOO

NO PAIN, NO GAIN: Senior Emilio Melendez continues his weightlifting training in preparation for a competition.

Bodybuilding History • “Strongmen,” the original bodybuilders, were almost all overweight; in the late 1800’s the sport represented strength, not physique.

• Modern bodybuilding began under Eugene Sandow, who created the “The Great Show,” the world’s first official bodybuilding contest in Europe in 1891. • Mr. Universe and Mr. Olympia competitions, the first major bodybuilding contests, were founded in 1950 by the National Amateur Bodybuilders Association and in 1965 by the IFBB, respectively. • The use of anabolic steroids have overshadowed natural bodybuilding during the past few decades, as the popularity of bodybuilding increased. SOURCE: bodybuilding.com

Swim improves through season BY KARINA REYNAGA Reporter

Hoping for strong performances, the swim team will travel for a league meet at Montebello today. The team will also have meets April 17 against Bell Gardens and April19 against Gabrielino. “For the next meet, I think we’ll beat Montebello. Varsity girls are good, and the boys are in the process [of improvement],” said Head Coach Jordan Lee. The varsity girls competed in Alhambra Park pool against the Alhambra Moors March 29, losing 76-62. “Varsity girls lost because the team is so small. That’s one of our biggest weaknesses,” said Lee. The team won

SHANNON CHU Visual Arts Editor

From pictures to words I hit “print” and waited. With perked ears, I listened for the hum of the printer and rubbed the behemoth machine, with my editor in chief’s voice echoing in my head, “If you rub it, it works better.” The printer started, churning its gears, and I sighed in relief. The document processed smoothly from the printer tray, and after all three pages were printed, like bread baked fresh from the oven, I brought the paper to my face to inhale the sweet smell of success. Until seven months ago, I never would have felt such gratification over a printed word document. I used to hate writing, much less writing about myself. The words “write about” or “explain why” were always met with apathetic whines and sighs. My interests as a child were directed towards art. Sunday mornings meant family and the Los Angeles

the rest of the divisions at their meet at Alhambra Park, with the JV girls, JV boys and varsity boys scoring 113-35, 76-70 and 90-73, respectively. On March 27, the Spartans competed against San Gabriel at Rosemead Park. However, the team lost all of the individual and relay events, with JV girls scoring 113-35, JV boys 59-91, varsity girls 81-70 and varsity boys 96-67. “The rest of the season, we have to get the team stronger and each individual team member to improve his or her time,” said JV Coach Lisa Hughes. On March 15, the Spartans competed with La Canada. away. Currently, the team is using the pool at East Los Angeles College some days and the Montebello High pool on others pending completion of the Schurr pool.

Times: my brother and I competed for the comics section, eager to be the first to giggle at the illustrations. From this, I developed an artistic interest and begged my parents to enroll me in art class. Tired of my nagging, they acquiesced and signed me up for one at my Chinese school. Finger painting and copying pictures soon evolved into original artwork. I doodled in notebooks and in the white spaces of my homework; art was my form of escape, as writing was for others. My infatuation followed me to high school, but instead of taking an art course, my brother persuaded me to sign up for journalism class. Prior to this decision, I would exasperatedly try to fight his suggestions, unwilling to take a class that revolved around writing. I was finally convinced when he said that it would improve my writing and that at the end of the year, I could try out to be a cartoonist on the newspaper staff. Miraculously, I survived the year in class, constantly motivating myself with the possibility of being cartoonist. For the next two years, I joined the Spartan Scroll staff as a cartoonist. Late nights were spent with my “Scroll family” doing what I knew best. Together, the staff traveled to participate in local and national competitions in places as near as Anaheim and as far away as Portland, OR. The only catch was that every quarter I was required to write an article (it was journalism after all). Journalism gave me the chance to share my art and helped me grow as an artist. Come senior year, it was inevitable that I tried out for the position one last time. At the end of the year banquet, the then-current

ALYSSA MIDDO

SPEEDY STROKE: Senior Pasadyne Ly slices through the water against Alhambra March 29.

Spartan Scroll staff gathered for dinner, speeches, awards and, the most anticipated event of the evening—the announcement of the next year’s staff. As the night drew on, whispers of whom people predicted to get this or that position slowly ceased. Finally, it was time, and little did I know, I was in for a surprise. When the outgoing executive board announced my name as this year’s Visual Arts Editor instead of cartoonist, I made an effort to stand up on my legs and plaster a smile onto my face. As the applause died and I sat back down in my seat, I tried to digest the information: I was no longer a cartoonist, but a visual arts editor; the phrase sounded foreign to my ears. This meant no more careful outlining, adding detail and shading in illustrations; the new position bestowed upon me the duty of writing a column for every newspaper issue. Writer’s block is a frequent (and unwelcome) visitor, and at times, I want nothing more than to close my eyes and open them to magically find myself with a pencil in hand and a blank sheet of paper in front of me waiting to be filled with illustrations. Taking a step back, though, and seeing how far I have gotten with journalism, I know I did not lose anything when I tried out for cartoonist. My brother was right; journalism improved my writing. Each 700-word column brings more reassurance of my abilities and a growing affection for writing. It is not the same as drawing, but writing has provided me with another outlet to express myself; it is a different art form. I often find that I have too much to say, exceeding not only word limits, but also my own expectations.


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Spartan Scroll April 5, 2012

Young tracksters stride ahead BY TRISTAN BROSSY DE DIOS Sports Editor

Now in an all-out struggle to dominate the Almont League, the tracksters will compete at Montebello High today. Although they started the season behind their pace from the previous year, the relatively young varsity teams managed to steal a victory from the Mark Keppel Aztecs while competing at home March 29. The varsity boys won, 94-33, while the varisty girls won, 79-43. Their second league meet, the win over the Aztecs gave the tracksters momentum, improving both the varsity boys’ and the varsity girls’ league records to 1-1. During the first meet of the season March 22, both the varsity boys and girls lost to the Bell Gardens Lancers, statistically one of the more successful teams in the league. The final score was close for the varsity boys, 67-60, but the Spartans, placing behind the Lancers in the relay races, fell behind in track event points. Similarly, the varsity girls lost, 79-62, in the competition. “Our team is relatively young and inexperienced, and therefore our two varsity divisions aren’t where I would like them to be at this point in time,” said Head Coach Manuel Quintero, who is also new to his position. Formerly the throwing coach, he is currently in his first year as head coach of the team. This season, the Spartans are also without a pole vault coach, since the event will not be scored for points during meets. “Our league does not score the event in the competitions because not

every school has a pole vault team,” said Quintero. In comparison to the varsity teams, the frosh/soph teams scored far better than their competitors, beating both the Aztecs and the Lancers to obtain current league records of 2-0. The frosh/soph boys scored 110-11 against Mark Keppel and 87-36 against Bell Gardens, while the frosh/soph girls’ scored 85-52 and 95-31 against the Aztecs and the Lancers, respectively. Although the Spartans’ frosh/soph divisions have generally won more championships than their varsity counterparts in the past, this season’s team contains some of the fastest tricksters, like up-and-coming distance runner Thomas Browning. As a freshman, Browning has surpassed the times of many varsity runners. “He can compete with us in varsity even though he’s barely a freshman,” said senior Chris Calaguing, distance captain. Due to rain, the 2nd annual Rosemead Track Invitational, originally planned for March 17, was postponed until April 14. The tracksters’ second invitational of the year, the Rosemead Track Invitational would have been one of only two occasions for the team’s members to earn medals, aside from League Finals. All tracksters competed against Pioneer High School March 15 during preseason, but no scores were kept. “The team just needs to continue to improve on a weekly basis,” said Quintero. “By the end of the year, the kids will be performing at their peak levels.”

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All photos by KAYLA ICHIBA

UNITED AS ONE: 1) Sophomore Javier Rosas rounds the corner, 100m away from the finish. 2) Tony Saucedo, freshman, catapults a shotput into the air. 3) Junior Mehmet Babaoglu hurdles his way against Aztec opponents, March 29.

Softball strives to succeed BY SARAI JARAMILLO Copy Editor

TREVOR QUAN

RIGHT OFF THE MOUND: Junior Raeleen Fuentes pitches the ball, striking out her Mayfield opponent during the March 20 home game.

With two wins under their belts, the varsity softball girls left for a tournament in Las Vegas yesterday and will return April 8. “The Vegas tournament allows the girls to play teams not only from California but from Utah, Nevada and Arizona,” said Assistant Coach Timothy Rother. “It is also a good team bonding experience. The girls spend a lot of time together and get to know each other outside of softball.” Entering league with a preseason record of 6-5, the Spartans beat the Mark Keppel Aztecs, 10-2, March 29. “We all backed each other up,” said junior Breanna Bolanos. “We helped correct each other if we made errors.” The varsity softball players dominated the Bell Gardens Lancers, 20-2, March 27. “We’ve had two really strong performances, which shows that we really prepared in the preseason for league,”

said Head Coach Jaqueline Montanez. “Our main goal is to not get complacent and keep striving to get a 10-0 record in league.” Beginning preseason with a 3-1 victory over the Alemany Warriors March 6 and ending with a 6-5 loss to the Garden Grove Argos March 23, the Spartans played challenging non-league teams. “I am very pleased with how we performed against top-rated programs,” said Montanez. “We’ve played teams that are CIF winners or ranked No. 1 in their division and beat them.” The JV team played the John Muir Mustangs yesterday, but scores were not available at press time. They hold a preseason record of 5-3 and a league record of 2-0. “I feel that the preseason really gave us an opportunity to come together as a team,” said JV Head Coach Amber Ackerman. “We have girls that are playing very well right now, which is good since we won our first two games in league.” The Spartans defeated the Mark Keppel Aztecs, 12-0, March 29 and beat the Bell Gardens Lancers, 13-0, March 27.

Spikers encounter rough start BY ALYSSA MIDDO Business Manager

Seeking improvement, the varsity spikers look to utilize spring break for more practice time in hopes of gaining their first league win against Mark Keppel April 17. “We’ve had a few struggles. Our record is not what we really want,” said Head Coach Marco Ramirez. “The kids are working through and fighting hard every match. We’re trying to build on the positives.” Previously, the spikers competed against the Alhambra Moors March 29, but lost, 3-0. The Spartans were defeated by the Bell Gardens Lancers March 27, in close matches, 3-2. Off to a good start, the spikers worked together to clinch the first and third set, but the team could not maintain the advantage during the second, fourth and fifth set, resulting in their loss that day. On March 22, the Spartans were beaten by the San Gabriel Matadors, 3-0. To start

off league, the spikers took on the Montebello Oilers March 20, but lost, 3-0. Ending preseason, the spikers faced the Sierra Vista Dons March 16 and lost after an attempt to rally back, 3-1. “I’m really proud of how far we have come. We are really showing some improvements, and I’m looking forward to finishing the season strong,” said Damian Gray, senior captain. “With help from our great coaches, Ramirez, Ruiz and Vo, I know we’re headed in the right direction.” Looking to gain another win in the first round of league, the JV spikers continue to practice for their next match. On March 29, the JV spikers defeated the Alhambra Moors, 2-0 but lost to the Bell Gardens Lancers March 27, San Gabriel Matadors March 22 and Montebello Oilers March 20, all with scores of 2-0. “We had a rough start, but it’s barely the beginning,” said Jacob Gallegos, sophomore captain. “Season is not over, and I have faith in us.”

ALYSSA MIDDO

UP & OVER: Acting just a moment quicker than his Lancer opponent, senior Giovanni Martinez spikes the volleyball over the net March 20.


Spartan Scroll Issue 9