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# 3 0 • 1 9 . 0 3 . 1 4 • M E L B O U R N E • F R E E • I N C O R P O R AT I N G

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2 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014


THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 3


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themusic 19TH MARCH 2014

FEATURE “THE DEEPEST INSPIRATION FOR ME IS CRAZY JAPANESE ART, AND A LOT OF WEIRD, RARE, GAY ART FROM JAPAN.”

#030

INSIDE FEATURES Trixie Whitley Sebadoh Sunnyboys Neon Festival Bobby Keys Jurassic 5 Caspian Vintage Girls The Pretty Reckless Orphaned Land Baths Dark Tranquility Sam Halmarack & The Miserablites Tim Heidecker

NINE INCH NAILS @ ROD LAVER ARENA. PIC: JAY HYNES

review

- WILL WIESENFELD OF BATHS (P30)

“WHILE QOTSA MAKE YOU WANNA SASHAY INTO THE NIGHT AND HIT UP TINDER, NIN ARE MORE ABOUT COLD SWEATS, DOOM AND ACCUSATIONS.” - BRYGET CHRISFIELD REVIEWS QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE AND NINE INCH NAILS (P37)

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Album: La Dispute Live: Billy Bragg Arts: The Long Pigs ...and more

GET THE FINAL REPORTS FROM OUR WEEK IN AUSTIN AT SXSW.

AT THEMUSIC.COM.AU RIGHT NOW

THE GUIDE

Cover: FOLA Live Art Dance Party Alcohol Around The World Frontlash/Backlash Indie News/Q&As Opinion Gig Guide

FILM CAREW WILL POINT YOU IN THE DIRECTION OF CINEMATIC BLISS. THIS SATURDAY ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU

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L-FRESH THE LION EXPLORES ISSUES IN AUSTRALIAN HIP HOP IN A NEW VIDEO SERIES. PREMIERING ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU THIS WEEK

The End: Best/ Worst Interviews SAM HALMARACK

“EVEN IF PEOPLE ARE A LITTLE SHY AT FIRST, WE MAKE THEM FEEL A REAL PART OF THE MUSIC-MAKING AND EXPERIENCING PROCESS.” - SAM HALMARACK (P31)

feature 6 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014


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THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 7


CREDITS PUBLISHER

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GIG GUIDE Justine Lynch vic.giguide@themusic.com.au

SENIOR CONTRIBUTOR Jeff Jenkins

CONTRIBUTORS

THIS WEEK THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK • 19 MARCH - 25 MARCH 2014

Aleksia Barron, Atticus Bastow, Steve Bell, Emma Breheny, Luke Carter, Anthony Carew, Oliver Coleman, Rebecca Cook, Adam Curley, Cyclone, Guy Davis, Dan Condon, Simon Eales, Guido Farnell, Sam Fell, Tim Finney, Bob Baker Fish, Cameron Grace, Tom Hawking, Andrew Hazel, Brendan Hitchens, Kate Kingsmill, Baz McAlister, Samson McDougall, Tony McMahon, Fred Negro, Matt O’Neill, Josh Ramselaar, Paul Ransom, Dylan Stewart, Stephanie Tell, Izzy Tolhurst, Simone Ubaldi, Glenn Waller, Matthew Ziccone

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ART DIRECTOR

The second annual Victorian Dance Festival takes place on 22 & 23 Mar at Colac East Primary School and features workshops with some of the Australian dance community’s leading choreographers. An episode of web series Dance Chat is to be filmed live from VDF’s showcase and one lucky dancer will win a dream trip to New York, complete with classes at The Broadway Dance Center! Head to isolatedancefestival.com.au for ticketing.

In A World is a hilarious comedy about a struggling vocal coach, Carol (Lake Bell, also the film’s director, writer and co-producer), who wants to make it as a voice-over artist for film trailers. In the running for a job, she discovers she’s competing with her father, the current king of voice-overs. In cinemas 3 Apr. Head to themusic. com.au/win-prizes to win one of 20 double passes to a Cinema Nova preview screening on 26 Mar, 6.30pm.

Nicholas Hopkins

ART DEPT Eamon Stewart, Brendon Wellwood, Julian De Bono, David Di Cristoforo vic.art@themusic.com.au

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MELBOURNE

Fans of California’s long-standing alternative hip hop outfit Jurassic 5 can score a unique opportunity to sit in on the band’s soundcheck, then meet the band and get autographs/happy snaps before their Palace Theatre shows on 20 & 21 Mar. Head to jurassic5.com.au to purchase these extremely limited edition (70 for each show) meet’n’greet tickets, which are completely separate from standard show tickets.


THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 9


national news news@themusic.com.au THE AUDREYS

ADALITA @ BIGSOUND. PIC: STEPHEN BOOTH

GET THE JUMP ON BIGSOUND 2014! UNLEASHING SOME EMOTION

Arriving with unheralded depth and diversity, ‘Til My Tears Roll Away, the fourth studio record from The Audreys, showcases the blues/folk act at the height of their powers. Catch the three-time ARIA Award-winners 5 Jun, The Abbey, Canberra; 8 Jun, Factory Theatre, Sydney; 14 Jun, Ormond Hall, Melbourne; 21 Jun, The Zoo, Brisbane; and 4 Jul, Fly By Night, Perth. Tickets are on sale from this Friday, with the tour proudly presented by The Music.

ALL LOVED UP

Hunx & His Punx are bringing the sexy back to stages across the nation, and making for the sweetest of love-struck line-ups, fellow US garage exponents Shannon & The Clams will also be visiting from across the pond. Touching on everything from ‘80s hardcore and ‘90s riot grrrl sounds to ‘60s bubblegum pop, the two acts will feast the eyes and ears when they play 17 Apr, Copacabana, Melbourne; 19 Apr, Oxford Art Factory, Sydney; 20 Apr, Farmer & The Owl Laneway Party, Wollongong; 22 Apr, The Zoo, Brisbane; and 24 Apr, Rosemount Hotel, Perth.

NO ONE LEFT BEHIND

Alternative rock rulers Dead Letter Circus are set to take their sounds rural later this year, with The Insider Tour hitting locations across the land. Catch the band 15 May, Surfers Paradise Beer Garden, Gold Coast; 16 May, Racehorse Hotel, Ipswich; 17 May, Big Pineapple Festival, Sunshine Coast; 18 May, Tatts Hotel, Ipswich; 20 May, Collector Hotel, Parramatta; 21 May, Tattersalls Hotel, Penrith; 22 May, Carmens, Miranda; 23 May, Hornsby RSL; 24 May, Entrance Leagues Club; 28 May, Black Swan Hotel, Bendigo; 29 May, Village Green, Mulgrave; 6 Jun, Settlers Tavern, Margaret River; 7 Jun, Prince Of Wales, Bunbury; and 8 Jun, Rosemount Hotel, Perth.

INSECTS AND STARS

Between the pair of them they’ve released over a hundred albums, and via their respective groups they’ve created plenty of timeless classics, so you can be guaranteed of a setlist spilling over with goodness when Robyn Hitchcock of The Soft Boys and The Church’s Steve Kilbey take their guitars on the road. Catch these two fine gentlemen when they join forces for a few special evenings, happening 26 Apr, Fly By Night, Fremantle; 3 May, Arts Centre, Melbourne; 10 May, Metro Theatre, Sydney; and 16 May, New Globe Theatre, Brisbane.

OVER BEFORE IT BEGAN You know how we were all excited that Action Bronson was coming Down Under again? Well scrap that because the Queens rapper has pulled the pin on his headline shows and Groovin The Moo appearances due to recording commitments. We’ll let you know when new dates are announced.

BLACK BOOT

We’re feeling the full force of Victorian prog metal powerhouse Sydonia once more, with their new album Reality Kicks showing why they’re so respected in the Aussie hard rock community. Supported by Helm and Red Bee (except dates marked *), Sydonia launch this latest triumph 3 May, The Espy, Melbourne; 15 May, The Basement, Canberra; 16 May, Towradgi Beach Hotel, Wollongong; 17 May, Bald Faced Stag, Sydney; 23 May, Crowbar, Brisbane; 24 May, Coolangatta Hotel, Gold Coast; 25 May, The Northern, Byron Bay; 6 Jun, Musicman Megastore, Bendigo*; 4 Jul, Amplifier Bar, Perth*; and 5 Jul, Burlington Hotel, Bunbury*.

“THE GOOD THING ABOUT SCIENCE IS THAT IT’S TRUE WHETHER OR NOT YOU BELIEVE IN IT” TRUST NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON [@NEILTYSON] ON THIS ONE. 10 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

Don’t let the biggest music showcase in the southern hemisphere pass you by! Early bird tickets for BIGSOUND 2014 are on sale now, and applications are also open for artists keen on playing the event. Happening 10 – 12 Sep in Brisbane’s Fortitude Valley Entertainment Precinct, it’s three days and two nights of parties, forums, seminars and cracking live music. Bands can get involved by heading to the QMusic website (applications close 9 May) while discounted tickets for delegates can be purchased at bigsound. org.au. Proudly presented by The Music.

LORDE. PIC: CYBELE MALINOWSKI

ALL HAIL THE QUEEN

The biggest NZ pop culture explosion since those hobbits first chased that ring around, Lorde has taken her moody pop gems around the globe and back, winning Grammy Awards and legions of admires, all before the age of 18. Having already lived up to the hype at Splendour and Laneway, you can now catch the Kiwi world-beater on a massive headline tour around the country: 24 Apr, Festival Hall, Melbourne; 29 Apr, Challenge Stadium, Perth; 2 May, Hordern Pavilion, Sydney; 4 May, Newcastle Entertainment Centre; and 6 May, Brisbane Riverstage. Tickets on sale this Friday.


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THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 11


local news vic.news@themusic.com.au SAIDAH BABA TALIBAH

SIETTA

A UNIQUE SOUL

Darwin duo Sietta are taking their blend of alt-soul on the road this month. On the back of their second album The Invisible River, singer Caiti Baker and producer James Mangohig are hitting up Northcote Social Club on 26 Apr to drop some seriously trancey, acoustic and electro beats.

SHOW US YOUR WARES

(S)CREAMING

Following a SXSW slot, Canada’s spicy soul singer Saidah Baba Talibah lands in Oz in support of her new album (S)Cream. This follows a performance with her band at BIGSOUND last year, a show in which her frenetic funk stylings and sassy, raw energy turned heads. Don’t miss the chance to check out the compelling songstress when she graces the stage at Ding Dong Lounge on 16 and 23 Apr.

POP ICON

Australian pop star Tina Arena will be heading on a national tour this August to show off her latest album, Reset. Catch the first woman to win the ARIA for Album Of The Year at Palais Theatre, 17 Sep.

ONE DARREN

Darren Middleton, guitarist from Powderfinger, went solo last year, releasing his debut album, Translations. He’s heading off on an acoustic tour, hitting Hotel Brunswick, Brunswick Heads, 5 & 6 Apr and Baby Black Café, Bacchus Marsh, 12 Apr.

ALPHA DELTA

Following the success of AMP-nominated album HEX.LOVER.KILLER, The Delta Riggs are heading on tour to drop single Supersonic Casualties from their forthcoming second album, Dipz Debazios. The Curtin, 25 Apr.

THE THREE FACTOR

ABC3 is on the hunt for charismatic, quirky talent to join their talented team of presenters. Demonstrate your ‘three factor’ with a short three-minute video, fill out an online application and submit your video by 28 Mar to make your mark in TV-land. More details at abc.net.au/abc3.

HARDEST OF STYLES

Head along to The Hi-Fi on 24 Apr for high energy club vibes with LA’s Clockwork, Destructo, and Oliver, plus our very own Motez on their HARDstraylia tour.

WILDE CHILD

Award-winning playwright Sir David Hare presents a portrait of Oscar Wilde and his one-sided love for Lord Alfred Douglas with The Judas Kiss. Mockingbird Theatre will present this powerful tale at Theatreworks between 14 and 22 Mar.

STRATEGIC ART

As part of Melbourne’s ongoing commitment to investing and working with the arts sector, The City Of Melbourne Art Strategy has been created in collaboration with the arts community. “The strategy is a blueprint for Council’s investment in the arts and provides a clear framework for the next three years,” said Lord Mayor Robert Doyle.

“NOT LOOKING FORWARD TO CONTEMPLATING THE VOID/ LIFE AFTER TRUE DETECTIVE. I GUESS I COULD DO WORK.” NEITHER ARE WE @ELMO_KEEP, NEITHER ARE WE. 12 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

Warehouse Cinema is a series of events aiming to bring together audiences and filmmakers for a night of great film, food and beverages in a warehouse setting. They’re kicking things off with the inaugural Warehouse Cinema Short Film Competition. Submissions open on 1 Apr and close on 10 May, with shortlisted films announced on 20 May and screened on 20 Jun, with food and drink provided by The People’s Market. The comp winner receives a production prize package worth $5,000. Visit warehousecinema.com.au to enter. Proudly presented by The Music.

THIS YEAR’S ASHES

ASHES TO ASHES

In pursuit of a fresh start, Ellen leaves Melbourne for a shiny new life in Sydney; but as usual, the grass is rarely greener. As she spirals into a depressing and lonely existence, Ellen finds comfort in binge drinking and one night stands. A bittersweet comedy about relationships and loss, This Year’s Ashes is on at Red Stitch Actors Theatre, 21 Mar – 19 Apr.

IT TAKES TWO

American pop duo MKTO are returning to our shores; this will be their third visit but the first time they’ll be touring their selftitled debut album nationally. The album reached number one in the ARIA charts and their debut single Thank You peaked at number two. They’ll perform an all ages show at the Palais Theatre on 28 Apr.


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THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 13


local news vic.news@themusic.com.au CHERRY, CHERRY (A DINING ROOM TALE)

OWEN CAMPBELL

WHATCHA OWEN

Slide-guitar champ Owen Campbell’s new single Remember To Breathe is a heavy slice of hair-raising roots music, and to celebrate the release, Campbell is taking his show on the road. He hits Bennetts Lane on 23 Apr; Beav’s Bar, Geelong on 24 Apr; and Babushka Lounge, Ballarat on 26 Apr. Proudly presented by The Music.

LEAN ON ME

For Today and Prepared Like A Bride are inviting To The Airship to Royal Melbourne Hotel, 12 Apr; and Void Of Vision, Proclaim and Hideaway to Arrow On Swanston, 13 Apr. Yacht Club DJs will be partying into Karova Lounge, Ballarat, 17 Apr with local support Godwolf, and to The Prince, 18 Apr with REMI and Godwolf. Folk troubadour Devendra Banhart has enlisted Mouth Tooth as his 17 Apr, The Prince, support. Bone-crushing metallers The Acacia Strain, Aversions Crown and Graves have announced their slew of supports: Exposures at Royal Melbourne Hotel, 26 Apr; and Free World and Left For Wolves at Arrow On Swanston. Russian Circles will be supported by Clagg and Fourteen Nights At Sea at The Hi-Fi, 1 May. Maples will open for Frente at the Arts Centre, 22 & 23 May and Theatre Royal, Castlemaine, 24 May.

COME DINE WITH ME

In the return season of this Dining Room Tale, A Is For Atlas invites audiences into the home of Iranian born Neda Rahmani for a unique theatre experience in an intimate setting. Cherry, Cherry (A Dining Room Tale) is a modern tale of multiculturalism that sees Rahmani share her history, culture and craft while preparing a communal meal for audiences at her Northcote home on 14 – 16, 28 and 29 Mar. Book at trybooking.com/EEZR.

HOLD ON ME

Sex On Toast have released a new single, the smooth falsetto-laden slow jam Hold My Love from their self-titled nine-song debut album. They launch the album at Northcote Social Club on 28 Mar with help from John Citizen, The Cactus Channel, Mandek Penha and DJ Kirkis.

“LOVE IS A SMOKE AND IS MADE WITH THE FUME OF SIGHS. SEND A DICK PIC.”

25 YEARS

It’s the 25th anniversary of Melbourne folk quartet Things Of Stone & Wood, so the original line-up is reforming to play a host of shows along the east coast. They haven’t played together since 1997 and hit Northcote Social Club, 24 & 25 May.

GETTING OLDER

Newcastle five-piece Twin Lakes have released new single The Ageing Field and are heading on tour to celebrate. They’ll be in our neck of the woods at Yah Yah’s, 29 Mar.

COMING ALIVE

With only one and a half weeks until the event (29 & 30 Mar), The Hills Are Alive have announced playing times and added 11 more acts: Al’s Music Rant, These New South Whales, Steph & Beth, The Plotch, Alister Green, Big Winter, Human Woman, Bronwyn Durrant & Oakley Grenell, The Real Slinger, Petty Crimes, 2 Bags Benny and SliceOfLive. The festival’s held on a private farm in South Gippsland and the only way to get a ticket is to ask someone who’s been there or is going to hook you up. 14 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

@SARAHKSILVERMAN, EVER THE ROMANTIC.

TO A T

T.Williams has forged himself a signature sound that incorporates his grime days, dubstep, bass music and the evolution into house. T.Williams is now set to visit Australia, playing Revolver Upstairs on 17 Apr.

HEY NOW

The Morning Night are heading east for the release of new single So Now from their second album Amberola. They stop by The Workers Club, 1 Apr; Wesley Anne, 2 Apr (acoustic set); Grace Darling Hotel, 3 Apr; The Public Bar, 4 Apr; and The Espy, 5 Apr.

DEVONSTATED

American jazz and blues veteran Robben Ford has been forced to make some last minute support changes after guitarist Walter Trout pulled out of Bluesfest 2014 due to health reasons. Ford will now play Corner Hotel with blues-rocker Devon Allman on 18 Apr.

KING WANTED

King Of The North have added new dates to their three-month Sound The Underground album tour, which takes in The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine, 21 Mar; Tanswell’s Commercial Hotel, Beechworth, 22 Mar; Newmarket Hotel, Bendigo, 29 Mar; Barwon Heads Hotel, 18 Apr; The Loft, Warnambool, 25 Apr; The Espy, 26 Apr.

BONE AGAIN

Europoppers Boney M are bringing their German-Jamaican disco-reggae back to Australia in June. After a four-year hiatus, Boney M are back, performing at The Palms At Crown, 28 Jun.

ROARING MAD

Tickets for Katy Perry sold out so fast that the triple-platinum singer has announced another swag of shows. The California Gurl is now playing eight shows at Rod Laver Arena: 14, 15, 18, 19 Nov and 4, 6, 7, 10 Dec.


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(Pot luck o’ the Irish)

~ EXCELLENT RESTAURANT AND BAR MEALS

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music

IN THE BLOOD Daughter of renowned singer-songwriter Chris Whitley and soul-icon-inthe-making, Trixie Whitley feels as if she’s “had a career in reverse”. Andy Hazel learns it was never her intention to become a singer.

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f you were raised in Ghent, Belgium (one of the most beautiful cities in the world), recorded at Electric Lady Studios in New York aged ten, danced with a French ballet ensemble and were crowned Europe’s youngest ever resident DJ by 11, would you ditch it for a job as a dish pig in Queens? Trixie Whitley, daughter of awards-laden blues icon Chris Whitley did. “I guess I just wanted to be normal for a while,” she says humbly. “I was born in Belgium, and my mom is from there, but I’ve spent most of my time in New York since I was a child. My dad is from the States, and my mom and I followed him to New York when I was barely a year old, so it has always felt more like my home. This is where I learned to walk and talk and read and write, but still, I’m a total nomad. Honestly, I’ve had a life journey that trained me to live like this.”

to that of her father’s near-genreless range of styles. Since the release of her debut album Fourth Corner last year, the talking point has shifted from Whitley being ‘Chris’s girl’ to ‘my God, her voice!’ Whitley’s raw, expressive instrument attracted the attention of a disparate bunch of musicians before she switched to singer as full-time occupation. “I’ve never really thought of myself as a singer,” she says, much to the disbelief of anyone who has ever heard her sing. “Well,” she laughs, “I always sang, but I didn’t perceive it as a dream I wanted to fulfil, as in, ‘I want to become a singer’. In the society we live in we’re all asked, ‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’ And

and recorded what would become Fourth Corner. “I feel like making Fourth Corner was such a turbulent journey,” she explains with a sigh. “It came from years of not only music industry stuff, but being in the shadow of more famous people and years of working with Black Dub and Lanois. We were recording a lot of my own stuff, and I was so thankful for that opportunity, but I’d been working on my own stuff for years before Black Dub. Making Fourth Corner seemed like a process that dragged out for such a long time; some of those songs had been around for years and I’d never put them out. I’m making a new album now,” she says, audibly perking up, “and it’s very exciting for me. Recording new songs and taking a different journey in the writing process, it feels like a big step, and I feel very free in a lot of ways. I can’t tell you who I’m working with, because…” she trails off before changing tack. “I think definitely for Australia I’ll let the first record have a chance, because it’s all new for you guys.” Bringing a band with her, Whitley promises a mix of Fourth Corner as well as some of her newest material, songs she is midway through recording when we speak. If the live footage of her concerts online is anything to go by, it will be a galvanising show. One quality that threads through all her work is a sparseness of her arrangements, a move that foregrounds her voice and makes listening to her music an uncommonly direct and affecting experience. Having so many talented friends who would doubtless lend

“I HAVE A LOW TOLERANCE FOR – AND EXCUSE THE LANGUAGE – BULLSHIT.”

Constantly travelling with her father as a child, and moving between Europe and the United States, her transience lends a thematic tone of connecting and disconnecting from people and places to her gritty, bluesy neo-soul. “Travelling is a big part of my songs. Up until now, they’ve been carried more by introspective metaphors than a specific line of storytelling or narrative, and not just from my background and my childhood, but from travelling so much as an adult,” she says in a tired, brittle voice. The current Arctic climate in New York and the occasional sniff lends a frailty to her words, which sound like they’re coming from somewhere warm and cosy. “In a way, I’ve had a career in reverse. I started touring so early – long before I released any records – and I’ve been in travelling with music for as long as I can recall. In all the time I’ve been writing, before my first record came out, a lot of my songs had this nomadic spirit about them.” The death of her father from lung cancer in 2005 marked a turning point in Whitley’s life. From expressing herself in a multitude of mediums, she focused instead on songwriting and singing with an openness similar 16 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

I never thought of singing as a job I would have. I’m so grateful that I‘ve turned my life and entire being into a profession.” When her first EP, 2008’s Strong Blood (produced by influential bassist, singer and songwriter Meshell Ndegeocello) found its way into the hands of super-producer Daniel Lanois (U2, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Martha & The Muffins), a phone call resulted in the two forming a band, Black Dub. This became the outlet for much of Whitley’s work, though in the background she released two more EPs

a hand, the fact that Whitley chooses such minimal instrumentation turns out to be an ethical, as well as a musical, choice. “I can definitely say that I’ve been a strong advocate for trimming the fat wherever you can,” she says, audibly warming to the subject. “I have a low tolerance for – and excuse the language – bullshit. Especially for the world that we live [in] where there is SO much excess in everything. For me, I think, ‘Don’t fuck with our natural instincts and our intelligence as a species. I don’t want to be numbed and dumbed-down by a massive amount of stuff ’, and that really resonates in everything I do.” She pauses and then laughs, “I’m very philosophical and I tend to bring this sort of language into my work, which is largely an outcome of what my values in life are. I like things to feel honest and pure in a way, and touching. Anything that doesn’t or can’t allow those things to flourish, I am very willing to lose.” Thankfully, one of the things she did lose along the way was her job in Queens. After failing to be ‘normal’, Whitley puts her subsequent step from kitchen to stage down to factors she says are beyond her control, and part of a basic human need for freedom. “There has always


LEARNING TO UNLEARN Learning to write music is hard. Unlearning to write music is harder. To help you unlearn, here are some tips from Trixie Whitley: “We’re all influenced by life in general, but to stay true to your essential core you have to unlearn every influence you’ve had to develop a language that is truly your own.” “Everyone I’ve ever worked with has had some impact on me, but it’s dangerous to look up to someone or something so much that their influence designs your sound.” “I think it’s inevitable that people are influenced by everything that has touched them in life. I can name a few people who have been important to me on my journey. Meshell Ndegeocello, I grew up listening to her records, and then I worked with her early on. She had a big impact on me for sure. The same as Brian Blade and Daniel Lanois, Daryl Johnson – they had an impact on me because I worked with them too. I actively, and respectfully, work to not let them influence what I do now.”

been a force inside me,” she explains keenly. “A force that is untameable in many ways. I don’t want to be confined to anything when it comes to this language of expression. I feel like that’s all I can identify myself with.” With the release of her first three EPs and now debut album, one place that has taken her to their heart is her home country of Belgium, proving it by recently awarding her a Music Industry Award for Best Female Artist. “It was very weird,” she laughs. “Belgium is a very small country and I haven’t lived there in years. It’s a little strange, my relationship with there, because I’m half-Belgian but I don’t really have a lot of ties left. It was a little awkward, but to win was a great honour because it’s voted for by the public and it’s wonderful to see that, even being there so little and being so inactive in the scene, I still got recognition. It was like when Gotye won some of these awards, because he has a Belgian mom or something!”

“It’s one thing to learn from every crossing path, and to make those experiences deeply inspiring in a positive way, but negative experiences are also essential and equally important. Learning how to do this is part of unlearning.”

WHEN & WHERE: 17 & 18 Apr, Bluesfest, Byron Bay; 20 Apr, Northcote Social Club THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 17


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ON THE ATTACK

ended up playing shows in cities where before we’d played to hundreds of people and suddenly we were playing to a dozen people. It was a remarkable failure.

US indie icons Sebadoh have taken their reunion to the logical next level with the release of new album, Defend Yourself. Band mainstay Lou Barlow talks to Steve Bell about grasping second chances and following that little voice in your head.

“But the new material really came from us going back and doing these shows where we were playing a lot of the stuff from Bakesale and Harmacy and [1993’s] Bubble And Scrape and kind of tapping into that older energy of the band. I think when we tackled the new recordings that’s what influenced it.”

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As with most Sebadoh material, Barlow’s contributions – he splits songwriting evenly with bandmate Jason Lowenstein – is characterised by its brutal honesty, although he attests that this approach is in his creative DNA rather than some contrived quest for catharsis.

t gets to the stage with any full-blown reunion of a seminal band where nostalgia is no longer enough to keep either the protagonists or punters coming back for more. At that juncture there’s only two clearcut options – either put the project back in mothballs or conjure with some compelling new music. The latter option is of course fraught with danger – not least the possibility of tarnishing one’s ‘legacy’ – but the prevailing viewpoint is that a band eventually needs new tunes if they’re to be seen as a relevant ongoing concern. In the case of ‘90s US indie legends Sebadoh they’d survived by revisiting their former glories since reforming back in 2007 – they’d toured both different incarnations and different eras of the band – before deciding that enough was enough, eventually hitting the studio and emerging with last year’s excellent eighth album, Defend Yourself (their first long-player since 1999’s The Sebadoh). Fortunately founding member and co-frontman Lou Barlow had recently been through a similar process with his other reformed alma mater Dinosaur Jr, so he had firsthand experience which proved that going back to the well – if approached correctly – can indeed pay handsome dividends. “I used the model of Dinosaur – the new material for Dinosaur really revitalised the band,” Barlow remembers. “I’ve been in the reincarnated, reunited version for twice as long as I was in the band originally so it worked – it’s actually amazing. We just out ourselves to the challenge of making new music with Dinosaur and we just did it in a very natural way, and with Sebadoh that’s what I used as the model – if we just go in and put some microphones there and record we will make a new Sebadoh record, and it will be Sebadoh. We always had our own musical identity and our own little sound, in the same way that Dinosaur does, so I knew that it could work if we just let it happen.” Sebadoh’s sound changed quite dramatically over the initial journey, and Barlow admits that they returned to these various eras as a template for the new music – namely their super-fertile mid-period, eschewing what they saw as the shortcomings of their later releases. “I did [have an agenda for the sound] a little bit,” he continues. “With [1996’s] Harmacy that was our

big follow up to [1994’s] Bakesale and it was meant to be our ‘breakout record’, but it was obvious to me at the time – I knew when we were recording it – that it would not be our breakout record. I just knew that you

“They’re all pretty much break-up songs,” he tells of his contributions to Defend Yourself. “I don’t mind them being so personal – that’s what I’ve always done. I’ve embarrassed myself countless times – I don’t even think about it anymore, I just do it. I’m not

“THE NEW MATERIAL REALLY CAME FROM US GOING BACK… AND KIND OF TAPPING INTO THAT OLDER ENERGY OF THE BAND.” couldn’t really take our basic thing and polish it up and make it into something more than it was, and I think it actually detracted from what we had trying to do that. “And I actually like The Sebadoh, but that’s a pretty complex and deep record – that one was also reviled. That one was really disliked among fans and was the end of an era for us, because we

naming names or anything like that, but I’ve always done it that way and it’s basically the only way I can do it because if I try to make something clever or tried to put a lot of metaphor in my songs or tried to describe something by describing something else, I wouldn’t even know how to remember the words. “Unless I’m speaking directly from my own experience and what I’m actually thinking – unless I’m speaking almost directly from that little voice in my head – then I can’t remember the lyrics when I play live, and that to me is unacceptable. To me it has to be easy – it has to be natural and easy – so, especially with Sebadoh, I default to purely autobiographical, stark language.” WHAT: Defend Yourself (Domino/EMI) WHEN & WHERE: 21 Mar, Corner Hotel


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music

HE AIN’T HEAVY The Sunnyboys’ triumphant return has played out like some far-fetched morality play – founding bassist Peter Oxley tells Steve Bell about boundless brotherly love and torrid teenage triumphs.

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n the two years since legendary ‘80s rockers Sunnyboys burst back into public consciousness at the inaugural Dig It Up! shindig, much has (rightly) been made of frontman Jeremy Oxley’s incredible triumph over mental illness. Oxley’s decades-long battle against paranoid schizophrenia became widespread public knowledge when featured in the harrowing-but-uplifting doco The Sunnyboy, his brave return to the spotlight eventually proving inspirational for countless people everywhere. What The Sunnyboy also highlighted, however, was the unwavering dedication exhibited by Jeremy’s older brother Peter – also the Sunnyboys’ bassist – who never stopped believing that one day he’d be able to pry his prodigiously-talented sibling from the clutches of his terrible affliction. To see the delight in Peter’s eyes as he watches Jeremy bringing the Sunnyboys’ amazing music back to life during these reunion shows – the brothers joined by fellow founding members Richard Burgman (guitar) and Bil Bilson (drums) – has been almost as special as hearing those incredible songs played once more in anger. “That’s the greatest thing,” Peter smiles. “We didn’t think we’d be able to play together – the four of us – and I think it’s great for Jeremy because he’s loving playing and he’s a remarkable guitar player – he just keeps getting better! I’m proud of him for just getting up there and doing it; it’s so great to play with him again. [And] Mary, Jeremy’s wife – without her love and support it’d be a much different situation, but the stars have aligned and we’re in this special place where we’re able to play. What’s quite amazing is that after all these years we have a lot of people that really love the band and the music – that’s what’s really special for us.” With the release last year of Sunnyboys compilation Our Best Of and the recent remastered reissue of their seminal 1981 debut, the focus has returned to the band’s stunning catalogue of music – why does Oxley believe the songs have aged so well? “When we put songs together back in the day, we never thought about how we should sound, we essentially

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played them as we felt,” Peter ponders. “We never had any premeditated idea of whether we should be new romantics or psychedelic or anything – it was just how we were. I think that was slightly naïve on our behalf, which was really great – we didn’t form the band to get in the

just 18 when that happened,” Peter reflects. “You meet an 18-year-old now and think, ‘Wow, I’d made an album by that stage and been top ten in the charts’, and we’d been on tour six nights a week – it was pretty full-on. “We played big shows, like The Manly Vale Hotel used to hold about 1800 people; it was just a big rectangular room with a stage down one end, and people would smoke cigarettes and drink beer out of schooner glasses or cans – it was just wild! It was full of surfers and girls and everyone would just take their clothes off, basically. The blokes would have their shirts off and the girls would be in singlets, and at the end of the

“WE DIDN’T FORM THE BAND TO GET IN THE CHARTS, WE JUST FORMED THE BAND BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WE USED TO ALWAYS DO.” charts, we just formed the band because that’s what we used to always do. All the way through high school, Bil, myself and Jeremy always just had bands; we’d had bands since we were 15, so it was quite a natural thing for us to do when we were all in Sydney.” It’s easy to forget that the Sunnyboys were so young when they were thrust into the thriving pub circuit. “Jeremy was

night there would be smoke everywhere and the floor would be littered with glass and cans and it was just amazing – there’d be condensation dripping down the walls, because there was no air conditioning. Although they probably had air con, they just wouldn’t turn it on because they wanted you to drink more beer! “There were great bands everywhere – INXS, The Models, The Church and Midnight Oil were thundering around, it was a really intense time of great music – and it’s been great to relive it and to show again how good we were, live particularly, and just to get those songs back out there. I think we’re really lucky to be able to do that.” WHAT: Sunnyboys (Festival/Warner) WHEN & WHERE: 21 & 22 Mar, Forum Theatre


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festival

BEST AND BRIGHTEST

MTC’s Neon Festival Of Independent Theatre is back again after the success of its inaugural run last year, presenting five boundary-pushing and intriguing independent pieces of theatre.

MKA. PIC: SARAH WALKER

Southbank Theatre: The Lawler, 10 – 20 Jul From Nicola Gunn and Sans Hotel comes Green Screen, an examination of the concept of identity and change that’s part career expo, part social experiment. It covers topics such as the relationship between being and doing, how we can save the planet, transformation and utopias. Southbank Theatre: The Lawler, 24 Jul – 3 Aug

Southbank Theatre: The Lawler, 29 May – 8 Jun

Neon Up Late: MKA

Resplendence In Resplendence, Angus Cerini/Doubletap respond to the world we live in. Focusing on the nature of existence, they explore what is beyond our control, unfulfilled desires and the human condition. Southbank Theatre: The Lawler, 12 – 22 Jun

Creative duo Arthur bring us The Myth Project: Twin, the first instalment of a multi-episode exploration into the Australian psyche. After her twin’s sudden appearance, Ana enters a world of dark riddles and dreams – presented in a mix of opera-noir, cabaret and naturalistic drama. Green Screen

Dangerous Liaisons Little Ones Theatre will open Neon with their seductive version of Dangerous Liaisons. Director Stephen Nicolazzo uses a period drama setting contrasted with high camp and comedy to explore sex, gender and power-play.

The Myth Project: Twin

SANS HOTEL. PIC: PIER CARTHEW

Neon Up Late showcases three works-in-progress through informal play readings, curated and presented by MKA: Theatre Of New Writing. Lord Willing And The Creek Don’t Rise is about a suicidal, homicidal army vet; Triumph traces the effect of real and imagined trauma; and Alraune is a tale of sexual double standards, lust and science gone wrong. See mtc.com.au/neon for reading dates and times.

Photographs Of A

Neon Extra

Daniel Keene and Antechamber Productions delve into the life of Louise Augustine Gleizes (or Augustine/A), a teen in the late 19th century who was diagnosed with hysteria and studied by ‘father of modern neurology’ Jean-Martin Charcot.

This year’s Neon Talks program features Komische Oper Berlin’s Intendant and Chef Regisseur Barrie Kosky for Neon’s inaugural keynote conversation, as well as panels for Who Can Tell Whose Stories? and What Is ‘Australian Theatre’ Now? There will also be Common Ground events in which theatre practitioners can come together and discuss challenges in their field, and Insights events for independent theatre-makers, plus a directing masterclass and writing workshops. Visit mtc.com.au/neon for details.

Southbank Theatre: The Lawler, 26 Jun – 6 Jul

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LITTLE ONES. PIC: SARAH WALKER


RIP THIS JOINT

The first track I played on was Live With Me, which was also the first track that Mick Taylor played on.”

Bobby Keys has played on heaps of your favourite records. He tells Dan Condon a little about it.

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here’s not enough space on this half-page to cover the depth of Bobby Keys’ discography. Here he is discussing a sample of the setlist you can expect when his Suffering Bastards come to town; he played on all these original recordings. “A lot of the material is taken from the Stones stuff, Exile On Main Street and Sticky Fingers, that period of time,” he says in his friendly Texan drawl. “Also some stuff from Joe Cocker I did with Mad Dogs & Englishmen, some hit records I did with George Harrison on All Things Must Pass and some John Lennon things people would be familiar with; Whatever Gets Your Through The Night and Power To The People.”

That’s barely scratching the surface; you could go into classic albums from Warren Zevon, Dr John, Eric Clapton, Donovan, Harry Nilsson… Even the personnel on Keys’ eponymous 1972 debut solo album are staggering, “There’s some great players on there. Clapton plays a lot of guitar on there, George and Ringo, Billy Preston, some excellent musicians…” The Rolling Stones will always be the band Keys is best known for his association with; he’s been with them almost 45 years and has been a vital part of their sound. He says when he first went in to lay down a sax part on the Let It Bleed album, he didn’t know what he was getting himself into. “Didn’t have a clue.

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After all these years, he never gets sick of playing with or listening to the Stones. “Nope, I really don’t. The band have never become a parody of themselves, they’re not just going through the motions or any of that jazz – I’d get sick of that real fast. I don’t get sick of playing with people that are playing on the kind of level they are – I’ve played Brown Sugar 2000 times or more, and I still put everything into it as much as I did the first time I played it – as do they. Having played on so many hugely influential recordings, it’s interesting to hear where Keys himself found his early inspiration. The late 1950s was a big time for the saxophone in rock’n’roll. “My approach to music was influenced by King Curtis and saxophone players of the late ‘50s on the Atlantic label, they had so many great saxophone players – The Coasters’ records, LaVern Baker… That’s when I became really aware of the saxophone as a rock’n’roll instrument. And those old r’n’b records, Fats Domino, Little Richard – everyone had saxophones! Then it changed and everybody had guitars.” He comes to Australia with The Suffering Bastards, a band put together by a friend for a bit of fun. “It all came about primarily because I was looking for something to do; a sax player in Nashville is not the busiest guy in town. I ran into this fella Chark [Von Kinsolving]; he had a place to play and knew musicians and it worked out real well.” WHERE & WHEN: 27 Mar, Caravan Music Club; 27 Mar, Thornbury Theatre

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the list. “The Aussies truly understand us and have been so supportive since day one. We had a great time playing with The Roots out there in 2003.” Potsic says the break was needed to refresh everyone’s batteries but it didn’t take long to turn the clock back once everyone was back in the rehearsal room. “After going through some of the songs in rehearsals it was like getting back on a bike after an extended vacation. The MCs laughed about how intricate and detailed some of the verses were, while Cut and I were trying to figure out how to create an entirely new DJ experience. All in all I’d say we started to feel the chemistry in an hour or so especially with all the jokes.” It’s an intriguing prospect, fitting a primarily positive big name live hip hop group back into the modern musical landscape - especially now J5’s most similar peers, The Roots are almost better known as a TV backing band. Potsic says the group are used to being out of step with the industry. “We’ve never fitted into anything. We are truly misfits when it comes to conventionalism in the music industry. That’s part of the reason why people are still intrigued with our chemistry.”

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The positivity that became the group’s trademark wasn’t always considered a good thing by the group itself. “Actually, that positivity created a challenge for us. The masses need to know where to categorise music. At that time the average consumer was used to jiggy, thugged-out hip hop to the point of not knowing if there was anything out there that differed in style. That mind-set made it tough for us to break into new markets. It was our stage presence that catapulted our name in front of new audiences who were eager to hear something other than Top 40 hip hop.”

THEY’RE GOLDEN Jurassic 5 are back with their classic rap shit. DJ Nu-Mark tells Danielle O’Donohue the big Coachella reunion almost didn’t go as planned.

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here are just minutes to go before you’re supposed to walk out onstage in front of a field full of Coachella revellers eagerly awaiting your first show in seven years. But then disaster strikes. A crew member drops a vital piece of your crewmate’s gear. What do you do? Do you panic and lose your cool? Start yelling and throwing your weight around? Or refuse to go onstage until everything is fixed, turning an eager crowd impatient and frustrated. If you’re Mark Potsic, better known as Nu-Mark, the renowned DJ from hip hop collective Jurassic 5, you don’t do any of those things. Instead, you pull out your smartphone and get your picture taken with one of the most famous musicians in the world. “That was absolutely the craziest show I’ve experienced,” Potsic admits. “What people don’t know about Coachella is that five minutes before myself and Cut Chemist were rolled out on stage we had a major equipment failure. Our engineer dropped Cut’s portable turntable and the needle shattered, and as that happens Sir Paul McCartney walks up. “This is about the time where a bubble appears over my head that says ‘Nu-Mark, do you help Cut with his needle problem or take a picture with the best melody arranger in the world?’ So, I took a few pics with Paul and I told him he’s my Gemini twin. He winked at me and I handed Cut a spare needle.” 26 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

Luckily Jurassic 5 also have plenty of friends at events like this and fellow DJ, Z-Trip, was on hand to lend his expertise. “As they roll our risers full of DJ equipment on stage, Z-Trip is superglueing a needle into a portable turntable and blowing on it so it dries. Yeah, first show in seven years and the group still crushed it. Proud of ‘em!” It was a triumphant return for a group known for the dynamism of their performances. With a return to the original line-up that includes Cut Chemist and Chali 2na, it wasn’t long before offers to do international tours were flooding in, Australia top of

“WE ARE TRULY MISFITS WHEN IT COMES TO CONVENTIONALISM.”

Despite the challenges, J5 were able to make their difference work for them and their breakthrough album, Quality Control, recently ticked over Gold sales in the US, an achievement Potsic is very proud of. “For me that’s really a big deal because it’s so tough to sell anything physical these days in the music industry. With all the piracy that has now become acceptable and almost expected, it really brings a smile to my face to hear that we sold Gold on an underground hip hop LP. At the time it was released Interscope was struggling to figure out how to sell Jurassic 5 albums because the other artists on the label, Dre, 50 and Eminem, were selling records left and right and almost made it look easy. For us, we really had to perform in every market and battle a ton opposition.” WHEN & WHERE: 20 & 21 Mar, Palace Theatre


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TALE OF TWO SEASONS Revisiting their latest album with its official Australian release, Philip Jamieson is eager to extend the lifetime of a record he considers Caspian’s finest hour. He chats with Benny Doyle.

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assachusetts instrumental rockers Caspian are heading Down Under for the very first time, roughly ten years since they began gigging around their oceanside hometown of Beverly. Band lynchpin Philip Jamieson admits that he has problems putting his joy into words regarding this maiden voyage, but says the situation is something he never expected. “In the back of our minds we always hoped that we would reach as many people as possible, but I don’t necessarily know if we thought it would reach as far as it has,” he smiles. “It continues to be a huge honour and a privilege to do this, and to bring [our music] to people who haven’t heard it, who are literally on the other side of planet earth. We really want to give [Australia] ten years of music in 70 minutes, if that’s possible. We’re going to present the suite, that’s for sure; we’ve got the arsenal ready.” Long established throughout North America and Europe as a post-rock force, the five-piece have gradually extended their three-guitar sonic attack to incorporate more mood into their soundscapes. This was brought to life no clearer than on 2012’s Waking Season, an album – recorded with celebrated post-rock player and producer Matt Bayles – which terrified Jamieson in its infancy. “We stretched the songs out so much and we got a little less proggy; things got a little lighter and ethereal and ambient, and we tried to incorporate textures beyond just the guitars. Pulling ourselves away from that was a little frightening at first but it was something that we ended up being proud of.” In the 18 months since its initial reveal, the success and reach of the record has all but exceeded Caspian’s expectations in terms of the way their fans have received it. This has pushed Aussie indie imprint Hobbledehoy to re-release Waking Season as a deluxe double vinyl to tie-in with the band’s debut tour. But Groundhog Day this isn’t for the quintet, with Jamieson admitting that reliving this music is a joy. “It’s like multiple Waking Seasons, it just keeps rising,” he chuckles. “[The record] was kinda a crossroad for us because we’d done everything ourselves up to that point, 28 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

and we were proud with what we had done, but when it came time to do that record we invested more work, more time, more everything into [its] creation. To see it get recitation with the release in Australia and getting people to experience it for the first time, it brings us back to the moment

was with us we channelled his energy and his presence into the music from his contributions; now that he’s no longer with us, we have our memories of him, and they’re all beautiful and wonderful and they’re things we use in a different way towards the music – we’ll see when we start writing this summer. But every show that we’ve played without him, pretty much every moment, we feel his presence all the time, and we want to make the band succeed for him especially.” Jamieson says that Caspian have trouble writing between tours, preferring instead to assimilate back into normal life before they begin work on a record. But having

“WHEN IT COMES TO CREATING, WE TRY TO THROW DOGMA OUT THE WINDOW.” [when] we were creating the record, and it was a great time for us so it’s nice to revisit it.”

already written the majority of one new song, the group are ahead of their standard curve, and with nothing extensive on the horizon following this Australian tour, a new album could become a reality before the year is out.

The strength of these songs also stands as a fitting tribute to their former bass player Chris Friedrich, who tragically passed away last year, aged 32.

“The talk around the campfire from everyone right now is that we’d kinda like to get back into heavier music a little bit,” reveals Jamieson. “We’ll see, though – before we started Waking Season we wanted to just totally get rid of guitars all together, and of course there’s [still] lots of guitars on the record, so there’s certain things you can’t detach from. When it comes to creating, we try to throw dogma out the window; we try to make it as pure a process as possible, whatever feels right, whatever sounds right, and we try to follow that.”

“His spirit is imbued in every piece of music we’ve done up until now, and always will be, but in a different way,” says Jamieson. “We know when Chris

WHAT: Waking Season (Hobbledehoy) WHEN & WHERE: 21 Mar, Evelyn Hotel


VINTAGE THREADS

Cyclone speaks to Nadia Barbaro about her book Vintage Girls, and making vintage clothes new again.

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intage fashion has never been as popular – or as accessible. Fashion once privileged the ‘new’, with only uni students buying secondhand ‘rags’. But today even pop stars like Florence Welch favour clothes from bygone eras. Now Melbourne stylist Nadia Barbaro is publishing Vintage Girls, featuring a set of fashionistas who model, and talk, vintage attire – among them Kimbra, Australian ballerina Juliet Burnett, and Mad Men costumier Janie Bryant. Vintage Girls, available as either a limited edition text or as an e-book, will be launched at 2014’s Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival, and its frocks displayed.

The versatile Barbaro has styled fashion editorials, ad campaigns and music videos (including for singer-songwriter Sarah Blasko, also profiled in the tome). “I got into styling because I really do love fashion,” she says. “My background was a Bachelor of Creative Arts at Melbourne Uni, so I did a lot of film studies. I ended up working in wardrobe in the film industry – and I still do that. [But] I also love the opportunity to do fashion shoots ‘cause they’re so different – they’re just completely different ways of approaching the clothing.” Barbaro’s attraction to vintage began in childhood. She’d admire her Italian grandmother’s old handbags and dresses.

A teen Barbaro scoured Camberwell Market for clothing distinct from that sold in chain stores. Later, she became Creative Director of the online fashion mag Sesame – and Vintage Girls similarly originated as a “personal” project. “I knew that there are other women who are really interested in vintage fashion and I wanted to hear their stories and meet with them. I just think, especially now when there’s so much fast fashion, [or] disposable fashion, it’s really an interesting topic to focus on.”

fashion

Barbaro admits to having “a wishlist” of women she esteemed for their individualistic style and work. However, she likewise sought to represent women from different cities. As such, Vintage Girls has taken Barbaro around two years to assemble – and seen her cross the Atlantic. In London she dressed Sarah Owen, Lily Allen’s older sister, who runs the vintage-hire outlet Lucy in Disguise. Barbaro holds that women, resisting the constant turnover of fashion trends, desire unique and timeless garments. Then, being of higher quality, and recycled, vintage appeals to those concerned with the environment and the ethics of manufacturing en masse. Collectors can raid op shops, markets and eBay, and curated boutiques exist, too. Vintage risks looking “costumey” but, as Barbaro’s ‘girls’ demonstrate, carrying it off is all about the styling. “I wanted to share vintage in a new and contemporary way… It doesn’t have that granny stigma to it. There’s more beyond just ‘60s dresses at the op shop – there’s a whole world of different, exciting clothes that are vintage to look at and to wear.” WHAT: Vintage Girls WHEN & WHERE: 18 – 23 Mar, Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival, InterContinental Melbourne, The Rialto

RECKLESS GOSSIP

music

Having faced down Hurricane Sandy, Taylor Momsen is ready to take on the world. The provocative frontwoman chats with Kitt Di Camillo ahead of the release of album number two from The Pretty Reckless.

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fter more than two years of solid touring, The Pretty Reckless were a well oiled machine when it came time to record a follow-up to their breakthrough debut album Light Me Up. The line-up of guitarist Ben Phillips, bassist Mark Damon, drummer Jamie Perkins and irrepressible frontwoman Taylor Momsen won over the initial doubters through a brutal live show by refusing refusal to go any direction but their own. Raring to go and with new tracks already in the bag, the band quickly found recording more of a mission than anyone could have expected. “This record took a lot,” explains Momsen. “We were working at this studio called Water Music in Hoboken New Jersey, and it was just our room, totally our vibe, our shit, and everything was flowing and it was great. Then Hurricane Sandy came in, wiped out the studio, took all our gear and guitars and recordings with it. So that was not fun! And from there we had to rebuild and find a new place to record because the studio was getting rebuilt. When we got a new studio we started recording again, and right as everything was starting to go great again our producer’s wife passed [away] very suddenly overnight. She was like a mother to everyone in the band. It doesn’t get any closer than that. I get choked up every time I talk about it – no one’s over it yet. The record’s

dedicated to her. So that stopped everything again and then during that break we actually wrote the song Fucked Up World, and then ended up recording the final songs for the record – the last songs we recorded back at Water Studios – so it came full circle. But death makes a hurricane look like nothing. So we went through a lot of tragedy and a lot of hardships, but I think that you can hear it in the record.” Beneath Momsen’s media-baiting antics is a powerful voice that defies any misconceptions stemming from her acting background, proving that her Gossip Girl days are now far behind her. “It

definitely was a struggle to overcome the actress-turnedmusician stereotype. When really I was a musician way before I was an actress anyway. I play piano, I play guitar, I’ve been writing songs since I was a kid, I’ve been singing since before I can remember. “But there definitely was a bit of struggle to get the public to see that. If you watch someone on a television show week after week playing a character, it’s just that – it’s a character. I look the same, I have the same face, I have the same voice, but I’m saying someone else’s lines. So to get someone to see you outside of that definitely took some time. But it’s been five years now since I acted and that transition has definitely happened. The people coming to shows aren’t bringing Gossip Girl DVDs to get signed, you know? They’re bringing records and they know every word to every song, they’re there for the music.” WHAT: Going To Hell (Cooking Vinyl) THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 29


music

METAL FOR PEACE Although hailing from a land historically rooted in hatred and bloodshed, Israeli metal act Orphaned Land want to discuss the light rather than the darkness, vocalist Kobi Farhi informs Brendan Crabb.

“W

e always heard about Australia because there’s a big Jewish community,” Kobi Farhi comments. “Everyone knows that all Australians are saying ‘no worries’. And that’s something very inspiring for us as Israelis, coming from the Middle East. Being Jewish we’re always worried about so many things,” he chuckles. “It’s always stories that Australia is magical and everybody is living a peaceful life. Of course you probably have your own problems and not everybody is perfect, but when we get to hear about Australia, we always

[think] about it in a positive way, that we want that peaceful life as well.” A first Australian tour is another landmark for the Israeli progressive metallers, now into their third decade, whose career highlights include supporting Metallica in their homeland and playing major festivals like Germany’s Wacken. Fans even started an online petition to nominate them for the Nobel Peace Prize. Head-banging for peace, Orphaned Land recently toured Europe with Palestinian band Khalas. Their sophisticated aural seduction has gradually seeped into international consciousness, courtesy their being

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featured in 2007 documentary, Global Metal. “We’re living in a free country, we can do whatever we want, speak about whatever we want, so for [filmmaker] Sam Dunn to come here and film it was just the easiest thing in the world.” Dunn’s film showcases other Israeli musicians acknowledging their everyday reality is infinitely more confronting than the fictional horror often portrayed within metal. In it Farhi emphasised that Orphaned Land try to be the “good news” coming out of Israel. “There is plenty of darkness in this world. I think this is why we should speak about the light. “We’re not using mythology; we’re using more stories that are happening these days. It’s very interesting, because everyone is familiar with bands from Europe or United States, and there weren’t many bands emerging from the Middle East. So for a metal fan it’s interesting to explore a heavy metal band from the Middle East, and to hear the stories from first impressions… The story of Orphaned Land is very interesting, because we’re an Israeli band, we have Arab fans; we’re functioning and writing music in a conflict zone. “Being Israelis with Arab fans is something that, if you would have told anyone 20 years ago that Arabs will follow an Israeli band, that would have been one of the biggest jokes around. It’s happening, because the themes are strong, the music is strong, and the subjects are very deep. People find it interesting, even in Israel or Arab countries, or anywhere in the world. I think Australians should find it interesting as well, because they can be proud as metal fans to see the achievements that metal has succeeded to gain in the Middle East. That’s a story for every metal-head everywhere in the world.” WHEN & WHERE: 22 Mar, The Espy

IMPROV ELECTRO While recording Obsidian, his third album as Baths, Will Wiesenfeld realised he wanted more freedom live – the ability to perform as a lead singer. That meant expanding the band. He talks to Sky Kirkham about the impact the change has had.

“I

t’s been more fun,” Wiesenfeld reflects, on the addition of Morgan Greenwood (of Azeda Booth) to Baths. “It’s a different sort of atmosphere. The set feels more flexible and more interesting to perform, whereas by myself I felt more limited in the actual sounds that I could make and things that I could do. One of the biggest contributions that Morgan made was being adamant about having improv in our sets, improvisational electronic bits. I was really sceptical at first, but it’s become the most fun parts of performing live for us, because each time we get to one of those sections it’s kind of like a free-for-all and it’s really exciting. “Morgan is one of the only people that I can even fathom doing a full record with. It’s taken a year of us doing stuff together [for me] to feel comfortable with the idea, [but] we’ve already sort of made a song together. I have a new EP coming out soon and the fourth track on it is one that we worked on together, so that will be the first thing out in the world that is of that collaboration, fully. I think for the next fulllength record we’re trying to actually work together. I may start a lot of the productions on my own, but he’s going to be heavily involved in a way that I haven’t had someone involved before, so it’s going to be interesting.”

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Obsidian is a much darker album than Baths’ first, Cerulean. Interestingly, Wiesenfeld says while he is inspired by music, his main influence is actually visual. “It’s hard to make it make sense, but the deepest inspiration for me is crazy Japanese art, and a lot of weird, rare, gay art from Japan. And animation in general. I’m constantly saving images on my phone or buying movies, or downloading things; searching through forums or Pixiv. So, at least in the past couple of years, that’s been my main thing: I can’t get enough of it and it always inspires me to try to write music that feels like the images I’m looking at.

“A small idea can still have a really broad sense of inspiration that you can’t really explain. One of the songs on Obsidian, No Past Lives, was just a sonic idea. I wanted to have a sharp jittery piano part that falls into something very loud and kind of earthquakey and slower, and then jumps between the parts a bunch, so that it’s very jarring, and the timing is different each time so it feels kind of uncomfortable. And I had that in my head before I’d made a single note of that song. Sometimes a single word will be a big inspiration and then I can write a whole song around that, so it will have small seeds, or sometimes it’s a very big idea that gets smaller. For me the fun of recording is that it’s always different.” WHEN & WHERE: 22 Mar, Corner Hotel


VIOLENT TRANQUILLITY With melodeath progenitors Dark Tranquillity heading Down Under, Mark Hebblewhite sat down with main man Mikael Stanne to talk artistic progression and the roots of the Gothenburg sound.

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usical revolutions happen in the strangest of places. And one of the strangest of all is the picturesque Swedish city of Gothenburg – home to a post-modernist opera house and, in the mid-1990s, a melodic death metal movement that’s gone on to influence a vast swathe of modern heavy music. Where the trailblazing Swedish Death Metal scene of Stockholm was dominated by punk attitude and the fuzzed sound of the Boss HM-2 pedal, the later Gothenburg death metal invasion sounded like

the bands were having an illicit affair with various members of Iron Maiden and Rush. “I think the melodic death metal sound can be put down to a few things,” muses Stanne, whose band, along with In Flames and At The Gates, is considered to have sired the melodeath sound. “First and foremost we were all brought up on a steady diet of the New Wave Of British Heavy Metal – so it made sense to incorporate the melodic aspects of that style into the more extreme death metal we also loved. I guess it was also a reaction to the fact that the Stockholm

sound was so ubiquitous. We loved those bands but we also wanted to do something different. I mean, as soon as we wrote music that was similar to other bands we would throw it away and start again. I think we also liked cleaner production and we didn’t want that patented Sunlight Studio sound the Stockholm bands had.”

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Compared to, say, In Flames, who are no longer recognisable as a death metal band, Dark Tranquillity have generally remained true to their own highly idiosyncratic brand of melodeath. That said, they’ve taken some divisive left-hand musical turns – first on 1999’s Projector and now again with last year’s Construct, which boasts clean vocals and a gentler sonic assault. “Construct was a reaction to the albums that came before it. We needed to take the risk doing this record – we couldn’t have carried on doing the same album again and again. We weren’t exactly burnt out but we did need to get excited about writing again. After 20 years of writing records things don’t get any easier.” “We were prepared for the fact that Construct would be polarising – that happened when we did Projector. But now when we play the songs live they go over very well and I think that’s the best good review we could possibly get.” Dark Tranquillity haven’t graced our shores in over seven years. “We play a longer set now than at any time in our career. We’ve been changing up the songs we play on this tour every night so there’s always something different. I think by the time we get to Australia the balance will be perfect. I promise a lot of old stuff and a lot of new stuff – so everyone should be happy.” WHEN & WHERE: 27 Mar, 170 Russell

LOSE YOURSELF TO LIVE MUSIC

art

Melbourne – contain yourself. The enigmatic and energetic stadium rock epicness of Sam Halmarack & The Miserablites is on its way for the Festival of Live Art. Liz Guiffre investigates.

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ike all good live shows, the presence Sam Halmarack & The Miserablites have has to be felt to really be experienced. And there’s very little on record about the group’s core members – making the live experience an even more special event. “I’ve had numerous calls from audience members wanting follow-ups to the key parts of the show, fan T-shirts and fan art, with interpretations of the band more wild than I could ever imagine,” says Sam Halmarack, talking from the UK. “It’s almost as if no one quite knows who the band are.” Halmarack and his group first caught the attention of Melbourne bookers during a show in Edinburgh, and critical column space recounting a number of their previous gigs has been particularly fond of pointing out the way audiences are made to feel really part of the music-making process. “It’s definitely a core of the show,” Halmarack says. “The show hinges around reacting to the interactivity, being in the moment, and we work really hard to make people feel a part of it. And what’s great is that audiences often get a bit carried away – there’s often a point where if people feel they want to participate, they

can, which is really rare for such a big show.” Quite a leap of faith, as getting the whole band in the one room at one time is often logistically difficult, but it’s not something he has let stop him. Instead, Hamarack has done what great musos over time have done – improvised. “There was one night where I asked if someone in the audience played keyboard, and not only did a lady do it, but she kept going – she quite upstaged the band actually.” The band’s eclectic musical output is also

something that’s been praised by critics to date. The energy of the performance is described as upbeat, electric and ‘of the moment’. “I’ve rarely had audiences not get into it. Even if people are a little shy at first, we make them feel a real part of the music-making and experiencing process. It’s interesting too how different crowds have got into it, and we’ve been able to really play with their expectations. It’s been a shot in the dark to begin and quite hard to rehearse, but we’ve been really pleasantly surprised. We went to San Francisco a few months ago and we were interested to see how it would go culturally, but those shows really went off, too, even if they weren’t sure what would happen.” WHAT: Sam Halmarack & The Miserablites WHEN & WHERE: 20 – 22 Mar, FOLA, Arts House, North Melbourne Town Hall THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 31


film

HERE HE COMES

Tim Heidecker admits to Anthony Carew that his character in The Comedy might be a dick, but at heart he’s still a decent person.

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im Heidecker knows that, despite all of the things he does – his TV show Tim And Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!, its bizarre big-screen translation Tim And Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie, his On Cinema podcast, albums both somewhat serious (Heidecker & Wood) and absolutely not (The Yellow River Boys) – he’s always going to be best known as the groom without any lines in Bridesmaids. “I’m sure all living US presidents have seen that movie, and have seen me in it,” Heidecker laughs. “It was offered to me as a movie with Kristen Wiig and Maya Rudolph.

I thought: ‘This’ll be fun, those two ladies are hilarious’, like I’d go shoot for a few days, and then maybe a couple of years later I’d see it on cable. I had no idea it’d be this juggernaut, and that it’d be the thing most people know me from, even though I didn’t speak in it.” Right now Heidecker is working with John C. Reilly, Gregg Turkington, and director Rick Alverson on Entertainment, a “dark, depressing, bleak yet funny look at what it means to be an entertainer on the road”. It’s the kind of project the 38-year-old likes working on: a somewhat strange collaboration with friends.

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He and the staunchly independent Alverson first worked together on 2012’s The Comedy, an incisive satire on white male privilege and the currency of irony that, despite its title, is emotionally brutal. Alverson reached out to Heidecker via Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy. “He [spoke] to me about rich guys in Williamsburg who communicated through sarcasm and grotesque humour, guys who shouldn’t still be hanging out drinking in the afternoon, guys who should’ve long ago got their shit together. Now I’m a guy in my late 30s who’s married with a family, but it really connected with me. I recognised people I know who are still just hanging out in Williamsburg or Echo Park; I even saw some of myself in that. “I think of him as a guy who’s smart and funny and has the potential to be a decent person, but he’s just been drinking and fucking off and behaving poorly for so long that he’s gone too far,” Heidecker says. Alverson wanted the film to be filled with actual friends getting actually drunk, so Heidecker roped in his Tim And Eric homie Eric Wareheim, Turkington (with whom he does On Cinema), and the cast was filled out with indie musicians ( James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem, Will Sheff of Okkervil River, Richard Swift) for whom this Comedy cut close to home. This meant that, making the film was a sheer joy. “It was a lot of running around New York with this tiny crew, stealing shots on subways. At one point it occurred to me: my job, at that point, was like a dream. I was hanging out with friends, getting drunk on a sailboat, making a movie.” WHAT: The Comedy WHEN & WHERE: 25 Mar, Speakeasy, Rooftop Cinema

OCCULT METAL Mythological Occult Metal is not only a thing - for founding Absu oddity Proscriptor McGovern, it’s a way of life. Lochlan Watt investigates their tonguetwisting ideas for Australian tour number two.

“I

still think that I’m projecting a vivid objective behind the band,” comments McGovern, drummer, arranger, vocalist, lyricist, and sole remaining original member of Absu. “I think any musician can say that they’re trying to create the perfect picture of what the band’s projection is all about, and so I decided that I’m still trying to perceive that goal, and that’s something that I’ve been trying to do since ‘89.” Absu is a unique entity in the world of underground metal. McGovern believes that the band stands out against “the normal unit of extreme metal music on a universal basis.” With six full-lengths alongside numerous splits and EPs, McGovern reveals that the band is aiming to release yet another full-length, the final of their selftitled-but-spelled-differently trilogy, in early 2015. “The next album is the concluding instalment of the trilogy - it’s the Sumerian spelling of the band moniker. I decided some years ago that the three albums in the trilogy would primarily be related to and based on everything that is related to what Absu is all about. I refuse to name the last three albums with unique titles, as I simply wanted to name each one as Absu, the English spelling; Abzu,

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the Mesopotamian; and Abzu, which is the forthcoming album, but differentiated by their different cover designs. That’s the objective so far.” So what is Absu all about exactly? “On a lyrical basis I combine mythology, paranormal, and metaphysical-related topics, and when writing Absu’s music I try to express my lyrical content and ideologies as vividly as possible. Absu’s music is a formation of chaos and magick, because I believe I can change subjective experiences and objective realities. On a lyrical aspect, Absu’s music is based on OTO - Ordo Templi Orientis, Hermetic Order

Of The Golden Dawn, Thelemic Magick, Enochian Magick, Tasseomancy and Necromancy, and also the adoration of Sumerian, Mesopotamian, and Celtic mythology. So that’s basically all the formations that make up the lyrics inside of Absu’s music.” Although the band doesn’t appear to tour full-time, “everything is dedicated to Absu. That’s it. We’ve basically broken away from tour agencies and everything is pretty much dedicated to doing it ourselves. We book our own shows, we manage the band… it’s definitely full-time employment. Outside of that it’s constant studying and memorising occult science, magick and mythology on a daily basis for myself, and for what I incorporate into the lyrical conceptions of Absu. Outside of that everything else is dedicated to the businesses and the musical writing of the music.” WHEN & WHERE: 21 Mar, The Hi-Fi


THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 33


ALBUM OF THE WEEK

★★★★

album reviews

LA DISPUTE

ALOE BLACC

Better Living/Resist

Interscope/Universal

If you want to feel what life is like between North America’s Great Lakes, then disappear into La Dispute’s third LP. The stories told on Rooms Of The House are average tales. They’re pulled from frontman Jordan Dreyer’s life – his family, his friends, himself – and the commonality of the verses – coffee boiling on the stove, cutting his hair short – means there’s something that relates to our own existence as well. Dreyer’s subject matter is so specific that it’s impossible not to quickly paint a picture, and it helps build his Rooms Of The House, and ours.

It’s too easy to label a new pop direction as a sell-out; evidence is needed for a conviction. A sophisticated cut above the rest of the neo-soul funkateers, Aloe Blacc already had two decent albums and one of the slickest live shows around, so tight in fact that even the gaps between songs were exquisitely timed. But things changed last year when he co-wrote and sang on Swedish cheese carousel Avicii’s excruciatingly large mega-hit, Wake Me Up. Abandoning his established retro style, Blacc has fearlessly leapt into the realm of pure, unabashed pop.

Rooms Of The House

His spoken word/screamo delivery provides a full palate of emotion for the music to envelope around, and it does so with just as much nuance as the vocals. The two-part movement Woman (in mirror) and Woman (reading) is striking, with a beautiful guitar node that swells and swells until bursting

Lift Your Spirit

climactically in the final stage of the reprise, while First Reactions After Falling Through The Ice is intelligent abrasion at its best. The respect this music has been given by the considered production means that each element is captured to full effect. Every sound you hear is deliberate, and the flow of the record makes more sense with every listen. Rooms Of The House is an album that you’ll keep coming back to, even if you’re not quite sure why; there’s just something homely here, something that you can relate to, which is why this incredible posthardcore statement rings so true. Benny Doyle

BLACK LIPS

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Lift Your Spirit is an indigestibly sweet, sticky pop pudding. Not recommended to anyone over the age of 14. Christopher H James

Grids

Vice/ADA

The mood switches between frenetic and mid-tempo, every song dipped in cowboy swag, like the casually catchy Waiting or opener Drive-By Buddy, each telling stories equal parts grit and guts, teamed with an overwhelmingly fun energy. The songs are either drenched in murky reverb or delivered crisp and clean, each having their place on the record. There’s greater appeal in ‘60s-tinged songs like Smiling, the vocals in not-quitesinging, not quite-shouting purgatory. It’s brash, messy and undeniably entertaining. Production from Tommy Breneck (The Dap-Kings) and Patrick Carney (The Black Keys) has

Bomb, Lift Your Spirit goes all-out on positivity, and boy is it saccharine. The lyrics don’t help either. Loaded with every cliché in the book, it chimes like a corporate video for unmotivated workers. Feel like you’ve been crushed under the wheels occupational stress? Just remember that “Love is the answer” and try to “Lift your spirit” even though “Life ain’t fair”, especially when you’re “caught up in a dream” and you “only have two hands”.

TEETH & TONGUE

Underneath The Rainbow

Black Lips’ latest is a continuation of their rockabillyflecked psych-rock. Boisterous, uncontained enthusiasm married to irrepressible percussion makes Underneath The Rainbow the soundtrack you want on a road trip.

A cynic might say he’s spotted a dormant CeeLo Green-sized hole in the market. A supporter might say pop’s the right outlet for his optimistic nature and elevating voice. But pop’s an altogether different animal to soul; it often works best when it contrasts happiness and sadness. With the exception of the doom-mongering Ticking

★½

Remote Control

★★★½ certainly helped the quartet hone their musical mania. There’s no stand-out catch-all song here in the way Modern Art or Family Tree captivated on 2011’s Arabia Mountain, but there’s a new stylistic constant that makes Underneath The Rainbow an easy listen. Dorner Party is total ‘50s surf beach party teamed with psychobilly antics, and Do The Vibrate puts a sinister twist on an old-fashioned jiving dance tune, lyrics like “Put your phone in your crotch and set it on vibrate” dripping with filth. This is ‘get out of your seat and dance’ music; it is ‘nod your head and stomp your feet’ music. Sevana Ohandjanian

Melbourne-via-New Zealand chanteuse Jess Cornelius has been responsible for some fascinating soundscapes in the past, with 2011’s Tambourine and acclaimed debut, Monobasic, in 2008 introducing us to a stark world where drum beats and raw vocals reign. It’s a testament to Cornelius’ ear for a winning formula that despite this lone girl territory being encroached upon lately by more young lasses, Grids still manages to sound familiar yet oh so different to them all. From the first breathy pout on Good Man, Cornelius captivates. With an almost theatre-like backed soaring vocal underpinned by thin key notes that are soon turned on their heads by that space-filling drum beat, it’s the perfect first page to an incredible story. Single, Newborn, cashes in on a very catchy central motif, with that voice and organ reaching and dipping to bounce

★★★★ around a woody, percussive bottom layer, seeming to mirror the internal rollercoaster of lyrics “What do you want and want do you need, I don’t know, it’s not for me”. It’s that struggle that’s reflected so well throughout, musically and lyrically, helping lift this album beyond expectations. I Feel Good, for instance, uses a fascinating and ear-pleasing mix of raw piano and sampled voices to again evoke a high drama that leaves Cornelius front and centre where she belongs. Grids is an album to be appreciated for its ability to present entrancing music by deceptively simple means. Carley Hall


album reviews

★★★★

★★★½

FUTURE ISLANDS

I AM THE AVALANCHE

4AD/Remote Control

Rude/Rocket

Singles

Baltimore synth-pop trio Future Islands mark their 4AD debut with fourth album Singles. It isn’t a best of – but it kinda is, because this is the most cohesive release they’ve put together to date. The hi-fi gloss and glam ups the ante on Samuel Herring and co’s woozy dancefloor ballads, balancing new wave whimsy with wistful heartbreak on a dangerous knife’s edge. Gerrit Welmers and William Cashion’s taut yet gossamer instrumentation is sublime, driven by new conspirator Denny Bowen (Double Dagger) on drums – but it’s Herring’s vocals, warbling maudlin barbs with fervour, that drives Singles into the stratosphere.

Wolverines

Throw on your denim vest and get ready for a late one, I Am The Avalanche are back with a third helping of honest punk from the streets of NYC. Line-up changes haven’t slowed things down in the slightest, Wolverines spilling over with fist-in-the-air anthems like The Shape I’m In and Save Your Name. These are tracks designed to share with your best friends, and sonically it’s hard to find a weakness across the board. The release lacks the same levels of reckless whimsy that previous LP Avalanche United held in spades, but you can’t deny Vinnie Caruana and the boys have tightened every facet of this rock’n’roll operation.

★★

POSTBLUE

I Hope They’re Praying For Me Poison City Byron Bay youngsters Postblue wear their influences bloodily tagged to their sleeves on their debut record, I Hope They’re Praying For Me, and don’t yet have the ingenuity or nuance to make these inspirations their own. A stylistically lightweight album that attempts to take on angst-ridden issues with the kind of brio that the likes of Violent Soho laid to waste in their fledgling days, the tracks here remain uninspired melodic grunge numbers that teeter precariously on the MOR side of the rock’n’roll highway. Brendan Telford

★★★★

SHIT ROBOT

We Got A Love DFA/[PIAS] Australia Shit Robot’s (aka Marcus Lambkin’s) releases have always entertained a distinctly New York house, and electro-disco state of mind. Lambkin’s latest moves in the same direction, delivering a classy selection of tunes designed to set dancefloors in motion. The illustrious Reggie Watts’ lending his R&B falsetto to the joyous title track steals the show. Elsewhere, Nancy Whang does her best Gina X, and Luke Jenner of the defunct The Rapture gets his Barry Gibb on with the Bee Gee-esque Feels Real. A hidden ten-minute house jam provides the after-party to bring the vibes down gently. Guido Farnell

Benny Doyle

Brendan Telford

★★★½

SKRILLEX Recess

OWSLA/BigBeat/Atlantic/ Warner Dubstep titan Skrillex has pulled his foot off the accelerator in his latest release Recess, favouring more reggae and dub-heavy tracks rolled over a smooth house backbeat. There’s still plenty of that trademark ‘robot coitus’ sound, but the focus has shifted well away from bass drops and breakdowns, and Recess sees Skrillex taking chances and flexing his creative muscles. Noticeably so in tracks like Coast Is Clear (ft Chance The Rapper), which slams out with trip hop and jazz influences, and Dirty Vibe (ft k-pop gods G Dragon and CL), which turns on gothic hardstyle and old-school electro samples.

★★★★

THE PERCH CREEK FAMILY JUG BAND Jumping On The Highwire Vitamin The Melbourne collective – most of whom are related – come into Jumping On The Highwire eager, road-refined and with a bag full of ideas. At times, too many ideas. With so many songwriters, Jumping On The Highwire never really settles into a rhythm, partyjigs backing into bleak murder ballads and Depression-era blues swings leading into round-thecampfire singalongs. Thankfully the best moments are intoxicating enough to throw the need for consistency out the railcar door, the band’s own coherency the only glue they need. Scott Fitzsimons

★★★½

THE PRETTY RECKLESS

THUMPERS

Cooking Vinyl

HUB/Inertia

You should know that Taylor Momsen, of The Grinch and Gossip Girl fame, has taken to The Pretty Reckless as her new career move. Now that’s out of the way, let’s get this album – the apparent combination of a Scott Weiland drug fantasy and an LA strip club – out of the way, too. Between admittedly rocky riffs and horrible balladeering, there’s ‘rawk’ sexuality that pretty much puts the Riot Grrrl movement back 20 years. Some riffs work, but don’t dig this out of the hole. This reviewer hopes some greasy producer is enjoying their money.

The fact that they’re only two people doesn’t stop Thumpers, aka. Marcus Pepperell and John Hamson Jr, from layering up their sound like it ain’t no thing. Galore is full of full, lush pop tunes that’ll have your girl/boyfriend swooning and you lying back sipping on a mojito feeling like a boss. Lifelong friends, their music is comfortable without ever seeming complacent, and their arrangements – while diverse – are never overcrowded or weak. It’s not always easy (Sound Of Screams for instance), but Galore is a very worthwhile listen and hopefully a sign of things to come.

Going To Hell

Cam Findlay

Galore

Dylan Stewart

Bailey Lions THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 35


singles/ep reviews

★★½

★★★

★★★★

ELEANOR DUNLOP

GINGER & THE GHOST

LE1F

Cut Your Teeth

Independent

Rabbl

Sony

Coasting over sultry, moderately jazzy tones in a nondemanding way, Dunlop’s warm vocals are slightly husky. Her restrained, pianodriven melodies recall Norah Jones, although they are more upbeat. This tame offering conveys a certain sleepiness, as demonstrated when single Rough Side Of Town sifts and patters along. This is an easy listening collection that strives for a loungey mood we’ve heard before – think returning home after a long day’s work and pouring yourself a glass of wine. But the EP’s production is far too uninteresting and bland, not enabling Dunlop to extend herself enough in any track.

Shrouded in solemnity and dripping, orchestral tones, this dramatic art-pop release flirts with self-indulgence. The Sydney duo present themselves in a delicate, earth banimal veneer (both style and sound). But this attempt at free-spirited aesthetic is forced to contend with highly controlled theatrics such as epic, militant-style backing vox in the fluid single/title track. Notable highlights include their interludes of lilting, fingerpicked guitar and uniquely high, sugary vocals. However if Call Up The Whales was released a few years ago, it might have made a stronger statement. They play at Boney on 27 Mar.

Terrible Records / XL Recordings

Stephanie Tell

Stephanie Tell

KYLA LA GRANGE A percussive foundation of snaps and tinkles is topped with La Grange’s soft but lethal vocals. Wonky synth and a low baritone in the chorus plus a gritty bridge drives the song home.

THE BACCHANALES

Why It Stopped Raining Independent Off to a bad start with a 25-second-long four-bar nothing for an intro. Bland rock continues in the verse, jumping jerkily into a ‘big’ chorus. Utterly basic, dude-guitar music.

FRANK OCEAN, DIPLO, PAUL SIMONON & MICK JONES

Eleanor Dunlop

Call Up The Whales

Hey

Returning to his grinding dance roots, older favourite Wut features here on the first official release from New York’s Le1f. His fast rapping skills on this track plus its rhythmic, horn-driven melody (undeniably the inspiration for Thrift Shop) can’t help but impress. Other killer numbers include the eerily cool opener/title track, plus the scorching Boom; an infectious, weed-smoking anthem. Le1f ’s throaty, drawling style of rap possesses a cruel, darker edge that’s completely becoming and carries weight. Brimming with style and personality, Le1f conveys a grimy, party feel within this minimalist, hip hop equivalent of junkyard music. Stephanie Tell

Hero

Converse Weirdly representative of all artists’ disparate styles – Ocean’s ever-soulful vocals, Diplo’s beats and production, and the bass and guitar mastery of The Clash’s Simonon and Jones – Hero sounds like the mess you’d expect, but you can’t stop listening.

ELEANOR DUNLOP

★★★½

LOST WOODS Lost Woods Independent

★★½

SLUMBERHAZE

Rhyme, Rhythm & Romance (Part 2) Independent

★★★½

THE LOVELESS Room

Independent

Taking Chances languidly but purposefully drapes itself over you, gently nodding bass and splashes of guitar propelled by Van Etten’s dreary, dreamy chorus lilt. Bathe in it.

The culmination of Lost Woods’ sound, name and cover evoke particularly peaceful elements of the wilderness, like a riverside camping trip. Sunny, psych hints in this airy indie-rock release result in a comforting, pleasurable listening experience. Driven by impressively vast and sprawling vocals, the individuality of their material sometimes detracts due to its cultivated perfection. Tender opener Overflow features billowy guitar lines and intricate, melting harmonies while the chordier King Of Aberdeen exudes a lighter playfulness. This offering is accessible to everyone to some extent, though perhaps from a gentle distance.

Jolting between genres and layers while cloaked in a veil of seriousness, this collection is incredibly hard to classify, which is strangely disconcerting. Unusual track Dancing With The Hollows falls somewhere between hip hop and alt-rock due to its mish-mash of reverby guitar and scratching. Later tracks draw on an epic, ‘80s pop sound, while the combo of piano, synth and guitar in I Lose Control is simultaneously operatic and all over the place. It’s commendable that Slumberhaze have attempted something adventurous, but they’ve overreached. Too much going on renders this release crowded and muddled.

For those who need extra padding for their sounds of Seattle collection, or who are simply after something more downbeat, this unabashed tribute to the ‘90s should certainly do the trick. Featuring strong grunge hooks and wholly apathetic scuzzy tones, tracks such as White Rabbit particularly recall Nirvana’s use of intimate, stark dynamics. Wading through a thick, murky haze, Elissa Rose’s scratchy, dissonant vocals channel those of Courtney Love, unleashing abrasive screams with ease. Refreshingly unfashionable (though some might say, dated), this clanging angstfest makes no effort to pierce its prevailing gloominess. And why should it?

Stephanie Liew

Stephanie Tell

Stephanie Tell

Stephanie Tell

Rough Side Of Town Independent Neither the song’s melody nor Dunlop’s shaky vocals are strong enough for Rough Side Of Town to be so stripped-back, its piano barely there; it starts off in the middle of nowhere and stays there.

SHARON VAN ETTEN Taking Chances Jagjaguwar/SC

36 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014


live reviews

NINE INCH NAILS, QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE, BRODY DALLE Rod Laver Arena 14 Mar Brody Dalle cranks out the jams bang on 6.30pm looking every inch the fierce, rockin’ babe with her tousled platinum barnet, clinging orange T-shirt and jet black jeans. Josh Homme’s other half admits she “has a bit of a chest infection”, adding she performs against doctor’s orders tonight. Raspy becomes her. When Dalle starts a rendition of Kookaburra (“Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree...”) most of us realise we don’t know the rest of the

towers over the honkytonk piano. Homme’s falsetto sounds girly, which is particularly notable when he commences The Vampyre Of Time And Memory on piano before the song explodes once the rest of the band join in. Like vampires, QOTSA glamour us (albeit aurally). Varied dynamics throughout the band’s set provide light and shade. You can actually sense the pleasure they extract from their instruments during the sinister If I Had A Tail and singing, “I wanna suck/I wanna lick,” has gotta make Homme feel sexy. Little Sister is a welcome inclusion. When Homme believes we’re holding back on the cheers, he dishes out some worthy advice: “Don’t be too cool, be awesome.” The three-headed axe harmonies within Better Living Through Chemistry – what EVEN! Just

BRODY DALLE @ ROD LAVER ARENA. PIC: JAY HYNES

song’s lyrics. New Brody Dalle material kicks serious ass. There’s speculation about whether or not a coin toss actually takes place to determine the order in which our double headliners play, but the fact that this is still up in the air adds an exciting element. The millisecond we hear Jon Theodore thwack a drum, however, the mystery is solved and then out saunter the remaining members of Queens Of The Stone Age. There’s an effects station onstage as well as Dean Fertito’s keys and the band’s tunes immediately make us feel like performing unholy sex acts – behaviour that deviates from our moral compasses. The No One Knows drum pattern is insane and Josh Homme’s vocals are flawless. Homme handles his axe tenderly, expertly; it’s actually surprising the instrument doesn’t jizz. From his stool, Homme

light at Reznor’s face, which is clumsily executed, but otherwise this crew would take out the stage tech Olympics; they’re nimble and make multiple adjustments in the blink of an eye. Reznor back-announces a song he wrote in one of the bleakest periods of his life when he wanted to take his own life – guess which song? The Wretched. What NIN bring is intense, especially The Hand That Feeds and menacing Head Like A Hole: “Bow down before the one you serve/You’re gonna get what you deserve.” While QOTSA make you wanna sashay into the night and hit up Tinder, NIN are more about cold sweats, doom and accusations. Both have earned their rightful place on the world’s stage. Bryget Chrisfield

QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE @ ROD LAVER ARENA. PIC: JAY HYNES

when you think they’ve explored every arrangement avenue, Queens Of The Stone Age turn a new tantalisingly forbidden corner. We acquiesce during Go With The Flow. QOTSA are armed and beyond dangerous when presenting their voodoo rock’n’roll live and they play as if they share the same pulse. Nine Inch Nails open on a very smoky stage with the in yo’ face Copy Of A and only Trent Reznor is illuminated, lurching rhythmically forward before the other band members are lit and then drive it home. They have chiselled haircuts, wear matching black tank tops and utilise incredibly complex time signatures. Reznor pants a lot when he’s not singing. The lighting rig hangs low, jagged beams flashing to highlight the action. There’s a section during which a tech points a handheld

seem worthy of the oftenformulaic songs it inhabits, but as the set progresses and singer Ben Woolner’s neo-soul voice limbers up, the gig takes off. The punchy swagger and mammoth beats of early track Stretched And Faded plus Listen To Soul, Listen To Blues and their remix of The Aston Shuffle’s Tear It Down best showcase this production/voice combination. The curtain parts, symphonic synth chords boom, clouds of purple dry ice billow and tonight’s star Elizabeth Rose arrives wearing a gold Lamé top. Blasting us skyward with her instantly addictive electro-pop, opening track Is it Love? buzzes like a head full of nitrous oxide. Breezing through technical glitches like a seasoned pro, Rose works her way through a set that’s heavy on R&B rhythms and spiraling

NINE INCH NAILS @ ROD LAVER ARENA. PIC: JAY HYNES

ELIZABETH ROSE, SAFIA, FISHING

Northcote Social Club 15 Mar The sold-out sign is up long before the rainstorm eases and the Tropicália rhythms of Fishing’s set begin. Their inventive Clams Casino-style sample-delica and cartoonish approach to electro-hip hop is instantly appealing. The duo’s clumsy approach to triggering and cutting – rather than sequencing their slippery beats, squelchy synths and airy chords – only adds to the party vibe. Safia, a tighter and less charismatic act, have Muse-sized ambition and get a passionate response. Initially, their sparkling and banging production doesn’t

melodies. Rose’s songs Ready and Out Of Step showcase her fresh approach to sampling and her deft way of dropping a killer chorus. In a genre that often feels limp and exhausted, to see so much energy and a complete lack of cynicism fills the heart with joy. Again (Rose’s 2012 single, produced by Sinden) still sounds futuristic, which is amazing in such a fast-moving field. Songs such as Sensibility hit the balance between Triple M rotation and a decent rating on Pitchfork. Her cover of Corona’s Rhythm Of The Night sends hands in the air, but seems foolish and empty when compared to her own compositions. The Good Life, the closing defiant anthem and opening track from Rose’s self-titled EP (being launched tonight), is final proof that we’ve all witnessed a monumental talent on the way up. Andy Hazel THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 37


live reviews

BILLY BRAGG, COURTNEY BARNETT Palais Theatre 13 Mar Hiding behind her brunette bangs under a spotlight, Courtney Barnett opens the night minus backing band. Stripping back her compositions, Barnett is left with her deadpan vocal style and southpaw guitar swagger. At one moment she plays misanthropic country the next, breezy folk. On Avant Gardener our raconteur crows, “The paramedic thinks I’m clever ‘cause I play guitar/I think she’s clever ‘cause she stops people dying.” Barnett is a hilarious blend of self-deprecation and celebration. Despite the subdued nature of an all-seated venue, there is nothing

Bragg trots out sentimental favourites The Milkman Of Human Kindness and Between The Wars. As the band returns and the set enters its closing stages, the hits roll in. Sexuality is followed by A New England, initially disguised in the ruse of a long lost Kraftwerk collaboration replete with thumping electronic introduction. The chorus is left to the crowd to sing, a challenge that we gleefully accept. Tonight’s encore is almost like a separate show. All facets of Bragg’s immense songwriting ability are on display. There Is Power In A Union is a paean to the working class, just Bragg and his guitar – enthralling and empowering. Tank Park Salute is a delicate, heart-wrenching ode to life lost. Bragg takes one last jab at Tony Abbott and the Rupert Murdoch media before Waiting For The Great Leap Forwards sees the

BILLY BRAGG @ PALAIS THEATRE. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

reserved about the reception for Billy Bragg. Opening with Ideology and following up with 2013’s No One Knows Nothing Anymore, the message is as clear as it’s ever been: Bragg is still a rebel with a cause. A Billy Bragg show can easily be understood as music meets comedy with political commentary. The Essex songster can banter with the best of them, taking light-hearted swipes at Perth Glory Football Club, Hobart, Lonnie Donegan and rough sex. Margaret Thatcher and Gina Rinehart unsurprisingly draw Bragg’s ire, Bragg all the while treading a fine line between acerbic and absurdist. All You Fascists has Bragg right back in the political punk pocket and all here love him for it. A chilling cover of Woody Guthrie’s I Ain’t Got No Home turns the tempo down a notch before Bragg’s backing band exit the stage. Left to his own devices 38 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

when my companions opines, “It’s good when you close your eyes,” that just about says it all. Neil Finn is the polar opposite. When the audience applauds after his opening song, Finn instructs: “Stop! Hamer time!” (referring to this venue) and then blames his band for “feeding him” this dad joke. The inclusion of Crowded House songs such as Fall At Your Feet and Distant Sun makes us reflect and feel melancholy that the band’s drummer/shining light Paul Hester is no longer with us. “Sounding awesome, Neil!” a punter yells. “Thanks, Graham,” Finn jests. He’s a character, alright, and introduces his wife Sharon, who plays bass in this band, as “a relative newcomer”. Finn thanks us all for coming, acknowledging there’s “some really good telly on” tonight, but then points out it’s easy to tape your favourite shows

BILLY BRAGG @ PALAIS THEATRE. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

entire cast returning to the stage as the night comes to a cathartic conclusion. Over 30 years in the music industry has done nothing to blunt the razor-sharp Billy Bragg, and may it never do so. Ryan Butler

NEIL FINN, JOSHUA JAMES Hamer Hall 12 Mar Gazing around the expansive auditorium, Joshua James admits, “We have never played for a three-tiered theatre.” James pulls an unflattering, ratface to achieve certain sounds and moves around the stage like a marionette operated by a puppet master who’s nodding out. Two guitarists plus stomp box is a fitting set-up for busking and

piano stool, Finn demonstrates how he originally intended Strait Old Line – quite jazzy before his Split Enz band members got hold of it. Finn’s backing band return to the stage for Don’t Dream It’s Over, which we learn was “written in Caulfield”. Lyrics such as, “And I’m counting the steps to the door of your heart,” remind us why the Finns are such peerless songwriters. The main set closer is She Will Have Her Way; however, we will have our way – “En-core!” Finn runs out, flops atop the piano and slides on his back with one leg up – total dag! Split Enz’s One Step Ahead is so wonderfully creepy, like mysterious shadows lurking on a child’s bedroom walls in the half-darkness. And those spooky descending keys! Finn bows down to former Enz buddy Noel Crombie and partner Sally Mill for creating his “next level

NEIL FINN @ HAMER HALL. PIC: ANDREW BRISCOE

these days. This banter perfectly segues into new track Better Than TV and the material from Finn’s latest Dizzy Heights set is amazing, slotting comfortably within that astonishing back catalogue. “I recorded this one back in the 20th century, thinking I was pretty modern,” is how Finn introduces Sinner. A dude hustles into the front row and announces to Finn that he’s been locked out. Finn immediately asks whether that’s a request then launches into an ad-libbed version of Crowded House’s Locked Out that echoes the latecomer’s plight (and then later dedicates the actual song to said “gentleman”). Finn is a piano virtuoso, accompanied only by the voices of Lisa Tomlinson and guitarist Jesse Sheehan singing extended drone notes during the exquisite Message To My Girl (Split Enz). Remaining on his

shit” backdrop. Continuing that he merely requested “something trippy with clouds”, we observe the results: swirling, giant pipe cleaners that resemble a jumble of oversized Muppet limbs. Finn also thanks Crombie for the line, “Love is a race run by two” from the previously performed song. A few enthusiastic dancing bodies invade the aisles for I Got You and the keys play an intrinsic role in Split Enz compositions. For encore number two, Finn jumps up on and walks over the piano lid. Solo on acoustic guitar, he performs Rocky Racoon (The Beatles song that features in some live versions of Crowded House’s Chocolate Cake), Private Universe then closes with Dizzy Heights. What we’ve digested this evening is soul food. Reunion call of the century: Split Enz! Bryget Chrisfield


arts reviews

THE LONG PIGS Theatre

Fortyfivedownstairs (finished) Tonight’s performance of The Long Pigs is an unsettling and hilarious affair that offers much in the way of visuals and sound. The show’s cast deftly weave a world that marries slapstick humour with an insidiously dark element. Hazy lighting filters in from various angles and as the show commences, chiming bells are used to great effect, blending with a melange of other sounds to create an eerie dissonance. Having set the tone, the actors appear, dressed in dirty overalls and blackened clown noses, busying themselves with the mechanical

EMPIRE Circus

Crown Melbourne’s Rooftop to 20 Apr Spiegelworld’s Empire has so many ‘holy crap’ moments your muscles hurt for the performers. The tension builds as someone balances more and more pieces of wood on top of each other or somebody’s neck as they spin around the neck of another roller skater. You have beautiful contortionists and dancers that draw you in just as fast as they make you turn away in horror. It’s not safe, either. Two acts were out on opening night from injury and on watching the other performers you understand why. Seven hundred people gaze upon performers on a circular stage maybe three metres in diameter. These guys are flipping,

THE LONG PIGS

tasks of their freakish factory. From here on in the crowd is transfixed, as the pantomime factor is elevated and juxtaposed with something altogether more sinister. Actors Clare Bartholomew, Derek Ives and Nicci Wilks bounce beautifully off each other. Andy Turner’s lighting masterfully basks the action and coupled with Jethro Woodward’s inspired sound design creates an atmosphere that is totally absorbing. Susie Dee’s direction sees all elements of the performance come together in a synergy that is captivating to behold. The Long Pigs is an intelligent piece that is in equal measures humorous and creepy. Glenn Waller

three showings each staggered throughout the evening. Fleur Kilpatrick writes of two men (Dion Mills and John Peck) whose unstable, fiery relationship is unnecessary; it’s a ‘want’ not ‘need’. Tim Potter enlists Paul Henri to help deliver a goofy, adorable meta-playlet-gone-wrong that morphs into a dance-along to Daft Punk’s Get Lucky. Melissa Bubnic’s playlet sees a blood-smeared nightie-wearing Morgan Maguire tell, in a flirty Romanian/Dracula accent, the tale of an abattoir worker (Marcel Dorney) whose pure love for a sheep goes so very wrong; the unsettling but hilarious story finishes with a sing-along of Enrique Iglesias’ Hero. Michelle Lee’s recorded ‘performance’ in the form of an automated dating app set-up asks the hard, existentialist questions, before Taylor Swift’s Trouble plays to fade. Natasha Pincus’ take on Love Story (Where

EMPIRE

bending and manoeuvring their bodies in ways that can’t be healthy. It’s an overwhelming experience to see people who have spent their lives perfecting things that are so strange and so beautiful and have the power to bring that many people together, shouting, whistling, cringing and laughing. Every person involved in Empire deserved the standing ovation they received. Matthew Ziccone

PLAYLIST Theatre

Donkey Wheel House Each writer selects a love song base a playlet on. The ten playlets are held in the various rooms, their

Do I Begin) sees two speed-daters who describe their imagined relationship from its start to finish, all before the bell rings after four minutes; it’s a sweet chokehold released too soon. Though not all playlets satisfy, PLAYlist is a wonderful experiment of form and medium, in an intimate and intriguing environment. Stephanie Liew

AIM HIGH IN CREATION! Film

Exclusive to Cinema Nova Director Anna Broinowski (Forbidden Lie$) sets out to make a film aimed at stopping the creation of a

gas mine near her home in Erskineville, Sydney. Perplexed by the amount of corporate propaganda generated by the large multi-national energy companies that benefit from such an enterprise, she takes an homeopathic approach to the problem in the production of her short film-within-afilm, Aim High In Creation! By utilising the expertise of North Korean filmmakers, who produce works according to Kim Jong-Il’s 1987 manifesto, The Cinema And Directing, Broinowski shines a light on the ideology of propaganda cinema and reveals a fascinating lesson in its production and application. Broinowski travels to Pyongyang to meet with North Korea’s filmmaking elite, who read her script concerning her fight to save her local

AIM HIGH IN CREATION!

park from being ‘fracked’ and share their experience in film production, teaching her the principles of cinema as social and political purpose. What Broinowski brings to the screen shows this process in development, culminating in the purpose-made short film starring Australian actors who sing, dance and use taekwondo moves in a melodramatic heroine-epic depicting the conquest of capitalist greed. More broadly, the film encourages reflection on the passive/aggressive propagandaas-advertising that proliferates in most countries beyond the borders of North Korea. Natalie Rhook

THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 39


40 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014


the guide

LIVE ART DANCE PARTY Photo by: Eliza Dyball Live Art Dance Party will take over the North Melbourne Town Hall on 22 Mar as part of Melbourne’s inaugural Festival Of Live Art. Artists will stretch their creative wings in this curated celebration of live art, music and dance. It features Sisters Grimm, Deep Soulful Sweats, Yumi Umiumare and Robin Fox to name a few. We have three double passes to give away so head to themusic.com.au/winprizes to enter. Pictured (left to right): Sarah Aiken, Natalie Abbott, Janine Proost and Rebecca Jensen.

THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 41


eat/drink

ALCOHOL AROUND THE WORLD As an alternative to your regular beer/wine/spirit/liqueur of choice, try one of these not-so-local varieties. The world our options. is a big place, filled with alcohol. Explore your

BAIJIU Translating to ‘white liquor’, this is a Chinese strong distilled spirit, usually made from sorghum (though other grains may be used) and generally around 40–60% alcohol by volume. Comparable to vodka, and is commonly consumed in shot glasses.

UMESHU A Japanese liqueur made from steeping ume ( Japanese/Chinese plum) fruits in shochu (a type of Japanese liquor) and sugar. It’s got a sweet and sour taste and alcohol content of only 10–15%, is often used in cocktails, and can be consumed chilled or with ice, at room temperature or even hot.

TEPACHE

CHICHA DE UMESHU

TEPACHE

PALM WINE

A cold fermented Mexican beverage made out of the flesh and rind of pineapple, sweetened with brown sugar or piloncillo, and cinnamon. It has a very low quantity of alcohol (though in Mexico it is often served mixed with beer), and is easy to make at home.

Palm wine is created from the sap of various species of palm tree such as the palmyra, date palms and coconut palms. It’s common in many countries in Asia and Africa – including Nigeria, Ghana, South India, Indonesia, Phillipines, Kenya and Borneo – and known by many names. It has a vinegar-like taste and plays an important role in some cultural ceremonies.

Country CHINA ISRAEL

VEGOS OF THE WORLD

INDIA AUSTRALIA SPAIN BRAZIL UK CANADA USA ITALY FRANCE GERMANY Estimated % of population who are vegetarians

42 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

JORA

CHICHA DE JORA From South and Central America, this type of corn beer is traditionally made from Jora corn from the Andes. Its flavour ranges from weaker and sweeter to stronger when mature, and brings to mind a hard apple cider or sour/tangy beer.


eat/drink DRINK UP Answered by: Michael Roszbach What’s your bar’s specialty drink? The Nieuw Cosmo is pretty popular – with vodka, blood orange liqueur, cranberry and vanilla shrub.

NIEUW AMSTERDAM 106-112 Hardware St, Melbourne nieuwamsterdam.com.au

What drink turns you off? Low carb beers; what a farce! What makes your bar different? We have original cuisine in a beautiful and unique building! To complement this we have a late

night licence (rare in Melbourne these days) and food running till late.

dress up for a special event but also drop in for a reuben for lunch!

Who will I meet at your bar? People from all walks of life in Melbourne. We appeal to a large demographic and like to feel we have a space and a drink for anyone who walks through the door.

Who is pouring at your bar and what makes them special? We have an excellent staff from different parts of Melbourne and it is this difference that makes the team special as a whole. Each staff member brings a different set of skills and knowledge to the venue and we hope that comes through in our service.

What’s the design/ atmosphere of your bar? The bar was inspired by some of my favourite places in New York and of course Melbourne. We tried to create a place where everybody feels comfortable and can relax, that they can

Best hangover cure? Definitely a reuben sandwich and a Bloody Maria.

HOT SPOT FEAST OF MERIT – 117 SWAN ST, RICHMOND The latest social enterprise from not-for-profit organisation YGAP has opened recently. The focus is on communal dining and a modern Middle Eastern-influenced menu driven by sustainable and locally sourced produce. The warm interior utilises local materials, furniture designers and homewares companies. In a few months they aim to have a rooftop garden too. By dining at Feast Of Merit you’ll be helping to raise funds for disadvantaged communities; it’s good food for a good cause. ygap.com.au

FOOD TRUCKIN’

ShortBatch.co / Twitter: @ShortBatch Answered by: Scott Kilmartin What is the best aspect of having your business mobile? Being on the move, the fresh air in the parks and gardens. Seeing punters stroll up to the cart with a big smile on their face to order ice-cream.

What is an ingredient you couldn’t live without? Boysenberries! They make up our most popular flavour by far, the boysenberry choc top. What food fad do you see being popularised next? More mobile street food trends, especially out of Asia. There’s theatre as well as food that comes with eating from a mobile food cart. We have a couple of ideas for winter…

MY KITCHEN RULES

MANU FEILDEL The harsh but fair Frenchman charms many contestants on My Kitchen Rules, most recently and notably the show’s ‘naughty nanna’ Deb Payne.

GEORGE CALOMBARIS As well as being entertaining on MasterChef Australia, George “needs more salt” Calombaris has also opened seven restaurants in Melbourne (way to hog all the Calombaris, Melbs) plus one in Mykonos.

POH LING YEOW The runner-up on MasterChef 2009 and host of Poh’s Kitchen is not just an ace chef, but also works as an artist, graphic designer, illustrator and actress.

MAGGIE BEER

SHORT BATCH ICE CREAM CART Edinburgh Gardens / various locations

CELEBRITY CHEFS

What is your dream festival to cater for? Burning Man would be interesting. The Nevada desert might be a little too hot for ice-cream though! It would be a fun way to see the circus cruising around on the ice-cream tricycle. Where do you eat out? The Standard Hotel

in Fitzroy for a hearty feed, the Tramways for a burger and I love skulking upstairs at the Waiters Club in Meyers Place for a bowl of pasta. What should I order when you pull up? Choc mint is refreshing for summer and has a flavour surprise in the first bite.

The cookbook author, TV show host and businesswoman was awarded Senior Australian of the Year in 2010 and was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in 2012 “for service to the tourism and hospitality industries”. Also her company makes some of the best ice-cream you’ll ever find in the supermarket frozen food aisle.

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the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

ALBUM FOCUS

ALBUM FOCUS Bergodaz recorded and mixed the album in two weeks or less.

when we began tracking until it had been mastered – that’s more of a reflection of procrastination and doubt rather than tireless perfectionism.

CHRISTOPHER COLEMAN COLLECTIVE Answered by: Christopher Coleman Album title: Christopher Coleman Collective Where did the title of your new album come from? While I wasn’t sailing across the Atlantic in the notorious winter of 2013 and spotted an iceberg, I knew this album must be self-titled.

Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? No, because it was recorded over such a long period of time. It was an equally cathartic and lethargic process. What’s your favourite song on it? Today I have a strong aversion to all of them. Will you do anything differently next time? Set a deadline and be familiar with the songs. This one was a flick through my notebooks and picking a song at random, sometimes re-learning that song on the day.

How many releases do you have now? This makes two for this project. We put out a three-track last year, Burnt Black Wood.

When and where is your launch/next gig? 19 Mar, Babushka Bar, Ballarat; 20 Mar, Music Man Mega Store, Bendigo; 21 Mar, Shebeen.

How long did it take to write/ record? Well, 25 months from

Website link for more info? christophercolemancollective.com

Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? When you find yourself in a creative place, you can be alone... or not. But either way it is inspiring to be there. This is a band of songwriters working as one. That is fucking rare.

LOST RAGAS Answered by: Matt Walker Album title: Phantom Ride Where did the title of your new album come from? I think we were doing ten hours on the Hume when pedal steel-player, Shane Riley mentioned it. Phantom Ride is a film where the camera moves forward into the images by an invisible force. How many releases do you have now? This is the debut album for Lost Ragas. How long did it take to write/ record? Twenty years, two months, three days and seven minutes to write it. Roger

HAVE YOU BEEN TO

TEQUILA MOCKINGBYRD

SHIP ROCK’D 2014 Answered by: Tequila Mockingbyrd Why should punters visit you? Ship Rock’d is a fun day of bands, booze and boats – stoked to have Dead City Ruins, Sudden, Two Headed Dog and City Sharps joining us for the ride! What’s the history of your event? We had a great time launching our debut EP at Ship Rock’d 2013 so we thought we’d do it all again! Any advice for f irst timers who want to visit the event? It’s optional fancy dress, which we encourage all punters to embrace! We had mermaids, 44 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

When and where for your next event? Saturday 29 March, Victoria Star, Docklands. Boat departs 1.30pm. Tickets $30+BF online presale only at shiprockd.com. Website link for more info? facebook.com/shiprockd

Will you do anything differently next time? All will be different... and the same. Not speaking for the band, but personally I wish to see drummer, Simon Burke, drink a glass of nails and sing his heart out. When and where is your launch/next gig? Friday 21 March, The Tote. Website link for more info? lostragas.com

SINGLE FOCUS album The Seven Seas which was released in late 2013.

pirates, Popeye, Spongebob – you name it – last year so looking forward to some more wacky creations this time! Do you have any plans for the event in the future? YES! Ship Rock’d will be even bigger and better every year! We already have ideas for the next one. Midnight New Year’s rockin’ booze cruise, anyone?!

What’s your favourite song on it? Phantom Ride. Someone suggested it sounded like a cross between Lou Reed and Creedence Clearwater Revival. Good enough for me.

What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? I wanted to write a dark, disturbing tale, with a twist in the tail. It has a Nick Cave quality with low rumbling vocals and nasty characters.

THE GOOD SHIP Answered by: John Meyer Single title: Sea Monster What’s the song about? A weathered old captain tries to scare young sailor with tales of a sea monster, only to have the tables turned... How long did it take to write/ record? We wrote this song back in 2009 and it’s been recorded twice, very differently. This new version is a demented stomper with lots of crazy scary shit, even an autoharp! Is this track from a forthcoming release/existing release? This is the second single from our third

We’ll like this song if we like... Nick Cave’s Red Right Hand, The Decemberists’ Mariner’s Revenge, The Pogues, Moby Dick, Sea Shepherd. Do you play it differently live? We’ve been playing it for five years so the recorded version is very accurate to how we play it live. It’s well worn, like a pair of dirty, holey socks. When and where is your launch/ next gig? Northcote Social Club, 21 March, with good mates Rich Davies & The Devil’s Union from Melbourne, and The Harry Heart Chrysalis from Sydney. Website link for more info? thegoodship.com.au


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

FOR THE BENEFIT OF...

ASRC Answered by: Les Thomas (pictured) Who/what is the benef it for? The Asylum Seeker Resource Centre (ASRC) as well as the Refugee Advocacy Network and the Refugee Action Collective. Why do they need help? Asylum seekers are barred from working so the ASRC provide critical food, material, legal and medical aid plus education, employment and empowerment programs. We also need advocacy and activism to end these cruel policies. What’s the current situation like? It’s a nightmare. Those inside detention are being traumatised

with threats of deportations to torture, imprisonment or worse. Outside of detention, thousands face poverty and uncertainty. But there’s a lot we can do to help. Who else is helping on the night? Van Walker, Saint Jude, Little Foot, Oh Pep Duo, Brooke Russell, Justin Bernasconi, Cat Canteri, Mandy Connell, Ben Smith Band, Berlin Postmark, Ruth Lindsey and LAPKAT. An inspiring and uplifting night, guaranteed. When and where can we help out? 7pm at Bella Union, Trades Hall on Saturday 22 March. Website link for more info? thesemachines.org.au

HAVE YOU HEARD You’re being sent into space, no iPod, you can bring one album – what would it be? Tough to pick one, but it would have to be Dive by Tycho. Something about hovering over Earth, while hearing those smooth synth-driven soundscapes in zero-gravity really fits.

MENISCUS Answered by: Daniel Oreskovic How did you get together? We are just a group of people that are equally passionate about creating music that resonates with us and the world around us, and we just so happened to find each other at the right time. Sum up your musical sound in four words? Enya with loud guitars. If you could support any band in the world – past or present – who would it be? At The Drive-In. They are the embodiment of everything I look up to in a live band.

JUST VISITING

Greatest rock’n’roll moment of your career to date? Seconds before our set, at Fusion Festival, Germany. A freak storm came ripping through the grounds, forcing everyone to evacuate the tent. We waited it out, got back on stage, wiped the rain off our gear, and played on. Why should people come and see your band? We’re honest about what we do and it translates live. We play delicate music in the most violent way possible. When and where for your next gig? 21 Mar, Evelyn Hotel. Website link for more info? meniscusband.com

HAVE YOU HEARD

Any extra-curricular activities you hope to participate in? Yes, my daughter and my lover are coming visit midtour so we might climb Sydney Harbour Bridge!

ELEANOR MCEVOY

What will you be taking home as a souvenir? Have you seen the overseas-international baggage allowance? Won’t be bringing much unless I post it to myself.

Why are you coming to visit our fair country? To play sweet music around your fine country. I believe music to be a moodaltering substance. Powerful, potent and healing – I hope to uplift spirits with mine.

Where can we come say hi, and buy you an Aussie beer? 21 Mar, Albert Park Yacht Club; 21 Mar, Basement Discs; 22 Mar, Harvester Moon Cafe, Bellarine; 23 Mar, St Cuthbert’s; 23 Mar, Northcote Social Club.

Is this your f irst visit? No, I have toured here in my own right approx six times, and prior to that I had toured with others.

Website link for more info? eleanormcevoy.com

How long are you here for? Seven weeks! (I’ll have an accent by the end of the tour.) What do you know about Australia, in ten words or less? Sublime mangoes and the spiders with the red backs are BAD.

LEVITATING CHURCHES Answered by: Matt Johnstone How did you get together? We pulled ourselves together through online dating and old friends. Sum up your musical sound in four words? Fuckingincrediblesonicdeathrock, braindestroyingdrugcultblues, devilworshippingbikerboogie, awesome. If you could support any band in the world – past or present – who would it be? Maybe a supergroup made up of members from Saint Vitus, Black Sabbath, 13th Floor Elevators and Dead Moon.

You’re being sent into space, no iPod, you can bring one album – what would it be? Easy – Volume 4. Greatest rock’n’roll moment of your career to date? Thirteen dates in 11 days with Dead Moon through NZ. Why should people come and see your band? Because we will either blow your mind or your eardrums. When and where for your next gig? We have a 2am levitation at The Public Bar on Saturday 22 Mar. Website link for more info? levitatingchurches.com

THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 45


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

FRONTLASH

LAUNCHING THIS WEEK

HIGH FIVES

Head to bunchof5s.wordpress. com to check out the full series of re-faced Australian five dollar notes. Creative to the max.

REMEMBERING MJ Tame Impala’s version of Michael Jackson’s Stranger In Moscow – dreamy.

THUMPING MCCONAISSANCE Did you froth over Matthew McConaughey chest-pumping in a restaurant with Leo DiCaprio in Wolf Of Wall Street? Then Google “The Wolf Of Wall Street Chest Thump Mix” for extended goodness.

MCCOKEHEAD

SMART MOVE

EXOTIC PETS

FAMILY TIES

A benefit night raising money for Child Wise – a charity committed to protecting children from abuse and exploitation – takes place at Thornbury Theatre on 23 Mar. It features Tim Rogers (pictured), Debra Anne Byrne, Steve Lucas and more.

Western Australia’s Tired Lion (pictured) offer a fresh take on indie grunge, giving audiences those ‘90s musical memories that somehow ring new to the ears. They play at Bar 291 on 21 Mar with Wildfires, Garden Party and Shiny Coin.

One of Australia’s hottest bluegrass acts, The Davidson Brothers (pictured) have become regulars at national festivals while developing a strong following overseas. They deliver highpowered acoustic music at The Standard Hotel on 23 Mar.

LOVIN’ LOUISIANA

HABIT KICKED

TAME CITY, WILD DOGS

Backed by The Belmar Playboys and launching her new album 4am, Kerri Simpson will host a night of hoodoo hoedowns, swampy southern funk and tasty uptown shuffle rhythm and blues at Caravan Music Club on 21 Mar.

Hitting the stage at Ding Dong Lounge on 21 Mar for a last hurrah, The Nymphs throw a party extravaganza with their good friends The ReChords and Ladie Dee to say goodbye to a most treasured member of their quartet.

Four of Melbourne’s hottest acts will take to the stage at National Gallery of Victoria for the Friday Nights at Melbourne Now series. On 21 Mar, this will feature Hiatus Kaiyote, playing their increasingly popular brand of jazz-fusion.

HONOUR AMONGST

FULL CIRCLE

COLOURS OF SUNSET

Sydney’s electronic pop artist, Thief (pictured) is releasing a deluxe edition of his EP Closer. He celebrates with a string of dates, including a show at Shebeen Bar on 22 Mar to show off his fresh minimalist sound. Nicole Millar and Leaks support.

Launching his new single, Dru Chen (pictured) plays The Workers Club on 22 Mar with a live video and skit prior to the performance. Turnaround has an uncluttered aesthetic centered on layers of neo-soul keyboards and ranged, meandering vocals.

The latest album from acclaimed folk-pop darlings Tinpan Orange (pictured), The Remix EP offers three mashed up electronic version of tracks from their 2012 album Over The Sun. They launch it at Northcote Social Club on 20 Mar with Hoy.

GETTING LOST

CHAMPAGNE ACT

TECH REVOLUTION

Soon releasing their first album Time Well Wasted, Strathmore will showcase a few tracks at Reverence Hotel on 22 Mar. The album is full of pop-punk hooks and singalong melodies. Friends Del Lago, Angry Seas and Gladstone support.

A six-piece Melbourne trad jazz and dixieland band, Shirazz specialise in classic hot jazz of the ‘20s and ‘30s. They are gaining a reputation as one of Victoria’s most exciting jazz bands. Catch them playing two sets at Spotted Mallard on 22 Mar.

Eighties punk-rock greats The Seminal Rats, Melbourne postpunks The Transitions along with The Interceptors and Shockwave come together for a huge night of punk, rock, surf, garage and post-punk apocalypse at The Bendigo on 21 Mar.

BACKLASH WEIGHT WATCHERS

There’s a definite need to warn cinemagoers viewing 12 Years A Slave not to bother visiting the candy bar on the way in.

THE VOICE(S) We know they’ve never done a duet together, and their voices may not even mesh that well, but seeing Lionel Richie and our very own Farnsey actually sharing a mic during their double headliner tour would’ve tickled our fancies.

MAKIN’ BACON So there’s a new device that plugs into your iPhone, which makes sizzling sounds and emits the smell of bacon when your alarm sounds of a morning. But then who’s in the kitchen actually making the bacon?

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 46 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

LAUNCHING THIS WEEK

OVERNIGHT CARRIAGE

BLISSED-OUT

INEVITABLE BURN

Twelve-piece extravaganza Smith Street Soul Train (pictured) play The Curtin on 20 Mar. They’ll whip you into a frenzy with their energetic mix of classic and current soul and killer rhythm section. Young guns Papa G & The Starcats support.

Back with a daring new style of media-art-pop music, Chicks On Speed (pictured) present their latest album, Utopia, culminated from a career spanning 15 years. They’re playing a series of Australian shows, including one at Howler on 20 Mar.

It’s been a while since The UV Race (pictured) played a show – perhaps it was as long ago as their closing slot at Meredith 2013. Either way, the punks are back, playing at Boney on 21 Mar with Miss Destiny and Tudor House (in their debut performance).

MISSILES KILL

MAGIC MAKERS

SNOW ANIMALS

Returning to Yah Yah’s after a sold out August show, The Eighty 88s are joined by Death Rattles and Damn The Torpedoes. Their old school rock‘n’roll, dirty soul and big-band party rhythms will get your heart thumping.

Blending elements of technical and progressive metal, Conjurer incorporates odd time signatures and fast-paced aggression with soaring melodies and pop hooks. This gives them room to breathe and experiment. They play Revolver Upstairs on 21 Mar.

Black Night Crash hosts the lively on stage performance of South Australia’s finest psychrock bandits Wolf & Cub on 22 Mar. They’re joined by up-and-comers High-Tails and From Oslo upstairs at Rochester Castle Hotel.

DELIGHTFUL DESSERTS

TRIBAL TORTURE

BLUE BEFORE

A fiendishly talented sextet of horns, strings and drums, The Woohoo Revue (pictured) have forged their reputation with their signature, adrenalin-fuelled, dance-happy sound. They play Flying Saucer Club on 21 Mar with The Royal Jellies.

Rocking sisters Stonefield (pictured) are touring extensively, playing at Northcote Social Club on 19 Mar, then with Lurch & Chief at Village Green Hotel (Mulgrave) on 20 Mar, Hallam Hotel on 21 Mar and at Theatre Royal (Castlemaine) on 22 Mar.

Primed for fans of shoegaze, ‘90s indie, and scuzz-punk, altrock trio Postblue (pictured) are soon releasing their debut album I Hope They’re Praying For Me. They celebrate with a launch at The Curtin on 21 March in support of Luca Brasi.

WALK THE EARTH

VIOLENT CREATURES

BURNT AND SPICY

Singer-songwriter Nicola Brown captures her audience’s attention with her blend of folk-pop acoustic tunes, catchy melodies and honest, relatable lyrics. She plays Evelyn Hotel on 23 Mar with Dinochip, Scotty Candlish and Mitchell P Ward.

With the fury of 19 angry keyboard warriors lies Murder Crab. Catch them at Grace Darling Hotel on 21 Mar. They’re supported by Jurassic Penguin, Oedipus Rex, Break The Wall, Cordell and The Evercold.

Exciting new Melbourne act The Johnny Can’t Dance Cajun Trio play old time Cajun and Creole two-steps, one-steps, waltzes, blues and stomps from the swamps with Cajun accordion, fiddle, triangle and vocals. They play Wesley Anne on 20 Mar.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

THIS WEEK’S RELEASES… ALOE BLACC Lift Your Spirit Universal BLACK LIPS Underneath The Rainbow Vice/ADA KEVIN DREW Darlings Arts & Crafts/Create Control WILKO JOHNSON & ROGER DALTREY Going Back Home Universal THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 47


opinion OG FLAVAS

ADAMANTIUM WOLF

WAKE THE DEAD

URBAN AND R&B NEWS WITH CYCLONE

METAL, HARDCORE AND PUNK WITH LOCHLAN WATT

PUNK AND HARDCORE WITH SARAH PETCHELL

There’s a viral joke that the eternally youthful Pharrell Williams is a vampire. Certainly, he’s omnipresent. He lately won the Grammy for Producer of the Year, while his Australian chart-topper Happy (from the Despicable Me 2 soundtrack) was nominated for Best Original Song at the Academy Awards. Williams’ giant Vivienne Westwood hat has its own Twitter account. He raps on Major Lazer’s club banger, Aerosol Can, and even “mentors” on Rihanna’s reality show, Styled To Rock. The (ex-) N*E*R*D frontman just toured with Future Music Festival, performing a hit megamix alongside DJ Eque and dancers. Happily for Sony Australia, this coincided with the release of G I R L – Williams’ first solo album since 2006’s underwhelming In My Mind. Interviewers know Phazza as the OG grumpy cat. But at G I R L’s heart is his endearing, eccentric, blithely sexy pop persona. Williams ostensibly made a celebratory ‘feminist’ LP to counter the chauvinism of Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines. Musically, G I R L carries the same breezy retro funk and r’n’b grooves as Happy and, going back, Frontin’, with Williams occasionally singing falsetto. The catchy new single Marilyn Monroe has highbrow strings. However, the handclappy Come Get It Bae (with Miley Cyrus!) is Blurred Lines II. Williams offers decent duets with pal Justin Timberlake and Alicia Keys, but Daft Punk’s robo-disco Gust Of Wind, though redolent of Lose Yourself To Dance, rules. @therealcyclone

PHARRELL WILLIAMS @ FUTURE MUSIC FESTIVAL. PIC: ANGELA PADOVAN

48 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

BABYMETAL

There’s a couple of bands right now that I am really feeling an imperative need to tell everyone about. First up is BABYMETAL. Hailing from Japan, this creation has slowly become a somewhat known quantity over the last year or so thanks to a string of video/ single releases, but has only in the last month totally exploded off the back of a self-titled debut album. Here’s the thing though – BABYMETAL isn’t even really a band, it’s a ‘metal vocal and dance group’, fronted by three teenage girls. Dressed like goth Harajuku girls, 16 year-old lead vocalist ‘Su-metal’, and 14 year-old back up vocalists and horn throwers ‘Mometal’ and ‘Yuimetal’, perform perfectly choreographed dance moves while a band of faceless men in skeleton outfits shred like madmen. Death, power and thrash metal styles have infiltrated an electronic J-pop structure, with screams, brutal breakdowns, insane shredding, and even reggae and hip hop mixed throughout the sickly sweet choruses. On a musical level, this shit is the real deal. As far as I can tell there is nothing else in the world like this that exists on this scale. On one hand, it’s some of the most awesome and unique heavy metal I have ever heard in my life. On the other, it’s a clear cash-grab: a manufactured corporate entity, and one that I’d probably struggle to enjoy if the songs about eating chocolate, turning 16, having beautiful long black hair, and standing up to bullying were being sung in English. Honestly though, if I had been exposed to this instead of the Spice Girls back in 1996 I would have found the path to greater metal awesomeness much sooner, and that’s a cool thought

if you like the idea of heavy music’s ever-growing strength. Shining, the next band I want to tell you about, is a much more serious prospect. Straight outta Norway, the ever-evolving group has actually existed since 1999, but is a much different beast now compared to its origins as an instrumental jazz quintet and mid-career experimental rock group. On their 2010 Black Jazz album, the band exploded into a full-on avant garde metal band of extreme leanings, and while still not forgetting their roots, have become a refined entity completely ready to tear your face off with their stylish catchiness on 2013’s One One One. Imagine if Refused, Emperor, and The Dillinger Escape Plan were the same band, and that Ministry, Godflesh and Nine Inch Nails were the same band, and then the best members of each of those two imaginary bands got together to make a new band with Frank Zappa and John Coltrane… whatever concoction currently you’ve currently imagined might be somewhat close to what Shining currently is. The static rumble of industrial music exists throughout their gigantic sounds, with compact structures hiding some super clever musicianship, all the while providing a nice clean slate for a harsh throat to spit a clear stream of poignant lyrics. There’s plenty of synth, just enough sax, and so much swagger that the whole experience is just dripping with cool. To put it more simply, One One One totally fucking rocks and destroys, soothes and intrigues, and is a gigantic breath of fresh air – one that I’m totally ashamed to say took me almost a year from its release to discover.

After the excitement of tours and festivals and albums being recorded, it’s time for a negative tone to be taken with this week’s column and the target of my ire is reunion tours. Specifically, when a band has broken up for about 15 minutes gets back together and starts playing shows again. I mean, is it really a reunion tour when you’ve broken up and little more than a year later you’re playing shows again? I forked out the money to see Refused. I would pay a buttload of money to see Champion again (yeah, right). It’s really great that The Gifthorse are back playing again. There are even a few Australian bands that have broken up recently that I miss A LOT (I’m looking at you Fires Of Waco and Colossus) that I would love to see play shows again. But I’m sorry, Basement, you can’t break up late in 2012, then decide to play shows back in January and call it a reunion tour. I mean, there wasn’t even a chance for fans to really miss you. The average band puts out one record every two years. An international band may hit Australia every two or three years. It has not even been that long. Perhaps it isn’t the band’s fault that shows are being touted as reunion shows, as the band never said they broke up – what they did say was that they “put things on hold”. Whatever you call it, I will still probably go and see the band play when they hit Australia in July. wakethedead@themusic.com.au

BASEMENT


opinion THE GET DOWN

TRAILER TRASH

INTELLIBLE FLOW

FUNKY SHIT WITH OBLIVEUS

DIVES INTO YOUR SCREENS AND IDIOT BOXES WITH GUY DAVIS

HIP HOP NEWS & COMMENTARY WITH ALEKSIA BARRON

THE ROBERT GLASPER EXPERIMENT

I cannot get outta first gear without mentioning the awesomeness that was The Robert Glasper Experiment & Roy Ayers show two Fridays back. The venue, 170 Russell, was rammed for the experimental funk from these well-respected musical entities and mad props to Total Eclipse for completely over-filling the shoes of no-show, Greg Wilson. Moving into second, I’ll hype local deep and bottom heavy superstar, Silversix. His latest jam Love What You Feel owns my late-night sets at Bigmouth and always gets the freaks into a lather. I also got much love for his track with DJ PP, F*cking Amazing!, for that horny, banging-house vibe. Get both while the getting’s good through the usual Beatport and SoundCloud channels now! Hitting third gear and trying to prove that I’m not some ultrahip club kid, let’s talk about the act UB40 could have been, The Resonators. I’ve hyped their Wah Wah 45s label before, but their newest full-length The Constant is the best reggae album of the past two years, full stop! Knowing that this statement would probably piss some people off, I’ll bring some serious ammo to this convo with my two favourite tracks off the album, Vipers and opener Family Familiar. Both reek of that laidback, ganja-toking Sunday party most never get invited to and both skank and groove their way through with enough reverb to make the dub heads pray plus energy to sway the proverbial masses. As always, producers send me your goods for review and with that, I’m out.

Why one goes to the movies depends on what one hopes to get from the movies. Well, duh. But take a minute and look beyond me sitting in the corner wearing a dunce cap – by the way, did they ever actually do this to schoolchildren slow to grasp the nuances of various lessons? How brilliantly demoralising! – to actually consider what you want to take away from your cinematic experience. Do you want to be overwhelmed by spectacle? Do you want to be swept up in story? Are you simply looking to get out of the pouring rain or oppressive heat for a couple of hours? Dude, do you actually enjoy the taste of popcorn? Or are you drawn in by the allure of what used to be called ‘movie stars’? Then why not stay at home and watch Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey and Oscar nominee Woody Harrelson in True Detective? Or Oscar winner Kevin Spacey in House Of Cards? Let me ask you this: would you rather see Aaron Paul in Breaking Bad or in Need For Speed? That’s a trick question, by the way; I know you don’t want to see Need For Speed. No one does. Movies have their place and their purpose. I’m not one of these people who constantly decries the state of modern cinema, calling every new mainstream release dumbeddown fluff or bombastic sensory overload. But it’s not exactly news that the creative lines between the big screen and the small have come blurred. When was the last time a big-screen crime drama engaged you the way Hannibal

or the aforementioned True Detective did? Has any recent movie looked as poignantly, unflinchingly and affectionately at life in one’s 20s as Lena Dunham’s Girls does? (Full disclosure: I haven’t seen Noah Baumbach’s Frances Ha, which I’m led to believe does a pretty job of it.) Is any comedy funnier than Eastbound & Down? Probably, but it’s a damn close race. I mentioned spectacle earlier, and I admit to being a sucker for it still. Well, in some cases. I mean, catching the new trailer for the latest Godzilla reboot at Melbourne’s IMAX cinema was a blast and a half – the big guy’s roar rattled my damn fillings and raised a big ol’ batch of goosebumps. And catching Gravity on the big screen last year was AN EXPERIENCE, one that is only partially replicated when you rewatch it at home, no matter the size of your TV screen and the oomph of your sound system. (Luckily, it’s still a magnificent movie, and its director Alfonso Cuaron definitely deserved his Oscar.) But the tricks the studios are rolling out to entice you to the cinema are kinda played-out, and I’m mainly talking about 3D here. Still, there’s something to be said for retrofitting old favourites with state-of-the-art 3D – I recently watched a 3D Bluray of Predator and adding a new dimension to Dutch and the crew get stalked and sliced up by that “ugly motherfucker” was pretty rad. (That said, it’s Predator, man. It could be acted out by fucking sock puppets and it’d still be the coolest shit ever. Go buy that 3D Blu, though.)

GODZILLA

BONG MAN BUSINESS MIXTAPE

My latest favourite aural discovery isn’t hip hop, although it came to me via just such a source. The brilliant lads from Astronomy Class recently put a mixtape up on SoundCloud, but it’s a bit different from the standard offering of raps and pilfered beats. This mixtape goes by the name Bong Man Business and was inspired by a trip the group took to Cambodia in 2012. Bong Man Business is a collection of songs from the golden age of Khmer pop music, where traditional Cambodian music collided with a variety of contrasting musical styles, including soul, R&B, jazz and psychedelic rock. According to the SoundCloud spiel for this mixtape, inspiration for the project materialised in the back of a taxi: “…during a six hour taxi ride up Highway 6 from Phnom Penh to Siem Reap, our minds were blown by the songs drifting from our driver’s cassette player. He played cassette after cassette of some of the most captivatingly beautiful and soulful, yet funky and raw music we’d ever heard.” The tracks selected for the mixtape are astounding: musically intricate, inherently pleasing and fantastically soulful. However, learning about the history of Khmer music in Cambodia takes it to another level. As with so many of our freedoms, it’s easy to take our access to art and music for granted in Australia. Reading about how the Khmer Rouge’s cultural genocide destroyed almost all original vinyl recordings from this era, and how many who fled Cambodia did so with their music collections, throws our good fortune into sharp relief. Check the mixtape out: soundcloud.com/elefanttraks/ astronomy-class-bong-man. THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 49


opinion HOWZAT! LOCAL MUSIC BY JEFF JENKINS SILVER UNDIES Underground Lovers have always done things their own way – they even like to write their name as undergroundLOVERS. The Undies are celebrating their Silver Jubilee with two big gigs at The Toff In Town this weekend: Saturday’s show is songs from 1989 to 1993; Sunday’s is 1994 and beyond. Howzat! caught up with singer Vince Giarrusso to mark the milestone. Have all your dreams come true, Vince? “Yep, and more.” Casting your mind back 25 years, what words would best describe you: Excited? Optimistic? Naive? “We were all those things and arrogant as well,” Vince smiles. “We never really had an aim, except for making records and trying hard to not be in music clips. We pride ourselves on our lame performances in videos.” The highlights? “Meeting amazing musicians and fans at gigs. Hearing a song on the radio is

50 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

always special. Playing pool with Robert Smith and beating him… priceless.” Where do the Undies keep their ARIA (for 1992’s Best New Talent)? “Hidden,” Vince says, admitting, “we don’t know where it is.” Lowlights? “Dealing with the corporate world of music, which is dying a slow death – ding-dong, the witch is dead.” Vince wishes the young Undies had more confidence to be independent and “not succumb to the offer of corporate donuts. The glaze is pretty, but …” Best gig? “The Corner and The Annandale when we started playing again in 2011. The love in the room was unbearable.” The worst? “In London. We were jet-lagged and half of our equipment broke in transit. We played terribly and the next day the Australian press in London gave us a no-star review, telling punters to avoid us like the plague. It was excellent because then all the Londoners came and saw us.” Vince recalls another UK

UNDERGROUND LOVERS

reviewer who said, “Close your eyes and this is music heaven. Open your eyes and you see a bunch of accountants.” Vince laughs: “We often wondered what he meant. What did he expect to see, Marlene Dietrich? Or a bunch of people dressed up like Big Bird? Weird, that.” These are “Past/Present” gigs; what’s the Undies’ future? “New longplayer on the horizon – we start writing soon and hopefully the production process will be quick and easy. Plus some more gigs, and interesting collaborations in China and the US.” Finally, what advice would Vince give to a band starting out today? “Do what you wanna do. Be what you wanna be. Yeah!”

KATE THE GREAT Northcote has more songwriters than any other suburb in the nation. And it now has two more – Brisbane’s Kate Miller-Heidke and hubby Keir Nuttall have relocated. By the way, Kate’s new album O Vertigo! is destined to be one of the albums of the year. HOT LINE “The Sunnyboys, God bless them and God bless you” – Died Pretty, Godbless.


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au Stonefield + Lurch & Chief: Village Green Hotel, Mulgrave

THE MUSIC PRESENTS

The Johnny Can’t Dance Cajun Trio: Wesley Anne (Front Bar), Northcote

Jurassic 5: 20 & 21 Mar Palace Theatre

Seth Lakeman: 19 Apr Thornbury Theatre

Stonefield: 20 Mar Village Green Hotel Mulgrave; 21 Mar Hallam Hotel; 22 Mar Theatre Royal Castlemaine; 2 May The Prince

North Mississippi Allstars: 20 Apr Corner Hotel

The Stain + Brandon Davey & The Houndlings: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote

Trixie Whitley: 20 Apr Northcote Social Club

Wooly Beef + Gorsha + Guy Parkman Band: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

Buddy Guy, Charlie Musselwhite, The James Cotton Blues Band: 21 Apr Palais Theatre

Emi Day + Emily South: Yarra Hotel, Abbotsford

Caspian: 21 Mar Evelyn Hotel Absu: 21 Mar The Hi-Fi Cloud Control: 28 Mar Penny Black & The Prince; 29 Beach Shack Sorrento, Portsea Hotel, The Westernport Hotel San Remo; 30 Lorne Hotel & Torquay Hotel Ella Hooper: 4 Apr Northcote Social Club The Jungle Giants: 4, 5 Apr Corner Hotel Monster Magnet: 6 Apr 170 Russell Loon Lake: 8 Apr Corner Hotel Residual: 10 Apr Beav’s Bar Geelong; 12 The Loft Warrnambool; 27 The Toff In Town

Aaron Neville, Dr John & The Nite Trippers: 21 Apr Hamer Hall Larry Graham & Graham Central Station: 23 Apr Corner Hotel Devon Allman, Gregg Allman, Gov’t Mule: 23 Apr Forum Theatre The Wailers, Sly & Robbie & The Taxi Gang: 23 Apr 170 Russell Owen Campbell: 23 Apr Bennetts Lane; 24 Beav’s Bar Geelong; 26 Babushka Lounge Ballarat

Sally Seltmann: 11 Apr Caravan Music Club; 13 Kelvin Club

Steve Earle & The Dukes, Kasey Chambers: 24 Apr Forum Theatre

The Magic Band, The Grandmothers Of Invention: 11 Apr Corner Hotel

Booker T Jones, Valerie June: 25 Apr Corner Hotel

Allen Stone: 12 Apr Corner Hotel

Ozomatli: 26 Apr Corner Hotel Harmony: 26 Apr Howler

GIG OF THE WEEK THE HOLIDAYS: 20 MAR CORNER HOTEL Stonefield + King Of The North + Millar Jukes + The Bandits: Northcote Social Club, Northcote

The Holidays + The Cairos + High-Tails: Corner Hotel, Richmond

Darling James + Luke Brennan Duo + Louis Spoils: Old Bar, Fitzroy

The Australian Bee Gees Show: Drum Theatre, Dandenong

Cat Canteri + Ladies Of The Shotgun Wedding: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick Die! Die! Die! + Special Guests: Rochester Castle Hotel, Fitzroy Toby Keith + Eli Young Band + Kellie Pickler: Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne Marianne Digs + Tom Dockray: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill The Pitys + Holyoake + V-Act: The Curtin, Carlton

Groovin The Moo: 3 May Prince Of Wales Showground Bendigo

Driving South + Zevon & The Werewolves of Melbourne: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda

The Soul Rebels: 15 Apr Recital Centre

Arctic Monkeys: 9 May Rod Laver Arena

Sean Simmons: The Standard Hotel, Fitzroy

Beth Hart: 15 Apr Corner Hotel

Bliss N Eso: 10 May Ballarat Showgrounds; 15 Bendigo Showgrounds; 16 Flemington Racecourse

Jimmie Vaughan, Nikki Hill: 17 Apr Corner Hotel

DZ Deathrays: 15 May Karova Lounge, Ballarat; 16 Corner Hotel Frente: 22 & 23 May Arts Centre; 24 Theatre Royal Castlemaine Kingswood: 24 May The Hi-Fi

India.Arie, Joss Stone: 17 Apr Palais Theatre

Free Your Mind ft Northlane: 31 May, 1 Jun The Hi-Fi

KC & The Sunshine Band, WAR: 18 Apr Hamer Hall

The Audreys: 14 Jun Ormond Hall

Robben Ford: 18 Apr Corner Hotel

The Beards: 16 Jul Karova Lounge Ballarat; 17 Barwon Club Geelong; 18 170 Russell; 19 Theatre Royal Castlemaine; 20 Spirit Bar & Lounge Traralgon

Suzanne Vega: 19 Apr Recital Centre

Ben Salter: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg

DJ Shuttersound: The Thornbury Local (8pm), Thornbury Belle Roscoe + Adam Hynes + Jaime Faulkner: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Crepes + Dreamin’ Wild + Casino Insano + Fluzies: The Tote (Front Bar), Collingwood Slow Club Residency ft. + Brett Franke + Kill TV: The Tote, Collingwood Whipped Cream Chargers + Big Face & The Boogie Woogie Boogie Board Boys + The Spasms + Wod: The Workers Club, Fitzroy The Australian Bee Gees Show: Wyndham Cultural Centre, Werribee

THU 20

Osloh + Elkkle + Mgkrp: 303, Northcote

WED 19

Christopher Coleman Collective + Birahny Lawrence + Joe Oppenheimer: Babushka Bar, North Ballarat Luke Biscan: Beav’s Bar, Geelong

Don Fernando + Guests: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Peter Hearne + Dizzy’s Big Band: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond Mayfair Kytes + The Imprints + Owen Rabbit + Cy Gorman: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Baltimore Gun Club + Hipster Kill Team + Gonna Ball: Karova Lounge, Ballarat

Christopher Coleman Collective: Music Man Mega Store, Bendigo

2014 Australia Jazz Bell Awards: 1 May Regent Theatre

Jake Bugg: 16, 17 Apr Palace Theatre

Chicks On Speed + DJ Kiti: Howler, Brunswick

Collage with blueVenus + Holy Pablito + Jordan Walker + The Wizard Franchise + Subrosa: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda

Calling All Cars: 12 Apr Waterfront Geelong; 17 Easter Festival Bendigo; 18 Mynt Lounge Werribee; 19 The Loft Warrnambool; 20 Torquay Hotel; 23 Karova Lounge Ballarat; 24 Corner Hotel

Seun Kuti & Egypt 80: 16 Apr Recital Centre

Disco Puppets + Grey Mantis + The Braves: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood

Liam Gerner: Labour In Vain (8.30pm), Fitzroy

KT Tunstall: 29 Apr Recital Centre

Morcheeba, Chali 2na: 16 Apr Corner Hotel

Little Desert + Acts Revelations + Bayou: Grace Darling Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood

Wine, Whiskey, Women + Michelle Parsons + Raphael Clark: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne

Bam Bam: 12 Apr Northcote Social Club

The Jezabels: 2 May Palais Theatre

Animaux + The Pretty Littles + Tulalah: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Above Kings + The Raffaellas + Cathouse Canary + ParkVue: Bar Open, Fitzroy

Brent Parlane: Lomond Hotel, Brunswick East

The Scene: Musicland, Fawkner Tinpan Orange + Guests: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Glacier + T54 + Claws & Organs + Popolice: Old Bar, Fitzroy Jurassic 5: Palace Theatre, Melbourne To Hell With Honour: Playground Bar, Fitzroy Jimmy Hawk + Big Smoke + Lucy & The Diamonds: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick Mara Threat + Josh Newman + Joe Guiton + David Grimson: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar), Footscray Liam Gerner: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick Live n Cooking Sessions with Tully On Tully + Squarehead: The B.East, Brunswick East Marta Pacek + blueVenus: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine Mustard + The Glare + Strings For Belts + Tex Natives: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Roesy: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne Dan Lethbridge + Shane O’Mara: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg Evil Ways: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

FRI 21

Take Your Own + Hopes Abandoned + Bombs Are Falling + Late Nights: 303 (8pm), Northcote Eleanor McEvoy: Albert Park Yacht Club, South Melbourne Madre Monte + Bachu Rose: Bar Open, Fitzroy Instore Ft. Eleanor McEvoy: Basement Discs, Melbourne The UV Race + Miss Destiny + Tudor House: Boney (8pm), Melbourne Kerri Simpson & The Belmar Playboys + more: Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh Magic Bones + La Bastard + Ohms: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Spencer P Jones: Cherry Bar (5.30pm), Melbourne Sebadoh + Bored Nothing + Pearls + Freak Wave: Corner Hotel, Richmond The Nymphs + The Rechords + Special Guests: Ding Dong Lounge, Melbourne Kunjani: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond King Lucho + 19th Century Strongmen: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (6pm), Brunswick Cherrybomb + Andy Grant Duo: European Bier Cafe, Melbourne Caspian + Meniscus + Fourteen Nights At Sea: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy The Cat Empire: Federation Square (7pm), Melbourne The Woohoo Revue: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick Sunnyboys + Ron S Peno & The Superstitions: Forum Theatre, Melbourne Murdercrab + Jurassic Penguin + Oediupus Rex + The Evercold + Cordell + Break The Wall: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood Stonefield + Lurch & Chief: Hallam Hotel, Hallam Alison Ferrier Band: Lomond Hotel, Brunswick East Einsteins Toyboys: Musicland, Fawkner Hiatus Kaiyote: National Gallery of Victoria, Southbank

Like A Prayer by Madonna Re-Imagined + The Twoks: The Toff In Town, Melbourne

The Good Ship + Rich Davies & The Devil’s Union + The Good Ship: Northcote Social Club, Northcote

Lanks + Tanya + Eagle & The Worm (Duo): Boney, Melbourne

Slow Club feat. Manta Five + Luna Ghost + The Dead Heir: The Tote, Collingwood

Bird Blobs + The Spinning Rooms + Nick Pratt: Old Bar, Fitzroy

Andrea Marr & The Funky Hitmen: Cherry Bar, Melbourne

Ginger & Tonic: Thornbury Theatre, Thornbury

Shaun Kirk: Old Hepburn Hotel, Hepburn Springs

Dave Anderson: Beav’s Bar, Geelong

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 51


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au Alex Landragin: Open Studio, Northcote

Trio Agogo: Wesley Anne (6pm), Northcote

Jurassic 5: Palace Theatre, Melbourne

Jane Rutter: West Gippsland Arts Centre, Warragul

Adrian Cunningham Quartet: Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne

The Kujo Kings + The Rolling Perpetual Groove Show: Whole Lotta Love, Brunswick East

Bada Bing feat. Warbrain + Agressor + Southpaw: Pier Live (Pelly Bar), Frankston Heavy Judy feat. Brat Farrar + The Morrisons: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick Abraxxas + Bane Of Bedlam + Armoured Earth + Cryptic Abyss + Harlott: Reverence Hotel (Band Room), Footscray Conjurer + Special Guests: Revolver Upstairs (8pm), Prahran Christopher Coleman Collective + Woodlock + Run Rabbit Run: Shebeen Bar, Melbourne Skyscraper Stan + Oskar Herbig: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill Pugsley Buzzard: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick The Seminal Rats + The Transitions + The Interceptors + Shockwave: The Bendigo, Collingwood King Of The North + Low Point: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine Seven Days Falling + Voodoocain + Drifter + Kerb: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Dragon: The Cube, Wodonga Luca Brasi + Postblue + Ceres + Kissing Booth: The Curtin, Carlton Catfish Voodoo: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne Traditional Irish Music Sessions + Dan Bourke & Friends: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne

The Cambodian Space Project + Merri Creek Pickers + Bobby & The Pins + Fine Blue Thread + more: True North Festival (Olive Street & Compton Street), Reservoir Jaju Choir + The Velvet Lips: Victoria Hotel, Brunswick

British India: Wool Exchange, Geelong

The Architects: Wesley Anne (Front Bar/6pm), Northcote

T54 + The New Pollution + The Sunday Reeds: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

Ted Danson With Wolves: Wrangler Studios, West Footscray

Michael Meeking & The Lost Souls + DJ Ben Salter: Yarra Hotel (9pm), Abbotsford

The Eighty 88s + The Death Rattles + Damn the Torpedoes: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

SAT 22

Dave Wright & The Midnight Electric: Yarra Hotel, Abbotsford

Cyclo Timik + The Unholy Racket + Grand Cru + Ezekiel Ox + Lasers Underwater: 303 (7pm), Northcote

SUN 23

Bronwyn Rose + Gemma Tully & The Thornbirds: 303 (3.30pm), Northcote

The Daddy-O’s: Baha Tacos, Rye Taste Of Indie Collective feat. Cosmic Rain + Gondola Kid + Sarah Eida & The Garden Of Eida: Bar 291, Brunswick Judge Pino & The Ruling Motions: Bar Open, Fitzroy Copyrite: Beaches of Mornington, Mornington These Machines Cut Razor Wire feat. Van Walker + Saint Jude + Les Thomas + Little Foot + Brooke Russell + more: Bella Union (7pm), Carlton South Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band: Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh CERES Harvest Festival + Liz Stringer + Bobby & The Pins + C3 + Essie Thomas + Beth & The Brave + more: CERES Enviromental Park (9am), Brunswick East

HIATUS KAIYOTE: 21 MAR NATIONAL GALLERY OF VICTORIA Neil Murray + Sammy Butcher + Shane Howard + Carus Thompson + Leah Flanagan + Tom Richardson + Miles 2 Go Trio + The Mik Maks + Brett Clarke: Lake Bolac Eel Festival, Lake Bolac Sam Linton-Smith Band + Lovers & Madmen: Lomond Hotel (9.30pm), Brunswick East Cat Stevens Tribute ft. Ron Vincent & Band: Musicland, Fawkner Cash Savage & The Last Drinks: Northcote Social Club, Northcote

Fiji + Spawnbreezie: The Espy (Gershwin Room), St Kilda

The Pass Outs + Turk Tresize + Nat Allison: Cherry Bar (5pm), Melbourne

Absu + Portal + Denouncement Pyre + more: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne

Popolice + Cool Drinks + Snowy Nasdaq + Waterfall Person: Conduit Arts, Fitzroy

Alex & The Shy Lashlies + Little Desert: Old Bar (Afternoon), Fitzroy

Baths + Kirkis + Andras Fox: Corner Hotel, Richmond

Bird Blobs + Dead River + Cuntz + DJ Rach: Old Bar, Fitzroy

Coach Bombay + I’ll Be An Indian + Dr Doctor: Ding Dong Lounge, Melbourne

Coral Ceto Folk Project + Shijvovitz Orchestra: Open Studio, Northcote

Joe Chindamo Trio: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond

Thando: Rainbow Hotel, Fitzroy

Greenthief: The Loft, Warrnambool Tek Tek Ensemble: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg Watts On + Various Artists: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda Old Love + Ted Danson With Wolves + Ships Piano + Yachtburner: The Public Bar, North Melbourne The Sideshow Brides: The Thornbury Local (9.30pm), Thornbury Matt Walker & The Lost Ragas + Raised By Eagles + Willow Darling: The Tote, Collingwood Slow Club feat. The Night Party + Richie 1250 & The Brides of Christ + Gator Queen: The Tote, Collingwood Latin Quarters + Various Artists: Trak Lounge Bar, Toorak Soul Salvation + Munro Melano + Hikayat: True North Festival, Reservoir The Bits + The Glorious North: Victoria Hotel, Brunswick The Australian Bee Gees Show: Wangaratta Performing Arts Centre, Wangaratta Parmy Dhillon + Acoustic Foxx + John Smith Quintet: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote

The Coves + Lonesome + JMS Harrison: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (9pm), Brunswick Action Sam: European Bier Cafe, Melbourne Copia + Scar The Surface + Riot In Toytown: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy The Songs of Lee Hazlewood + Stu Thomas Paradox: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick Sunnyboys + Huxton Creepers: Forum Theatre, Melbourne T54 + Contrast + Minatures + The Baudelaires: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood Leather Towell + Efficiency + Velvet Whip + Baader: Grace Darling Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood

Wendy Rule: Northcote Uniting Church (8pm), Northcote

Waz E James + Mick Daley & The Corporate Raiders: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick To Hell With Honour + Awakening + Find The Remedy: Reverence Hotel (Band Room), Footscray Strathmore + Del Lago + Angry Seas + Gladstone: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar), Footscray Mercucio + Davy Simony + more: Revolver Upstairs (8pm), Prahran Wolf & Cub + High Tails + From Oslo: Rochester Castle Hotel (Bookclub Band Room ), Fitzroy Bang feat. Chasing Ghosts + Free World + Among The Abyss + Evacuate The Fallen: Royal Melbourne Hotel, Melbourne

Dead + Wicked City + Sarge & The Nuked: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine Broozer + Gvrlls + Warpigs + Horsehunter: The Brunswick Hotel (9pm), Brunswick Max Rudd + Rad Navajo: The Brunswick Hotel (5pm), Brunswick The Australian Bee Gees Show: The Capital, Bendigo Performing Arts Centre, Bendigo Wire Bird + Portraits Of August + Iris: The Curtin, Carlton Slime Dime & The Prairie Kings: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne Orphaned Land + Voyager + Orsome Welles: The Espy (Gershwin Room), St Kilda Greenthief + I Am Duckeye + Teal + High Side Driver: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda Dragon: The Forge Theatre, Bairnsdale Lucha Libre Mexican Wrestling: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne Mighty Duke & The Lords: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg Caged Grave + Disapro + Disintegrator + Atomic Death Squad + Bombs Over Brunswick + Counter Attack + Levitating Churches: The Public Bar, North Melbourne Human Woman + Vicuna Coat: The Thornbury Local (9.30pm), Thornbury Everybody’s Favourite: Songs from 1989-1993 + Underground Lovers + Penny Hewson: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Bodies + Touching The Bees: The Tote (Front Bar), Collingwood Sun God Replica + Damn Terran + Seedy Jeezus: The Tote, Collingwood

Monkey’s Pirate + Holy Moses Heartache + Todd Cook: Bar Open, Fitzroy Angie + Rat Columns + Miss Destiny + Toothache: Boney, Melbourne Snareophobe Feat. Dub Princess + Rolex Bifta + Titus 12 + more: Brunswick Pop Up Park (3pm), Brunswick Mr Black & Blues: Cherry Bar (2pm), Melbourne Waco Social Club: Cherry Bar (7pm), Melbourne Barney: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (4pm), Brunswick Nicola Brown + Dinochip + Scotty Candlish + Mitchell P Ward: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy Great Barrier Reef Fundraiser feat. Smile + Pink Tiles + Velcro + Jumpin Jack: Grace Darling Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood The Smith Street Band + The Menzingers + Grim Fandango + Ceres: Karova Lounge, Ballarat Dirty Elvis + King Wolf: Labour In Vain (5pm), Fitzroy Ultrafox: Lomond Hotel (5.30pm), Brunswick East Ken Maher & Tony Hargreaves + Guests: Lomond Hotel (9pm), Brunswick East Jam At Musicland Sundays + Various: Musicland, Fawkner Eleanor McEvoy + Enda Kenny Band: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Dewayne Everettsmith: Northcote Social Club (Matinee), Northcote Mountain Goat Beersoaked Sundays ft. Roller One + Ned Collette + Emily Ulman + DJ Fee Fee: Old Bar, Fitzroy Lucas Michaildis + Patrick Thiele: Open Studio, Northcote Chris Wilson: Rainbow Hotel, Fitzroy

Thief + Nicole Millar + Leaks: Shebeen Bar, Melbourne

Dru Chen + Alta + Echo Drama + Broadway Sounds: The Workers Club, Fitzroy

Vulgargrad + Kazband: Kindred Studios (Bar of Bengal), Yarraville

Ben Whiting + Grim Fawkner + Emilee South: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill

Stonefield + Lurch & Chief: Theatre Royal, Castlemaine

Eddie Baytos + Gator Queen + Strum Rebellion: Retreat Hotel (5pm), Brunswick

The Bakersfield Glee Club: Labour In Vain (5pm), Fitzroy

Shirazz: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick

Fast Track Grand Final + Various Artists: Thornbury Theatre, Thornbury

Georgia Mac + Lucy Wilson + Jay Stevens: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar/3pm), Footscray

Eleanor McEvoy: Harvester Moon Cafe, Bellarine

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 52 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

By Eleanor + Chop Squad + The Rift + Aviar: 303 (7.30pm), Northcote


THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 53


classies classies.themusic.com.au Tayutau + Open Swimmer + Super XX Man: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill Andrew Nolte & his Orchestra: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick Melody Pool: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick Eleanor McEvoy + Enda Kenny Band: St Cuthbert’s (2pm), Menzies Creek Disparo + Disintegrator + Counter Attack + Atomic Death Squad + Cabin Fever + Substance Abuse: The Bendigo, Collingwood Mick Daley: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine The Nitty Gritty + Adrian Whitehead: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick The Let Your Hair Down Girls: The Curtin (Front Bar / 4pm), Carlton Little Bands #2 + Various Artists: The Curtin (6), Carlton Van Walker + The Bona Fide Travelers: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne Dale Ryder Band + Gary Eastwood Express + DJ Roc Landers: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda The Blackeyed Susans: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg Sun-dazed - Dub, Afro & World + Various Artists: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda The Beegles + Zone Out + Local Group: The Public Bar, North Melbourne The Davidson Brothers: The Standard Hotel, Fitzroy Anna Cordell: The Thornbury Local (5pm), Thornbury Wonderful Things: Songs From 1994 & Beyond + Underground Lovers + Dave Graney: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Toehider + Troldhaugen + Voltera: The Tote, Collingwood Shaun Kirk: The Westernport Hotel, San Remo Trivia: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Child Wise Benefit feat. + Tim Rogers + Davey Lane + James Reyne + Deborah Conway + Kaity Dunstan + Chris Wilson + Mark Seymour + Ash Naylor + Bruce Haymes + Paul Williamson + Stephen Hadley + Rob Snarski + Steve Lucas + more: Thornbury Theatre, Thornbury Biddlewood + Miss Eileen & King Lear + The Rims + more: True North Festival, Reservoir Cisco Ceasar: Union Hotel (5pm), Brunswick The Luau Cowboys: Victoria Hotel (4.30pm), Brunswick Harvest ‘n’ Gaze ith + James Reyne + Daryl Braithwaite + The Black Sorrows + Chocolate Starfish: Victory Park, Traralgon

Unpaved Sessions + Various: Old Bar, Fitzroy Oh Pep! + Stan Woodhouse + Jacob Pearson + Nick Bastiras: Retreat Hotel (7pm), Brunswick Passionate Tongues Poetry + Various Artists: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Do You Know What I Mean? + Trivia: The Curtin (Front Bar / 7.30pm), Carlton The Black Molls + Monte Diamontes World Famous Drag Superstars: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda

Oliver Paterson: 303 (8pm), Northcote

Lisa Marie Presley + Leeroy Lee: Arts Centre (Playhouse Theatre), Melbourne The Good Lovelies: Burrinja Café & Bar, Upwey Dan Waters: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Super Unsigned Music Festival + Pocketwatch Knight + Inhuman Being + Doktor + Arcadian + Dirt Land + Jack And The Kids + Mojo Pin + Trigger + Aaron James + Marco + Everseer: Corner Hotel, Richmond Jack Earle Big Band: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond

$55

$65

day sessions

$55

$65

Public Holiday Solo Practice

Mon-Fri 11am-5:30pm $15

Solo Practice

with a drum kit or amp

$20

GROUND FLOOR | OPEN 7 DAYS

9415 7177 www.midianrehearsals.com

2 York St Richmond

Things of Stone and Wood + Carus Thompson: Northcote Social Club (Matinee Show), Northcote Apple Ida: Open Studio, Northcote Ravenswood + Clive J Mann: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick Never Cheer Before You Know Who’s Winning + Trivia: Revolver Upstairs (7.15pm), Prahran Fresh Industry Showcase + Various Artists: Revolver Upstairs (7pm), Prahran Melbourne Free University - Love & Sex In The 21st Century + Various Artists: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill Let’s Get Trivical + X: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick Trivia: The B.East, Brunswick East Los Bendigueros + Danger DJ: The Bendigo, Collingwood Discovery Night feat. + Wounded Pig + Stoning + Xenos + Terror Strike + Flowers For Cops: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Trivia: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne

Fact Hunt Trivia + Various: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

54 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

$70

all sessions

LoopDeLoop @ Loop + Various Artists: Loop, Melbourne

The Large Number 12s + DJ Stickman: Yarra Hotel (4pm), Abbotsford

Aunty Stingray’s Bingo Club: Ferdydurke, Melbourne

Monday - Friday 6pm-12midnight $60 Weekends

The Last Tuesday Society + Various Artists: Howler, Brunswick

Open Mic Night with + Nicolette Forte + Friends: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda

Cherry Jam: Cherry Bar, Melbourne

RATES: (GST INCLUDED) SMALL LARGE Monday - Friday 11am-5:30pm $35 $45

Beyond The Bathroom Choir: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (7.30pm), Brunswick

Green’s Dairy Angel Ensemble: Wesley Anne (Bandroom), Northcote

MON 24

REHEARSAL STUDIOS

TUE 25

Trivia: The Thornbury Local, Thornbury Ben Wright Smith + The Kite Machine + Gena Rose Bruce: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Sleepy Dreamers + Hayley Couper + Louis Spoils: The Workers Club, Fitzroy

ADVERTISE HERE CALL: (03) 9421 4499 OR GO TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU


THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014 • 55


56 • THE MUSIC • 19TH MARCH 2014

The Music (Melbourne) Issue #30  

The Music is a free, weekly gloss magazine of newsstand quality. It features a diverse range of content including arts, culture, fashion, li...