Page 1

Supporting your child through their GCSEs


Contents

Common Parental Frustration

4

The Months Before - Preparing to Study

5

How Can I Make a Difference?

6

Tips for Parents

7

Course Requirements Year 10

8

Course Requirements Year 11

9

Notice to Candidates

10 - 11

Tips for Revising Extra Classes

12 - 13

Useful Websites

18

14 - 17

3


Common Parental Frustration

I can’t stand the arguments and stress when I try to make him work and tell him exams are important – it always ends up with him saying “it’s my life” and slamming the door. He doesn’t seem to understand what to do next and will not ask for help. I don’t understand all this coursework, levels and module exams – it’s completely different from when I was at school. There are a million websites to help but how do I know which are any good? I didn’t even do GCSEs – how can I help him? She’s always got an excuse – I don’t know what to believe. He seems so stressed; I don’t even know who to turn to for help? How do I help him manage his deadlines? Surely she shouldn’t be going out again when she’s got exams coming up? She’s fallen behind and feels like a failure. She always panics in exams – when I try to help her it always ends up in a slanging match, making her more stressed. He always leaves everything to the last minute – one moment he has all the time in the world, the next it is all stress and panic because it has to be in tomorrow and he hasn’t got the stuff he needs to do it.

• • • • • • • • • • •

4


The Months Before - Preparing to Study

STUDY ENVIRONMENT What is required? • Desk • Comfortable chair • Light • Ventilation • No noise or distractions LEARNING TO RELAX Talk to them about: • How to avoid exam anxiety. • How to become more relaxed. • How to control their breathing. • How to relax during the exam. DIET Do they need to make any changes to their diet?

PLANNING THEIR WORKLOAD Ask them: • Do they need extra help? • Where can they get this help? WE WOULD RECOMMEND STUDENTS SET UP TWO REVISION PLANS: A long-term plan - this will be a general plan accounting for topics and chapters revised between now and the final exams in each subject. Create a grid: weeks across the top, subjects down the side. A short term plan - this will be drawn up each week and be more detailed and specific. It includes time for homework and revision, and time they are not available for study. Create a grid: days across the top, times down the side. 5


How Can I Make a Difference?

Many parents feel at a loss when their children enter their examination years, but your involvement during this crucial time can make an enormous difference – the difference between success and failure, or between a D and an E grade or an A and a B grade. According to a new study, parental support is eight times more important in determining a child’s academic success than social class. And the good news is you do not have to be an expert in any of the subjects your child chooses to make a difference. There are many expectations of your child in Years 10 and 11 – expectations which for many children, even the brightest, are hard to meet. The demands you will be able to help your child with are likely to include: •

Being more self-motivated and taking more responsibility for their own learning. Asking when they do not understand. (This requires confidence and can be difficult at a time when friends’ opinions hold such sway.) Developing their abilities to overcome frustrations. Organising themselves, revision notes and hand outs for different subjects and topics. Completing independent work at home.

• • • • 6

• • • •

Organising and planning their time over longer periods, for example to complete a coursework project. Understanding the exam structure and the relative importance of each piece of work to their final grade. Planning and carrying out their revision. Perfecting their ‘exam technique’.

Your role may include some or all of the following: • •

• • • • •

Provider of the tools for homework and revision – a quiet space, a ‘workbox’ of pens, paper and other necessities. Study buddy – showing an interest in the subject, helping with homework (but not doing it for them), testing them when they ask you etc. Sounding board - listening to your child’s ideas and responding with feedback and comments. Adviser – helping your child to break tasks down so that they are manageable. Project manager – agreeing the rules for homework or revision. Helping them to make a realistic timetable, balancing work against the ‘fun stuff’ and revising the plans as necessary. Go-between – liaise with your child’s Head of Year as problems arise.


Tips for Parents SUPPORTING YOUR CHILD IN SETTING THEMSELVES UP FOR REVISION

SUPPORTING YOUR CHILD IN DOING THE REVISION

Talk to your child about how you can support them and what they would find helpful.

Support your child in sticking to their revision plan and keeping to the start and finishing times. Praise them when they do it, and if necessary agree a reward structure. Do not make treats dependent on certain results – it will only add to their feelings of disappointment if they do not do as well as expected.

The simplest things often get in the way of starting revision – weeks can be lost while students are ‘going to get some folders soon’. Avoid this by simply providing the files, dividers, wall charts etc. your child will need for revision. Encourage your child to empty their bag of hand outs and information from lessons at the end of each day. They won’t seem important until they need them, at which point they are likely to be lost under a mountain of other papers. Support your child in choosing one good revision guide for each subject – it is the best investment you will make. Check with the teacher yourself if you are not sure which is best. Help your child to plan their revision timetable. It will take an investment of your time (probably several hours) but it is the single thing that will make the biggest difference to the effectiveness of the revision, and therefore the outcome. Children vary in the amount of support they need at each stage of the process.

Quietly top up the ‘workbox’ with pens, rulers, paper etc. Do not get wound up about lost items if you can help – motivation for revision is hard enough to find and arguments about a 50p pen just aren’t worth it. Provide water and favourite snacks for revision periods. Be flexible – if they want to go out to a party on a revision night, agree when they will make the time up. Be sensitive to the pressure your child is feeling and let them know that if they are really not up to it on odd days, it isn’t the end of the world – remind them of all the good work they have done, and will continue to do. It is the big picture that will count in the end. Keep up with regular ‘check-ins’ and do not nag in between times. Show an interest in how revision is going, talk through any difficulties and be prepared to help them reschedule their planning as necessary. Keep things in perspective – your child may not be doing things the way you would do them, or as often as you would like, but they are doing the best they can in the way that works for them.

7


Course Requirements Year 10 EXAM BOARD

CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT PIECES

DATES FOR CA

GCSE Art and Design

AQA

0*

Ongoing

BTEC Art and Design

Edexcel

Portfolio

Ongoing

Business

Edexcel

0

None

OCR

2

Spring and Summer

Dance

AQA

0*

N/A

Drama

Edexcel

2

Oct – Jan

Engineering Double

OCR

4

Sept – May

Engineering Single

OCR

2

Sept – May

English Lang and Lit (single award)

WJEC

4

Sept – July

English Lang and Lit (double award)

WJEC

4

Sept – July

AQA

1

April

SUBJECT

Child Development

Food Technology Geography Spec A History ICT Maths MFL

AQA

1

April – June

Edexcel

1

October

OCR Cambridge Nationals

8*

Ongoing

Edexcel

0

N/A

AQA

4

Jan/June Year 10

0*

Ongoing

BTEC Media

Edexcel

Music

(2 speaking / 2 writing)

Edexcel

1

Dec – July

GCSE Photography

AQA

0*

Ongoing

Product Design

OCR

3

Sept – April

RS Spec B

AQA

0

N/A

Sports Studies

Edexcel

2**

Nov – Feb, April – June

BTEC Sports Studies

Edexcel

0*

Ongoing

Textiles

AQA

0

N/A

Biology

OCR – 21C

0

N/A

Chemistry

OCR – 21C

0

N/A

Physics

OCR – 21C

0

N/A

Science Core

OCR – 21C

2

Jan – March

Science Additional OCR – 21C * Ongoing portfolio assessment or coursework ** Practical assessment externally moderated

0

N/A

8


Course Requirements Year 11 EXAM BOARD

CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT PIECES

DATES FOR CA

YEAR 11 EXTERNAL EXAMS

GCSE Art and Design

AQA

0*

Ongoing

Feb – May

BTEC Art and Design

Edexcel

Portfolio

Ongoing

None

Business

Edexcel

1

October

Summer

OCR

2

Sept – April

Summer

Dance

AQA

3

April – May

Summer

Drama

Edexcel

2

Oct – Jan

April / May**

Engineering Double

OCR

4

Sept – May

Jan, Summer

Engineering Single

OCR

2

Sept – May

Jan, Summer

English Lang and Lit (single award)

WJEC

4

Sept – July

Jan, Summer

English Lang and Lit (double award)

WJEC

4

Sept – July

Jan, Summer

Food Technology

AQA

1

Sept – March

Summer

Geography Spec A

Edexcel

0

N/A

Summer

History

Edexcel

1

Oct

Summer

SUBJECT

Child Development

ICT

OCR Nationals

8*

Ongoing

None

Maths

Edexcel

0

N/A

Nov, March and Summer

MFL

AQA

(2 speaking / 2 writing)

Nov

Summer

BTEC Media

Edexcel

0*

Ongoing

None

Music

Edexcel

1

Nov – Feb

Ensemble Performing Exam February

GCSE Photography

AQA

0*

Ongoing

Feb – May

Product Design

OCR

3

Sept – April

Jan, Summer

RS Spec B

AQA

0

N/A

Summer Summer

4

Reserve Task

Sports Studies

Edexcel

2**

Nov – Feb, April – June

BTEC Sports Studies

Edexcel

0*

Ongoing

None

Textiles

AQA

1

March

Summer

Biology

OCR – 21C

1

Sept – Dec

Jan, Summer

Chemistry

OCR – 21C

1

Sept – Dec

Jan, Summer

Physics

OCR – 21C

1

Sept – Dec

Jan, Summer

2

Jan – March

Varies according to class – Jan and Summer (all resits in Summer)

1

Oct - Dec

Jan, Summer

Science Core

OCR – 21C

Science Additional OCR – 21C * Ongoing portfolio assessment or coursework ** Practical assessment externally moderated

9


Notice to Candidates

This notice has been produced on behalf of: AQA, City & Guilds, CCEA, Edexcel, OCR and WJEC

is called “referencing”. You must make sure that you give detailed references for everything in your work which is not in your own words. A reference from a printed book or journal should show the name of the author, the year of publication and the page number, for example: (Morrison, 2000, pg.29).

NOTICE TO CANDIDATES GCSE, GCE, ELC, Functional Skills and Project Qualifications COURSEWORK ASSESSMENTS Before you submit any coursework for marking, you will be asked to sign an authentication statement confirming that you have read and followed these regulations. If there is anything that you do not understand, you must ask your teacher or lecturer. Coursework provides you with an opportunity to do some independent research into a topic. The research you do will involve looking for information in published sources such as textbooks, encyclopaedias, journals, TV, radio, and on the internet. Using information from published sources (including the internet) as the basis for your coursework is a good way to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of a subject, but you must take care how you use this material - you cannot copy it and claim it as your own work.

For material taken from the internet, your reference should show the date when the material was downloaded and must show the precise web page, not the search engine used to locate it. This can be copied from the address line. For example: (http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/16/sosteacher/ history/49766.shtml), downloaded 12 February 2011.

The regulations state that: “The work which you submit for assessment must be your own.” “You must not copy from someone else or allow another candidate to copy from you.”

You must also include a bibliography at the end of your work which lists the full details of publications you have used in your research, even where these are not directly referred to, for example: Morrison, A. (2000) “Mary, Queen of Scots”, London: Weston Press.

If you use the same wording as a published source, you must place quotation marks around the passage and state where it came from. This

If you copy the words or ideas of others and don’t show your sources in references and a bibliography, this will be considered as cheating.

10


Notice to Candidates PREPARING YOUR COURSEWORK – GOOD PRACTICE If you receive help and guidance from someone other than your teacher, you must tell your teacher who will then record the nature of the assistance given to you. If you worked as part of a group on an assignment, you must each write up your own account of the assignment. Even if the data you have is the same, the description of how that data was obtained and the conclusions you draw from it should be in your own words.

the topic concerned — they may have read the source you are using (or even marked the essay you have copied from). Internet search engines and specialised computer software can be used to match phrases or pieces of text with original sources and to detect changes in the grammar and style of writing or punctuation.

You must meet the deadlines that your teacher gives you for submitting drafts and final pieces of work. Your teachers are there to guide and assist you — showing them your work as it progresses will allow you and your teacher time to sort out any problems before it is too late. Take care of your work and keep it safe. Do not leave it lying around where your classmates can find it. You must always keep your coursework secure and confidential whilst you are preparing it; do not share it with your classmates. If it is stored on the computer network, keep your password secure. Collect all copies from the printer and destroy those you do not need. Do not be tempted to use essays from online essay banks — this is cheating. Electronic tools used by awarding bodies can detect this sort of copying. PLAGIARISM Plagiarism involves taking someone else’s words, thoughts or ideas and trying to pass them off as your own. It is a form of cheating which is taken very seriously. Do not think you won’t be caught; there are many ways to detect plagiarism. Markers can spot changes in the style of writing and use of language. • Markers are highly experienced subject specialists who are very familiar with work on

PENALTIES FOR BREAKING THE REGULATIONS If your work is submitted and it is discovered that you have broken the regulations, one of the following penalties will be applied: • the piece of work will be awarded zero marks; • you will be disqualified from that unit for that examination series; • you will be disqualified from the whole subject for that examination series; • you will be disqualified from all subjects and barred from entering again for a period of time. Your awarding body will decide which penalty is appropriate. REMEMBER – IT IS YOUR QUALIFICATION SO IT NEEDS TO BE YOUR OWN WORK 11


Tips for Revising WHAT IS REVISION? It means ‘re-looking’ at information you have learnt previously. The aim is that you know the information you will be tested on and can remember it for the exam. Knowing something depends on understanding it. THE AIM OF REVISION The aim is to reduce the amount of information relating to a subject to a series of key points, any of which you can expand upon in an exam answer. The key point, phrase or word prompts your brain to retrieve the information stored in it. At the end of your revision for each topic or sub topic, aim to have a card or A4 sheet of KEY points for that section. THE STRUCTURE OF REVISION SESSIONS Good revision techniques always include: • An aim for the session e.g. ‘By the end of this two hour revision session I will understand and be able to answer questions on photosynthesis’. • Thinking about what you know already and identifying the bits you need to spend more time on (usually by doing some sort of self-testing – many revision aids include opportunities for self-testing). • Breaking down each topic into ‘doable’ chunks. Revise each section – not just reading the information but doing something active with it (see below). • Producing notes (shorter each time you revise a particular area) noting key points, phrases or words. • Testing yourself to see what you have learnt. • Ticking off the subject on your ‘overall list’ so that you can see regular progress. • Revisiting your notes briefly after one day, one week and one month, as well as just before the exam – THIS REALLY WORKS. THE KEY TO EFFECTIVE REVISION Useful revision involves DOING SOMETHING with the information you are trying to learn and remember. This is essential to allow your brain to 12

remember, learn and make connections. Different people find different activities useful, and you need to find out how you revise best. Some ideas are: • Drawing ‘spider maps’ on large pieces of paper to show how different parts of a subject hang together. • Use pictures, large flip chart sheets and colour to make posters with key points. Display these on walls where you will see them regularly. • Put revision aids up around the house – especially for ‘rote learning’ (chemical or mathematical formulae, French verbs etc). Read them when brushing your teeth, eating breakfast etc. • Record yourself saying ten key points about a particular topic, then play it back when you are travelling, running etc. • Highlight key areas of notes or books (if yours), picking out the key points or summaries. • Listen to tapes of books and plays and discuss them with another person. • Watch revision DVDs but don’t just sit back passively – pause them and make notes of key or difficult areas, test yourself or get someone to watch with you and test each other. • Read a page and shut the book – what can you remember? • Tell someone about what you have learned – explain how the heart works over a meal (or perhaps stick to something less gory). • Ask people around you to test you on ‘rote knowledge’ – have a family quiz. MEMORY TECHNIQUES Find out what helps you to remember stuff. Some ideas are: ACRONYMS (using the first letter of each word to make a word to prompt your memory) – you may find it hard to remember this sentence: ‘Wholly Inadequate Needless Damned Outrageous Waste of Space’. However, turn it into an acronym and it becomes much easier: WINDOWS.


Tips for Revising PICTURE STORIES (thinking of a strong visual image to associate with each word and linking them together in an unlikely and silly story) – you may find it hard to remember the facts in this sentence simply by reading it through: ‘The Great Plague struck London in 1665, followed by the fire of London in 1666, starting in the shop of the baker to King Charles II in Pudding Lane.’

MNEMONICS – make up a silly sentence to help you remember the order of something e.g. Never Eat Shredded Wheat (North, South, East, and West). REVIEW – take time occasionally to ask yourself how well your revision techniques are working for you. How much have you covered? Have you stuck to your timetable? Are you ending up with notes you can use for last minute revision? Congratulate yourself for all the subjects you have covered. Change your timetable plan if necessary. LATER ON – try some past exam questions. Make sure you set the appropriate time limit and try to work under exam conditions. It is worth looking at them early on to get an idea of the sort of question you will be answering – essays, multiple choices etc. Do these in plenty of time so that your teacher can mark them.

Try this out: get a picture of a large rat (the plague) running around before being burnt (plague year before fire) in a bread oven (bakers’ shop) with the flames curling up around it like the curls of the numbers 666 (1666), and then being put into a pudding (Pudding Lane) eaten by two King Charles spaniels (King Charles II). Go through the picture sequence a couple of times and see if you can remember the seven facts in the sentence. Ask someone to test you, and see if it works for them.

QUICK TIPS FOR REVISING • Make yourself start, however much you don’t want to – the hardest bit is over with then! • Build in short breaks. • Do frequent short exercises – stretches, neck and shoulder rolls, walking around etc. • Drink water, get fresh air and keep the temperature cool. • Eat ‘brain food’, avoid sugar and have healthy snacks around to eat little and often. • Take a day off and do something completely different. • Do not leave the difficult bits to the end. • Do something relaxing between revising and bedtime. • Stop and take a break if you start feeling frustrated, angry, and overwhelmed. Make a note of the problem to take to your next lesson, and move onto something else. • Focus on what you have done, not all the things that you haven’t – every little helps. • Promise yourself rewards after each session – watching TV, reading a trashy novel or going out with friends. • At the end of each session, file away your notes so your work area is clear for next time. 13


Extra Classes MATHS Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Mr King, R38 – Foundation.

Rubik’s Cube Club, R28 – Mr Byron available for help.

Mr Holmes, R37 – Higher after Unit 1 Exam.

Puzzle Club, R29 Mrs Russell available for help. Mrs Trainor, R31 Year 11 homework and help session (Year 10 also welcome).

Puzzle Club, R29 Mrs Russell available for help.

Friday

Mrs Trainor, R31 Year 11 homework and help session (Year 10 also welcome). Lego Club, R27 – Mr Loftus and Mr Holmes available for help.

After school:

Mrs Russell, R29 Foundation. Mr Stokes, R32 Foundation. Mr Loftus, R27 Sixth Form revision but Year 11 Higher students welcome. Mr Holmes, R37 Higher (Unit 1 Exam).

ENGLISH Monday

Tuesday

After school:

Lunchtime:

There will be targeted revision sessions. Your teacher will direct you to the most appropriate session for you. The rooms will vary but will always be in Humber – please ask your teacher.

14

Drop in sessions in H6 with Mrs Bateman and Miss Marsh – can be any student from any class.

Wednesday

Thursday After school:

Coursework catch up in H9 with Mrs Harrison. There will also be targeted revision sessions. Your teacher will direct you to the most appropriate session for you. The rooms will vary but will always be in Humber – please ask your teacher.

Friday


Extra Classes PHYISCAL EDUCATION Monday Lunchtime:

Mr Leaf, Mr Morris and Miss Leighton, K76 – BTEC Sport catch up. Miss Baker, K83 – Sports Studies catch up.

After school:

Mr Walton, Miss Baker and Mr Martinson – K80/K83 – Sports Studies/PEP club. Mr Leaf, Mr Morris and Miss Leighton, K76 – BTEC Sport catch up.

ENTERPRISE AND ICT Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

After school:

After school:

After school:

After school:

Controlled assessment support runs throughout October in E1/E2.

Revision for January resit in Business Studies Unit 6 runs from November to January.

Controlled assessment support runs throughout October in E1/E2.

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Autumn-Winter Term Lunchtime:

After October Half Term Lunchtime:

After Christmas Lunchtime:

ICT room in East Dale available for homework.

Support for OCR (if staff have meetings, facilities are still available). All welcome.

ICT room in East Dale available for homework.

Support for OCR (unless staff have a meeting). All welcome.

ICT room in East Dale available for homework.

Friday

Support for OCR (unless staff have meeting). All welcome.

Support for OCR (unless staff have a meeting). All welcome.

DANCE Monday

GCSE Dance, Year 11 Unit 4a Solo Composition Unit 2 Set Dance Preparation.

One to one drop in session by appointment in the Conference Room.

Friday

GCSE Dance, Year 11 Unit 1 – Theory catch up and revision sessions, Conference Room.

Spring Term Lunchtime:

Year 11 Unit 4b Choreography catchup Unit 3 Group Performance Piece rehearsals - Dance Studio. 15


Extra Classes DRAMA Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

After school:

Thursday

Friday

Lunchtime:

Mrs Witts and Miss Derry, R25 - Key Stage 4/GCSE Paper 3, 1:5 Group support/development (rotational appointments).

Mrs Witts, R30 Key Stage 4/5 written coursework portfolio drop in.

After school:

Mrs Witts and Miss Derry – Practical Unit 3 Rehearsal

MEDIA Monday

Tuesday

After school:

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Friday

After school:

Miss Clark and Mr Shaw, H7 - Key Stage 4 BTEC drop in. One to one by appointment/ invitation.

Miss Clark, H7 Key Stage 4 BTEC drop in. One to one by appointment/ invitation.

LANGUAGES Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Mrs Percival, W2 Extra support for her GCSE French students.

Mrs Savage, W3 – GCSE German.

Miss Lowe, W6 GCSE French during stage 1 of tasks.

Miss Miles, W7 – GCSE French during stage 1 of tasks.

Miss Lowe, W6 GCSE French during stage 1 of tasks.

Miss Richardson, W5 – Year 11 French.

Mrs Savage, W3 -Year 11 French.

After school:

Miss Miles, W7 – GCSE French during stage 1 of tasks.

Mrs Colepio, W8 – Year 10 French. Miss Richardson, W5 – Year 10 French.

UNDERSTANDING THE WORLD Monday

Tuesday

Geography resit for Year 11 – arranged by class teacher.

Lunchtime:

16

Year 11 catch up for RS, History and Geography in K77.

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday Lunchtime:

K58, History resit (Year 11) – Unit 2 American West.


Extra Classes CREATIVE DESIGN Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Miss Walton and Mrs Pearson, DW1/DW0 Textiles.

Mrs Foster, K62 – Food Technology.

Mr Killen, K47 Art and Design, Photography.

After school:

Miss Walton and Mrs Pearson, DW1/DW0 -Textiles.

Miss Walton and Mrs Pearson, DW1/DW0 – Textiles.

Miss Walton and Mrs Pearson, DW1/DW0 -Textiles.

Mrs Foster, K62 Food Technology.

Mr Killen, K47 – Art and Design, Photography.

Mrs Myers, DW6 Product Design.

Miss Walton and Mrs Pearson, DW1/DW0 – Textiles.

Mrs Blee and Mrs Foster, K64 – Food Technology.

After school:

Mrs Beharell, R18 Child Development.

Mrs Blee and Mrs Foster, K62 – Food Technology.

Mrs Beharell, R18 Child Development.

Mrs Mulhaire, K62 Key Stage 4 catch up.

Mr Lang, DW3 Engineering catch up. Mr Killen, K47 – Art and Design.

Mrs Neves, K44 - Art and Design, Photography

Miss Atkinson, K43 - Art and Design, Photography.

Mr Irwin Product Design/ Engineering – arranged when necessary.

Mrs Mulhaire, K81 Key Stage 4 catch up. Mrs Blee, K65 – Food Technology.

MUSIC Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

Lunchtime:

After school:

After school:

Mrs Prescott – Key Stage 4/GCSE.

Mrs Prescott - as arranged with individual students.

Mrs Prescott – Key Stage 4/GCSE.

Mrs Prescott - as arranged with individual students.

Mrs Prescott – Key Stage 4/GCSE.

Mrs Prescott – Key Stage 4/GCSE.

Mrs Prescott – Key Stage 4/GCSE.

After school:

Mrs Prescott - as arranged with individual students.

SCIENCE Informal sessions can be arranged with class teachers to assist the students with their controlled assessments. More specific revision classes will be advertised after Christmas for Year 11 to allow students to concentrate on Maths and English. These will be on a Monday and a Thursday after school.

17


Useful Websites

MAKING CHOICES www.connexions-humber.co.uk Click on “Young People” for guidance on choices and options available at all ages plus career choices. GENERAL - SUPPORT FOR TEENAGERS www.childline.org.uk Tel: 0800 1111 for tips and advice on exam stress as well as lots of other advice and support. www.bbc.co.uk Choose ‘More’ and go to ‘Full A-Z’ then click on ‘Teens Advice’. www.youth2youth.co.uk/ www.connexions-humber.co.uk www.youthaccess.org.uk 18

GENERAL – PARENT SUPPORT www.connexions-humber.co.uk Click on ‘Parents and Carers’ for help and support. www.parentlineplus.org.uk Also confidential helpline for parents on 0808 800 2222. EXAM BOARDS www.aqa.org.uk www.edexcel.org.uk www.ocr.org.uk www.wjec.co.uk

COURSEWORK AND REVISION www.markedbyteachers.com/ coursework-info www.studentcentral.co.uk www.essaybank.co.uk www.sparknotes.com www.gcseguide.co.uk Use the bookshop option to see what revision guides are available in each subject area. www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ gcsebitesize www.gcse.com www.mymaths.co.uk Use the username: hunsley and password: number www.o2learn.co.uk www.s-cool.co.uk www.schoolsnet.com


Melton North Ferriby East Yorkshire HU14 3HS (01482) 631208 enquiries@southhunsley.org.uk southhunsley.org.uk


Key Stage 4 Exam Information Booklet  

Exam information for Key Stag2 4 students and parents

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