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SOUTHWINDS News & Views for Southern Sailors

Hurricane Survival Issue How A Charter Company Survived Hurricane Charley Strengthen Your Dock For A Storm August 2005 For Sailors — Free…It’s Priceless


Murray Yacht Sales New Orleans, LA Mobile, AL Pensacola, FL (504) 283-2507 info@MurrayYachtSales.com

Carson Yacht Brokerage Regatta Pointe Marina 1065 Riverside Drive Palmetto, FL 34221 (941) 723-1825 (941) 729-8254 Fax

St. Barts Yachts Charleston, SC (843) 577-7377 Jacksonville, FL (904) 387-5047 sales@st-barts.com

Eastern Yachts West Palm Beach & Fort Lauderdale, FL (561) 844-1100 (954) 828-9071 yachts3@attglobal.net


The Pros

and

Know!

SAVE 20% ON ALL BULK ROPE!

SAVE $5

Charter Chief

Limited to stock on hand. While supplies last.

Windex 10 Sport Windex 15

Davis

99

24

From

Windex Wind Indicators •Super-sensitive masthead windvanes detect the slightest changes in air flow Windex 10 Sport– Model 277983 Reg. 29.99 SALE 24.99 Windex 15– Model 135210 Reg. 44.99 SALE 39.99

SAVE 20% ON ALL HARKEN CARBO BLOCKS! “The Moorings provides ‘The Best Sailing Vacations in the World,’ and with that commitment, we demand a partner such as West Marine that delivers the best products in the industry, at a fair price and on time. Our customers are on vacation and our passion is to ensure that they have the finest yachts and the best service in the industry. West Marine shares our passion for excellence. Personally, I appreciate the one-stop shopping for marine supplies for my own boat.” —Lex Raas President, The Moorings www.moorings.com

1-800-BOATING westmarine.com or BoatUS-store.com 2

August 2005

SOUTHWINDS

SAVE 25% ON ALL MAINSAIL COVERS! Limited to stock on hand. While supplies last.

Limited to stock on hand. While supplies last.

SAVE $20

49999

7999

GPSMAP 76C Color Mapping GPS

Super Kart Ahoy

•Presents brilliant maps on the large, sunlight readable color TFT display Model 5498472

•Compact, lightweight, affordable cart makes light work of moving gear to and from your boat Model 1968023 Reg. 99.99

Garmin

Kart Ahoy

Folded

MUST PRESENT THIS AD!

to get the Sale Prices* shown. Specials in this ad not combinable with any other offer. Sale Prices good August 4–28, 2005 *Cashier please ring through as POV using item discount, reason code “Event”. Product descriptions, typographic, price or photographic mistakes are unintentional and subject to correction.

www.southwindssailing.com


2005 Hunter and Catalina

Inventory Clearance 2005 Catalina 440 • Hull #6

2005 Catalina 400 • Hull #310

2005 Catalina 387 • Hull #66

Purchase a new 2005 in-stock Hunter or Catalina from Massey and SAVE LIKE NEVER BEFORE!

SOLD Reg. Price $337,052 - Call for Savings

Reg. Price $226,435 - Call for Savings

Reg. Price $192,668 - Call for Savings

2005 Catalina 350 • Hull #339

2005 Catalina 310 • Hull #310

2005 Hunter 306 • Hull #586

Big cash discounts or generous trade in allowances. Reg. Price $164,836 - Call for Savings

Reg. Price $107,794 - Call for Savings

Reg. Price $97,856 - Call for Savings

2005 Hunter 33 • Hull #243

2005 Hunter 36 • Hull #229

2005 Hunter 38 • Hull #108

The best deals ever are limited to our 2005 in stock inventory shown on this page…

SOLD Reg. Price $119,270 - Call for Savings

Reg. Price $155,950 - Call for Savings

Reg. Price $205,159 - Call for Savings

2005 Hunter 41DS • Hull #236

2005 Hunter 44DS • Hull #182

2005 Hunter 46LE • Hull #336

Call your nearest Massey dealership today… When these boats are sold the deals sail away with them… Sail and

Save Now! Reg. Price $240,021 - Call for Savings

Reg. Price $270,504 - Call for Savings

Reg. Price $343,852 - Call for Savings

For Online Boat Show – www.MasseyYacht.com 65 Steel Schooner ‘87 . . . 51 Shannon ‘01 . . . . . . 50 Gulfstar ‘78 . . . . . . . 466 Hunter ‘04 (warranty) 46 Hunter ‘04 (warranty) . 46 Hunter ‘00 . . . . . . . 45 Morgan ‘91 . . . . . . . 45 Jeanneau 45.2 ‘99 . . . 45 Hunter ‘00 . . . . . . . 45 Hunter CC ‘99 . . . . . 44 Morgan CC ‘90 . . . . . 43 Shannon ‘98 . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

.$329,900 .$875,000 .$115,000 .$209,000 .$239,000 .$244,900 .$179,900 .$249,000 .$237,500 .$198,000 .$165,000 .$449,000

2001 Shannon 51 • $875,000

43 43 43 42 42 42 42 42 42 41 40 40

Roberts-Steel ‘91/’95 . . . . . . .$149,500 Hunter ‘96 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$149,995 Beneteau 435 ‘86 . . . . . . . . . .$99,900 Tayana ‘87 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$149,900 Island Packet ‘00 . . . . . . . . .$359,000 Hunter CC ‘96 . . . . . . . . . . .$164,900 Cheoy Lee ‘98 . . . . . . . . . . .$185,000 Catalina ‘03 . . . . . . . . . . . .$185,000 Catalina ‘90 . . . . . . . . . . . .$128,500 Morgan Classic ‘87 . . . . . . . . .$97,000 Island Packet ‘97 . . . . . . . . .$215,000 Catalina MKII ‘02 . . . . . . . . .$199,900

1997 Island Packet 350 • $155,000

Call Sheryl Boddy for Best Rate Yacht Finance Quotes and FREE Pre-Qualification

40 Catalina 400 MKII ‘01 . . . . . .$179,900 40 Caliber ‘98 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$198,500 40 Caliber LRC ‘96 . . . . . . . . . .$183,500 40 Caliber ‘93 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$164,900 380 Catalina ‘00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$124,900 38 Catalina ‘02 . . . . . . . . . . . .$155,000 37 Pacific Seacraft ‘00 . . . . . . . .$209,000 37 Endeavour ‘78 . . . . . . . . . . . .$39,900 36 Hunter 356 ‘04 (warranty) . . . .$99,900 36 Catalina ‘98 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$99,500 36 Catalina ‘98 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$98,500 35 Island Packet ‘97 . . . . . . . . .$155,000

941-723-3991

Bill Wiard

Christine Silvia

Al Pollak

David Cole

Beneteau ‘98 . . . . . . . . . . . .$93,900 Pacific Seacraft ‘87 . . . . . . . .$109,900 Hunter ‘01 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$73,000 Hunter Vision ‘89 . . . . . . . . . .$41,900 Catalina 320 ‘94 . . . . . . . . . .$59,500 C&C 99 ‘03 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$124,900 Beneteau ‘98 . . . . . . . . . . . .$76,900 Pearson ‘89 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$49,900 Catalina 310 ‘03 . . . . . . . . . .$87,500 Sabre MKIII ‘88 . . . . . . . . . . .$57,900 Catalina ‘94 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$54,500 Catalina ‘91 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$39,500

2004 Hunter 46 (3) • from $209,000 SINCE 1977

Sailing Yacht Sales Position Resumes being accepted for all Massey locations

St. Pete, FL 727-824-7262 • TOLL-FREE 877-552-0525

35 34 32 32 32 32 32 31 31 30 30 30

Palmetto, FL 941-723-1610 • TOLL-FREE 800-375-0130

Brad Crabtree Scott Pursell Frank Hamilton Al Halpern

John Kelley

www.masseyyacht.com Ft. Myers, FL 239-334-3674 TOLL-FREE 800-763-3157

Ben Fowke

Dan Howland

3 Massey Florida Locations

St. Pete Palmetto Ft. Myers


News & Views for Southern Sailors

SOUTHWINDS August 2005

3


ADVERTISER INDEX BY CATEGORY

(SEE

PAGE

61

FOR ALPHABETICAL LIST)

TELL THEM YOU SAW IT IN SOUTHWINDS! SOUTHWINDS provides this list as a courtesy and asks our readers to support our advertisers. This list includes all display advertising. SAILBOATS – NEW AND BROKERAGE Apex/Mayer Yacht Brokerage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Beneteau Sailboats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BC BigFish Sailboat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Boaters Exchange/Catalina Sailboats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Carson Yacht Sales/Beneteau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BC Cortez Yacht Brokerage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Eastern Yachts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BC Flying Scot Sailboats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Gulf Coast Yacht Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53,56,57 Hanse Sailboats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Hobie Cats/Tackle Shack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 The Hull Company/Island Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Island Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Island Yachting Centre/Island Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,55 Johannssen/Raider Sailboats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Massey Yacht Sales/Catalina//Hunter/Shannon/Albin . .6,15,IBC Masthead Yacht Sales/Catalina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20,60 Mayer Yacht Brokerage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Murray Yacht Sales/Beneteau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BC Performance Sail and Sport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Raider Sailboats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Sailboats Florida, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Sailor’s Wharf Boatyard and Brokerage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Sailtime, Fractional Sailing & Brokerage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Sarasota Youth Sailing Program donated boats . . . . . . . . . . .54 Snug Harbor Yacht Brokerage/Hunter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 St. Barts/Beneteau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BC Southern Trades Brokerage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Suncoast Inflatables/ West Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Tackle Shack/Hobie/Sunfish, St. Petersburg . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Tampa Sailing Squadron Youth Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Turner Marine/Island Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Two Hulls Brokerage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Windcraft, Trimarans and Catamarans, Sail or Power . . . . . . .10 GEAR, HARDWARE, ACCESSORIES, CLOTHING Anne’s Anchors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22,59 Air Duck Hatch Windscoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Bluewater Sailing Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Boaters Exchange, boats, gear, etc. Rockledge FL . . . . . . . . . .35 Bo’sun Supplies/Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Defender Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 E-Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59,60 Garhauer Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Glacier Bay Refrigeration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Hotwire/Fans & other products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Island Marine Products/Davits,motorlocks,etc. . . . . . . . . . . . .38 JR Overseas/Moisture Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 JSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Leather Wheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Masthead Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20,60 Nautical Trader/buy/sell/consign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Performance Sail and Sport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Rparts Refrigeration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 SSMR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Tackle Shack/Hobie/Sunfish, St. Petersburg . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 West Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13,IFC SAILS (NEW & USED), RIGGING, SPARS, RIGGING SERVICES Atlantic Sail Traders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Banks Sails/new, used, repair & canvas/ West Florida . . . . . . .45 Cruising Direct/sails online by North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Dwyer Mast/spars, hardware, rigging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 JSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Masthead/Used Sails and Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20,60 National Sail Supply, new&used online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 North Sails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Performance Sail and Sport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Porpoise Used Sails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Quantum Sails and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Schurr Sails, Pensacola FL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 SSMR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Sunrise Sails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 4

August 2005

SOUTHWINDS

SAILS (NEW & USED), RIGGING, SPARS, RIGGING SERVICES cont. Ullman Sails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 West Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13,IFC CANVAS Banks Sails/new, used, repair & canvas/ West Florida . . . . . . .45 JSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Quantum Sails and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 USED SAILING/BOATING SUPPLIES Nautical Trader/buy/sell/consign, West Florida . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Scurvy Dog Marine/Used, Consign, Pensacola FL . . . . . . . . . .43 SAILING SCHOOLS Sea School/Captain’s License . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 St. Augustine Sailing School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 MARINE ENGINES AND ACCESSORIES America’s Generators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Beta Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Fleetside Marine Service/Yanmar (813) 645-8971 . . . . . . . . .59 RB Grove/Universal and Westerbeke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Yanmar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 RESORTS, MARINAS, RESTAURANTS, BOAT YARDS Bob and Annie’s Boatyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Crow’s Nest Restaurant & Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Sailor’s Wharf Boatyard and Brokerage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 FRACTIONAL SAILING/CHARTER COMPANIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sailtime, Fractional Sailing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 MARINE SERVICES, SURVEYORS, INSURANCE, TOWING, BOAT LETTERING, ETC. Aqua Graphics/Boat Names/Tampa Bay or buy online . . . . . .45 Beachmaster Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Drive Insurance From Progressive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 MARINE ELECTRONICS Dockside Radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 JR Overseas/Moisture Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Sea Tech/Navigation/Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38,59 WEATHER SERVICES Weather Wave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 BOOKS/CHARTS/VIDEOS Bubba Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 REGATTA ADVERTISEMENTS, BOAT SHOWS Bradenton YC Kick-Off Regatta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Key West Race Week/Premiere Racing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Sarasota Sailing Squad Labor Day Regatta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Sailing Services Directory West Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Regional Sailing Services Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Subscription Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .this page Alphabetical Advertisers’ List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

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SOUTHWINDS NEWS & VIEWS 8

From the Helm

10

Letters

16

Short Tacks

20

Bubba’s Boat Inspected by DEA By Morgan Stinemetz

22

Hurricane Section How One Charter Company Survived Hurricane Charley By Steve Morrell Spring Line Math By Capt. Bill Cullen Tips for Preparing Your Dock By Roy Laughlin

FOR

SOUTHERN SAILORS

32

Southeast Coast Sailing: Carolinas and Georgia: Upcoming Events and News, Race Calendar, Race Report

35

East Florida Sailing: Upcoming Events and News, Race Calendar, Race Report

37

Southeast Florida Sailing: Upcoming Events and News, Race Calendar, Race Report

39

Florida Keys Sailing: Upcoming Events and News, Race Calendar, Race Report

41

Northern Gulf Coast Sailing: Upcoming Events and News, Race Calendar, Race Report

46

West Florida Sailing: Upcoming Events and News, Race Calendar, Race Report

56

Classifieds

62

The Frankenboat By Roy Laughlin

44-45 61 4 4

Sailing Services Directories Alphabetical Index of Advertisers Advertisers’ List by Category Subscription Form COVER: Anchored in St. Augustine, FL. Photo by Bob Walters.

Survive the storms. Photo courtesy Yachting Vacations. Page 22

Prepare your dock for the storm. Photo by Roy Laughlin. Page 30.

From the Carolinas to Cuba…from Atlanta to the Abacos…SOUTHWINDS Covers Southern Sailing News & Views for Southern Sailors

SOUTHWINDS

August 2005

5


SOUTHWINDS News & Views For Southern Sailors SOUTHWINDS Media, Inc. P.O. Box 1175, Holmes Beach, Florida 34218-1175 (941) 795-8704 (877) 372-7245 (941) 795-8705 Fax www .southwindssailing.com e-mail: editor@southwindssailing.com Volume 13 Number 8 August 2005 Copyright 2005, Southwinds Media, Inc. Founded in 1993 Steve Morrell

Doran Cushing, Publisher 1993-2002

Publisher/Editor editor@southwindssailing.com (941) 795-8704

Advertising Gary Hufford David Curry Advertising Advertising Director davidcurry@southwindssailing.com Pinellas & Hillsborough Counties, FL gary@southwindssailing.com (941) 761-0048 (727) 585-2814 Regional Editors CAROLINAS AND GEORGIA Walt McFarlane waltmcfarlane@aol.com (912) EAST FLORIDA Roy Laughlin mhw1@earthlink.net (321) SOUTHEAST FLORIDA Steve Morrell editor@southwindssailing.com (941) SOUTHEAST FLORIDA RACING Art Perez miamiyachtracing@bellsouth.net (305) FLORIDA KEYS Rebecca Burg angel@artoffshore.com (305) WEST FLORIDA Steve Morrell editor@southwindssailing.com (941) NORTHERN GULF COAST Kim Kaminski kimberlyk@connectpens.net (850) Production Heather Nicoll

429-4197 690-0137 795-8704 380-0106 304-5118 795-8704 384-8941

Proofreading Kathy Elliott Contributing Writers

Rebecca Burg Julie Connerley Dave Huff Kim Kaminski Walt McFarlane Ron Mitchellette Kathleen Robinson-Malone Morgan Stinemetz

Dave Ellis Roy Laughlin Art Perez Hone Scunook

Contributing Photographers

Rebecca Burg Roy Laughlin Bob Walters

Julie Connerley Bill Cullen Kathleen Robinson-Malone Yachting Vacations

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTIONS: ARTICLES & PHOTOGRAPHY: SOUTHWINDS encourages readers, writers, photographers, cartoonists, jokers, magicians, philosophers and whoever else is out there, including sailors, to send in their material. Just make it about the water world and generally about sailing and about sailing in the South, the Bahamas or the Caribbean, or general sailing interest, or sailboats, or sailing in some faroff and far-out place. SOUTHWINDS welcomes contributions in writing and photography, stories about sailing, racing, cruising, maintenance and other technical articles and other sailing-related topics. Please submit all articles electronically by e-mail (mailed-in discs also accepted), and with photographs, if possible. We also accept photographs alone, for cover shots, racing, cruising and just funny entertaining shots. Please take them at a high resolution if digital, or scan at 300 dpi if photos, or mail them to us for scanning. Contact the editor with questions. Subscriptions to SOUTHWINDS are available at $19.95/year, or $37/2 years for third class, and $24/year for first class. Checks and credit card numbers may be mailed with name and address to SOUTHWINDS Subscriptions, PO Box 1175, Holmes Beach FL, 34218-1175, or call (941) 795-8704. Subscriptions are also available with a credit card through a secure server on our Web site, www.southwindssailing.com. SOUTHWINDS is distributed to over 500 locations throughout 10 Southern states. If you would like to distribute SOUTHWINDS at your location, please contact the editor.

Read SOUTHWINDS on our Web site, www.southwindssailing.com. 6

August 2005

SOUTHWINDS

www.southwindssailing.com


FROM THE HELM July Hurricanes?

H

ere it is August, and we have already had several tropical storms, two of which became hurricanes. That is, there were only two by the time we went to press. Hopefully, it is no more than that by the time this is read. I was going to buy a generator this year but didn’t think there was a hurry before August. Was I wrong! Since August, in my mind, is when the real hurricane season begins, we have made this our hurricane issue. Maybe I was wrong again. Perhaps it should be at the beginning, in June. Maybe next year. After last year’s hurricanes destroyed so many boats, I began a quest to find out how we can save them in the future. Perhaps the insurance companies will come pat me on the back. They should at least advertise with us. I have learned that they can be saved—and many prepare and do save their boats. And I have learned that most people don’t do anything to try to save them. Some of those who fall in the latter group have boats that end up damaging the boats owned by the former group. Something’s wrong with this picture. There could be lots of reasons people don’t prepare their boats before these storms hit. Of course, some prepare them, but with little effort. They might go down to the dock and make sure their lines are secure, maybe take the canvas off the bimini, then go home and make sure they made their insurance payment. Some might think the boat is better off anchored out, so they take it out, drop one anchor and go

8

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home and make sure they made their insurance payment. I can think of some other reasons, some legitimate, some not. They have a home and family, and that comes first. Makes sense. They are out of town and didn’t expect an early storm. They live out of town and keep their boat in Florida and come sailing periodically. Last they were there, the lines were secure. They can’t afford to have someone look after the boat if a storm comes. They spend enough money on the boat as it is. Besides, they have insurance. There are a lot more reasons, some just excuses. But I have learned these boats can be saved. I talked to Capt. Chris Rogiers, owner of Yachting Vacations charters in Punta Gorda. Sixteen boats in its fleet survived Hurricane Charley because of lots of effort, a good plan and a responsible company. See his story in our hurricane section. When I found out how many boats at his marina were left unprepared and were damaged, it was staggering. The photos showed damage all over of boats no one had prepared— leaving headsails up, canvas on, lines untouched. Many boats were dismasted. Yet Chris’ boats survived. His story will help others. We can save these boats. It requires a plan, effort, knowledge of what works—and a bit of luck, of course. We will help spread the word. Read on. Check out the hurricane pages on our Web site, too. Lots of info there. And more to come. Editor

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LETTERS

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“Freedom of the press is limited to those who own one.” H.L. Mencken In its continuing endeavor to share its press, SOUTHWINDS invites readers to write in with experiences & opinions.

CHARLEY’S PASS? We were recently cruising along North Captiva and saw the new pass that was created on the island from Hurricane Charley and wondered if the new pass has a name. We thought it would be appropriate to call it Charley’s Pass. Do you know if it has it been named yet? Beach Edwards Captiva, FL Beach, Is that really your name or is this some kind of joke? Someone named Beach writing about the name of a pass? Hmmm….. I heard someone else call it that so perhaps it will get that name. I, too, had a chance to see it, and right now, it doesn’t appear to be deep enough to allow anything but kayaks to pass through. Can it really officially be called a pass at this point? What is the protocol for when a pass can be called a pass? Maybe the next storm will close it up. Editor MIAMI BEACH CITY LIMITS All this is important within the Miami Beach boundaries…so what are they? A search on the Web fails to produce a definitive outline of these boundaries. Can you help? Howard Rosenthal Howard, Good question. I, too, looked around with a lot of effort and eventually found one we posted on our Web site page covering the ordinance. Please verify before using it, but it is at least one posted by the city of Miami Beach on its site showing the boundaries (it is a historic district map). We put it up there only to give the reader a general idea of the limits. Verify the boundaries yourself and do not use for navigation. Editor DOCK EMPLOYEES What is it with some of the people who work the docks? These are the people who are supposed to be the happy link between facility and customer. You know, welcoming smile, expert help in tying up the boat and telling one how a stay can be more enjoyable? Recently, after a particularly arduous four-hour solo sail in heavy winds, I called the dockmaster’s office of where I wanted to stay on the VHF radio. After the obligatory switch to a working channel, I told the lady on the radio that I had been there before and knew how to get to the transient dock. I also told her the length of my boat and its draft. What I got back was about 30 seconds of unnecessary non-stop talk. Tired and busy, I understood nothing of what she said. It could have waited, should have waited. When I got to the dock, she helped tie up the boat. It was only some time later that I noted that she had tied up a spring line to a flag halyard cleat. Maybe she didn’t know See LETTERS continued on page 12 10

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LETTERS

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that a flag halyard cleat is not meant for spring lines. Once tied up, I got a mini lecture on why I needed to make a reservation. Then I was told that the transient dock was reserved for the following day and I would have to leave early. Where do people like this come from? How do they get these jobs? Morgan Stinemetz Bradenton, FL Morgan, Maybe through nepotism? A distant cousin who needs a job perhaps? I, too, have seen a wide range of dock employees from good to bad. You would think that the person who hired them would have at least given them a little training about the basics. Or, perhaps they lied their way into the job saying they had experience, thinking to themselves, “How hard can it be?” I was once bringing a boat in, and this dock employee— strange-looking character he was—proceeds to guide me in with his arms pointing this way and that. He so confused me, I ignored him. Never did figure out what he was trying to tell me. He said his name was Bubba something. Never saw him again and I was there for several days. No one else at the dock ever saw him. Maybe he was an apparition. He did secure my lines correctly. Editor DISAPPEARING MARINAS AND ANCHORAGES As a 10-year, liveaboard cruiser, the declining availability of slips is a serious problem, and even worse is the disappearing anchorages. I will give you an account of what has transpired in my travels this last year. Upon returning from the Bahamas last June, I could find nothing open but a transient slip at the Fort Myers City Marina. I would usually go to Fisherman’s Village Marina in Punta Gorda, but it has been closed for a couple of years now with no opening in sight. I was required to leave Fort Myers City Marina on Nov. 1, as it was booked full as the snowbirds arrive, for the season, but I was allowed to get on the list for a permanent slip. I’m number 134 on the list. As nothing else was open in the area, I went to the anchorage in Matanzas Harbor, but the city had just finished putting down 70 mooring balls, and the sheriff came down and ran all the anchored boats out of the harbor, so I was forced to go on the mooring. That was okay with me at $216 a month and all the hot showers you could take. But I soon found out that the marina (Salty Sam’s Marina owns and rents the mooring field under contract with the city of Fort Myers Beach) wasn’t required to upgrade its facilities to accommodate the influx of potentially 100 new “showerees” but loved the idea of them coming to its bar and restaurant. So the two showers located in the work area of the high and dry section of the marina were always cold unless you were first or second in line. The harbor and dock workers also used the showers so they never were clean, and did I mention that the two showers were also for the boats in the marina slips, so make that 150 users. But I could live with that—until after two weeks into my contract a flyer appeared on my car windshield telling me to report to the marina office to register my car. I did so and was told I would have to pay $240 dollars a month for a parking permit. That was nearly the last straw, 12

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but Bonita Bill’s Bar came to our rescue with their free dinghy dock (bless their hearts), and we could park under the harbor bridge for free. (Did I forget to mention that Salty Sam’s dinghy dock could only hold about eight to nine dinghys and is a derelict and wasn’t repaired after last year’s hurricane? Also Salty Sam’s charged us $.25 a gallon for water). Shades of Marathon; Once they get you by the short hairs, they start twisting. So, anyway, we adjusted to the long dinghy ride to Bonita Bill’s and parking under the bridge for a couple of months, but lo and behold, the city posted no overnight parking signs under the bridge (I wonder what marina initiated that change?). So that was the death knell for me. But it was April, the snowbirds were starting to leave, and I was able to get a recently opened slip in Paradise Marina in North Fort Myers. Great! Well, not really. As I got settled in, I noticed that they were clearing land at the end of the road near the marina, and soon the word came down that all the less acceptable boats (read smaller, older, less yachty appearing) were being evicted on short notice, and those that were acceptable and under 45 feet could stay but had to move down to the far corner of the marina—out of sight of the people driving through who were getting the tour and being encouraged to buy one of the condos in the three 24-story buildings being built at the foot of the marina. What a great concept! Condos starting at $700,000 and boat slips at $130,000. I’m sure those people spending $130,000 for a slip won’t mind that their marina office, showers and restrooms are in portable trailers. Also, townhouses will be built along the length of the marina. Well, panic struck the marina inhabitants. Most had been there for many years. Where would they all go on short notice if all were evicted? They started leaving like rats from a sinking ship. By the grace of Odin, I was able to get back into a transit slip in Fort Myers City Marina this week. Full circle. When I am again evicted on Nov. 1 to make room for the snowbirds, and I start my yearly trek to the Bahamas, I think I may just have to stay this time. Would I have a place to come back to? Looks like Key West is no longer an option, as I understand they are trying to require all boats be in slips or on moorings. Do boaters really pollute the waters there? Why have all the public beaches been closed all season for the last four or five years due to high bacteria counts? (A closely guarded secret; tourists can lie on the beach but can’t get in the water.) The public beaches are on the other side of the island from the anchorage, and the only beach open is the Navy beach, which is right near the anchorage. I guess they never thought about the mega condos across the street from the beaches that pump raw sewage into the ocean. What a concept! Alternatively, maybe I’ll take another trip down to the eastern Caribbean. Of course, those that keep up with that news know there are few anchorages there now that aren’t full of mooring. I can’t go to Cuba as I have in the past. Maybe Mexico, but I wanted to get the boat painted in Venezuela this year. (Can’t have it done again in Trinidad as I did in 1995 for $3,500 because they got smart and charge about what it would cost in St. Pete now.) Of course, people aren’t beating their doors See LETTERS continued on page 14 News & Views for Southern Sailors

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LETTERS

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down now to have their boats painted, so maybe that’s not so smart. Bad for Trinidad, good for Puerto La Cruz, Venezuela. So where do we go now and have some peace of mind? Maybe Belize. Captain Richard Lyon Richard, I recently had two friends visit who came to west Florida looking for a sailboat (they are from Colorado), as I had told them there was a great selection here—one of the best in the country. I also told them it was great sailing, with the coastal waters and accessible passes and harbors. They found and purchased their dream boat, but they now believe all the letters and articles we have printed in the past about the marinas and anchorages. They have pretty much decided to move their boat overland to the Sea of Cortez in Mexico, where the Mexican government recently announced plans to increase and improve the marinas in that region—making it more inviting to cruisers to visit the area. Having sailed there myself (with them), I see the attraction. Their concern was heightened (after spending a month here) after seeing the lack of liveaboard marinas, the disappearing marinas and boatyards, the prices, and the few options, which are getting fewer, for anchoring. They felt the atmosphere was slowly turning anti-boat, while Mexico was going in the opposite direction and improving facilities as it increased them. It just appeared to be too expensive to stay in Florida—and it was appearing unfriendly to cruisers. Our waterways, marinas, boatyards and anchorages are disappearing and most of the people—the majority being nonboaters—could care less. Many believe economic forces will find a solution to the problem, which they will; condos and mega yachts pay the bills—and pay well. I fear that is the trend unfolding. Editor

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Crew Overboard Recovery Symposium to be Held on San Francisco Bay, August 9-12 At the 2005 Crew Overboard Recovery Symposium on August 9-12 on windy San Francisco Bay, more than 60 volunteers – including amateur sailors and powerboat operators, instructors, professional sailors, and boating writers – will engage in four demanding days of testing crew overboard gear and skills in sailboats and powerboats. Using volunteer “victims” in the water and a fleet of multihulls, powerboats, modern racers, and other boats, the testers will try to answer a number of crucial questions. For example: How should a sailing trimaran or power cruiser maneuver near a victim in the water? What’s the best way to make contact with the victim? How do you hoist a victim back on deck before hypothermia sets in? Is there any chance of rescuing an unconscious victim? The symposium’s sponsors are Modern Sailing Academy, a sailing school in Sausalito, CA, and West Marine. When MSA and West Marine teamed up to run previous trials for sailboats during the 1990s, among their discoveries were a tactic for sailing back to the victim in strong winds without jibing plus insights about the lights that work best for effecting rescues in poor visibility. This year’s trials will be based at MSA’s facility in Sausalito. Each day, participants will report by 8:30 a.m., receive their assignments, and head out for several hours of testing, followed by a debriefing at the Golden Gate Yacht Club in San Francisco’s Marina District. One set of trials will be held at night. Day-to-day management of the Crewoverboard Recovery Symposium is in the hands of a committee of five

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safety experts: John Connolly, Sausalito, CA (Modern Sailing Academy); Chuck Hawley, Watsonville, CA (West Marine, US Sailing safety-at-sea seminar moderator); Karen Prioleau, Newport Beach, CA (US Sailing instructor trainer/National Faculty, Orange Coast College instructor); John Rousmaniere, New York, NY (author, The Annapolis Book of Seamanship, North U instructor); and Ruth Wood, Alexandria, VA (president, BoatUS Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean Water). Advising them are an international steering committee and a panel of scientists who are developing a research design for the most objective testing possible. The thorough records kept of each test will include GPS tracks of maneuvers. A report will be issued after the trials. Major support for the 2005 Crewoverboard Recovery Symposium is provided by the Bonnell Cove Foundation of the Cruising Club of America and by the BoatUS Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean Water, with additional support by North Sails and the Sailing Foundation of Seattle. Potential volunteers and gear suppliers should contact Sailors@COBevent.com. For more information about the 2005 Crewoverboard Recovery Symposium and crew overboard techniques, go to www.COBevent.com, or call Karen Prioleau at (949) 548-8801.

Unique EasyStow BreakAway Anchor Assembles in Seconds Following the popularity of the original HydroBubble BreakAway anchor, a new version has been developed that quickly and easily assembles and dismantles for easy, compact storage. The Captain’s Choice 35BA EasyStow BreakAway is suitable for boats to 30 feet and is the latest in

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the anchor, a boater simply a series of inventions from needs to come directly over Anchor Concepts designed to the anchor, cleat the rode off at offer unique solutions to a the bow of the boat, and genboater’s anchoring problems. tly power forward. At approxThe EasyStow was developed imately 60-80 pounds of to meet the requests of boaters upward pull the locking cam who want the features of the will open, allowing the original BreakAway anchor anchor’s shank to lay back, but who have limited onboard and the anchor can be pulled storage space, or who only out backwards. Once onoccasionally use an anchor. board, the anchor can easily They are ideal for high perbe reset. The BreakAway is a formance boats, bass boats, special purpose anchor for use and any other boat with limitonly while the boat is being ed storage. tended. Otherwise, the feature BreakAway anchors are should be deactivated. To intended for use in areas of deactivate the BreakAway fearock, wrecks, ledges, limbs or ture and use the anchor at other fouling bottom condiother times, such as when tions. HydroBubble Breakthere is no fouling material on Away anchors feature a unique the bottom, to sleep onboard locking cam that lets the shank overnight, or while not on the of the anchor fold back, allow- The EasyStow BreakAway Anchor folded. boat, the boater simply needs ing the anchor to be released if to insert a clip, which is included with the anchor, into a it becomes stuck. To activate the breakaway feature and free hole in the bottom of the anchor, and it is locked off. Converting the anchor to breakaway mode takes only a few seconds. For more information, go to www.hydrobubble.com.

Scot West Resigns Sail America Post – New Executive Director Search Under Way Sail Executive Director Scot West has given notice to announce his resignation, effective July 31. West, who has served in this capacity since November 2000, will be pursuing another venture in the sailing industry. “I’ve had a really great time at Sail America and have had many opportunities to work with the best people in the sailing industry,” said West. “However, it is time to move on for my own professional growth, and I’m thankful for the many opportunities I have enjoyed and for the support

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support I have been given during my tenure at Sail America.” In his nearly five years of association management, West has been directly involved in numerous initiatives. He was part of the successful integration of the Sail America–NMMA affiliation and oversaw the recently united national branding of sail-only boat shows. From a sailboat show perspective during his tenure, the Sail America and NMMA Strictly Sail Show team produced 25 shows, including the development and execution of two inaugural show events. In addition, he worked closely with the association’s marketing committee and ad agency in the conceptualization through execution of the industry’s largest national marketing outreach initiative, the Discover Sailing: The Ultimate Adventure program, which ultimately resulted in an international award-winning video/DVD production that has been received by well over 29,000 prospects to date. The Sail America Board of Directors is under way on a recruitment effort to replace West. Interested applicants should e-mail resumes to ScotW@sailamerica.com, or contact Scot West directly at (401) 841-0900, ext.12. After July 31, go to www.sailamerica.com.

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Congress Considering ICW Improvements Budget for 2006 On July 1, the Senate passed the appropriations bill for the Army Corps of Engineers for fiscal year 2006. The bill included $14-million for the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway from Virginia through Florida. The House version has only $ 3.8-million for the ICW work. The two chambers will meet next in conference for the final version. The Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway Association (AIWA) is calling for boaters to express their support for ample funding drastically needed for improvements, repair and maintenance of the ICW. Senate recommended appropriations: FL $4.5-million (House version $250,000) GA $286,000 (House $286,000) no maintenance funds (need is $11-million) NC $ 5.86-million (House $860,000) SC $ $2.5-million (House $46,000) VA $ 850,000 for Dismal Swamp (House $275,000) Go to www.atlintracoastal.org for further information and to express your support to your congressman.

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Boating Infrastructure Grant Program (BIG) Helps Build Marina Improvements Of the hundreds of events held nationwide to celebrate National Fishing and Boating Week (June 4 - 12), Corpus Christi, TX, hosted an event on June 10 that marks a milestone in recreational boating. Corpus Christi Mayor Henry Garrett along with David P. Smith, deputy assistant secretary of the interior, officially opened the first phase of the state-of-the-art facilities designed to serve transient boaters visiting the 600-slip municipal marina there. This phase of the project includes a new transient boaters services building offering muchneeded services such as laundry, shower and meeting space, an advanced weather station with complimentary chart-plotting computers and a boaters library. In addition, the federally, chartered Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council, which advises the secretary of the interior, released its review of the innovative Boating Infrastructure Grant Program (BIG) that made this project possible as well as dozens more like it across the country. BIG, which BoatU.S. helped shepherd through Congress in 1998, has pumped more than $32-million in federal boat gas tax monies into building and renovating facilities, like marina slips, channel improvements and mooring fields, to serve people who choose to travel by boat and thereby bolstering local waterfront economies. Corpus Christi, an important stopover on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, received $650,000 in BIG funds, enough seed money for a $6-million, long-term marina renovation and expansion now under way. “This project exemplifies what Congress set out to do in creating the Boating Infrastructure Grant Program,” said Michael Sciulla, BoatU.S. government affairs director. “In many parts of the country, facilities suited to today’s larger cruising vessels are lacking,” added Ryck Lydecker, BoatU.S associate director for state affairs, who chaired the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council panel that conducted the extensive review the BIG Program for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Interior Department.

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One finding of the review panel was that demand for BIG funds for qualified projects had exceeded available monies by well over two-to-one in each year, despite ample state and local matching funds. For more information on BIG funding, go to www.BoatUS.com/gov/BIG.htm or call the BoatU.S. Government Affairs Department at (703) 461-2864.

Storm Batters Regatta Racers: BoatU.S. Rental EPIRBS Save Crew On Two Vessels Stricken In Gulf in the Regata del Sol al Sol Race to Mexico from St. Petersburg, FL From BoatU.S On May 1 and 2, two sailing vessels in the Regata del Sol al Sol race from St. Petersburg, FL, to Isla Mujeres, Mexico, were battered by stormy weather, forcing crews to abandon the race and activate emergency rescue beacons provided by the BoatU.S. Foundation’s EPIRB rental program. As a public service, the BoatU.S. Foundation makes these $900 lifesaving devices available for $50 a week. On Sunday evening May 1 around 9 p.m., the crew of the S/V Luan Two activated their Emergency Position Indicating Rescue Beacon (EPIRB) over 150 miles from shore after spending two days battling high winds and seas in an increasingly compromised vessel. The stormy weather had progressively blown out the Gulfstar 36-foot sloop’s collection of sails, leaving the vessel under engine power alone. However, while the vessel’s fuel system had been inspected prior to the race, the agitated seas dislodged rust particles that progressively clogged each of the five spare fuel filters the crew had brought aboard. With no sail power, damaged steering, nearly dead See SHORT TACTS continued on page 61

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talking to relieve the tension and purposely skipping answering his question at the same time. “I am not sure, exactly. I was asleep on Right Guard earlier this afternoon when I felt some people get on the boat. I got out of the sack and started to go out into the cockpit to tell them to get lost, when a guy with a gun drawn came down into the cabin and said he was with law enforcement and they were executing a search warrant,” Bubba sputtered, his anxiety level rising noticeably. Doobie arrived with Bubba’s third beer, and his angst subsided slightly. He had his hands around the beer mug as he continued. “I asked them what they were looking for and the officer said they were looking for ‘illegal substances.’ That could be anything. It could be Niger yellow cake. It could be ANFO. It could be Micron 22,” Bubba complained. “What did they do?” “They took apart everything in the boat. They got into lockers and took the contents out and piled it on the cabin floor. They looked in all the drawers. They brought a dog on board and had it sniff everything. They dumped the sails out of the sail bags. They pulled all the settee cushions out. In general they made a nuisance of themselves and a damn mess out of Right Guard,” snarled the live-alone, live-aboard sailor. “And to add insult to injury they took my red baseball cap, the one with the Peterbilt emblem on it, off my head and examined inside the sweat band.” “Did they show you the search warrant?” I wanted to know. “Yeah. They showed me a piece of paper with my name on it and the name of my boat on it. It was signed by a judge

News & Views for Southern Sailors

of some kind up in Tampa, so I guess it was legitimate,” Bubba explained, holding up his hand to get Doobie’s attention again. “How long were they there?” “I guess about 30 minutes. When they started to get ready to go, I asked them who in the hell was going to clean up the mess they had made. One of the police guys said it wasn’t in their job description. And then he laughed,” Bubba groused. “When I asked them what they were looking for, one of the cops said they were looking for ‘roaches.’ Someone, it turns out, had heard me talking about all the cockroaches I had on board Right Guard. They called the DEA. I told him that they didn’t need a whole bunch of guys with guns and dogs to find roaches on my boat. All they needed was a flashlight after dark. He said to me that it was another kind of roach they were looking for. What in the hell are DEA agents doing looking for a specific kind of insect? “Can you imagine the trouble this country is in when armed men who are supposed to be arresting druggies and terrorists and rapists and murderers come aboard a guy’s boat in the middle of the day looking for cockroaches? That’s just a waste of manpower. They should have sent the Orkin man instead. That’s what I think. I am going to write my congressman, Katherine Harris.” After listening to Bubba’s take on this latest outrage, this invasion of his personal space by law enforcement goons, I signaled Doobie that I would have two beers for myself and ordered two more for Bubba. It seemed like the decent thing to do, attempting to smooth out storm-tossed waters for a guy whose surprising innocence sometimes reminds one of easier times, like pink cotton candy from the county fair.

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HURRICANE SEASON 2005

Active 2005 Season Gets an Early Start We have published this hurricane issue in August because that generally is the beginning month when Southerners need concern themselves with the stronger tropical storms hitting the United States. Pilot charts show the probability of tropical storms in the region for each month during the season, and the chances increase drastically from June-July to August and through September and October. This year, though, at press time for this issue, five named storms and one major hurricane (Dennis) already surfaced by mid-July. Visit our Web site hurricane page to see these probabilities. We received a late report from Kim Kaminski in Pensacola on the effects of Hurricane Dennis in that area. Go to the Northern Gulf Coast section for that story and another about surviving Hurricane Ivan last year. With the first story below about the Yachting Vacations charter company in southwest Florida, we can all learn that it is possible to survive these storms with a plan and a bit of effort. We have been regularly adding more information to our Web site hurricane page on boat survival with more stories and links, in hopes that more boat owners can learn how their boats can be saved. Please send us your stories and photos to pass the word along and help others. Send them to editor@southwindssailing.com. Correction: Last month we printed an article in the hurricane section titled, “One Way to Survive a Hurricane,” and credited the story to Hugh Grant. The writer’s correct name is Harold Grant.

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The calm before the storm. Notice the Yachting Vacations’ Island Packets on the right side of the dock, prepared for the storm, canvas and sails removed. On the left side, many left their boats untouched.

How One Florida Charter Company Saved 16 Boats During Hurricane Charley By Steve Morrell Photos courtesy Yachting Vacations and their friends.

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hen Yachting Vacations’ owner Capt. Chris Rogiers went home at 2 p.m. Friday afternoon on August 13, 2004, he thought that the 16-plus boats he and his crew had spent the last two days securing were well-prepared for the tropical storm force winds expected from Hurricane Charley that was heading north up the west coast of Florida. It wasn’t till reaching home a few minutes later that he learned that the storm was turning toward the northeast and heading right for Punta Gorda and Burnt Store Marina—home to his charter fleet. With this news, he was convinced that the boats would be lost along with his business. Upon returning to the marina that evening, he was happily surprised to learn he had been wrong. This story really begins three years earlier when Chris Rogiers purchased Yachting Vacations in the summer of 2001 (the company has been in existence since 1984). The charter company was mainly Island Packet boats (as it is today), with a few other-brand catamarans rounding out www.southwindssailing.com


the fleet. Today they have 16 boats from 32 to 48 feet, three of which are catamarans. Charterers generally cruise the popular southwest coast of Florida, the Florida Keys and the Bahamas. Island Packets are known to be solidly built, long-keeled, ocean-cruising yachts. They are well-outfitted with all the amenities and modern conveniences of today’s luxury sailboats. The ones at Yachting Vacations are kept in brand-new condition, maintained by a charter company known for its quality and care. Written Down Hurricane Plan Along with the purchase of the company came a hurricane protection plan that contained three phases. In the existing plan they had when Charley approached, Stage I prepared the boats for tropical storm force winds (39-73 mph winds and storm surge up to four feet above normal). Stage II prepared for Categories 1 through 2 (and perhaps a weak category 3 condition, as there are gray areas. Saffir The dinghies tied together before the storm. All survived undamaged. Simpson scale: Category 1: 74-95, storm surge 4-5 feet. Category 2: 96-110 mph winds and storm surge 6-8 in normal docking conditions, the spring lines might run feet above normal). Stage III prepared the boats for the from a midships cleat to a forward and aft piling, lines worst conditions, Category 3, 4 and 5 (111-155 mph and up would now be run to the bow cleat or stern cleat from and storm surge 9-18 feet and more above normal). those same pilings. Stern and bowlines going straight In Stage I, all canvas (except mainsail cover) is removed right or left to a piling would be run, if the slip was a narfrom the boats (and put down below). The mainsail and row one, to a piling at the next slip over to give it greater cover are heavily wrapped with line, and the boom is length and act more as a spring line. secured with extra lines to winches and cleats on deck. The If the storm surge was predicted to be high, they roller furling sail is checked to insure the sheets are wrapped adjusted the lines high on the pilings to account for it. (As several times around the sail and well tightened. Dock lines compared to a low surge prediction, they would not put are doubled where felt needed and spring lines increased in the lines as high up). They expect to leave the docks durlength for the surge. All lines are set up to be adjusted from ing these conditions and do not plan on people adjusting the dock where possible and others, which go to pilings not lines during these stronger storms. secured to docks, are set up to be adjusted from the boat. In In Stage III, bimini and dodger frames are removed, preparation for all conditions, extra lines were kept in dock roller furling gear is removed and the boats are moved boxes to secure the boats just for tropical storms. and anchored outside the marina basin in Charlotte Also in Stage I, seacocks, hatches and ports are closed, Harbor in deeper, more open water with at least two bilge pumps checked, batteries checked for full charge, and anchors. Of course, these actions are taken along with all shore power cords and other loose items are removed. Dock those things done in Stages I and II. boxes are moved to higher ground and locked. The boat is Chris and his team have several times prepared the completely closed up. All available fenders are secured boats for tropical storms, the first being tropical storm around pilings. Dinghies on davits or on shoreside racks are Gabrielle in September 2001—two months after purchassecured tightly. ing the business. Consequently, they have prepared the In Stage I people are scheduled to adjust the lines durboats before and have experience with the process. ing the storm. In Stage II, all of the Stage I items are completed along with several more. All the sails are stripped from the boat. The roller furling gear is tied more securely by tying a line as Visit Our New Hurricane Page high as one can reach off the deck and run aft to the mast and On The SOUTHWINDS Web Site tightened to minimize any movement it would have from For more information, links, and others stories and letstrong winds. The furling drums are tied down to cleats and ters on hurricane protection for you and your boat, go the bow pulpit to minimize any movement they might have. to our Web site, www.southwindssailing.com. The Bimini and dodger frames are secured to the cabin top, or Southwinds hurricane page will be dedicated to saving stanchions, or other solid bases. boats during tropical storms—sail or power. The stories All lines are doubled and spring and dock line lengths printed monthly will be available on the online magaincreased and altered to secure the boats for extra wind and zine each month and then posted to our hurricane page storm surge. Since the docks are fixed with pilings, spring the following month along with other stories previouslines are critical. For the storm surge, all lines are run to ly printed (follow the link on the home page). points farther away to act more as long spring lines. Where, News & Views for Southern Sailors

SOUTHWINDS

August 2005

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HURRICANE SEASON

High tide and storm surge. Notice the lines being pulled upwards above the pilings. The tops of the pilings are about four feet above the dock planking.

Damaged boats at the marina that were not as prepared as those with Yachting Vacations. Some boats rode up onto the docks as the storm surge rose. No one even took the sails off this boat. Perhaps they didn’t secure it from moving either.

Hurricane Charley Develops Rapidly Early during the week of August 9-13, Chris, his wife and four employees watched as a tropical depression became a storm named Charley and traveled westward across the Caribbean. It was only on Wednesday afternoon, August 11, that Charley, south of Jamaica, became a hurricane. Moving at upwards of 26 mph, the storm went from a tropical wave only a few days earlier to a hurricane—and it was rapidly approaching the Gulf of Mexico. It was on Wednesday around noon when the Yachting Vacations team began to prepare the boats for a storm that was moving quickly while intensifying rapidly. They decided to implement Stage I immediately and worked up to Stage II as the situation developed. Work was immediately begun on removal of all canvas on all the boats, since this action is to be taken whether implementing Stage I, II or III. The team worked on into the evening and seeing that the storm was still only a tropical storm, they prepared the boats for those conditions. On Thursday morning, Charley was heading northwest, and the expected storm track was north into the gulf. The “cone” that forecasters use showed Charley centered to still come ashore in the northwest Gulf, and the eastern edge of the storm’s cone was southwest Florida. At this

point, they decided to prepare the boats with the Stage II plan. Along with removing the sails, they increased the dock lines for a higher surge and also ran some anchors out into the waterways between the docks, as some of the boats stuck out beyond their slips a ways, and they felt anchoring was necessary. All of their boats go in their slips stern first. The other Stage II actions were also implemented. They did not expect to implement Stage III—moving the boats out into open water and anchoring them. Storm surge can be extreme if a storm hits at high tide, and forecasters predicted a high surge for Charlotte Harbor. Consequently, Chris and his employees set all the lines high on the pilings expecting the surge to be extreme. During a previous year’s preparations for a tropical storm, water was as high as two feet above the dock boards, and they walked out onto the docks to adjust the lines during the storm. This storm surge was expected to be substantially higher, and they did not believe they would have the opportunity to adjust the lines, believing that they would not even be able to be in the area. With fixed docks, they cannot prepare for an extreme low and an extreme high, only one or the other. Forecasters called for a high surge, and they prepared for that. Being in the cone of the storm’s projected path, it was uncertain whether they would take a direct hit, which they believed would be a Category 2 at the worst and tropical storm force winds at the best. No one expected to be hit with what eventually came. Meanwhile, others at the marina prepared their boats, and some helped the Yachting Vacations crew, while they in turn helped them. Burnt Store Marina is a large marina with hundreds of sailboats and powerboats. Many boats were left untouched in preparation for the coming storm. Most who did work on the boats, including Chris and his team, worked into the evening on Thursday. Storm Day, Friday, August 13, 2004 Chris and his crew returned to work early on Friday morning to continue preparing the boats. When they left their homes that morning, Charley had just left Cuba, entering the Gulf of Mexico a few hours earlier. Having died down

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to 110 mph winds—a strong Category 2 storm—Charley was heading north at about 18 mph. As the morning progressed, the storm made gradual turns to the east but was expected to head still to the north—aiming its eye at Tampa Bay. Since the Yachting Vacations crew had much work to do, there was little time to watch the TV weather reports, and they were only able to get periodic radio reports while on the docks. It was predicted that the storm would be passing southwest of them in the early afternoon, and around 2 p.m. everyone went home to prepare for the storm. When they all left the docks, they still expected the storm to head north to Tampa Bay, but prepared the boats best they could in case the storm made a turn toward them. They felt confident that they had completed their task sufficiently. While they, along with almost everyone else, left the docks, several liveaboard boaters remained, along with others who stayed in the Sometimes fenders just aren’t enough. This boat is not part of the Yachting Vacations fleet. condominiums surrounding the marina. Many boats in the marina were left untouched in prepaCharlotte. They watched—as long as the TV had power— ration for the coming storm, with all sails and canvas and dock as Charley increased in strength as it headed toward them, lines remaining as though normal conditions were expected. first to a Category 3 and then to a Category 4—with winds When Chris and his wife returned to their home—minat 150 mph. Chris at that point became convinced that he utes from the marina—they watched as TV reports came in would no longer have a business. announcing that Charley had made a sudden turn to the Charley made landfall on North Captiva (after creating north northeast, now heading toward Punta Gorda and Port a new “pass” on the island, “Charley’s Pass,” as many have begun to call it) around 4 p.m. Moving quickly, the storm headed north-northeast into upper Charlotte Harbor, hitting Port Charlotte around 5 p.m., the eye passing just east of Burnt Store Marina a little earlier. Chris and his wife watched the storm from their house—with uncovered windows as all their time was spent on the boats—as it tore through the neighborhood. Moving rapidly, the storm was out of the area by 5:30 to six that evening and they ventured down to the marina to assess the damage. Friday Evening: Boat Damage Report It took only minutes to get to the marina. As they approached the marina, they could see extensive damage to the docks and boats, but as they walked the docks, they were amazed at how well their charter boats survived the storm. Some boats appeared to be untouched, while others had only minor damage.

News & Views for Southern Sailors

SOUTHWINDS

August 2005

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HURRICANE SEASON basin, lowering it by several feet below normal low tide, and was now coming back in rapidly. This became obvious, and Chris and his wife realized they better leave the area immediately, which they did, and went home to higher ground. One of the liveaboards who stayed on their boats during the entire storm later told them that the tide went from six feet below the docks to four feet above in less than 10 minutes. Some of the dock damage was done at this time. By dark, conditions were calm and they returned to the marina, sloshing out onto the docks, which were about two inches below the water level. The storm was over. Other damage in the marina was extensive. Some boats were heavily damaged, losing masts, canvas, sails, canvas framing, with serious fiberglass damage and more. Some boats broke free from their lines and rode up on top of docks, causing severe damage— Another boat not in the charter fleet left unprepared. Dismasted, with the roller after the high surge came. Buildings surrounding the marina were damaged, and furling still on. Is that a surprise? parts of buildings had flown in from other areas to land in the marina—on docks, in the water, on top The greatest damage was to an Island Packet 485, and of boats. In many cases, luck prevailed; a few boats that peothat was minimal. The 485, usually docked at the end with ple did not touch in preparation for the storm were undamno outer pilings, was moved to another slip nearby. Its bow aged or suffered only minor bruises. was tied to a freestanding piling along with another large The docks themselves survived the storm well, except powerboat next to it. The piling fell over, and both boats where the boats broke free and damaged them. Some boards became partially free, but the damage was minor, to one popped off the dock framing as the storm surge rose up. Many small area on the side, only requiring toe rail, rub rail and pilings became loose, and a few completely broke away. some fiberglass repairs. As it later turned out, no boat had damage that exceeded the insurance deductible. On several The Dinghies, Dock Boxes and the Sign boats, the worst damage was losing the Windex and light at Every boat in the charter fleet has a dinghy—inflatable the top of the mast (which happened on all boats). On othwith a hard bottom. Chris and his crew decided to tie all the ers, it was rub rail, toe rail and fiberglass damage from rubdinghies together in a row and secure the two ends of the bing up alongside a piling in a narrow slip. But there was no row to separate pilings so they were strung out in one of the major damage. Chris and his wife were not only pleased but waterways between the docks. They figured that rain amazed. All their work had paid off. It was Friday evening, would fill them up, make them heavy, and tied together and quick-moving Charley was already in central Florida they would be a strong, but moveable and flexible object. heading northeast. Their gamble paid off, and on their return they found them As they wandered the docks—the tide was way down still there, undamaged, with only a few having flipped over about six feet below the dock—they noticed the water rising in the storm. But Charley was so fast that it dropped little rapidly. Although forecasters predicted a high initial storm rain, and the boats did not fill up. Next time, Chris says he surge, the water was actually first drawn out of the marina will fill them with water. Every boat also has a dock box, and since these are not secured to the docks, but just resting on them, it was decided to take them ashore and group them together on the grassy area nearby and tie them all together. Again, they, like the dinghies, would be together a larger more solid unit. Although a few were damaged (and some lost), most survived well—another good guess in storm preparation. Others at the marina who did nothing with their dock boxes had them blown in all different directions, and some were lost in the water, where it is assumed they remain today. The Yachting Vacations sign, torn from its post at the entry to their main dock, was found three docks away, retrieved and secured back up to the old, still-standing posts. Although damaged, it still does the job. A new one is on order. 26

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What Worked and What Didn’t Work Chris and the Yachting Vacations team felt a strong sense of success as they surveyed the damage to their boats. Their success was measured in part by comparing their boats to others. Some of the unprepared boats at the marina suffered little damage, but they were the exception. The general rule was that those who prepared fared well and those who didn’t, did not. It was obvious that those who tied up boats securely, with additional, longer spring lines, moved the least. This was especially true for those boats that planned for extreme tide changes because of a strong storm surge. The longer the spring line, the better the boat did in staying in place. Chris’ plan of running spring lines to the piling in the next slip over worked well, as did running spring lines from the bow or stern and not just from midships. Doubling up the lines was important as some broke (two lines broke on one boat The Yachting Vacations sign was retrieved from several docks away and put because the lines were set for a high surge, back up, waiting for a new one to arrive. and a low surge came, causing the boat to be hanging from its lines), but Hurricane Charley was a faststorm. It was later learned by those who weathered moving storm, and there were no long, sustained winds. Hurricane Frances on Florida’s east coast that chafe protecChris’ storm plan did not include chafe protection—sometion became important because of the speed and size of the thing strongly recommended by many in planning for a storm. The average storm might create winds of hurricane

News & Views for Southern Sailors

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August 2005

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HURRICANE SEASON

Notice the high storm surge mark on the lawn.

Another boat, not in the charter fleet, dismasted. Notice the roller furling still on.

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force that last 4-5 hours. Frances was a large storm and so slow that winds lasted up to 18 hours (See “Hurricane Frances’ Effect on East Florida” SOUTHWINDS , October 2004, or see the article on the hurricane page at the SOUTHWINDS Web site, www.southwindssailing.com). Hurricane Charley was very different. Although powerful, it was small and fast. Chris guessed that hurricane force winds lasted maybe two-and-a-half hours. The Yachting Vacations team implemented no chafe protection, but their lines, when they began, were in excellent condition. Because of damage from chafe, many of their lines were discarded after the storm, and Chris said that a longer storm might have broken many more. Removal of canvas and sails proved essential in comparison to other boats. It was the norm that those who left sails up, particularly the headsail, suffered substantial damage. (There were some boats that were extremely lucky, but they were the exception). Not only did the headsail get destroyed in such a condition, but it also created extreme windage. If the sail started to tear, it would open up and become even more windage. This on top of the fact that it is well known that the winds are stronger aloft. Once windage started, the boats moved considerably in their space, hitting pilings, docks— even other masts. Many boats lost their masts because of the windage. They might have been tied well to the dock, but the windage was so substantial with a higher, open sail blowing in the wind, that the mast could not take the stress. And lines stretch, increasing the problem. The leverage high up can be substantial, breaking or tearing the mast off the boat. If other canvas or sails

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are left on, then windage can be even worse. One of the main concerns that Chris now believes is critical to the success or failure of a boat in a storm is the width of the boat’s slip. Where boats were in slips just a little wider than the boat, damage from rubbing against pilings resulted. In wider slips, boats never touched the pilings. When asked about what he would do differently, Chris said that they would move the boats around so that the wider boats were in the widest slips. Currently, the boats at Yachting vacations are all at one dock at the marina, lined up in length with the shortest boat closest to shore. Another major question that Chris now asks is about his Stage III plan. Stage III is for storms of a strong Category 3 and up and, along with all the Stage I and II preparations (removal of sails, canvas, framing, etc.), call for all the boats to be moved to open water in Charlotte Harbor, outside the marina, and moored with at least two anchors. With the success he experienced after preparing for Charley, he now wonders if he would not now be better off Dismasted, with all the sails on. Is that a surprise? This boat too was not in leaving the boats at the docks. Time and manpower the Yachting Vacations charter fleet. are major reasons. Moving 16 (plus they take care of three other non-charter boats at the marina) boats outside, white paint stood out, but the boards could not be seen.) after doing all the other prep work, and setting two anchors, How they tie the lines to pilings is also important. They requires a lot of time and manpower. He is not certain there always go around the piling twice, then make two half is enough time to complete that task, as storm warnings don’t hitches to the line. This way the lines are always free enough give lots of time. Charley did not become a hurricane till to easily adjust. Wednesday afternoon—a mere 48 hours before it slammed into Charlotte Harbor as a Category 4. Why the Boats Survived Consequently, in their revised plan they have ruled “We were lucky. Well… we were well prepared. That was out the previous plan of anchoring the boats and will now the first thing,” says Chris about why their boats suffered so move the boats around to the wider slips during the little damage. They were lucky partly because the marina is stronger storms. surrounded by condos. The condos are southwest of the main marina, and the storm moved northeast, its eye passAdjusting the Lines During a Storm ing a few miles to the west of them. The condos that suffered One other important point that Chris likes to stress is how the worst damage and took the right front quarter of the they secure their lines. With charter boats that regularly storm helped protect the boats in the marina. Being surreturn to the same slip, Chris and crew all run the dock lines rounded on almost all sides by condos meant they were proto the boat so they are adjusted at the pilings. That way, the tected in many directions as the winds changed when the end of the line with the eye is secured to a cleat on board, storm passed through. and no readjusting of lines is needed each time a boat They were also lucky in other ways. returns to port. During a storm, though, they will want to “We’ve seen projectiles, roof tiles, go through hulls. adjust the lines as conditions change. This can be during a They look like a mail slot,” Chris says. Luckily, none of their smaller storm or just before or after a stronger storm, when boats got mail slots. No other boats managed to drift and hit conditions are less severe and they can be there. theirs either. While flying debris from other buildings seriIn preparations, they leave all the lines that are secured ously damaged other boats in the marina, their boats to pilings accessible from the dock as they normally are, received little of what is widely known as one of the biggest enabling them to adjust them as conditions change without hazards of hurricanes, flying debris. getting on board. But for those lines that are attached to pilSome might find this hard to take, but they were all ings that are not accessible from the dock, they reverse them lucky, all the boatowners in the marina and maybe even from their normal condition and make them adjustable everyone in the region. Hurricane Charley was a fast, small from the boat. Chris and his crew have gone through severand powerful storm. If it had been slow, large and powerful, al tropical storms and have had conditions where they were only a few boats might have survived. Chafe would have walking on the docks in two feet of water adjusting lines. mattered more, as that destroyed boats in east Florida dur(Once they found themselves in this situation with many of ing Frances. Perhaps it would be wise in future preparations the dockboards missing, but they could not see which ones— to see how fast storms move. Maybe the smaller storms creating a very dangerous problem. They were only able to move faster. Maybe they intensify faster. Charley did, on walk out and step over these openings because of the white, both counts. painted areas along the edges of the docks at each slip. The Perhaps no one, and no boat, can survive the most News & Views for Southern Sailors

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HURRICANE SEASON Spring Lines Tying Up Your Boat: Dockside Math A2+B2=C2

10 Tips to Prepare Your Dock for Hurricane Weather By Roy Laughlin

By Capt. Bill Cullen s/v Pura Vida, Tampa Sailing Squadron

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hen tying up alongside a dock, you will more than likely hang a fender over the side at amidships up against a dock post. You will want to keep the boat in place on the dock post, yet allow for the tidal drop. If you try to do this with bow and stern lines and add enough slack for tidal swings, the boat won’t stay in place on the dock post. It will move one way or the other resulting in scratched up topsides. The solution is spring lines, one going forward, one going aft. These springs can be made fairly snug if they are long enough, and still allow for a tidal drop. The lines should be led from a center point on the rail, and can be led back to a cleat or winch on the boat. Snug these up against each other, adjust the bow and stern lines so that the ends of the boat can’t touch the dock and you’re set. The rule of thumb is the longer the spring lines the better, and the snugger you can make them. For those captains out there who want the math, here is a calculation for a three-foot tidal drop, with a 35-foot spring line. A2+b2=c2, 352 + 32=1234; square root of 1234 is 35.128 feet. So as you can see, for a threefoot drop you’d need only two inches of slack in the spring line. Apply this same idea to your dock lines for a hurricane surge. The longer you can make your dock lines, the better you can keep the boat in her slip. Using the formula above for a 20-foot dock line and an eight-foot surge, you’d need only a one-and-a-half feet of slack in the dock line. To accomplish this, you will more than likely have to run your dock lines to the posts on the far side of the slip next to you. To test this idea yourself, take the end of your halyard and swing it from the gooseneck out to the end of your boom. With a 10-foot boom, you should see about a two- foot difference. powerful storms, the Category 4s and 5s, but those storms don’t come along every year. The bulk of the storms are the lighter ones—the Category 1s, 2s and 3s. And most only feel the edges of these storms that produce only tropical storm force winds. Having a storm plan and using it and changing it each time as they learn more is essential to success. What Chris Rogiers and his team at Yachting Vacations did was prove it can be done; you can save your boat with good preparation. And he will probably do better the next time, and the time after that. After last year’s hurricanes, Yachting Vacations first experienced a severe drop in its charter business as the 2004-5 tourist season began, and Chris was concerned about the future of his company, but as the season progressed, business picked up, and they ended the year with the busiest season they have ever had. 30

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Docks that didn’t make it.

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ntil last year, my neighbors took their docks for granted. They walked all over them. Those days are now history. Waterfront property owners consistently had more damage to docks and shore structures than any other property. Lack of convenient dockage has reduced our sailing time considerably since last summer’s hurricanes. Usually, insurance companies do not cover docks, so successful efforts to prevent hurricane damage means money in the bank as well as convenient boat dockage. Preparations described here aim primarily to protect your dock against damage caused by buoyancy should waters rise over the dock’s decking, from battering by waves, or damage caused by a boat tied to it. 1. Securing Your Deck Planks Pound elevated nails back into place to keep decking planks snug. If nails are several years old and visibly corroded, add new nails. Stainless ring-shank nails are a good replacement for corroded galvanized nails. Screws are more effective than nails. Coated, corrosion-resistant deck screws are good; stainless screws are best. Due to the expense, consider using stainless nails or screws only if your wood is in good condition, or you are replacing boards that you expect to have in place for a decade. This step will reduce or prevent loss of buoyant wood should water rise over it. It also protects against moderate wave-pounding. 2. Deck Planks Exposed to Waves If your dock is exposed to heavy waves, it may be effective to have some boards in your decking nailed with smooth shank nails, allowing heavy waves to break them away. Alternately, remove every fourth or fifth plank before the storm hits. Gaps in the decking form release points, dispersing wave energy. It is a technique used in the northern www.southwindssailing.com


Bahamas. I have little information about this, but it seems it could be effective. 3. Bolt Dock Joists to Pilings Bolt horizontal joists to the pilings. Use stainless bolts, washers and nuts if your dock is new. Galvanized components are a cheaper alternative for retrofitting and may last as long as wood already a few years old is likely to remain sound. One bolt is good; two are better. Tighten the nuts snugly to stop pilings from racking under wave-pounding. Solid cross bracing, bolted to the pilings, on a dock prepared for heavy weather. 4. Cross Brace the Pilings same concepts and techniques to protect your boat. Put cross ties on pilings to further strengthen them. Use Think about the force at both ends of the docking lines so bolts as with piling joists. This is the most effective way to that you minimize point-loading on the dock as well as structurally reinforce a dock against wave-battering or the boat. heavy loads caused by a boat tied to it. 5. Remove Furniture and Storage Boxes. If they damage decking or stringers during wave-pounding, this weak point is the beginning of more extensive damage. 6. Remove Your Boat Remove your boat from the dock and let it ride out the storm elsewhere. Take trailerable boats to land storage; put larger ones on a tested, reliable storm mooring. Or better yet, move them to a marina or more protected dockage. This is the strategy most likely to protect both your boat and your dock. 7. Boats on Lifts If you have a boat on a lift, raise it to its highest level. It’s safe to leave a boat on a lift only if it will be above the highest waves. If not, expect to lose both boat and at least part of your dock. Your neighbor’s dock may follow yours. In my neighborhood, a boat left hanging on a lift during Hurricane Frances was floated off by high waves. Paradoxically, it did not damage its own lift, but once adrift, initiated complete destruction of five docks downwind. 8. Securing Dock Lines for a Boat Give dock lines sufficient scope so that your boat can rise and fall with waves and flooding water levels. Wrap these lines around pilings several times rather than using dock cleats. Several turns of rope will keep a line from being lifted off a piling and reduce line chafe. Use multiple points of attachment to the dock to relieve excessive force on a small area of your dock. You should use the News & Views for Southern Sailors

9. Turn off Water and Electricity to the Dock Turn off water and electricity to the dock when storm arrival is imminent. If you have to attend to your boat during the storm, a live electrical line should not become one of your problems. (Incidentally, wear a life jacket if you go out on your dock during a hurricane. You can’t be sure the decking you walked out on will be there 10 minutes later when you want to return to shore.) Place the valve in your water line so that it will be protected from damage and far enough upland that pipe breakage does not occur before the valve. Placing a turnoff valve at the foot of the dock is the most convenient place for it but is rarely effective to protect the pipe behind it from waves and debris they push on shore. Placing the valve in the buried line well back from the foot of the dock is much more effective. 10. Prepare Ahead of Time The reality of storm preparation is that there is little time to prepare when the storm is within 300 miles, the range within which strike predictions are most accurate. Structural reinforcements suggested are efforts that can be done well before the most active portion of the hurricane season arrives. Leaving your boat at the dock using tips given here is in no way intended to encourage anyone from moving the boat to land or a mooring to weather a hurricane. During and after a hurricane, the less you have to do to prepare a boat and dock, the more effort you can put to more significant priorities. SOUTHWINDS

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SOUTHEAST COAST SAILING Carolinas & Georgia Upcoming Events Calendar News for Sailors Racing Calendar Race Report

SE Coast August Weather WATER TEMPERATURE Cape Hatteras, NC - 80° Savannah, GA - 85° AVERAGE TEMPERATURES Cape Hatteras, NC 73° lo - 84° hi Savannah, GA 71° lo - 90° hi For Real Time Southeast Coast Weather go to: www.ndbc.noaa.gov/Maps/ Southeast.shtml

UPCOMING EVENTS & NEWS AUGUST 13 Beach Party, Long Bay Sailing Association, SC. www.longbaysailing.org www.wliinc3.com 20-21 Wrightsville Beach (NC) is the scene for the 9th Annual Wahines Surfing Championship. www.eastcoastwahines.com 26-27 Tybee Island Seafood and Music Festival, Tybee Island, GA., www.tybeevisit.com SEPTEMBER 2-5 Hilton Head Island, SC., Labor Day Weekend Celebration, www.wliinc3.com 3 – 5 Sail to Wilmington, www.longbaysailing.org 14 Lake Lanier, GA., AISC Series II, Party, Atlanta Inland Sailing Club. www.larc.strictlysailing.com 17 Hilton Head Island, SC., Hilton Head Food Festival, Shelter Cove Community Park, www.hiltonheadhospitalityassociation.com 17 Little River Inlet, SC., Aloha Party, www.longbaysailing.org 23 New Bern, NC., Oktoberfest 2005, www.vivitnewbern.com 23-24 Elizabeth City, NC., Offshore Grand Prix, www.elizcity.com 24 Lake Lanier, GA., SSC Lobster Bake, Southern Sailing Club, Open to All. www.larc.strictlysailing.com 24 Acworth, GA., Acworth Opry Bluegrass Jam, www.cobbcvb.com/ccalender 30 Savannah, GA., Octorberfest on the River, River Street, www.savriverstreet.com

Intracoastal Waterway (ICW) Again Open near Savannah, GA By Walt McFarlane

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here will be no need to detour around Tybee and Wilmington Islands, GA, any longer. The Sam Varnedoe Bridge, which spans the Wilmington River east of Savannah, has been repaired and can now open to marine ICW traffic. It is with regret that I report that the dump truck driver

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August Prevailing Winds See page 61 for Windrose legend

involved in the accident, which closed the bridge, died of his injuries. An investigation of the accident is still under way. It has been reported that a number of witnesses have stated that the bridge’s motor traffic safety equipment was not working properly at the time. A word of caution: When approaching bridges, do so slowly and with caution. Sometimes there are problems with them, and if you can’t stop a motor vehicle in time to avoid a collision, you’re surely not going to stop your boat. You should make sure that you have overhead clearance. If approaching a swing or drawbridge, give yourself enough time for it to be fully opened and secured into position before passing through. A little time lost being safe is worth it.

Coast Guard Shuts Down Group Cape Hatteras

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s part of the Homeland Security reorganization plans to increase efficiency, the Coast Guard has disestablished the group at Cape Hatteras and moved administrative command and control operations to Fort Macon in Atlantic Beach, NC, 70 miles south of Cape Hatteras. Although the reorganization was the main reason for the move, erosion of the sand dunes at the Cape Hatteras facility was a major factor. Erosion over the years and recent storms have caused the dunes, which protected the grounds and building, to be destroyed, and North Carolina prohibits the rebuilding of any dunes. The facility was originally established by the Navy in the 50Æs to listen to submerged submarine traffic. The Coast Guard took over the area in 1982, establishing the group and built housing units there for personnel. The area has also been home to many lifesaving groups and maintenance facilities for aids to navigation and other stations. Some of these crews will remain in the Cape Hatteras area. A disestablishment ceremony was held on June 3. The grounds will be maintained by the National Park Service, which currently maintains the nearby Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. SOUTHWINDS is looking for sailors/boaters to send race reporting and boating/marine news from the Carolinas and Georgia. Contact editor@southwindssailing.com. www.southwindssailing.com


SOUTHEAST COAST SAILING

Arthur B. Hanson Rescue Medal Awarded to Lake Lanier Sailing Club Member

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LSC member and Capri 22 Fleet 58 member Dora McGee was recognized by US Sailing for her part in a rescue that took place at the Dixie Sailing Club. The incident took place during the Punchbowl Regatta on April 4, 2004. The race committee was short-handed for the regatta. Ted and Dora McGee were running the committee and were assisted by Tamara Isaacs-Smith. Dora was alone on the only chase boat on the course and was stationed at the leeward mark. A Flying Scot, sailed by Marty and Charlie French, was knocked down and turtled in 15-20 knots of wind. Marty was in the cool 65-degree water and was unable to climb aboard, while Charlie managed to climb onto the upturned hull. The race committee played a vital role in this rescue and was assisted by Curt Bird and Bruce Smith aboard Sheet Music, a Capri 22 that was also a competitor. Bruce Smith had gotten on the chase boat to help Dora. The situation was getting serious as Marty was in the cold water about 15 minutes. After several attempts to get Marty on a boat had failed, it was decided to tow Marty to shore. Dora consistently reassured Marty, who had now been in the water about 25 minutes. Hypothermia and shock were becoming a factor. Dora and Bruce got to the shore, and they pulled Marty into the chase boat. Marty was clearly in distress; not as coherent as she should be, shivering, trying to get into the chase boat. Bruce gave Marty dry jackets, and they headed back across the lake. Aboard the DSC Rescue boat, RC Members Ted McGee and Tamara Isaacs-Smith went back to the turtled Flying Scot and rafted up to the vessel long enough to bring Charlie on board. He was shivering and didn’t appear to be doing well. After signaling the Capri 22 over, an attempt was made to transfer Charlie to the Capri. As he stepped across to the Capri, he fell in between the two boats. Curt grabbed the boats to separate them and lost his hold on the Capri, but kept his hold on Charlie. With quick and decisive action, Tamara boarded the Capri and brought the boat around to facilitate the transfer. Keith Bennett of the Dixie Sailing Club nominated Dora McGee and Curt Bird for the Arthur B. Hanson Rescue Medal. The Dixie Sailing Club planned the presentation for the 2005 Punchbowl Regatta. Everyone involved was recognized during the presentation on April 16. The highlight came when Keith Bennett presented the Arthur B. Hanson Rescue Medal on behalf of US Sailing to Dora McGee and Curt Bird.

year’s event proved to be the most successful in recent memory.” Its clubhouse is situated on a beautiful point lot with panoramic views of most racing venues and many of the islands rich in hard oaks. The American flag, the club burgee and code flags were flying from its flag pole, creating an ambiance that would rival an eastern seaboard regatta, anytime, anywhere. The racing program included the US Sailing Association’s monitoring the Opti fleet and escalated from there to the PHRF big guys. Unfortunately, the wind gods did not co-operate with the event on Saturday, and the races had to be cancelled, but Sunday was another story with all venues working. The theme of the event, as the name suggests, was Caribbean-inspired as the food, balmy weather and the steel drum music of the PanPeople made all who attended think they were in Kingston, Ocho Rios or Montego Bay, Jamaica, not Flowery Branch, Georgia, on beautiful Lake Lanier. The weekend event started on Friday evening with a skippers meeting and refreshments, followed by a full day Saturday of “pattern holding,” while race officials determined the viability of racing in zero wind. Even apparent wind seemed to be non-existent, so the race was cancelled. However, the evening party more than made up for the disappointment of the day’s cancellation. Then on Sunday all races commenced, and a final grill-out that evening included awards to the well-deserved winners. Go to www.llsc.com for results.

RACING Lake Lanier Sailing Club Reggae Regatta, June 18-19 By R. J. Mitchellette

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hat a weekend! What father on Father’s Day Weekend, June 18-19, could have had a better gift than watching and even, in some cases, crewing with his children in a variety of race venues? The event was hosted by the Lake Lanier Sailing Club, whose spokesperson said “This

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SOUTHEAST COAST SAILING

Lowcountry Regatta, Beaufort Yacht and Sailing Club, Beaufort, SC, June 25-26 By Walt McFarlane

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he Lowcountry Regatta hosted by the Beaufort Yacht and Sailing Club was held June 25-26 in Beaufort, SC. This long-standing regatta attracted nearly 100 boats, consisting of 12 fleet classes, which included both adult and junior sailors, some as young as eight years old. Each class sailed five races. Sailors from North and South Carolina, as well as Georgia and Florida, came to take part in this event. The weekend event had a mixed bag of weather. On Saturday, it was overcast with some light rain. The wind speeds were at times blowing between 15 to 20 knots. This in no way discouraged the crews as they maneuvered their crafts into position for the starts. Sunday’s weather was somewhat better. The clouds lifted, and the wind calmed to an average of about seven knots. All of the races went well. There was no protest registered and no accidents, other than a few capsizes. Everyone enjoyed the event, sailors as well as the many spectators. For more information on the Beaufort Yacht and Sailing Club as well as viewing the total results and splendid photographs of this year’s regatta, go to www.byscnet.com.

The top finishers of each class are as follows; Hobie Cat - Al Hefner, Beaufort, SC. Sea Island One Design - Dave Stanger, Charleston, SC. SC Scow - Tommy Harken, Charleston, SC. Lightning - Bob Harkrider, Augusta, GA. JY15 - John Potter, Beaufort, SC. Snipe - Hal Gilreath, Jacksonville, FL. Laser - Max Hardage, Atlanta, GA. Sunfish Open - Dan Rohde, Savannah, GA. Sunfish Junior - Shane McCarthy, Savannah, GA. Sunfish Midget - Nathan Akers, Beaufort, SC. Optimist Blue - Rolfe Glover, Savannah, GA. Optimist Green - Rachel User, Savannah, GA.

RACE CALENDAR These dates and events are subject to change without warning. Please refer to each sailing club’s Web site for more accurate details. Races listed should be open to anyone.

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AUGUST Lake Lanier, GA. www.larc.strictlysailing.com 3,10,17,24,31 AISC Series II, Atlanta Inland Sailing Club 6,13 Trade Winds Series, Barefoot Sailing Club, 6 pm 20 Women Helmsman Race, Atlanta Inland Sailing Club, AISC does RC 20 Moonlight Scramble #2 / Better Late Than Never, Barefoot Sailing Club and Southern Sailing Club (Combined), 8 p.m. Flat Start 27-28 Raft-Up Regatta, Southern Sailing Club Charleston, SC. www.charlestonoceanracing.org 2 CORA, Executive Meeting, www.charlestonoceanracing.org 3,10,17 Summer Series #2 race 4 20-21 Melges 24 Charleston Harbor Challenge 27 Fall Ocean Race #1 Go to www.longbaysailing.org for additional information 5-6 Wooden Boat Race, South Port 20 Race Week 4, Little River Inlet Go to www.sayra-sailing.org/pages/racing.htm for information 5– 7 Wrightsville Beach, NC., South Atlantic Yacht Racing Association Open Invitational, Carolina Yacht Club-NC, 6–7 Wadmalaw, SC., Rockville Regatta,, Open, ea Island Yacht Club 13 – 14 Hilton Head, SC., Spar Wars - Opti, Sunfish, Laser – South Carolina Yacht Club 20 – 21 Charleston, SC. , Melges 24, Charleston Yacht Club SEPTEMBER Lake Lanier, GA. www.larc.strictlysailing.com 3–4 Vernon Pickering Cup, Lake Lanier Sailing Club, Closed 7 AISC Series II, #10, Atlanta Inland Sailing Club 9 – 10 Special Olympics Regatta, Southern Sailing Club, Open 10 Old Goat Regatta, Lake Lanier Sailing Club, One Design Thistle, Open 11 Special Olympics Regatta, Southern Sailing Club, Open 17 - 18 Snipe Battle of Atlanta, Lake Lanier Sailing Club, OneDesign, Open 17 – 18 Dorton Cup, Barefoot Sailing Club, Club Championship 21 LLSC Daylight Savings, Lake Lanier Sailing Club 24 – 25 GWTW Regatta, Lake Lanier Sailing Club, Open and One-Design C22 25 Trade Winds #3, Barefoot Sailing Club, 6 p.m. 28 LLSC Daylight Savings, Lake Lanier Sailing Club Charleston, SC. www.charlestonoceanracing.org 6 CORA, Executive Meeting, www.charlestonoceanracing.org 4,17,25 Fall Harbor Races #2,3,4 Go to www.longbaysailing.org for additional information 6 Cape Fear Open, Cape Fear 17 Race Week 5, Little River Inlet Go to www.sayra-sailing.org/pages/racing.htm for information 2 Southport NC., Cape Fear Open, Cape Fear Yacht Club 3–4 Mooresville, NC., Labor Day Regatta, Open, Lake Norman Yacht Club 10 –11 Mooresville, NC., Cat Fest, Multi hull, Lake Norman Yacht Club 10 –11 Flowery Branch, GA., Thistle Old Goat, Thistle, Lake Lanier Sailing Club 16 –18 Cornelius, NC., Peninsula Cup - PHRF, Open Peninsula Yacht Club 16 – 8 Southport NC., Cape Fear Open, Cape Fear Yacht Club 17 – 8 Savannah, GA., Leukemia Cup - PHRF, Open Savannah Yacht Club 24 Beaufort, SC., Around Parris Island - Sunfish, Hobie Beaufort Yacht & Sailing Club 24 – 25 Mooresville, NC., Board Bash - Opti, Sunfish, Laser Lake Norman Yacht Club www.southwindssailing.com


EAST FLORIDA COAST Upcoming Events Calendar News for Sailors Regional Sailing & Cruising Racing Calendar Race Report

East Florida August Weather WATER TEMPERATURE Daytona Beach - 81° Jacksonville Beach - 83° GULFSTREAM CURRENT 3.5 knots AVERAGE TEMPERATURES Daytona Beach 73° lo - 90° hi Jacksonville Beach 74° lo - 88° hi For Real Time East Florida Coast Weather go to: www.ndbc.noaa.gov/Maps/ Florida.shtml

UPCOMING EVENTS US Sailing Level 1 (Small Boat) Instructor Course Aug. 20-21 and Aug. 27-28 at St. Augustine's Lighthouse Museum. 40-hour course. $300, US Sailing membership required. Minimum age 16. For registration and information, go to www.ussailing.org and go to the training menu. For questions, contact Jabbo Gordon, the instructor trainer, at (941) 351-5845 or e-mail, mj343@webtv.net. August 14. Adult Sailing Class begin (5 Saturdays). Melbourne Yacht Club www.melbourneyachtclub.com

August Prevailing Winds See page 61 for Windrose legend

RACE CALENDAR Daytona to St. Augustine 2005 Race

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he Halifax River Yacht Club announces the much-anticipated 2005 St. Augustine Race. This is a terrific race for skippers and crew of all levels. The race occurs overnight from Ponce Inlet on Friday, Sept. 2, and ends in the scenic town of St. Augustine where sailors and crews will meet for a rum party and cookout. Racing is open to any seaworthy, competently crewed sailing monohull 24 feet or greater in three classes:

RACING First Coast Offshore Challenge, April 20-23, , North Florida Cruising Club, Jacksonville By Dave Huff

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he inaugural First Coast Offshore Challenge providing four days and nights of ocean racing was held on April 20-23 and proved to be a great success both for the racers competing in the event and the Safe Harbor Boys Home charity. The fleet consisted of skippers and crews from Jacksonville, St. Augustine, Daytona, and Fernandina Beach and provided a challenging range of conditions. The first race of 30 miles started in drifting conditions; the last race of 20 miles was sailed in a 35-knot gale, and, in between, the 75-mile overnight race was sailed under a moonlit sky in near perfect winds. Pre- and post-race parties were held at the St. Augustine Yacht Club and in beautiful St. Mary’s, GA, the site of the finish of the overnight race. In this event, like all good races, winning the party is important, too.

Overall Class Winners were: Spinnaker: 1. Renegade, Tom Slade, Santa Cruz 52; 2. Tom Bell, Whisper, C&C 38; 3.Cracker Jack, Hal Runnfeldt, Morgan 27. Cruiser: 1. Password, Dave Huff, Morgan 38 Yawl; 2. Jollie Dancer, Richard Klimas, Irwin 43; 3. Monkey’s Uncle, Carter Quillen, Hunter Passage 42. Non-Spinnaker: Sunday Morning Jazz, Gene Sokolowski, Islander 36; 2. Last Mangas, Robert Ford, Beneteau 37; 3. Changin’ Channels, Rick Elbracht, Hunter Legend 35.5. News & Views for Southern Sailors

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EAST FLORIDA COAST Spinnaker, Non-Spinnaker and Cruising. This is a very affordable race. Entry fee is only $34.08 (tax included). Slips are available to you for your visit to St. Augustine but are not included in the price. If you would like an entry form and sailing instructions or need answers to questions, please call Rob at (386) 804-6837. Leave a callback message if Rob is unavailable and he will call you back. We hope that you will join us for an evening of fun, competitive, coastal racing. AUGUST – Central East Florida 14 Adult Sailing Class begins (5 Saturdays) Melbourne Yacht Club www.melbourneyachtclub.com 8 Summer/Fall Race #3. Indian River Yacht Club 8 Small Boat Sunday Racing. Melbourne Yacht Club 13 Fall Rum Race #1. Melbourne Yacht Club 13-14 Cruise to Lake Shepherd. East Coast Sailing Association–Cruising 14 Manatee Cove Marina Race. Manatee Cove Marina (Patrick Air Force Base) 14 Summer River Race #3. East Coast Sailing Association–Racing 15 Summer Women’s Series #2 East Coast Sailing Association–Women’s 20 Full Moon Cruise. Indian River Yacht Club 21 Single-Handed Race. East Coast Sailing Association–Racing 22 Fall Series 1,2,3. Lake Monroe Sailing Association 22 Small Boat Sunday Racing. Melbourne Yacht Club 27 Fall Rum Race #2. Melbourne Yacht Club AUGUST—Northeast Florida. www.sailjax.com WEDNESDAY NIGHT RACING May 4 - Aug 31 Wednesday Night Races – North Course Fleet 55 6:30 p.m. @ Mark “5” Free race

May 4 - Sep 28 Wednesday Night Races – South Course NFCC 6:30p.m. Mark “13” Free race Aug. 13 Burn-it. Rudder Club. www.rudderclub.com SEPTEMBER – Central East Florida 3-5 Sebastian Inlet Cruise. Melbourne Yacht Club 3-4 Fall Steak & Lobster Regatta. Cocoa Beach Yacht Club 4-6 Cruise to Port Canaveral. East Coast Sailing Association-Cruising 4 Small Boat Sunday Racing. Melbourne Yacht Club 5 FUNMA Regatta. Lake Monroe Sailing Association 10-11 Junior Sailing Festival and Regatta. Lake Eustis Yacht Club (Opti, Lasers & 420s) 10 Fall Rum Race #3. Melbourne Yacht Club 11 Double-Handed Race. East Coast Sailing Association-Racing 11 Manatee Cove Marina Race. Manatee Cove Marina 12 Summer Women’s Series #2 East Coast Sailing Association-Women’s 17 Fall Series 4,5,6. Lake Monroe Sailing Association 18-19 Cruise to Titusville. East Coast Sailing Association-Cruising 19 Summer/Fall #4. Indian River Yacht Club 19 Small Boat Sunday Racing. Melbourne Yacht Club 24 Fall Rum Race #4. Melbourne Yacht Club 25-26 Mermaid Regatta. Melbourne Yacht Club and East Coast Sailing Association-Women’s Race 25-26 Wildcat Regatta. Fleet 80 & Lake Eustis Yacht Club (beach cat regatta) SEPTEMBER – Northeast Florida. www.sailjax.com 4-6 Labor Day Regatta. Rudder Club 10 Fall Series #1 and Mexican Fiesta. Rudder Club 24 Fall Series #2/Work day/Burn-It. Rudder Club

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SOUTHWINDS

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SOUTHEAST FLORIDA COAST

SOUTHEAST FLORIDA SAILING Upcoming Events Calendar News for Sailors Racing Calendar Southeastern Florida August Weather Race Report WATER TEMPERATURE Miami - 86° Stuart - 80° GULFSTREAM CURRENT 3.2 knots AVERAGE TEMPERATURES Miami Beach - 76° lo - 91° hi Stuart - 75° lo - 90° hi For Real Time East Florida Coast Weather go to: www.ndbc.noaa.gov/Maps/ Florida.shtml

EVENTS & NEWS Hollywood Beach Clambake September 16-18. Friday 5-10 p.m. Sat. noon-10 p.m. Sun noon-8 p.m. Hollywood Beach & Broadwalk. Free. Enjoy classic summer’s end fun with a clambake and tons of fresh seafood. Live music, arts and crafts and treasure hunt. (954) 926-3377. www.hollywoodbeachclambake.com.

16th Annual Ocean Watch Reef Sweep Another Success

August Prevailing Winds See page 61 for Windrose legend

efit from the clean-up efforts conducted during this event. Since its inception in 1989, the Reef Sweep has hauled in more than 26.5 tons (or over 53,000 lbs.) of harmful garbage, collected by more than 6,791 volunteers who have participated in the cleanup. Normally this annual event includes removal of debris from the ocean environment by both scuba divers and beach walkers. However, due to conditions caused by Tropical Storm Arlene, the diving portion of the event could not be held. Ocean Watch Foundation of Greater Fort Lauderdale is a non-profit, local volunteer organization involved in con-

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n Saturday, June 11, 581 beach walkers braved inclement weather in less than ideal conditions in collecting over 5,000 pounds of trash from along the shores of Deerfield Beach, Pompano Beach, Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, Fort Lauderdale, and Hollywood. All participants were invited to the Reef Sweep party at John U. Lloyd Park in Dania. At the party, awards were given for the most unusual items brought in. A Royal Caribbean International cruise, a Sandals resort stay, and original artwork by Doug Bolly were donated to be raffled. Live entertainment was provided by DJ Rob Vango. This year, Broward Beautiful was the title sponsor of the event. Broward Beautiful is an advisory board appointed by the County Commissioners dedicated to beautification and litter control throughout Broward County. Other sponsors included the Florida Marlins, Leiterslanding Foundation, American Express Foundation, the South Florida Water Management District, PADI – Project Aware, Whole Foods Markets, Marine Industries Association of South Florida, Zodiac Pool Care, Publix Supermarkets Charities, Pace Microsystems, Rotary Club of Pompano Beach, the National Save the Turtle Foundation, the City of Hollywood, Gerdau Ameristeel, and Wild Oats Natural Marketplace. Coral reefs are some of the most valuable and spectacular places on earth, and they are in crisis. As one of the most wondrous and ancient forms of life in the world, coral reefs provide a home for over 4,000 species of fish, 700 species of coral, and thousands of other animals and plants. Too often, the beautiful reefs off the Broward County coast are the victims of careless boating and recreational use. These delicate reefs ben-

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SOUTHEAST FLORIDA COAST servation and educational projects to preserve the coral reef environment. For more information about the Reef Sweep, call (954) 467-1366 or e-mail info@oceanwatch.org.

Underwater Shipwreck Dive Trail Being Established in Biscayne National Park

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panish gold fleets, British warships from the 18th century, and 20th century freighters are some of the shipwrecks found in Biscayne National Park. The park has one of the largest collections of shipwrecks in the United States, and park managers are creating an underwater trail marking five ships with underwater cards explaining what divers will see. Many ships have been wrecked on the series of coral reefs that stretch from Key Biscayne to the Florida Keys. One of the wrecks included is the Mandalay, a two-masted sailboat of Windjammer Cruises. The boat sunk after hitting a reef on New Year’s Eve in 1966. Everyone was rescued, and the boat was almost immediately stripped by looters before breaking up in the waves. The boat lies in only 10 feet of water and is one of the best wrecks to dive. Much of the work will be completed by December and the final work done by next summer. For more information, call (305) 230-7275. Another shipwreck dive trail in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary has been in existence since 1999. Park managers in the Dry Tortugas are also working on one.

RACING Key Biscayne Yacht Club Annual Regatta, BBYRA #7, PHRF, Miami, June 18 By Art Perez

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he seventh and final race of the BBYRA Series-1 lacked the expected climax many had hoped for as the positions for first place had all but been secured by the leading boats in each class. Nevertheless, a respectable number of boats, 30 to be exact, turned out to brave the elements and make a race of it. Under a continuous threat of thunderstorms, the PHRF

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fleet endured the shifty conditions and rain. The host club (CRYC) did an excellent job of getting the races under way in spite of equipment failure of the leeward mark committee boat. In PHRF 1, Triptease continued its domination of the season with two first-place finishes. Most of the fleet had stayed away for various reasons with three boats deciding to stay around long enough for the last race. In PHRF 2, Blackbird made its return from its layup at the boatyard, but the rust showed with the mighty Pat Cacace only managing a third-place finish after winning the tiebreaker from Tiburon. Dave Kurtz aboard Goombay pulled off the win with two perfectly sailed races and two first places to show for his effort, wrapping up the Series-1 in the lead position. Consistency paid off for first time winner Iker Belausteguigoitia in the J/24 class. With two second-place finishes, Iker managed the upset from favorites Peter Benziger and Mark Miles. Results: PHRF1;1st Pl – Triptease/Rubin-Shellow; 2nd Pl – Group Therapy/Tom Seghi; 3rd Pl – Sleeper/Malcolm Swartz; PHRF2; 1st Pl – Goombay/Dave Kurtz; 2nd Pl – Caraluna/Cai Svendson; 3rd Pl – Blackbird/Pat Cacace; PHRF3; 1st Pl - Mild to Wild/Russ Horn; 2nd Pl – Sailing for Life/Karen Mitchell; 3rd Pl – Touchtone/Jaime & Vicki Topp; PHRF4; 1st Pl – Leprechan/Eduard Asmus; 2nd Pl – Freebird/Kennith Ellis; 3rd Pl – Just Chillin’/Steve Perry; J/24; 1st Pl – LacaLaca/Iker Belausteguigoitia; 2nd Pl – Gotta Go/Peter Benziger; 3rd Pl – Blah Blah Blah/Mark Miles.

RACE CALENDAR AUGUST 6-7 Sat./Sun Lime Cup. BBYC. Important Notice: The regatta date has been moved to Sept. 17-18. 6-7 Sat./Sun Summer in the City. MYC. The regatta is open to the following classes: Dinghy: Laser, 420, IODA (opti) Red, White, Blue and Green. Multihull: Hobie 16 13 Sat. Single-Handed Race. CGSC. Designed to test skippers’ sailing ability to single-hand sailing. Open to all PHRF and One Design boats with PHRF rating 14 Sun. Double-Handed Race. CGSC. Maximum two sailors per boat makes this regatta a challenge when it comes to spinnekar handling 20 Sat. Conch Cup. MYC. Annual Multihull race starting off Hobie Beach in Biscayne Bay and finishing at Miami Yacht Club 27 Sat. Flat Earth Racing – J24. The last race of the J24 summer series sponsored by Flat Earth Racing SEPTEMBER 10-11 Sat./Sun. Florida State Snipe Juniors. CGSC – The 48th annual two-day regatta for Snipes See SOUTHEAST FLORIDA SAILING continued on page 61

www.southwindssailing.com


F LORIDA KEYS SAILING Upcoming Events Calendar News for Sailors Regional Sailing & Cuising Racing Calendar Race Report

Florida Keys August Weather AVERAGE TEMPERATURES Key West 79° lo - 90° hi GULF WATER TEMPERATURES Key West 87° For Real Time eastern Gulf weather, winds and marine forecasts, go to: http://comps.marine.usf.edu

UPCOMING EVENTS & NEWS Every Saturday – Open House at the Key West Sailing Club. 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. (305) 292-5993. www.keywestsailingclub.org. Sailboat Lane off Palm Avenue in Key West. July 29-Aug. 7 – Key West. Summer food and wine festival. Highlights the tasty range of cuisine available on the island. (305) 296-6909. www.kwrba.com/festival.htm. Aug. 6 – Lobster season opens. Call 800-DIAL-FMP www.floridaconservation.org/marine/lobster.htm. September 6-11. Key West’s WomenFest. Enjoy your own week in paradise and have fun with women’s art , sailing and snorkeling trips, dance parties and comedy shows. www.womenfest.com.

News & Views for Southern Sailors

August Prevailing Winds See page 61 for Windrose legend

Drawbridge Traps Cruisers in Boot Key Harbor By Rebecca Burg

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t the end of May, several cruising sailboats waited in Marathon’s Boot Key Harbor after being trapped by the drawbridge. The old bridge was stuck about three-quarters of the way open. The city promptly ordered a replacement part, which would arrive about five days later. Ron Sheridan onboard s/v Memory Rose was one of the trapped cruisers. He spoke with the city, which allowed several eager volunteers to manually crank the bridge open and let a few vessels out in the meantime. When the new part arrived, the bridge was back in business, opening and closing on demand. A manual cranking system serves as an

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FLORIDA KEYS SAILING like all cruisers, he is concerned about the loss of free anchorages. Cruisers worry about how temporary anchoring spots do not take waiting for a safe weather window into consideration. For years now, Florida cities and towns have been trying to contend with liveaboards on derelict or unseaworthy vessels. Cruisers and sailboat owners indicate that they end up being negatively affected by this.

Weather Watch

Boot Key Harbor.

emergency backup. Cruisers entering Boot Key Harbor have two options. The deepest access is on the west side of the harbor where boats must pass under the Boot Key drawbridge. It’s 60 feet wide and about 25 feet high in its closed position. Open height clearance is 65 feet at mean high water due to overhead telephone cables. At the time of this report, the bridge opens and closes on demand with the appropriate horn signal or by calling on Channel 9. To help reduce the strain on the elderly bridge, the city is considering putting the bridge on an hourly or half-hourly schedule. Vessels with smaller drafts can enter Boot Key Harbor via Sister Creek from the Atlantic side. Running along the east side of Boot Key, this natural channel has an approximate depth of five feet at low tide and has areas of hard bottom. The city has placed a request to dredge Sister Creek, which is silting up in places. So far, a permit to dredge has not been given to the city. The drawbridge leads to a small island called Boot Key, which is lightly populated. Local boaters and cruisers have expressed concern about the possibility of Boot Key becoming more developed. I spoke with marina dockmaster Harry DeLashmutt. He indicated that Boot Key is zoned as a natural area, and there are no plans for future development. I asked about the future of Boot Key’s anchoring areas, which boaters worry about losing. Harry said that there will be designated short-term anchoring zones, and the city is planning to add 166 more moorings in the harbor. In about a year, there should be 230 moorings available for boaters to use by the day, week or month. Pump-out services are included, and current prices will not be raised anytime soon. Transient slips, 10 days or less, are also being made available. Ron, on Memory Rose, mentioned that he’s had friendly and positive interaction with the city of Marathon, but 40

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Sailors are quite familiar with that ever-steady artificial voice on the VHF. Keys boaters are excited now that the new National Weather Service building in Key West opened in July. The hefty structure, overlooking White Street, has been built to withstand the forces that a category five hurricane can dole out, and the roof should stay on in up to 165 mph winds. Here, weather balloons will be launched, and about 20 weather pros and 40 numbercrunching computers will be keeping busy with the daily dramas of our area’s tropical atmosphere. Meteorologist Matt Strahan is in charge at the new NWS in Key West where weather is taken very seriously by visitors and locals alike. Researchers believe that we are in the midst of a 40-year period of heightened hurricane activity. In the past decade, the number of major hurricanes worldwide has nearly tripled. Our invaluable weather folks next door are going to be busy.

RACING Key West Sailing Club. Wednesday night races have begun! Casual and fun racing in the sea plane basin every Wednesday at 6:00 p.m. until October. Socializing and food afterwards at the clubhouse. Women’s Sailing continues every Sunday at 12:00 p.m. Non-members and members welcome.

RACE CALENDAR Upper Keys Sailing Club AUGUST 2,4,9,11 Boating Skills and Seamanship, 7:00 p.m. 13 Dog Day Regatta. One-Design. 14 Dog Day PHRF, beach party and cookout. 27 Ladies Sailing Program. 28 Ocean Side Championship, Regatta #2 SEPTEMBER 3-4 Labor Day Regatta B/S Portsmouth & PHRF w/ beach party 17 Ladies Sailing Program 18 Ocean Side Championship, Regatta #3 www.southwindssailing.com


NORTHERN GULF COAST SAILING Florida Panhandle, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas Northern Gulf August Weather

Upcoming Events Calendar News for Sailors Race Report & Calendar

UPCOMING EVENTS & NEWS Because of Hurricane Dennis, we were not able to get a lot of planned race reports and other news and events into this issue, but did get a last minute Hurricane Dennis report on the region from Kim Kaminski, who regularly writes for SOUTHWINDS and lives in Pensacola.

WATER TEMPERATURE - 85° AVERAGE TEMPERATURES Pensacola, FL 74° lo - 90° hi Gulfport, MS 74° lo - 91° hi For Northern Gulf Weather go to: www.csc.noaa.gov/coos/

August Prevailing Winds See page 61 for Windrose legend

became a menace to the coast, plans were set in motion to protect these precious treasures. Boat owners learned lessons of what can happen during the past few storms and utilized some of the successful tricks that other boaters had implemented in protecting their boats during those storms. Thanks to the success stories, quite a few vessels survived the recent bombardment from Dennis.

Hurricane “Dennis the Menace” By Kim Kaminski

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urricane Dennis definitely was a menace to the northern Gulf coast during the first week in July. Just like the prankster in the comic book, Hurricane Dennis played with everyone’s emotions, property and lives. The comic book character would begrudgingly calm down under the wagging finger of authority, be it his friend Margaret or his mother and father. Thankfully, Hurricane Dennis was similar in that respect as it approached the northern Gulf coast. The storm ran into the colder coastal waters (thanks to Tropical Storm Cindy) and reduced its fury by hitting the coast as a weak Category 3 instead of the stronger Category 4 that was on the edge of being a devastating Category 5 hurricane. Dennis’ path took the storm over what local residents call “Opal Beach” (a section of Santa Rosa Island where Hurricane Opal hit in October 1995) between the cities of Gulf Breeze and Navarre, FL. Besides dealing with Dennis, residential and business communities along the Gulf Coast have also been recuperating from the devastation left behind from Hurricane Ivan, a storm that struck the coast in September 2004, along with the recent 2005 Tropical Storms Arlene and Cindy. These coastal communities have been through quite a bit, and yet the local residents manage to get back up and brush off the sand and debris to continue to live in and defend the place they call home. Many of the sailors in the coastal community have been repairing or replacing their boats following last year’s destructive storm, Hurricane Ivan. When Hurricane Dennis

News & Views for Southern Sailors

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NORTHERN GULF COAST Dan Owczarczak, a Pensacola Yacht Club member, lost his Hunter 36 during Hurricane Ivan. After locating a replacement boat in Texas (a Tartan Ten) and having it transported to Pensacola, he was determined not to lose his “new” boat. He used three anchors, just as he did with his previous boat, but instead of using anchor rope, he used chain to secure the boat in a bayou. Thankfully, the storm surge (6 to 10 feet) was not as high as originally predicted (25 to 30 feet if the storm had hit during high tide) and the boat rode the storm out successfully. Dan stated that having the right-sized anchor for your boat and being able to effectively set the anchor are major accomplishments in being able to safely secure your vessel. Thankfully, the anchors held this time around. Too many boats had dragged their anchors in the previous storms and ran into other boats or structures, causing severe damage, not only to the boat being dragged, but also to other boats or docks in the area as well. Hurricane Dennis pounded the Gulf EZ-Duz-It after the storm. Photo by Julie B. Connerley. Coast with winds ranging from 115 to 120 oped Pensacola Beach, Little Sabine is considered prime real mph and, acting like its comic book namesake, it teased and estate during two occasions – the Navy’s Blue Angels Flight taunted the Gulf Coast throughout early Sunday afternoon. Demonstration Team’s summer show, and anytime a hurriSome structures that managed to survive the pounding of cane is moving toward the northern Gulf of Mexico. “Ivan the Terrible” did not endure through Dennis the Menace’s For many years, vessels have sought refuge inside the hazards. The Grand Lagoon Yacht Club, situated along the bay during hurricanes. However, nobody imagined the Intracoastal Waterway between the Pensacola Naval Air magnitude of destruction Hurricane Ivan would cause Station and Perdido Key, looked as if a child had poked holes when it made landfall 45 miles to the west of Pensacola throughout its entire structure. Gaping holes in the outer walls Beach on September 16, 2005. were found everywhere all through the building. The National publicity focused on boats slammed into swimPensacola Yacht Club, on the other hand, had received a signifming pools, or blocking four-lane divided roadways. Aerial icant amount of damage from Hurricane Ivan. However, with views of marinas appeared more like a child’s game of pickDennis’ landfall being farther to the east of the yacht club, minup sticks with boats scattered and piled atop each other. imal damages were found this time around. Every dry storage and wet slip marina in Escambia and Santa Hopefully, Dennis will be the last storm to menace the Rosa counties was either damaged or totaled. northern gulf coast for a long time. However, here it is just Before Ivan’s arrival, the marinas inside Little Sabine barely a month and a half into the 2005 hurricane season, had emptied. At least two dozen vessels were anchored in and we are already expecting another storm named Emily the small bay; other boat owners trailered their boats or (as of press date for this issue). I hope we have learned our moved them to another safe harbor. Some owners who hurricane lessons well or at least found a good place to get lived on Little Sabine left their boats in their slips. plenty of anchor chain. My husband, lovingly referred to as Captain Cautious, was one of the first to set anchor two days before Ivan hit Hurricane Wreaks Havoc on a our coastline. We set two anchors and plenty of scope. With Montego 25 Anchored Near a shoal draft, we were able to anchor closer to “dirty bird island” than most. Pensacola Beach The 20-foot storm surge of Ivan overwashed the narrow By Julie B. Connerley island, breaching it in some areas. Tons of sugary-white quartz sand was redeposited throughout the island and ittle Sabine Bay is nestled between the Gulf of Mexico Little Sabine. and the Intracoastal Waterway, lying within the confines Virtually every vessel inside Little Sabine received of Santa Rosa Island, better known as Pensacola Beach. The some damage; the majority were totaled. When residents were waters surrounding the barrier island are ideal for a variety finally allowed back onto Pensacola Beach, only a few of the of boating activities from deep-sea charter fishing in the original boats anchored out were still on their moorings. Gulf to sailboat regattas in Pensacola Bay. Our beloved vessel, a 1982 Montego 25 named EZ-DuzAn artificially dredged channel around its perimeter It, was one of the sailboats still attached to anchor lines. characterizes the small bay. Roughly, one-half of the center From the deck of the Pensacola Beach Yacht Club she looked of the bay is extremely shallow. In winter, this sandbar is at peace, lying on her starboard side on “dirty bird island.” exposed, giving rise to its nickname, “dirty bird island.” Her mast was snapped at the step, the lifelines dangled, Conveniently situated near the central core of develthe bowsprit was bent, but her brand-new four-stroke

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NORTHERN GULF COAST SAILING fair share. We learned two valuable lessons from Ivan. First, our boat insurance policy specified a sailboat with outboard motor. The brand-new motor had not yet been added to our insurance policy and was therefore not covered. Secondly, instead of writing our boat’s name on our life vests, we decided to put our name and city for identification. Two weeks after the storm, we received a phone call about our offshore life vests, which had floated up three miles east of where our boat was anchored. As for EZ-Duz-It, she went down in glory. A few days after the hurricane, my husband’s sister sent us the Montgomery, AL, newspaper with a front-page story about Ivan. The photo? EZ-Duz-It, alone in the bay, totaled, with the famous Pensacola Beach ball water tower in the background. Little Sabine Bay.

motor looked perfect, and the wheel was fine, too. From a distance, it appeared that perhaps the Coast Guard had already come by, surveyed the damage, and marked her for navigational purposes. Or so I thought. Unfortunately, Ivan destroyed the island’s infrastructure. County officials deemed it too unsafe for residents to return to their property immediately after the hurricane. Tensions ran high as anxious homeowners, boat owners and business owners waited to learn the fate of their property. The situation was compounded by the U.S. Coast Guard’s decree that nobody could enter the waters surrounding Pensacola Beach. The concern was two-fold. Without water or electricity expected for months and roadways impassable, island residents were fearful of widespread lootings. Secondly, the waterways were full of every imaginable kind of debris besides vessels. Commercial Dumpsters, vehicles, household furniture, docks, decks, water heaters, and lawn furniture were just some of the items that were found floating, washed upland, or visible in the water. I obtained special permission from local law enforcement to retrieve personal belongings from my vessel. I took one of only two PBYC-constructed Optimist dinghies recovered after the hurricane and paddled out to the sandbar to survey the damage closer. The view in two feet of water told a much different story. Like the mast, the rudder was also snapped. What I thought was a navigational marker was our Lifesling, which had come out of its bag and was floating at the end of the line. EZ-Duz-It was ripped open from her bowsprit to midship on her starboard side. She was missing all hatch covers, inside ladder, wet locker, all cushions, starboard shelving, stove, sails, all miscellaneous gear and tools, life vests and even the marine head. Savage doesn’t adequately describe the storm. The halyards had been yanked through the hull for several feet like dental floss between crowded teeth. A once fitted sheet from the v-berth was shredded, yet twisted around the boom flapping in the breeze like some strange yacht club burgee. Sailors often refer to a tangled mess of lines as spaghetti. At least there is a beginning and an end to spaghetti. Not so with hurricane wind-whipped lines. Entwined together they seemed more like a steel cable made of many strands. Alas, EZ-Duz-It was not made of steel, and she succumbed to the forces of Mother Nature. She was a good vessel and the slowest PHRF-rated boat that consistently raced on Pensacola Bay for many years, but she won her fair share, and by some accounts more than her News & Views for Southern Sailors

RACE CALENDAR AUGUST 6 Commodore’s Cup #4. NYC. 6 CSA Summer #3. CSA. 6 J22 Angus Invitational. GYC 6 Star Gulf Coast Champs. BYC 6 Jerry Ellis Junior Regatta. BYC 13 Knost Regatta. PCYC. 13 Round the Rig. MYC. 20 Charles R. Galloway GYA Sunfish/Laser/Opti - GYC. 20 CSA Around the Lake. CSA. 20 Summer Splash. BYC. 20 Big Mouth Regatta. PBYC. 20 Summer Swelter. PYC. 27 Hill Junior. SABYC. 28 Pam Sintes. SSYC. CSA. Northern Gulf Coast Yacht Club Legend BYC Buccaneer Yacht Club, Mobile, AL www.bucyc.com* CSA Corinthian Sailing Association. New Orleans, LA. www.corinthians.org* GYC Gulfport Yacht Club. Gulfport, MS. www.gulfportyachtcclub.org* MYC Mobile Yacht Club, Mobile, AL. www.mobileyachtclub.com* NYC Navy Yacht Club Pensacola, FL www.navypnsyc.org* PBYC Pensacola Beach Yacht Club. Pensacola, FL. www.pensacolabeachyc.org* PCYC Pass Christian Yacht Club, Pass Christian, MS. www.pcyc-gya.org* PYC Pensacola Yacht Club. Pensacola, FL. www.pensacolayachtclub.org.* SABYC St. Andrews Bay Yacht Club, Panama City, FL www.stabyc.com*

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Regional Sailing Services Directory Sailing Services Directory starts as low as $8 a month. Call (941) 795-8704 or e-mail editor@southwindssailing.com CAPTAIN SERVICES

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MARINE SURVEYING

Towne Yacht Surveys Member ABYC, SAMS John M. Towne, AMS Jim Towne (813) 645-4896 townesurvey@gbronline.com

PORPOISE SAILING SERVICES – Sarasota

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WEST FLORIDA COAST Upcoming Events Calendar News for Sailors Regional Sailing & Cruising Racing Calendar Race Report

West Florida August Weather AVERAGE TEMPERATURES St. Petersburg 77° lo - 90° hi Naples 73° lo - 91° hi GULF WATER TEMPERATURES St. Petersburg 86° Naples 87° For Real Time eastern Gulf weather, winds and marine forecasts, go to: http://comps.marine.usf.edu

UPCOMING EVENTS & NEWS Boating Skills and Seamanship Programs Ongoing. Each Tuesday night, 7:30-9:30 p.m., 1300 Beach Dr. SE, St. Petersburg. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 72. Completion satisfies the State of Florida boater safety education requirements. The continuous rotating program has 11 lessons. One lesson is presented each Tuesday night. Lessons include: Which Boat For You, Equipment, Trailering, Lines and Knots, Boat Handling, Signs, Weather, Rules, Introduction to Navigation, Inland Boating and Radio. (727) 823-3753 Coast Guard Auxiliary offers Public Boating Programs: Boating Skills and Seamanship Programs. Sept. 8-Oct. 3. Six lessons. Boating Safely Program. Aug. 13, 14. Sept. 10, 11. GPS and Chart Reading. Aug. 25, 31. All programs are held at the Clearwater Sailing Center, 1001 Gulf Blvd., Sand Key (Clearwater). They are open to adults and youths.

August Prevailing Winds See page 61 for Windrose legend

40th Annual 2005 Tampa Boat Show, Tampa Convention Center Sept. 29 – Oct. 2

T

he Tampa Boat Show is the largest boat show in the Bay Area and Tampa’s longest running boat show. Show activities include the Discover Boating Center. There will be more than 100 different manufacturers represented and over 700 boats on site. The boats will range from nine feet all the way past 70 feet in size and will be selling for anywhere from $1000 to upwards of $2-million. Thursday and Friday from noon-8 p.m. Saturday from

For more information on upcoming education programs or to request a free vessel safety check call (727) 469-8895 or visit www.uscgaux.org/~0701101/PublicEducationPrograms.htm. Aug. 6 Lobster season opens — Call 800-DIAL-FMP for more information.

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WEST FLORIDA SAILING 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tampa Convention Center, 333 S. Franklin Street. (813) 274-8511 or (800) 426-5630. Admission is $8.00 for adults, $4.00 for junior boaters (13-15) and FREE to children ages 12 and under. For E-tickets and show information, visit www.tampaboatshow.com or call (954) 441-3220.

Clearwater Bay Marina Bought by Condominium Developers: Another High and Dry Storage Closes

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learwater Bay Marina was recently sold to developers who will be closing the high and dry storage facility. The marina has several wet slips, but their future is uncertain. They will most likely become part of the new condominiums to be built on the property. The sale of Clearwater Bay Marina came as the third in a series of other marinas in Clearwater to be sold for condominium development in recent months. High and Dry Marina and Ross Yachts were also recently sold for the same reasons. The closing of all three will eliminate all high and dry storage in the city of Clearwater and cut into the availability of wet slips. The city is currently looking into building more dry boat storage on public property, but waterfront property is at a premium right now, especially with the recent skyrocketing increases in the value of such land. The city is looking into developing current city-owned property for high and dry storage use. The Florida state legislature, in response to the dwindling number of marinas in the state, is considering legisla-

tion that will require municipalities to replace a marina if other property is rezoned from marina property to residential property. Such legislation is too late for many properties around the state that are already under contract for sales to developers. The city of Clearwater has applied for grants with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to study expanding the municipal marina and using three other city-owned properties to build high and dry storage. Clark Mills, a boat builder and designer of the Optimist sailing dinghy, one of the largest sailing classes in the world, was the former owner of Clearwater Bay Marina.

Tampa Bay United States Coast Guard Auxiliaries Seeks Members and Volunteers

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ll eight of the local U. S. C. G. Auxiliary flotillas in the Tampa Bay area are presently seeking new members to assist with harbor safety patrols, public education programs and civic activities. Ruskin Flotilla 75 of the auxiliary holds monthly meetings on the second Wednesday evening of the month at the Ruskin Senior Center, 901 6th St. S.E., Ruskin, at 7:30 p.m. The local flotillas are looking for local boat owners who would be interested in joining the Auxiliary to donate their time, learn advanced boating skills and, be an active participant for Homeland Security. For more information, contact Fred Kramer, Flotilla Commander at (813) 677-2354.

Mahina La Charters Purchases a MacGregor 65

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eff Kendrick, owner of Mahina La Charters in Cortez, recently sold his 50-foot schooner, the Francis Crowe, and replaced her with a pilothouse MacGregor 65, a cutterrigged sloop. Jeff has been running local and regional charter trips out of the marina at the Seafood Shack restaurant for several years. A 36-foot catamaran, the Mahina La, is also available for charter out of the same dock. Jeff’s boats have been very popular in the area, taking guests out on sunset cruises, dolphin cruises and other charters in the area. The MacGregor 65 has always been an intriguing boat in the sailing world, being one of the most affordable 65foot boats built. A very fast boat, she carries only a 12-foot

News & Views for Southern Sailors

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WEST FLORIDA SAILING beam. Jeff’s boat, named the Lex Sea, is well suited for Florida waters, having a wing keel and drawing only six feet—quite shallow for a 65-foot boat with no centerboard. Besides the local sunset trips, the boat is also available for longer charters, having just returned from a seven-day family cruise to the Florida Keys. The boat sleeps up to eight, has two heads and comfortable accommodations. It takes only two people to charter her for a two-hour sunset cruise. Call (941) 713-8000 for more informa- The Lex Sea, a MacGregor 65, recently entered the charter fleet at Mahina La Charters in Cortez. tion. Mahina La Charters is located at the Seafood Shack Marina in Cortez on the east side of the is high for ramps, parking, moorings and slips. At the 11 counICW just north of the Cortez Bridge in Cortez. ty-operated ramps, there are only 507 parking spaces. The county currently sees a need for three more ramps immediately and many more in coming years. Sarasota County Adding Boat Ramps With prices of waterfront land rising rapidly, the county sees an urgency in purchasing property now. Borrowing s property values in West Florida have increased, so money against future tax revenues makes this option more have tax revenues. Sarasota County, one of the few sensible as prices increase. The county is seriously considering localities in the state to recognize and respond positively to purchasing private boat ramps, as it is a lengthy process to the need for additional waterway access, is planning to spend purchase land to build new ramps. some of these additional funds by purchasing waterfront

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property for parks, beaches and boat ramps. It could spend $10-million of this money for such purchases or even more by borrowing on future revenues. It has been 10 years since the county purchased a boat ramp. With 22,000 registered boats in the county, the demand

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Vinoy Resort Marina in St. Petersburg Heavily Damaged by Hurricane Dennis

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ast winds from Hurricane Dennis caused four- to five-foot waves to enter Vinoy basin, rocking the floating docks at the Vinoy Resort Marina. Starting on Saturday, July 9, and lasting through the night and most of the following day, the waves pretty much destroyed the 13-year old docks. Even though hurricane force winds did not reach Tampa Bay, the winds caused considerable wave action building up across the bay from the east, entering the eastern facing entrance to the basin. The marina will have to close, as the docks are unsalvageable and will have to be rebuilt. Boat owners will have to move their boats to other marinas, which will not be easy, as marinas and slips are disappearing throughout the state and new ones are not being built. The cost of rebuilding the marina could be as high as $2 million. The city of St. Petersburg owns the bottomland under the marina and leases it to the Vinoy Resort. The resort has tried to get the city to build a breakwater at the entrance, but so far no action has been taken. The city wonders if it is in the public interest to build a breakwater for a private marina. One local citizen commented that if it was a football stadium and a privately owned franchise, the funding would probably come through, but private marinas don’t get that kind of special treatment. The St. Petersburg Municipal Marina is well protected by a breakwater and the marina suffered only minor damage. What concerned many boat owners was what would have happened if a hurricane had actually hit the marina. The Vinoy Resort Marina is the site of the fall St. Petersburg Strictly Sail boat show, held in early November. Show officials are looking for alternative locations and other options if the marina is not rebuilt in time for the show, but are confident the show will go on. www.southwindssailing.com


WEST FLORIDA SAILING

Manatee County to Improve Boat Ramps

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anatee County is planning to improve eight boat ramps that are in need of repair and improvement over the next three years. The county commissioners have recently received suggestions from local citizens on what marinas need what improvements. Some of the work will be done over the next year, and some are slated for longterm improvements over three years. Funds will come from a boater registration fee fund, which has built up over the years. Half of the fund was slated for paving and striping at the ramps, but the commissioners agreed that runoff from paving and striping is more of an environmental problem than allowing the unpaved ground to absorb some of the pollutants. Paving and striping was therefore decided to be done to satisfy parking for the American with Disabilities Act. Some of the improvements will be to improve traffic flow at many already crowded ramps. Some of the other improvements are more parking spaces, cleanup of built-up algae at some ramps, concrete ramps for better traction, and improved fish-cleaning facilities.

Women’s Sailing Group Seeks New Members

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he Windlasses, a women’s sailing group based out of the Dunedin Marina, is seeking new members. A membership drive begins Aug. 18 at 9:30 a.m. at the First Presbyterian Church in Dunedin. The group offers sailing lessons and holds races and monthly cruises. They meet

News & Views for Southern Sailors

every Thursday during the school year. The Windlasses have been around since 1967 and have over 120 members. For more information, call (727) 424-3783 or (727) 725-1015.

Manatee Sail and Power Squadron Promotes Hurricane Preparedness for Boats

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he Manatee Sail and Power Squadron held a seminar in April that worked on a plan for boaters to protect and prepare their boats for tropical storms. Their suggestions include developing a plan of action. Then they promote stocking the proper equipment to be prepared, such as duct tape for sealing cabinets, plugs, chafing gear, extra lines, fenders and ground tackle. The plan should then include such actions as checking batteries, pumps, switches, drains, etc. Other plans include hurricane holes, trailering, how to secure your boat at dock or at anchor and other situations. The information is available at its Web site, http://www.manatee-squadron.org/hurricanes.html. The link can also be found at the Southwinds hurricane page at www.southwindssailing.com.

West Florida Catalina 42 Owners Association Forming

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n organizational meeting will be held to form a fleet of west Florida Catalina 42 owners. The fleet will participate in group sailing trips, as well as other matters of com-

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WEST FLORIDA SAILING mon interest to Catalina 42 skippers. The meeting is proposed for Saturday, August 19, in the vicinity of the Regatta Point Marina complex in Palmetto. Call Dan Hundley for more information at (727) 480-4855. Leave a message and he will contact you with more details. Or e-mail him at dhundley@wachoviafinet.com

RACING On-line West Florida Race Calendar Starting in September, SOUTHWINDS will be providing an online race calendar for west Florida racing and regattas. All racing events held in the region from Marco Island to Tarpon Springs will be listed for the period from September 2005 up through August 2006. Listed will be the event, sponsoring organization and contacts, and links to the NORs, registration and results, when made available by those organizations. The Web site will also publish up-to-date venue changes for those who send us that information. With this new service, sailors only need go to www.southwindssailing.com and will no longer have to seek out the sponsoring organization’s Web site for this information. Only races open to everyone will be listed. To have your race listed, or changes in your race schedule, e-mail the information to the editor, Steve Morrell, at editor@southwindssailing.com. For those who cannot post the results on-line at a Web site, contact us for possibly doing so on ours. The west Florida list of yacht clubs and sailing organizations will also be on-line.

2004-2005 West Florida PHRF Boat of the Year Awards By Kathleen Robinson-Malone

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arasota Yacht Club welcomed participants of the 2005 West Florida PHRF Boat of the Year series to an awards party on Saturday, June 18. BOTY winners from Charlotte Harbor, Sarasota Bay, southwest Florida, the Suncoast, and the TBYRA series were announced and presented with a variety of trophies, usable and perpetual, at the occasion. West Florida PHRF members were in attendance and assisted in the presentation of accolades to the winners. Boat owners and crews from the winning boats circulated before the presentations, and they enjoyed the hospitality provided by Sarasota Yacht Club. “The club did an excellent job at hosting the event, and the setting couldn’t have been more appropriate,” stated John House of Snatch, the 2005 Suncoast BOTY Spin Light winner. Following snacks and drinks, the ceremony began with members of each respective BOTY area announcing his or her local winners. Prizes and awards ranged from hats for the participants in attendance who had not placed but had shown remarkable activity in BOTY racing to deluxe picnic sets given to the BOTY winners. All prizes bore the name, date, and class of the winners. In addition, many perpetual trophies changed hands, except in the case of Suncoast Spinnaker B Division winner, Semper, Fi who retained BOTY honors for the second year running. Jay Tyson, director and racing committee chairman, remarked, “While this event recognizes those who have

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www.southwindssailing.com


WEST FLORIDA SAILING

Some of the crew of Semper Fi, winners of the Suncoast Boat of the Year, Spinnaker B fleet, display their award. Courtesy photo by Kathleen Robinson-Malone.

exhibited the highest level of performance over the season, it is important to also note that we recognized those who through their participation make this the sport for a lifetime that we all love.” Results: Charlotte Harbor – Spinnaker: 1st:Crime Scene: 2nd: Rooster Tail: 3rd: Bama Slammer; Sport Boat:1st: Threesome: 2nd: Obsession: 3rd: Running with Scissors; Multihull: 1st: Bahama Hunter: 2nd: Anhinga: 3rd: Passion III; Non:Spinnaker: 1st: Fancy Free: 2nd: Jammin: 3rd: Air Supply. Southwest Florida – Spinnaker: 1st: Maria: 2nd: Carioca: 3rd: Children at Play; Sport Boat : 1st: Gone Mad: 2nd: Rocket Board: 3rd: Obsession; MultiHull: 1st: Tripower: 2nd: Triumph: 3rd: Trifecta; Non:Spinnaker: 1st: Desperado: 2nd: Air Supply: 3rd: Sanderling; True:Cruising: 1st: Island Time: 2nd: Minerva: 3rd: Windy City. Suncoast – Spinnaker A: 1st: Time Bandit: 2nd: Rocket: 3rd Fire and Ice; Spinnaker B: 1st: Semper Fi: 2nd: Desperado: 3rd: Mother Ocean; Spin Light:1st: Snatch: 2nd Lucky Pony: 3rd: Tack:Tick; Multi:Hull: 1st: Triple Trouble: 2nd: Merlin: 3rd: Trifecta; Non:Spin A (over 8000 pounds): 1st: Addiction: 2nd: Intrepid: 3rd: Escapade; Non:Spin B (under 8000 pounds):1st: Lucky Ducky: 2nd: Blue Cloud: 3rd: Tango III; True Cruiser: 1st: Sonia Cate: 2nd: Easy Out: 3rd: Chances R; Pocket Cruiser: 1st: Seraphim: 2nd: Zig Zag: 3rd: Kitten; Racer:Cruiser:1st:Mother Ocean: 2nd: Prime Plus: 3rd: Mon Ami.

Davis Island Yacht Club One-Design Crew Training, Aug. 6, 13, 20

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ecause of scheduling conflicts with the Key West Rendezvous in May, DIYC one-design crew training was postponed to Aug. 6-13-20 and will be held from 12-5 p.m. to catch the afternoon sea breeze. This training is designed to teach the skills to be a crew member on one-design boats and is not to be confused with a Learn To Sail program. This program has been offered three times in the past five years. This training is conducted in a orderly, non-threatening manner as opposed to learning under race conditions. Each applicant must be in good physical condition and have normal flexibility. The primary boat to be used in training will be the J-24. Melges and J-35 owners are invited to join the program. The program is open to all who desire to partipate.. The cost of training is a $100 tax deductible donation to the Davis Island Youth Sailing Foundation. Those who are interested may contact King Purton at (813) 760-0177. kpurton@tampabay.rr.com. News & Views for Southern Sailors

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WEST FLORIDA SAILING

RACE REPORT Tampa Bay Sailor Dave Ellis Returns to Windmill Nationals

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or St. Petersburg sailor Dave Ellis, 61, there was a nagging question: Did he teach sailing, run a sailing center, serve on race committee and write about the sport because he couldn’t really do it anymore? It is one thing to stand in a classroom or on the back of a boat and pontificate. It may be a different story with the helm in hand. The 2005 Windmill Nationals at Rock Hall Yacht Club, MD, June 24-26, would be a good time to find out. In 1957 and 1959, Ellis was crew for the Windmill champ and won the title as skipper in 1980 and 1985. Ironically, 20 years of sailing instruction and race administration had kept him from serious racing since then. Sailing with youth sailor Max Ruehrmund, 14, from the local club, Ellis scored 2-1-2-1-(5)-2 = 8 points to win the 2005 Windmill Nationals. The start in a good fleet was the most difficult. When a good start was attained, a win followed. The other races featured good last upwind legs to catch all but one boat each time. Other Southeast sailors included: Allen Chauvenet of North Carolina, 5th; Stuart Proctor of North Carolina 8th; Bill Dodge of Tennessee, 14th; Dan Fontaine of Lakeland, Florida, 15th; Randy Trudell of Tennessee, 20th.

RACING CALENDAR Club Racing—Open to Everyone Wanting to Race The races listed here are open to those who want to sail. No club membership is required, although a West Florida PHRF rating is most likely required. For publishing, send us your race schedule by the 5th of the month to editor@southwindssailing.com. Bradenton YC. Thursday evening races at 6:30 p.m. through the

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Fall. PHRF racing on Manatee River. For info call Larry Lecuyer, (941) 729-5401. Venice Sailing Squadron. Saturdays. First Saturday of each month, PHRF racing. Start at mouth of Venice Inlet. www.venice-sailing-squadron.org Edison Sailing Center, Fort Myers. Sunfish and dinghy racing once a month, year-round john@johnkremski.com Port Charlotte. Third Saturday of month, year-round. pbgvtrax@aol.com Since races are sometimes canceled, postponed or locations changed, it is advisable to contact the organization beforehand. AUGUST 14 CortezYC

Commodore’S Cup series Race #4. www.cortezyachtclub.com.

SEPTEMBER 2 DIYC 3-5 CMCS 3-4 4 10–11 17 17 17 17-19 17-18 17–18 17 18 24–25 24–24 24-25 24-25 29 30

Labor Day Race. PHRF to SSS Summerset regatta, PHRF. SWFLPHRF & CHPHRF BOTY event. SSS Annual Labor Day Open Regatta. Opti, dinghies, cats, PHRF, windsurfers. SBPHRF BOTY event *TBCS Union Catamaran Regatta LESC Junior Sailing Festival SAMI/GCSC Fall Ladies Day Race, PHRF CMCS Hurricane Race, PHRF DIYC Keelboat Regatta *TBCS Round the Island Catamaran Distance Regatta TITYC Annual Bruce Neubauer Pram Regatta-Optimist dinghies Port Charlotte, FL Sunfish World Qualifier (pbgvtrax@aol.com) DIYC Keelboat Regatta. PHRF, TBYRA BOTY DIYC Dore Drake Women’s Regatta. SAMI/GCSC Captain’s Cup, PHRF SPYC Bruce Watters Junior Regatta, Green Fleet Optis BYC Kick-Off Regatta, PHRF. Suncoast and SBPHRF BOTY event LESC 7th Annual Wildcat Regatta, Catamarans SRQ Feeder Race to Venice, PHRF SSS Windjammer to Venice, PHRF, 1800 hours

* Schedule not confirmed.

www.southwindssailing.com


WWW.GCYACHTS.COM CALL (888) 882-5516

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News & Views for Southern Sailors

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News & Views for Southern Sailors

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C L A S S I F I E D

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CLASSIFIED ADS — 3 Months for $25 Place then on the Internet early for $10 • Classified ads with text only for boats are $25 for a three-month ad for up to 30 words. $50 for ad with horizontal photo ($65 if vertical photo). Check or Credit cards accepted. Must be for sale by owner – no business ads. Boats wanted ads included. • Free ads for boats under $500 (sail and dinghys only), all gear under $500, and windsurfing equipment. For sale by owner ads only. • All other ads (including business ads) are $20 a month for up to 20 words, add $5 a month for each additional 10 words. $10 a month for a horizontal photo. Frequency discounts available. Contact editor. • All ads go on the SOUTHWINDS Web site. For a one-time $10 fee, we will place your ad on the internet before going to press on the next issue. • No Refunds • The last month your ad runs will be in parentheses, e.g., (10/06) is October, 2006.

BOATS WANTED ___________________________ S-2, 7.9, outboard version, preferably with trailer and racing sails, but all 7.9s considered. Must be in good condition. (239) 945-3063, p.perisho@att.net (8/05)

BOATS & DINGHIES ___________________________ FLYING SCOT…Very Attractively Priced New Boats used only for the Adams Cup Finals. Race-rigged and professionally tuned. Includes North Sails main, jib,spinnaker, and galvanized trailer. Available in mid-September at Rye, NY. For details Call (800)-864-7208 (12/05)

• Ad must be received by the 10th of the month. TO PLACE AN AD: 1. On the Internet at www.southwindssailing.com This applies only to the $25 and $50 ads above with and without photo. Pay with Paypal and put your ad in the subject line. If a photo, then e-mail to editor@southwindssailing.com as a separate jpeg attachment. 2. Via E-mail and Credit Card. E-mail your ad to editor@southwindssailing.com. Text can be put in the email. Send photos as a separate jpeg attachment to the e-mail. Pay be mail (see below) or credit card. You can call us with a credit card number. Give us the credit card number, expiration, billing address and name on card. Call (941) 795-8704. 3. Mail your ad in. Mail to SOUTHWINDS, PO Box 1175, Holmes Beach, FL 34218-1175. Send a check or credit card number with information as listed in #2

above. Mail the photo in (35mm best). If you want the photo back, enclose a SASE. Add $5 for a typing charge. 4. Telephone or fax your ad in. Call (941) 7958704 and give us your ad over the phone. There is an additional $5 typing charge. If you have a photo, you can mail it in. We can take your credit card number, or you can mail a check. Fax: (941) 795-8705. 5. Do a combination of the above. E-mail, call in or send the ad text in via Paypal on our Web site. Email the photo directly to the editor. If you don’t have a scanner, mail the photo to us separately. Call the editor at (941) 795-8704 with any questions. 6. We will pick up your ad. Send the editor a check for air flight, car rental, hotel, travel, eating and entertainment expenses, and he will come to your location and pick up the ad. Any ads to be picked up on tropical islands or other resort destinations will be free.

DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS

Advertise your business in a display ad in the classifieds section. Sold by the column inch. 2 inch minimum. (3 column inches is 1/8 page) MONTHLY COST ADS PER INCH

12 6 3 1

$19 $22 $25 $29

MINIMUM INCHES

TOTAL COST

2" 2" 2" 2"

$38 $44 $50 $58

Catalina 30, 1990 shoal draft, Universal diesel, loaded with new gear, Harken RF, Raymarine radar/GPS chart plot, wind gen, solar, custom arch, Auto Helm 4000, inverter, VHF, stereo, carry on AC, dinghy w/OB, bottom job 2005. $36,500. (941) 792-9100. (8/05)

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9’1” Caribe dinghy, wooden insert deck and seat inflatable. 1993 $1,200. 9.9 Mercury Outboard 1999. 2 hours on engine with stand and gas can $1,200. (813) 632-9684. (8/05)

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S2 7.9, 1984 Hull # 294, 6HP Merc OB, 2 mains, 2 155s, 1 jib, 2 spinnakers. GPS, compass, many new halyards, swim ladder, trailer, new brakes, tires, $11,900. (321) 779-4464. palexy@cfl.rr.com. (10/05)

28’ Ranger 75, freshwater maintained racer/cruiser now in Tampa, over $20K recently spent in improvements, new Yanmar diesel, 9 sails, 3 spinnakers, much more. $12,900. Call Original Owner at (813) 685-8737 (11/05) 28’ Albin Mariner 79, 1977. Good condition. Watermaker, 10hp diesel, 7 sails. Auto pilot, GPS, Loran, VHF. 3’ 6” draft. $15,000. On a trailer in good condition. (507) 744-2579. (9/05)

Catamaran. Iroquois MK I, 30’, 1966. Many Sails. Standard navigational aids. T9.9 EXRX Yamaha 1999 O/B. Bimini hardtop, swim platform. Sound; cosmetic attention needed. (850) 926-2356. Crawfordville, FL. “Big Bend” Gulf. (8/05)

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DISPLAY CLASSIFIED ADS STARTING AT $38/MONTH 56

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Cal 29 Mk II, 1971 classic. Fully overhauled with new equipment & material. 23hp Universal diesel, roller furling, 2 mains, jib, genoa, gennaker, tiller auto pilot, Imron hull, Awl Grip deck, Trinidad bottom 2005, barrier coated. A must-see to appreciate this beauty. $19,000. (941) 730-8200. (8/05) www.southwindssailing.com


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32’ Allied Seawind II, 1977 ketch, Westerbeke 30, roller furler, new sails, auto helm, depth, VHF, speed, stereo, GPS, EPIRB, Lectra-San MSD,epoxy bottom. Well-maintained classic-looking boat with graceful lines. $34,000 (941) 792-9100. (8/05)

30’ Catalina 30, 1990. std rig, fin keel 5’3”, roller furling, bimini, cushions, instruments, Excellent condition. Reasonably and practically priced at $32,900. email: galileo430@comcast.net or (727) 207-0717. (10/05)

1974 Northstar 1000, 30’, two mains, four headsails, spinnaker, bristol condition. Inboard engine. Topsides repainted 2003. Interior upgrades. Auto pilot, VHF, depthfinder, GPS and more. Overall first place Daytona to Charleston Race. Good heavy weather racer/cruiser. South Carolina. $18,900. (843) 884-1729. (8/05)

1996 Cheetah 30 sport boat. 87 PHRF. Carbon lift keel and bow pole. 3 spinakers. 2 mains, 2 jibs. 15+ knots on reach. KVH, Knotmeter, depthmeter. Trailer. $24,500. (904) 880-6503. (9/05)

FREE-New Hunter 33 or 36. SailTime will pay mortgage and all expenses for 5 years – you put 20% down–own 100%.1-866-Sailtime.

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35’ GARDEN KETCH, 1965-Japan, riveted wood, Yanmar 30,monel tanks,Doyle tanbark fullbatten sails,6 Trojan batteries, Bose, Lewmars, Force 10, RIB & 8 hp OB, HW, fridge, New standing, running rigging, bimini, cutlass, carpet, Great cruiser. $31,000 firm. Clearwater (813) 391-0470 georgetheleo@hotmail.com. (8/05) 36 Catalina 1985 $49,500. Sea Gypsy. Medical forces sale. Tall rig, fin keel 4.5 Harkin system, central air, refrigerator, 2 mains, 3 headsails, 2 anchors, dodger, bimini. Plus extras. bobhrck@aol.com. (8/05)

1982 MORGAN OUTISLAND 416 Engine: 65HP Perkins, ONAN Generators, 2 AC units, auto pilot, integrated GPS chart plotter, integrated LCD radar, VHF, 2 refrigerators, 2 freezers, ice maker, electric stove, microwave, TV & TV Booster, radio & CD player, 6 speakers, 2 baths, electric aft head, inverter 1750, enclosed bimini, 2 anchors, windlass, many spare parts, watermaker installation, 5 sails, roller furler & storm jib, major upgrades on engine, all new hydraulics, new hull paint Mar. 05, new cushions 04, life raft. Surveyed at $95,000, asking $92,500. Total Value $150,000. (504) 4914132. alan@tirebargaincenter.com (10/05)

45’ 6” LOA Bayfield 40, Hull # 34 Full keel 5’ draft, cutter ketch designed by H.T.Gozzard built in 1984 Exceptional condition with lots of new gear. Harken Roller furling on all sails. Marine Air, WS, WD, Depth,VHF w/remote, SSB, CD/Radio, Autopilot, Chartploter, Radar, Dinghy, Life Raft $114,000 Call Major Carter or visit www.Cortezyachts.com (8/05)

YOUR DISPLAY AD Erickson 31’ Independence 1979, Cutter Hull, # 36. standing rigging replaced 2001, wheel, VHF, Depth, Yanmar 15 hp, Green hull. ONLY 74 BUILT, unique boat. $22,500. E-mail bowlegs2003@aol.com. Call (727) 3985646. (9/05) Advertise with a 1" tall ad for $25 a month.

News & Views for Southern Sailors

will also appear on our web site! Go on-line to www.southwindssailing.com SOUTHWINDS

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C L A S S I F I E D

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Construction/Real Estate Investment A highly-experienced, honest, licensed, responsible and reliable contractor seeks investor/partner in new construction/remodeling in west Florida. Perhaps a spec house or purchase to remodel. Contractor is experienced in custom homes of all sizes, including very high-end homes. Only interested in doing interesting and enjoyable projects. (941) 795-8711 (8/05)

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FREE – New Hunter 33 or 36. SailTime will pay mortgage and all expenses for 5 years – you put 20% down and own 100%. Call 1-866-Sailtime. (8/05)

CREW AVAILABLE/WANTED ___________________________ Visit SOUTHWINDS “NEW” boat and crew listing service at southwindssailing.com

DELIVERY SERVICES ___________________________ DELIVERIES. ICW, Coastal, Caribbean & Gulf, Sail or Power, by USCG Licensed Captain With 30 Years Professional Experience Including Two Trans-Atlantic Deliveries. (443) 243-4925 or www.marylandsailing.com (10/05)

1976 CT41 Cutter-rigged ketch. Come to Louisiana to see La Mouette, beautiful, seaworthy double-handed cruiser. Many improvements. Offered by liveaboard owners of 20 years. $79,500. (985) 781-5625 Details www.ct41ketchforsale.com. (9/05)

1987/88 Brewer 44 shoal-draft w/board, center-cockpit, cutter-rig, Perkins 85, RIB w/15 hp, R/F foresails, cruising-equipped, for sale by original liveabord owners, well-maintained, lying Palmetto, FL, (941) 962-7100 or paritytwo@yahoo.com. (9/05)

BOOKS & CHARTS ___________________________ Ocean Routing – Jenifer Clark’s Gulf Stream Boat Routing/Ocean Charts by the “best in the business.” (301) 952-0930, fax (301) 5740289 or www.erols.com/gulfstrm

BUSINESS/INVESTMENT ___________________________ Would take 40+ ft range sailboat as partial payment on established, profitable small business near Asheville, NC, with Web and walk-in customers. Integrated Web site, accounting, and shipping systems with documentation and 30 days training make it a great one or two-person operation. Residence could be included in the package. (800) 915-2320. (8/05)

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CLASSIFIED WORD ADS 1" $25 FOR 3 MONTH 2" $50 FOR 3 MONTHS 58

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Sailtime.com is looking for base operators on the Florida coast. This may suit existing marine business owners who wish to add an additional income stream. Sailtime is a unique business model that requires minimal capital and no staff. Tel. (813) 817-0104 or jtwomey@sailtime.com (8/05)

HELP WANTED ___________________________ Massey Yacht Sales Opportunities-Massey is accepting resumes and interview appointments for yacht sales positions in both their sail and power divisions. Dealership locations are in St. Petersburg at the Harborage Marina, Palmetto at Regatta Pointe Marina and Fort Myers at Centennial Harbour Marina. Massey offers its sales team an extensive range of yacht sales tools as well as expansive advertising, marketing and boat show attendance. We are the largest Southeast U.S. dealer for Catalina, Hunter, Caliber and Shannon sailing yachts and the exclusive Florida west coast dealer for Albin and Shannon power yachts. Massey is an industry leader in brokerage yacht sales with continued rapid growth, in both sail and power. Applicants must be self-motivated, successful yacht sales professionals. A thorough knowledge of either the sail or power industry and substantial computer skills are essential. Fax resume to the attention of Frank Hamilton at (941) 729-7520 or call (941) 723-1610 for interview information.

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Service Dept. Rigger. Massey Yacht Sales is accepting applications and resumes for sail and/or powerboat riggers/outfitters. Many employee benefits including paid holidays, paid vacations, health insurance, workmen’s comp insurance, performance bonuses, and good hourly salary. Must be hardworking, honest, have own tools and be a team player. Excellent service department support and organization. Call George Humes, service department manager at (941) 723-1949, ext. 16 or fax resume to (941) 729-7520. www.southwindssailing.com


C L A S S I F I E D SOUTHWINDS is looking for someone to help part time/spare time in running the magazine in all phases. Must be good at writing, grammar, etc. Must also be “comfortable” with selling (not looking for a salesperson – no soliciting), able to do bookkeeping, computer literate, have (or can get) high-speed Internet access (like DSL), good on the Internet, and other misc. tasks—and have lots of great ideas and interested in running a business. Great future potential. You can learn the business here, but experience helpful. Must live in West Florida (living near Bradenton a plus), but almost all work can be done on a computer from home. Four-year college degree required or good writing/grammar ability. Must be extremely reliable and responsible and communicate well and easy to get along with, like the editor. Must have a fair amount of sailing experience, basic racing knowledge. editor@southwindssailing.com.

LODGING FOR SAILORS ___________________________ Ponce de Leon Hotel Historic downtown hotel at the bay, across from St. Petersburg YC. 95 Central Ave., St. Petersburg, FL 33701 (727) 550-9300 FAX (727) 896-2287 www.poncedeleon hotel.com

MARINE ENGINES ___________________________

A D S

Tiralo floating deck chair - a beach chair that floats in water and rolls easily on the sand. Looks great. Folds and fits on your boat or inside your car. More info: www.tiralousa.com. UNUSED: Rule Pump, 3800 gph with 30 feet 1-1/2 inch hose - $150; Galerider Drogue with 300 feet of ? inch line - $150; ProTech Battery Charger, 4-Step 120/240 volt, 40 amp - $350; Mastclimber, 40 feet - $100; Collision Mat, West, 4-foot triangle - $90. SLIGHTLY USED: Davis Mark 20 Sextant with Celesticomp computer - $250; Par Electric Flush Pump which converts all PAR manual heads to electric operation. Adaptors available for other brands - $150. USED: Yamaha 6 HP Outboard Model 6 mshr, standard shaft, no tank, used 30 hours - $400; Johnson 2.3 HP Outboard, standard shaft $150; Simson-Lawrance Manual Windlass, 600 pound, double acting 5/16 inch chain $200. Call Matt (904) 460-0501 or e-mail yachtsantana@aol.com. (10/05)

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UNUSED: Zodiac 6-person Valise Liferaft, 2005 Model Opensea MP-6 - $1900; Survivor Technologies Bag with Pur 06 hand watermaker, inflatable splints, parachute flares, emergency lites - $600. USED: Sailomat Windvane Steering System, Size 600-X5 for yacths 38 to 50 feet - $1200. Call Matt (904) 460-0501 or email yachtsantana@aol.com. (10/05)VHF radio, fixed mount, excellent condition.$45 (941) 235-1890. (10/05)

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Wanted-SSB transceiver. Under $500. (941) 235-1890. (9/05)

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Robertson AP 2500 parts. Just rebuilt by Simrad, control box ($300), new RF 100 rudder feedback ($295), Fluxgate compass ($125). Control Head is out of service and Simrad won’t support it any longer. If you can fix it, it is free for shipping. (727)-866-2295 or sleeper41@pol.net. (8/05)

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AC/DC Reefer, 22# Bruce Anchor, Anchor Ball, Sospenders, Magma Grills, Mariner 9.9 Mercury Long Shaft 7.5 HP, folding bikes, windsurfers, Metzeler sailing rig, windscoop, Drogues, lifesling, Type I life jackets w/strobe. Nautical Trader. (941) 488-0766. (8/05)

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MISCELLANEOUS BOAT GEAR NEW & USED ___________________________ 2 NEW 4” X 14’ POLYESTER SLINGS, 8000# capacity each, D ring ends. Paid $200, sell $100 + shipping. (281) 324-1416. (9/05) News & Views for Southern Sailors

Offshore, OCR Category 1 Survival Pack. Certified. 1-year old $3500. C&C 110 Schurr Racing Mainsail, Mylar/Kevlar Laminate. 2Years Old. Good Condition (P=45’, E= 15.5’) $1500. (770) 265-0187. (8/05)

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20HP NEW !! Lombardini marine diesel engine weighs only 218 lbs model mg702. Can find more infomation on our link www.prp-inc.com net price only $5450 complete contact Ralph at (732) 286-6104 or ralph@prp-inc.com (8/05)

DISPLAY CLASSIFIED ADS STARTING AT $38/MONTH SOUTHWINDS

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C L A S S I F I E D

A D S

SAILING INSTRUCTION ___________________________

SAILS & CANVAS ___________________________

CHECK OR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED. PAY ON LINE. 60

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WINDSURFING GEAR ___________________________ Wanted: Used Prodigy (standard or race), other boards, miscellaneous windsurfing equipment. Steve (941) 795-8704, editor@southwindssailing.com

www.southwindssailing.com


INDEX

OF

ADVERTISERS

TELL THEM YOU SAW IT IN SOUTHWINDS! Southwinds provides this list as a courtesy and asks our readers to support our advertisers. This list includes all display advertising. Air Duck 60 America’s Generators 60 Anne’s Anchors 22,59 Apex/Mayer Yacht Brokerage 28 Aqua Graphics 45 Atlantic Sail Traders 24 Banks Sails 45 Beachmaster Photography 56 Beneteau Sailboats BC Beta Marine 34 BigFish Sailboat 10 Bluewater Sailing Supply 48 Boaters Exchange 35 Bob and Annie’s Boatyard 16 Bo’sun Supplies 14 Bradenton YC Kick-Off Regatta 51 Bubba Book 14 Carson/Beneteau BC Cortez Yacht Brokerage 58 Crow’s Nest Restaurant/Marina Regatta 47 Cruising Direct Sails 37 Defender Industries 60 Dockside Radio 19 Drive Insurance From Progressive 8 Dwyer mast 60 Eastern Yachts/Beneteau BC E-marine 59,60 Fleetside Marine Service/Yanmar (813) 645-8971 59 Flying Scot Sailboats 58 Garhauer Hardware 39 Glacier Bay Refrigeration 14 Gulf Coast Yacht Sales 53,56,57 Hanse Sailboats 57 Hobie Cats/Tackle Shack 49 Hotwire/Fans & other products 60 The Hull Company/Island Packet 7 Island Marine Products 38 Island Packet 7 Island Yachting Centre/Island Packet 7,55 Johannssen/Raider Sailboats 58 JR Overseas/Moisture Meter 26 JSI 60 Key West Race Week 9

Laurie Kimball Realtor 12 Leather Wheel 44 Massey Yacht Sales 6,15,IBC Masthead Enterprises 20,60 Mayer Yacht Brokerage 27 Murray Yacht Sales/Beneteau BC National Sail Supply 13 Nautical Trader 47 North Sails 21 Performance Sail and Sport 19 Porpoise Used Sails 60 Premiere Racing 9 Quantum Sarasota 3 Raider Sailboats 58 RB Grove/Universal and Westerbeke 17 Rparts Refrigeration 17 Sailboats Florida, Inc. 57 Sailor’s Wharf Boatyard and Brokerage 55 Sailrite 25 Sailtime 11 Sarasota Sailing Squad Labor Day Regatta 50 Sarasota Youth Sailing Program 54 Schurr Sails 41 Scurvy Dog Marine 43 Sea School 13 Sea Tech 38,59 Snug Harbor Yacht Brokerage/Hunter 33 Southern Trades Brokerage 54 SSMR 48 St. Augustine Sailing School 60 St. Barts/Beneteau BC Suncoast Inflatables 52 Sunrise Sails 45 Tackle Shack 49 Tampa Sailing Squadron Youth Program 46 Turner Marine/Island Packet 7 Two Hulls Brokerage 53 UK-Halsey Sails 18 Ullman sails 12 Weather Wave 25 West Marine 13,IFC Windcraft Catamarans 10 Yanmar Diesel 59

SHORT TACKS continued from page 19 batteries and after numerous jury-rigged attempts failed to restart the engine, crewmembers made the decision to notify authorities via an automatic Mayday alert via the sailboat’s DSC-VHF radio. Luan Two successfully made radio contact with a nearby sailing crew aboard China Doll, but after an attempt to use flares failed to assist China Doll in locating Luan Two, the BoatU.S. rental EPIRB was activated. “The captain and his crew of Luan Two did everything right,” said David Carter, manager of the BoatU.S. EPIRB rental program. “It was only after they had completely exhausted all other means of self-rescue did they use the EPIRB,” he added. In the second case, the captain of the S/V Maltese Kross, a CSY 37 cutter, became gravely ill after experiencing the stormy seas. He was seasick, dehydrated, hallucinating and suffering heart problems. The crew decided to abandon the race on May 2 and notified the Coast Guard of the need for evacuation. After the BoatU.S. rental EPIRB was activated, a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter was sent to the scene and safely removed the sick sailor. “Planning and equipping your vessel for any eventuality is something offshore boaters must do, and a serviceNews & Views for Southern Sailors

able EPIRB should be the last item checked off the preparation list,” said Carter. “In these cases, our rental EPIRBs contributed to potentially saving the lives of 10 crew members.” The EPIRB rental program is funded by the voluntary contributions of 590,000 BoatU.S. members. For more information, visit www.BoatUS.com/foundation/epirb or call (888) 663-7472.

SOUTHEAST FLORIDA SAILING continued from page 38 17-18 Sat./Sun. Lime Cup. BBYC – The 38th annual ocean race from Miami to Ft. Lauderdale, starting on Sat. and returning Sun. Winner determined by lowest combined time 18 Sun. Single-Handed Race. CRYC – Skippers test their skills to the limite in this single-handed race. 24 Sat. BBYRA#8 – PHRF. MYC – The start of the second leg of the season (Series-2) for PHRF and ARC fleet. 25 Sat. BBYRA#8 – O.D. CRYC Originally scheduled for the 17th this race gives commencement to the second part of the racing season, Series 2. Legend. – Yacht Clubs and Organizations BBYRA Biscayne Bay Yacht Racing Association. www.bbyra.net BBYC Biscayne Bay Yacht Club. www.bbyra.net CGSC Coconut Grove Sailing Club. www.cgsc.org CRYC Coral Reef Yacht Club. www.coralreefyachtclub.org KBYC Key Biscayne Yacht Club. www.kbyc.org. MYC Miami Yacht Club. www.miamiyachtclub.net. SOUTHWINDS

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The Frankenboat. Photo by Roy Laughlin

The Frankenboat By Roy Laughlin

W

hen Frank Rodrick was looking for a new beach cat, he wanted one that was good for single-handing, possessed contemporary go-fast features such as a flat top mainsail, and carried a spinnaker. Also, he wanted all this for a low, low price. Frank knew he would never buy such a boat from a dealer, so he decided to make one from parts of markedly different catamarans. Frank’s first Frankenboat, the beta version, was a Hobie 16 with a proportionally large symmetrical spinnaker. Frank speaks with great reticence about spectacular pitch poles whose final stage was to create a catamaransized aperture through the jib, revealing a watery dimension on the other side. By the time he and his crew righted the catamaran, the jib was folded into a Mobius strip encircling hulls, standing rigging, and maybe even the crew. Such outcomes are not uncommon for a beta version. Frank continued to experiment. Frank’s subsequent versions of the Frankenboat were built on a Prindle 18 and then a Prindle 19 platform, both of which had mainsail upgrades 62

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and variously sized jibs and spinnakers. Frank became a legend for his spectacular pitchpoles. Some of those may have terminated his relationships with the women who crewed for him. They did little to reduce Frank’s interest in upgrading an old boat to create the perfect sailing machine to fulfill his desires. Those learning experiences apparently served him well The current Frankenboat, version 3.2, started with a NACRA 5.2, a charter member of the dead boat society. (To be a member of the dead boat society, the sailboat must be a formerly popular model no longer made, but sailed by devoted owners long after the final year of production.) He substituted a flat-top main originally intended for a Mystere 6.0. When the sail arrived from the sailmaker, the luff was a couple feet too short for the Mystere’s mast. It fit Frank’s 5.2 mast almost perfectly. The disgruntled original owner sold Frank the "new and unused" sail for a fraction of its original cost. Frank continued to use the NACRA 5.2's stock jib. When other beach cat builders began adding spinnaker sails to their sail plans, Frank

decided that the Frankenboat should have one as well. He acquired the spinnaker and snuffer made for the Inter 17, then purchased lines and hardware, modifying and customizing as necessary, to make the spinnaker work on the NACRA 5.2's mast and standing rigging. Frank named the Frankenboat 3.2 Flippin’ Fearless. It is less flipping and more fearless than earlier versions, but its behavior is sometimes true to its Frankenboat ancestry. The Frankenboat 3.2 has a Portsmouth rating of 67.5. In class races, it sails with other high tech 16foot boats, such as the Taipan and Blade. Frank says Frankenboat 3.2 is not as fast upwind as those newer boats, but he has some impressive regatta results indicating that he can make it move when the wind is right. It is unlikely that the Flippin' Fearless will be the terminal Frankenboat. No successor is imminent, however. Version 4.0 will begin when Frank finds a new catamaran priced so low he can’t pass it up. Once again, he’ll prove it is possible to breathe new life into a dead boat if he digs up the right parts for it. www.southwindssailing.com

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