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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1 OMOTESANDO STREET Historical evolution Meiji Temple

Small scale

Acces to Meiji Temple

Destruction 1939/45

Omotesando bis Reconstruction

Olympic Games 1964

Developement

Commercial avenue

FLAGSHIP STORE AVENUE Omotesando nowadays 80


PART II: PROJECTS > OMOTESANDO

Olympic Games equipements

Yoyogi park Harajuku station

Meiji Temple

Flagship stores big scale in street font

Commercial Typology

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1

3. ANALYSIS STREET NETWORK Automobile and pedestrian flow Two circulation systems prevail: the automobile flow and the pedestrian flow. The first system moves solely along a horizontal axis in the centre of the avenue, completed by two main perpendicular streets. The secondary roads are often shared spaces with the pedestrian flow. The second system, the pedestrians, mainly uses the congested sidewalk and the secondary roads as mentioned above.

Perpendiculars of Omotesando street section

There is a clearly noticeable disruption in the diagonal pedestrian circulation: The possibilities of a fluid and continuous flow from one side to the other of the avenue are rare (there are only three pedestrian footbridges).

Meiji dori section

Omotesando section 82


PART II: PROJECTS > OMOTESANDO

Espace Roadroutier system Espace routier

Espace piéton Espace piéton system Pedestrian

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N°1

URBAN FABRIC Three different morphological segments are visible:

M

Segment 1

Meiji dori

Harajuku M

Yoyogi

Omotesando Street

Segment 2

Ayoma do ri

Meiji dori

Station Harajuku (rail+metro) Yoyogi park entrance, sport complex, Shops, Access to Omotesando.

M

Ayoma do ri

Omotesando, Flagship stores, Built commerical front, ‘Show window’ front, Access to metro.

Segment 3 ???

M Omotesando BIS

Omotesando Bis, Mixed-use.

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housing

‘alternative’ shop

budget store

Harajuku station

The first segment is a vital mobility node for the avenue, i.e. access to the Yamanote line, etc. Budget stores progressively flood the urban fabric and the ‘alternative’ shops supervene to the detriment of housing and the flagship stores.

‘alternative’ shop

budget store

housing

flagship store

The second segment is caracterized by a strong density of flagship stores thus presenting the true symbol of the entire avenue. The residential area is continually cut back by the evergrowing alternative scene. In parallel, there is an upcoming development of competitive budget stores that that imitate the flagship store image and strategies in hopes of replacing them entirely.

flagship store

‘alternative’ shop

mixed-use

housing

The final segment of the avenue is difficult to put in relation with the rest of Omotesando aveue. Apart of its administrative name, there are no physical or morphological characteristics that resemble the two precedent segments of the avenue. This circumstance attracts a new type of flagship store: the flagship store of the alternative scene. 85


TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1

4. ISSUES AUTOMOBILE INFRASTRUCTURE The car occupies the majority of the avenue and forms a visible barrier to the possible diagonal pedestrian circulation; the pedestrians are thus forced to remain on their sidewalks that eventually turn into a congested pedestrian corridor.

Pedestrian and road traffic Road Pedestrian

Current situation

Optimal situation

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THE DEATH OF LUXURY In ten years time, the sell rate of luxury items is expected to decrease by two thirds. In these conditions, one questions the sustainability of the luxury market in Omotesando. To function, a flagship store needs to continually renew itself and foresee changes of its concept. In this way the pedestrian will have the impression of rediscovering the store, navigating through it to distinguish the changes. Is it not necessary to assure the survival of the flagship stores face to face with the bargain bins; and to save the housing units face to face with the alternative scene? A balance cannot be found by forcing the elements of the avenue into a face to face proximity. By attributing a real space to the alternative scene of the avenue, the housing situation will be preserved and new view points, confrontations, and neighborhoods will in return preserve the flagship stores.


PART II: PROJECTS > OMOTESANDO

Conjunctural situation

Voids, potential space

Projected situation

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1

5. STRATEGY In addition to the general idea of reestablishing the historic perspective along the avenue, the topography defines a possible new space that spands the length of one kilometer and that permits the expression of the dualities.

OMOTESANDO AVENUE

Topography Height differential: 14 m

Longitudinal section (current situation)

Projected level: passage as a viaduct (horizontal level at 33m altitude)

Transversal sections (restored traditional views) 88


PART II: PROJECTS > OMOTESANDO PERSPECTIVE

FLOW

URBAN FORM

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N°1

Position of the store entrances

Visual and physical links between the store entrances (from door to door, from facade front to facade fron

Pedestrian passage way (1,2m) - Car traffic passage way (3 à 6m)

Negative space of the circulation space: spaces vacant for potential buildings

Plan (project basis)

Modular types of buildings - housing (‘alternative’ shops) - elements of urban furniture - structure of the viaduct - vertical access structures 90


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nt)

+

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1 Zoom 1 view of top level

view of bottom level

Zoom 2 view of top level

view of bottom level

Zoom 3 view of top level

view of bottom level

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PART II: PROJECTS > OMOTESANDO The present density of the stores along the avenue creates a high density of transversal circulation flow which subsequently creates a series of publics spaces, which in return generate a high circulation density. In this way, a balance between the store density and the built/ housing/ programmed space is introduced. New unique situations naturally develop along the walkway allowing for new discoveries and events.

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View of the public space (zoom 1) 94


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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1

View of the public space (zoom 2)

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View of the elevation seen along Omotesando (zoom 3)

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N°1

ROPPONGI Roppongi is a district of Minato, Tokyo, Japan, famous as home to the rich Roppongi Hills area and an active nightclub scene. Many foreign embassies are located in Roppongi, and the nightlife is known to be popular with westerners; though the vast majority of visitors and residents are Japanese and other Asians. It is in the southern portion of the circle described by the Yamanote Line, south of Akasaka and north of Azabu. After World War II, during which the area was completely destroyed by aerial bombing raids, the United States Army and Allied government officials occupied several facilities in the area, beginning Roppongi’s reputation as a foreigner neighborhood. Several large US military installations were located in the nearby area, with Hardy Barracks probably the most significant. In large part due to the US military presence, the area soon became crowded with Western-oriented shops, bars, restaurants, prostitution establishments and «hostess bars.» Starting in the late 1960s, Roppongi became popular among Japanese and foreigners alike for its disco scene, which attracted many of Tokyo’s entertainment elites. Contributing to the international scene was the location of several foreign embassies and foreign corporate offices in the Roppongi area. However, many dance clubs shut down in the recession following the market crash of 1989. The Roppongi area received a major economic boost in 2002–2003 when the Izumi Garden Tower and the Roppongi Hills high-rise complexes were completed. These projects brought high-end office and condominium space to Roppongi for the first time. The Tokyo Midtown project, which was completed in 2006, and which includes the first Tokyo Ritz-Carlton Hotel, continued this trend. Roppongi Hills Mori Tower at night is an area with numerous bars, nightclubs, strip clubs, restaurants, hostess clubs, cabarets, and other forms of entertainment. Among the Western expatriate community, the area tends to be favored by business people, students, and off-duty US military personnel. Overall though, the neighborhood caters to a younger crowd. In the past, Roppongi had a reputation as an area with high Yakuza presence, whether as customers at Roppongi establishments, conducting business, or managing or owning clubs and bars in the area. Although still exerting some influence in Roppongi, in recent times they appear to have shifted much oftheir presence to other districts in the Tokyo area.

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1

ROPPONGI RETHINKING THE TOKYOITE CENTER

Can an ugly avenue invaded by highway turn into the new landscape spine of Tokyo?

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ROPPONGICORE: Rethinking the tokyoite center Pierre Escobar

1. SUMMARY Roppongi is a major sub center in central Tokyo. However, this district is marked by the urban ambiguities and contradictions within itself and its relation to the rest of the city. These controversial characteristics have inspired the interest in this project. Roppongi is situated in central Tokyo, along the expressway linking Shibuya and Tokyo station and enclosed by the Yamanote train line. After World War II the American Army was stationed in this area. As a consequence this district became the most westernized part of Tokyo and accommodates many foreign embassies, resulting in a popular district. Roppongi has a wide spread reputation for its nightlife and clubs. In recent years, multiple large scale mixed use projects have developed in Roppongi, such as the Tokyo Midtown and the Roppongi Hills. These developments have been criticized for destroying the traditional urban tissue while privatizing the public space.

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N°1

The Roppongi Core project focuses on three controversial aspects of Roppongi: Firstly, Roppongi presents itself as a crucial sub-center in Tokyo despite its lack of necessary mobility connections which are the criteria for a sub-center: It only has two secondary metro stops; it does not have a direct connection to the Yamanote line; and it does not have any JR line stops. In general, Roppongi’s central programmatic concentration cannot integrate itself into the contemporary sub-center morphology of Tokyo. Secondly, Roppongi’s population is characterized by a socio-economic diversity, ranging from the inner city traditional Japanese inhabitant to the wealthier foreigners living in the area. Each ethnic group has its visible effects on the spatial organization, creating an architectural and social pluralism. Thirdly, Roppongi’s new developments are very controversial. The large scale mixed use projects, such as Tokyo Midtown and Roppongi Hills, do not only destroy the traditional urban tissue but also disturb the urban context with their over-sized dimensions and their gated communities. Nonetheless, these urban developments attempt to create a positive reputation of Roppongi by introducing new and contemporary shopping facilities, as well as cultural and leisure activities.

104

The Roppongi Core proposes an urban development based on multiple scales that challenges these three controversial aspects of Roppongi. The project is divided into three parts, each referring to a specific scale and the communicating urban theme: transport infrastructure, urban contextualization and architectural icon. Concerning the transport aspect, the project proposes to integrate the present elevated highway infrastructure, connecting Ginza and Shibuya, into a JR line that travels from the suburbs into the center via Roppongi. For the urban contextualization, the Roppongi train station will be developed as a core element within the district and will house multiple programs and amenities. Finally, an architectural icon is achieved by elevating the new structure above the existing urban tissue while securing several connections with the ground level and viaduct.


PART II: PROJECTS > ROPPONGI

INTERPRETATION OF ROPPONGI’S CONTEXT IN TOKYO

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1 RK WO

RK WO

D UP

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THE DIFFERENT COMMUNITIES OF ROPPONGI DISTRICT R

DI O

R DI O

D

RK WO

I OR

TSS

TSS

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HI S

US

A *CK

ON

I NG

RE HE

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US military personnel

CA

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American Veterans

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Rich housewives

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E THE HE PPONGI ROPPONGI ROPPONGI ROPPONGI ROPPONGI TEAM TEAM TEAM TEAM TEAM

TEAM

Japanese business men

Y HE

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Tourists

OPP

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Expatriates

ER TH

TE GI

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Call girls

L ET

S VE HA

DIOR DIOR

TSSTSS TSSTSS TSSTSS TSSTSS WAZUP TSSTSS WAZUP WAZUP WAZUP DOG WAZUP DOG DOG DOG DOG

WORK WORK WORK

LETS HAVE SUSHIS

TSSTSS WAZUP DOG

HEY HEY HEY YOU HEY YOU HEY YOU I LOVE YOU IYOU LOVE I LOVE IYOU... LOVE I LOVE YOU... YOU... YOU... YOU...

WHAT WHAT WHAT THE WHAT WHAT THE F*CK THE THE F*CK THE F*CK AM F*CK F*CK AM I AM DOING AM I AM IDOING DOING I IDOING HERE? DOING HERE? HERE? HERE? HERE? STUPID STUPID STUPID STUPID STUPID CAMERA! CAMERA! CAMERA! CAMERA! CAMERA!

HEY YOU I LOVE YOU...

I AM I AM IAAM IMONUMENT AM IAAM AMONUMENT MONUMENT AAMONUMENT MONUMENT

WHAT THE F*CK AM I DOING HERE? STUPID CAMERA! I AM A MONUMENT

SCALE CONTRASTS AND RIVALITIES

WHY DO YOU ALWAYS COPY ME?

I WAS THERE BEFORE, YOU BASTARD

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PART II: PROJECTS > ROPPONGI

XL AROUND ROPPONGI

NORTH

YAMANOTE VS TRADITIONAL SPIRAL

<VS>

ROPPONGI AS A SUBCENTER

SH I

A BUY TOKYO

SHINJUKU

3 1 2 NOT YET HONEY, MAYBE NEXT YEAR I WISH I HAD A MULTIMODAL STATION

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1

2. INFRASTRUCTURE

PROCESS

One of the main aspects of this project is the new railway line connecting Roppongi to the immediate suburbs of Tokyo. This new East-West line ensures a direct link between Shibuya and Tokyo station, connecting Roppongi to the other sub-centers and the immediate suburbs. While densifying the railway system of central Tokyo, only 10 percent of the new railway line needs to be built, while the remaining 90 percent reuses existing infrastructure such as the middle lanes of existing highway infrastructure.

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PART II: PROJECTS > ROPPONGI

Yotsukaido

Fukeshiba Miyanoki Futagotobishi Shinozaki

Hamacho

Kameido

Narashino

Higashiojima

Tokyo Kayabacho Toranomon Roppongi itchome Shibuya

Roppongi Nogizaka iro

Nanpeidahicho

Ikejiriohashi

Sangenjaya

Komazawa

M

Futakoganagawa

Mizunokushi

Kajigawa

MO

RIL

IN

E

Arima

Nakagawa Eda

Centralized line

Present system Shrinking zone

Densifying zone

More stops in the center

New system

Connecting Roppongi to Yamanote

Station system

Tokyo

Toranomon

Roppongi

Nogizaka iro

Shibuya

Faster Shibuya/Tokyo connection

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URBAN SCALES

TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N°1 STEP 1

3. CONTEXTUALIZATION

PRESENT SITUATION

The architectural project connects the multiple transport infrastructures:

TYPICALLY WHAT IF?

PRIVATE ACTIVITIES

PUBLIC SPACE

STEP 3

INFRASTRUCTURES

PUBLIC CATALYST URBAN SCALES URBAN RELATIONS

PRIVATE ACTIVITIES

INFRASTRUCTURES

WHAT IF?

PRIVATE ACTIVITIES

PUBLIC SPACE

STEP 4

INFRASTRUCTURES

PUBLIC CATALYST URBAN SCALES URBAN RELATIONS

PRIVATE ACTIVITIES

INFRASTRUCTURES

TYPICALLY

PLATFORM CONNECTIONS PUBLIC SPACE

The new structure that hovers over Roppongi superposes public and private spaces, as well as circulation spaces and patios. Its apparent opacity, its connection to the public space and its horizontality give the building a strong presence.

NEW TRAIN PLATFORM PUBLIC SPACE

There are two underground stations and one elevated highway in the existing context. The project link the new elevated train station to the two existing ones via a vertical circulation element. It, furthermore, introduces a series of public and urban programs to the station and to the surrounding district. This creates an architectural icon that hovers above Roppongi, linking its various parts with a diverse blend of different programs, like shopping, cultural and leisure amenities.

STEP 2

PUBLIC CATALYST URBAN SCALES

PROCESS

WHAT IF?

PRIVATE ACTIVITIES

PUBLIC SPACE

STEP 5

INFRASTRUCTURES

PUBLIC CATALYST URBAN SCALES URBAN RELATIONS

PRIVATE ACTIVITIES

INFRASTRUCTURES

PUBLIC SPACE

TYPICALLY

PUBLIC PROGRAM

“Roppongi Core” is more than a building; it is an active urban monument, a catalyst connecting the multiple scale of Tokyo urban space.

PRIVATE ACTIVITIES

INFRASTRUCTURES

PUBLIC SPACE

TYPICALLY

CONNECT TO TISSUE

WHAT IF?

PUBLIC SPACE INFRASTRUCTURES

PUBLIC CATALYST URBAN RELATIONS

PRIVATE ACTIVITIES

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ACTIVITIES PRIVATE ACTIVITIES

STATION

GRID

PART II: PROJECTS > ROPPONGI

LEISURE

PUBLIC SPORT

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

SPONTANIOUS ACTIVITIES

CORE BUILDING VS LINKING BUILDING URBAN CATALIST

VS

URBAN DISTRIBUTOR

PROGRAM

SPATIAL DUALITIES

PLATFORM 3 PLATFORM 2 PLATFORM 1 ORGANISATIONS

ORGANSATION

URBAN SCALES BUILDING SCALES

/ DISTRICT RELATION

PUBLIC CATALYST

GLASS ROOFS

NO VIEWS

VERTICAL ELEMENTS IN HORIZONTAL STRUCTURE

HORIZONTAL ELEMENTS IN VERTICAL STRUCTURE

+

VS

HORIZONTAL VERTICAL DIFFERENCIATION

=

SUPPORTS

PUBLIC SPACE / BUILDING RELATION

OPAQUE BOX

PATIO ESCALATOR

PATIO LIFT

LIFT

BUILDING UNDER

GLASS FLOOR

PATIO

COLUMNS

COLUMNS’ VISUAL EFFECT VIEWS

NO VIEWS

VS 111


PROJECT

roppongicore

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1


PART II: PROJECTS > ROPPONGI

EXPLODED ISOMETRY OF THE PROJECT Volume

FLOOR ISOMETRY 3rd

Patios 2nd

Accesses

Programs 1st

Interior circulation

Ground Result

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View of Roppongi Hills 114


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View of the crossing 116


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117


View of the train station entrance 118


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View from the main Hall

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AKIHABARA

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AKIHABARA OTAKU CITY

Revealing the infinite inner world of Otaku culture.

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N°1

AKIHABARA : Otaku City Charles de Finance

1. SUMMARY Akihabara, also known as the Electric Town of Tokyo, is famous for its electronic, computer, robot and anime stores and is a sought-after destination for all manga and anime fans, called the otaku. The architecture that is found in Akihabara is best described as an empty box, its shape, its form, its size are independent of the use of the individual building. This independence reduces the spatial qualities of architecture to a minimum. Many of the buildings are specifically dedicated to the otaku, incorporating both large and small scale spaces where the manga fans can indulge their obsession with extensive anime libraries, shops and arcades. These leisure spaces, completely devoid of natural light, are often perceived as an extension of private space and thus can be classified in degrees of domesticity. The manga shops, arcades and fan centers have become more important, both in size and in popularity. They remain however situated on the upper floors of the buildings, presenting a semi-private atmosphere separated from the public spaces and street activities.

126

This project imagines the creation of a new inner space, detached from the public main stream: A continuous interior level underneath Akihabara devoted to the otakusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; needs and life style. This new space accommodates a series of different activities and spaces while maintaining a continual progression from public to private environment.


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2. ELECTRIC TOWN AND ANIME CITY SITUATION AND URBAN LAYERS

AKIHABARA AND THE OTAKU

Akihabara is the largest commercial center for electronics in the world and one of the most important Japanese pop culture metropolis. Akihabara is beyond any doubt, the dream come true for many a gadget, video game, anime, robot and manga lover.

The otaku are best described as shy computer and anime/ manga fetishists that develop an obsessive interest in the anime and manga culture. Originally, before their outing, the otaku limited their fanatics to their private space while broadcasting their production via internet, with self made manga, newspapers etc.

Situated at the intersection of the Yamanote and Chuo train lines, Akihabara can be defined by three major programmatic and cultural layers.

Nowadays the otaku culture is spread throughout Akihabara, covering facades and overloading interiors with complex manga and anime art, computer games, and infinite figure collections.

Manga/Anime shop Arcade

JR Chuo line Duty-free shop

Family multimedia shop

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PART II: PROJECTS > AKIHABARA

Ishimaru Denki, LaOX main store

Animate, manga/anime store

Daibiru building

Duty free akihabara

GiGO SEGA, arcade

LABI Akihabara PC Store

Club Sega, arcade

UDX building

Japanese family Middle class

Otakus

Business men Tokyo University sudents

Family multimedia shop Manga/Anime shop

Duty-free shop

Arcade

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N°1

3. OTAKUS

OTAKU HABITAT 300 cm 300 cm

Backpack ; to carry material and have free hands Mobile phone bag

Big showcase with lots of figures

Jacket Chino pants; Comfortable wear

Walls without openings. Posters of idols are everywhere: walls, ceiling, bed...

300 cm

Sport sneaker ; Perfect to go shopping

300 cm Computer : a link with outer or virtual world

Large screen: to watch anime films, play video games

The translation of the term “otaku” is “home” or “walled up”; its literal meaning defines in fact their way of life. While they are completely cut off from the outside world, their only means of contact is their passion for the manga, cosplay, railways, video games, etc. There are three million Japanese otaku, equivalent to 2% of the country’s population, of which the anime/ manga/ game fans take up the majority with 1 million. Akihabara and the otaku cultural development parallelism: In the 60s, the shops found in Akihabara sold radios and electric supplies

In the 70s, the market for electronic appliance grew. It included TVs, washing machines and refrigerators: ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS 1970

Yamato & Gundam generation, Captain Future, Captain Harlock: space opera

Dragon ball generation: Shonens. Beginning of long length TV series.

In the 80s and 90s the market incorporated personal computers and video games: COMPUTER PRODUCTS 1980

Evangelion generation: video games, birth of otaku hero personification

After 2000, the otaku culture progressively conquers Akihabara. The market for anime and manga products is launched. 2000

Moe generation: Attractive elements in manga, games, animation, city…

From the early 60s on, Akihabara’s development has had a strong influence on the otaku culture. It is evident, therefore, that the otakus’ way of life is majorly defined by the continual technological innovations. Reciprocally, Akihabara’s morphology and program, activities and shops are a consequence of the otaku subculture and influence. 130


PART II: PROJECTS > AKIHABARA

Otakuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s habitat

Akihabaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urbanity

Example of how domesticity can infiltrate the urban space: the characteristics of the otaku world influence the facades, typologies and programs on different levels.

The facade : No depth just overloaded flat. Outer map of its spatial and programmatic contents.

Store areas extended onto the sidewalks.

The box : No in-out interaction.

The maze : Distribution according to complexity.

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N°1 OTAKU’S SPACES

Patchinko

Arcade

Rental Showcase shop

Manga kissa box

132

Maid kissa


PART ????: AKIHABARA

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1

COMMON FIGURES

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KIRBY DATABASE 02 02

1.

2. 02

3.

4.

5.

02 02 02 02 02 02

6.

02 02

7.

02

8.

9.

02

02

02

1O.

11.

14.

18.

12.

15.

19.

16.

20.

13.

17.

21.

135


x 40

x 20

x XSR+SR+MR+LR

x 1 - 2

Room TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORTXSN°1

Manga kissa(common

S Room

area)

Maid café M Room 4. PUBLIC TO DOMESTIC, Arcade LARGE SCALE TO CAPSULE. DIVIDUAL SPACES AND HIERARCHY

L Room

Manga shop Otakus are the center of many spaces which are dedicated to them. The public spaces are necessary for otakus to meet fellow members of the «faith» or to take part in public demonstrations tions. These public spaces are new domestic spaces, i.e. extensions of the otaku habitat. Patchinko

x 1 Otaku habitat

Public in

x 40

Semi Public

x 20

Semi Domestic

Domestic

x XSR+SR+MR+LR

x 1 - 2

x 1

Semi Domestic

Domestic

x SR+MR+LR+XLR

x 4 - 30

Semi Domestic

Domestic

x C+LR

x 1- 20

Showcase

XS Room

Capsule S Box

Manga kissa(common

area)

S Room

Karaoke(common

Kenko Land(common

area)

area)

Maid café Arcade

M Box

M Room

L Room L Room

Manga shop

L Box

Patchinko

XL Box

It is characteristic for Akihabara to dedicate its spaces purposefully to the otaku, while including all scales possible from extra large to miniscule. These spaces often are perceived as an extension of private space and are organized by size and level of privacy. Rentalcase SIZE OF SPACES

Box

Manga Kissa Rentalcase Box

Maid Café - Manga Shop

Manga Kissa

Maid Café - Manga Shop

Arcade - Patchiko

Arcade - Patchiko

Out - Urban Space

136

Out - Urban Space

x

Show


1

wcase

x SR+MR+LR+XLR

x 4 - 30

x C+LR

x 1- 20

PART II: PROJECTS > AKIHABARA

Capsule

S Box Karaoke(common

Kenko Land(common

area)

LEVEL OF SPACES’ PRIVACY

area)

M Box L Room

S Room

XS Room Big arcade games Entry

/

Arcade

L Box

M Room

S Box

M Box

Patchinko

M Room

M Room L Room

L Box Drink/eat corner

Shower XLroom Box Small Arcade

Drink/eat corner

Comic book shelf

Small karaoke box

Box for 2

Big box Box

Shop

Bigbook karaoke box Comic shelf/Manga kissa Shower Café

Café Maid / Café Arcade

Manga kissa library 2

Manga kissa library 1

Drink/ea t corner

Patchinko

ORGANIZATION OF SPACES

private

progressive path from public to private public

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NEVERENDING CITY

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N°1

AKIHABARA, OTAKUS’ CENTERS FROM LIMITED SPACES TO CONTINUOUS FLOORS 1.Otaku spaces : retro, trading cards, cosplay, idol, doujin, hobby/ figures, visual/audio, PC games, recreation, consumer games, books, arcades, parts 2.Growth of otakus’ spaces 1 : Expansion on other plots 3.Growth of otakus’ spaces 2 : Less visible demarcation of plots 4.Densification within plots 5.Densification 2 : islets and underground, infrastructure is a limit 6.Connections via the underground 7.Intensified connections, no more impact of islets on otaku growth 8.Continuous underground city

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PART II: PROJECTS > AKIHABARA

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8 141


SQUARES centers of the underground world

UNDERGROUND OTAKU CITY IN AKIHABARA 142


ENTRANCES from the outer world

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isometry of the otaku city

< «interior square»

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SHINJUKU Shinjuku is one of the 23 special wards of Tokyo. It is a major commercial and administrative center, housing the busiest train station in the world (Shinjuku Station with 3.64 million passengers each day), and the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, the administration center for the government of Tokyo. As of 2008, the ward has an estimated population of 312,418 and a density of 17,140 persons per km2 distributed on a total area of 18.23 km2. Shinjuku began to develop into its current form after the Great Kanto earthquake in 1923, since the seismically stable area largely escaped the devastation. West Shinjuku is one of the few areas in Tokyo with many skyscrapers. The Tokyo air raids from May to August 1945 destroyed almost 90% of the buildings in the area in and around Shinjuku Station. The pre-war form of Shinjuku, and the rest of Tokyo, for that matter, was retained after the war because the roads and rails, damaged as they were, remained, and formed the heart of the Shinjuku in the post-war construction. Shinjuku Gyoen is one of the most popular sightseeing spots in Shinjuku. It is an oasis within skyscrapers, and one can enjoy its beauty throughout the four seasons; the cherry blossom season is considered a special event. Its 100th anniversary of founding was in 2006. Shinjuku Choo Koen (Shinjuku Central Park) is a big park neighboring the skyscrapers of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building. This park provides a place for business people to have a break during their busy weekdays, and for children to play on weekends. Since 1991 The Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, built by renowned architect Kenzo Tange, has been a symbol of Shinjuku. From its public observation room on the 45th floor, which is 202 meters high, one can see the National Diet Building and Tokyo Tower, and weather permitting, Mount Fuji; the entrance is free. Golden Gai, on the other side of the station is a famous bar district. It is composed of tiny shanty-style bars and clubs (formerly brothels) known for the artistic quality of its patrons. Musicians, artists, actors and directors are known to gather here.

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SHINJUKU SHINJUKU COMMON GROUND

Introducing a keystone on top of Shinjuku station’s labyrinthine flow space.

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SHINJUKU : Common ground Thibaud Claessens

1. SUMMARY Shinjuku is one of the major subcenters on the west side of the Yamanote line. It is strategically located at the crossroads of multiple railway and subway lines connecting the sprawling west housing suburbs of Tokyo with many business and commercial districts organized around the Yamanote line. As a result Shinjuku station has grown to be the largest intermodal node in Tokyo with more than three million commuters in transit everyday. This huge transport infrastructure has cut Shinjuku into two parts with the traditional urban fabric on the east side which has grown to a bustling commercial and entertainment district.

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2. GENERAL OVERVIEW / ANALYSIS

Since World War II, the northern part of this district has turned into an area controlled by the Yakuza underworld and is dedicated to the sex industry. This red light district tends to give an ‘underground’ and vulgar image that undermines Shinjuku’s popularity in comparison to the trendy flare of Shibuya. Since the 1960s, the former water tanks of west Shinjuku station have been redeveloped into a large-scale modern business district. It is defined by a succession of office towers densely packed onto an infrastructural urban grid. This west Shinjuku business district is connected to the station by a kilometer long underground pedestrian corridor congested in the early morning and the late afternoon by the flux of commuters. In contrast, the ground floor corporate urban space facing the different towers is devoid of human activities.

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Shinjuku consists of two autonomous urban identities disconnected by the railway infrastructure. While the two hundred exits of Shinjuku station achieved to distribute the flow of commuters in transit into the surrounding commercial space, it fails to form a qualitative urban space. The rhizomatous underground space of the station unfolds into interior labyrinths that one can hardly understand without signs and mapping system.


PART II: PROJECTS > SHINJUKU

office vs commercial on either side of the Yamanote Line

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3. ISSUES Shinjuku Common Ground project intends to convert the introverted and labyrinthine status of the stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spatiality by introducing a floating infrastructure on top of the tracks. A central covered platform is defined between a mat-building and the existing railway tracks. This covered platform emerges from the unintelligible underground space of the station. On this covered urban space, commuters can orient themselves according to the station and the Shinjuku district. On the opposite of the existing underground flow space, the platform is a place to interact and to linger. The railway tracks, the public programs, the department stores and the Shinjuku district are all accessible from this covered platform.

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4. STRATEGY Covering the platform, a mat building encloses a multiplicity of public programs that balance the commercial function of the surrounding department stores. Commuters will be able to find a sport facility, a conference center, a museum, a day nursery, a police station, a day care center for the elderly, a nightlife core and parking spaces. The roof of the mat-building is an open air public space that enjoys a panoramic view of Shinjuku district. It is dedicated to peaceful strolling and restaurant terraces. The horizontal shafts and light tubes are established in three scales. The first one runs across the whole building giving light to the train platforms, the second brings light to the large slab, the third illuminates the interior of the volume. These create a peculiar landscape on the roof.

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0

50 m

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N째1 day care centre sport facilities conference centre

night life

museum

parkings

police station

day nursery

museum

day nursery

day care centre

conference centre

parkings night life sport facilities

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police station


PART II: PROJECTS > SHINJUKU

museum

day nursery

day care centre

conference centre

parkings night life sport facilities

police station

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ADDITIONALS

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OMOTESANDO OMOTESANDO DRESS CODE

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Vue satellite- carte avec yamanote et subcenters

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OMOTESANDO DRESS CODE Valentin Thevenot & Simon Bidal

1. SUMMARY Omotesando is an avenue renowned for fashion in Tokyo flaunting flagship stores of world-known brands that are designed by prestigious architects (e.g. SANAA, Toyo Ito, Herzog & Demeuron). These flagship stores line the avenue similar to real life fashion models that pose on a catwalk. In 2010, Arquitectum and Waseda University of Tokyo launched an architecture competition calling for design proposals for a new fashion museum located along Omotesando. The program requested a tower with 100 meter height located on a vacant site across from the Prada flagship store. Due to its height, the tower is destined to become the new landmark of the district.

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This project was conceived as an entry to the competition. The proposal is conceived as a critical reflexion of the purpose of a fashion museum in the context of Omotesando district. By compacting the program of the museum as much as possible, the project offers a multi-purpose vertical space for temporary exhibitions and performances crowned with a sky bar. The main concept is to create a vertical urban catwalk that stretches throughout the different levels of the tower, playing with the voyeur’s status of the Omotesando avenue. The initial phase of the project consisted of designing the tower so as to fulfill the spatial qualities of a fashion museum. This original sketch, which won the second price of the competition, creates the base for a more detailed study concerning the programmatic potential of the project. The research that followed enriched the project by inserting it into a critical study of Omotesando’s urban context.


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2. PROCESS The project is based on the concept that a tower is a superposition of different spaces and programs. In this way, the spatiality of different programs (the show rooms, the sky bar, the catwalk, etc) is developed separately. Intensive model-studies allowed to develop the spaces independently while exploring a variety of approaches.

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By progressively integrating new ideas on program, spatial atmosphere and visual impact, the tower evolves successively as a complex entity. The final project suggests a dynamic vertical assemblage of multiple atmospheres and programmatic opportunities.

a. Building mass

b. Landmark

c. Fragmentation

d. Addition

e. Porosity

f. Skin

g. (un)Defintion

h. Spatiality

i. Structure & concepts

Sketches illustrating the evolution of the project in relation to the different analytical themes.


PART III: ADDITIONALS > SHIBUYA

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SUBCULTURE Public Space Harajuku Place Location of representation

MAJOR BRANDS AND CORPORATIONS Medium scale Front of the avenue Communication by architecture

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YOUNG DESIGNERS Small Scale Back Spaces Show window along the avenue

3. CONTEXT HARAJUKU/ OMOTESANDO DORI The tower’s location towards the end of Omotesando’s fashion mile completes the perspective created along the avenue. Omotesando, also known as the Tokyoite Champs-Elysées, is mainly bordered by brand name stores, especially flagship stores. On either side of Omotesando, the urban fabric remains more traditional and small scale. It is within these areas, that a myriad of activities is launched around small independent fashion creators and galleries. At the beginning of Omotesando, a different sort of fashion space can be found: Harajuku square. Harajuku is a major destination for Japanese youth; it is the “in” meeting place for the Harajuku Girls, the rockers and others. The entire district enveloping Omotesando brings together a multitude of different protagonists that share one main theme: fashion. All these different urban dynamics need to gather into the fashion tower in order to create a social and cultural hub.

Integration Concentration Representation 171


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4. PROGRAM

ショールーム

The program outlined by the competition suggests different spaces to be worked independently. Three main functions can be identified: the catwalk, the museum galleries and the sky bar.

100

150

ワークショップ ショールーム

バー

Fashion Exhibition Rooms

Skybar

Urban Balcony

10

Restrooms

130

Bar

Permanent exhibition 20's

Studio Fashion Exhibition Housing Rooms

150

Urban Balcony

150

Permanent exhibition 20's

Permanent exhibition 30's

150

Permanent exhibition 40's

150

The program underestimates the potential surface of the tower. The fashion museum is a pretext for creating an iconic tower.

150

Permanent exhibition 50's

150

Permanent exhibition 60's

150

Permanent exhibition 70's

300

Permanent exhibition 80's

演壇

25

記憶のホールと店(記念品)

駐車場

駐車場

40

Entrance Hall & Souvenir Parking Area Store

Parking Area アドミニストレーション

Administration

200

110

25

Restrooms

25

Restrooms

50

200

100

Souvenir Store

Entrance Hall

60

Restrooms Runway Backstage Area

Administration 100

Seating Area

110

Urban Balcony

300

25 Permanent exhibition 90's 25

記憶のホールと店(記念品)

Entrance Hall & Souvenir Store 25

Restrooms

25

Restrooms

50

100

Souvenir Store

300

Temporary Exhibition Entrance Hall

駐 Pa 車場 rkin g

アド ミニ ストレ Adm ーション inistr ation

バー Skybar

of programs determined by the competition

、そして熟 トラフィック culations Murs et Cir

Programme d’origine The different types

店 と e ル tré ー n ホ d'e の Hall 憶

ショールーム Salles d'expos itio

ns

演壇 Podium & Salle de Défilé

Adapted Japanese flag. The program of the competition is represented by the circle, the potential space of the tower is represented by the main frame. 172

300

Runway Restrooms

アドミニストレーション

100

Studio

Studio

Studio

Permanent exhibition 80's 150

Studio

100

Housing/Studio

演壇

Runway 25

Permanent exhibition 60's Workshop openspace

Permanent exhibition 70's

150

300

Workshop openspace

+ 300

150

Beyond these pure aesthetic aspects, the project searches to explore space for temporary uses and cultural activities.

Permanent exhibition 40's

Permanent exhibition 50's

150

300

Workshop openspace

Permanent exhibition 30's

300

150

40 60

100

100

100 Restrooms Restrooms

300

Runway

Housing/Studio Permanent exhibition 90's

100

Housing

100

Housing

Backstage Area

Seating Area

Urban Balcony

Sk 10

100

300

150

バー

300

Temporary Exhibition

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5. ADDED PROGRAMS

IMAGE

N

IN

ÉMULATION

OUVERTURE

EX

BL PU

É SIT P OR O

ESPACE

IC

SÉE DE LA MO DE STITUTIO

RE IBILITÉ AT ION

MU

The tower gains the status of a landmark by presenting a functional variety. Added programs, such as showrooms, studios, shops, workshops, etc, wish to allow interaction between the multiple protagonists of Omotesando district. Nonetheless, fashion, looks and design remain the main themes and foci of the project.

FL

C

Diagram expressing the complentary functions

The district’s population is actively incorporated in the program by adding new workshops and ateliers for designers and equivalent spaces for fashion consumers. This conjunction of programs is a condition for creative emulation. It allows the transformation of the fashion museum into a cultural institution that embodies the richness of Omotesando urban life.

The different interdependant programs are connected in one and the same project 173


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6. MODELS Flagship Stores The flagship store is the new typology of Omotesando. It intends to create through architectural design the most fashionable image of a brand. The main specificities of the flagship store reside in its outstanding envelope, similar to the textile design of the haut couture. The different building skins play with half-transparency, half opacity, and mesh of more or less detail. The outer envelope is the image of the brand, but the building itself presents often a basic spatiality resulting in the stacking of generic floors. In contrast to the flagship stores, every room of the fashion tower is defined by the tectonic spatialities of its structure. These spatialities alternate between extreme opacity and transparency.

architecture of the outer skin

The flagship store principal 174

Axonometry of the Prada store : example of the flagship store


PART III: ADDITIONALS > SHIBUYA

7. REFERENCES Big Box The typology of the big box originates from the same basic mechanism as the flagship store: the simple extrusion of the plot. Contrary to the flagship store however, the big box shifts the focus from the envelope to the interior. Its envelope is reduced to being a mere support for billboards and signage. The interior on the other hand is often a succession of determined rooms.

architecture of collage

Calling its inspiration from the big box model, the project foresees a vertical stacking of independent rooms. This organization expresses the variety of programs and spatialities incorporated into the tower.

Exploded axonometry of a Tokyoite Big Box building 175


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8. POROSITY Small Scale The project is located in the midst of a small scale urban fabric. The main spatial characteristic is porosity: the buildings are separated from one another by gaps, creating an impression of spatial fluidity that flows between the public and private space. This porosity continues inside some of the commercial spaces that propose sales rooms in the center of the building block, or on higher floors of the smaller buildings. While passing through from one space to the other via passages and staircases open to the sky, the user obtains an impression of freedom and a diversity of different pathways. The plurality of the circulation routes is reinforced with a voluntary fragmentation of the program as well as a vertical porosity emphasized with a variety of different circulation typologies.

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Diagram of the built space of Harajuku

The porosity of the smal scale urban fabric

Axonometries of the two commercial centers of Harajuku. They present a continous flow from the public space into the built space, illustrating the porosity of the small scale urban fabric.


PART III: ADDITIONALS > SHIBUYA

9. STRUCTURE & CONCEPTS To emphasize the multiplicity of the program, the project applies different structural systems according to the specific purpose and atmosphere of the spaces. Furthermore, the circulation is discontinuous and is adapted to the different ambiances of the multiple spaces. Split levels, the hall and the temporary exhibition galleries ensure the coherence and the articulation of the structural features.

Diagrams illustrating the successive fragmentation of the spaces, of the vertical circulation with elevators, stairs and structural elements. 177


TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION - RESEARCH REPORT N°1

10. PROJECT The duality between opacity and transparency is the principal characteristic of the project. The opaque spaces enclose the museum’s program within clearly defined spaces. In contrast, a large porous cage (the fashion grid) allows for multiple uses with a spatial freedom.

The architectural specificity of each space is meant to constrain or liberate the use of space, to provoke interaction and confrontation between actors and to create strong visual connections. The tower appears instable, an impression suggested by the superposition of autonomous volumes.

mmes

Programme ComPlémentaire ショールーム

ワークショップ ショールーム

バー

Fashion Exhibition Rooms

Skybar 10

100

150

Urban Balcony

Restrooms

130

Bar

Permanent exhibition 20's

Studio Fashion Exhibition Housing Rooms

100

Urban Balcony

150

Permanent exhibition 30's

ワークショップ パレード

買い物を

Studio Showrooms Housing

Shops Skybar 10

100 130

Collective shop

150

150

Workshop openspace

Permanent exhibition 30's

Permanent exhibition 50's

150

300

150

150

Permanent exhibition 60's

150

Permanent exhibition 70's

300

Collective shop

100

Collective shop

100

200

300

Showroom

Workshop openspace

200

Shop/Showroom

演壇

駐車場

40

Entrance Hall & Souvenir Parking Area Store

Parking Area アドミニストレーション

Administration

200

25

記憶のホールと店(記念品)

駐車場

110

25

Restrooms

25

Restrooms

50

200

100

Souvenir Store

Entrance Hall

60

Restrooms Runway Backstage Area

Administration 100

100

300

Runway Restrooms

アドミニストレーション

110

Collective shop

Showroom

100

100

200

Flux Collective shop

50

View point

50

CollectiveView shoppoint

50

View point

50

Shop/Showroom View point

Backstage

50

Backstage

100

Shop/Showroom

100

Shop/Showroom

100

Shop

100

Shop

100

Shop

200

200

Showroom

Showroom

50

Backstage

50

Backstage

200

Flux

50

View point

50

View point

50

View point

50

View point

300 100

Shop/Showroom

100

Shop

100

Shop

100

Shop

Permanent exhibition 60's Workshop openspace

Studio

300

Workshop openspace

Workshop openspace

150

Studio

Studio

150

Studio

Studio

150

Studio

150

Studio

100

Housing/Studio

100

Housing/Studio

100

Housing

100

Housing

Permanent exhibition 80's 150

Studio

100

Housing/Studio

100

Housing/Studio

演壇

Runway 25

100

Permanent exhibition 70's

150

Permanent exhibition 80's

Shop/Showroom

Workshop openspace

+ 300

150

300

Collective space

Permanent exhibition 40's

Permanent exhibition 50's

150

300

共同体

Showrooms

Bar

100

100 Permanent exhibition 40's

パレード

Collective space Shops

100

50

150

共同体 買い物を

Restrooms

Permanent exhibition 20's 300

150

バー

300

25 Permanent exhibition 90's 25

記憶のホールと店(記念品)

Entrance Hall & Souvenir Store 25

Restrooms

25

Restrooms

Seating Area

50

Urban Balcony

100

Souvenir Store

300

Temporary Exhibition Entrance Hall

40 60

100

100

Restrooms Restrooms

300

Runway

Permanent exhibition 90's 100

Housing

100

Housing

Backstage Area

Seating Area

Urban Balcony

300

Temporary Exhibition

Programme d’origine

Program defined by the competition and the additional program: the mixed functions are the condition of the creative emulation

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+94m Skybar

+49-94m Fashion Grid

+45m Temporary Exhibitions

+9-45m : Galleries

+4m : Hall

-3m : Catwalk

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+4m : Hall Transition level that is directly connected to the avenue. The centrifugal organization invites the visitors into the exhibition galleries. This space offers a viewing platform onto the avenue. 180


PART III: ADDITIONALS > SHIBUYA

-3m : Catwalk Flexible architectural landscape that is adaptable to the different scenographic settings needed for the different modeling shows. An opening allows the passing pedestrians on the street to equally take part in the event. +9-45m : Galleries The galleries are organized around the central core of the building which stages both the visitors as well as the models and houses temporary artistic events. The galleries succeed one after the other crossed by random pathways allowing for a liberal circulation pathway.

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+45mTemporary Exhibitions This level articulates the museum with the structural grid. The spaces project the visitors to the exterior. The interior core proposes enclosed spaces. The circulation, much like objects, melts together with the exhibited master pieces. 182


PART III: ADDITIONALS > SHIBUYA

+94m Skybar The space is enclosed, projected into the sky, surrounded by Japanese gardens.

+49-94m Fashion Grid The rational and porous structure invites diverse activities that in return generate a creative process and emulation. The morphology of this section of the tower introduced a visual connection with the city and thus underlines its function as landmark.

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+95,0m: Skybar

+47,0m: Fashion Grid

+43,0m: Temporary Exhibitions

+9,0m: Fashion Museum

+4,0m: Entrance Hall, Souvenir Store...

0,0m: Street Level

-3,0m: Catwalk, Administration -7,5m: Parking

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CREDITS

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TOKYO SPACE SPECULATION RESEARCH REPORT N°1

Editors : Geoffrey Grulois & Julien Deloffre Graphic design : Julien Deloffre Yannick Vanhaelen Projects & research : Simon Bidal Thibaud Claessens Charles De Finance Julien Deloffre Pierre Escobar Sylvain Guillaume Philippe Nathan Valentin Thévenot Yannick Vanhaelen Pauline Varloteaux Studio tutors : Nadia Casabella, Geoffrey Grulois, Gery Leloutre English translation : Lisa Ferkinghoff Printed by : Presses Universitaires de Bruxelles Fonts : Grotesque Mt

© 2011 SPACE SPECULTION urban design lab, Université Libre de Bruxelles. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproducted or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owners.

Statements contained in this research report, are the sole responsibility of their authors. Publishing officials have tried to settle the rights to the illustrations according to official regulations. Right holders, despite our research, we could not find are requested to make known to the publishers.

ISSN : 2034-4880

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TOKYO! [Part II]