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Southern Peninsula

Proudly published by Mornington Peninsula News Group Pty. Ltd

PHONE: 03 5973 6424 Published weekly

Circulation: 22,870

Audit period: Apr 2014 - Sept 2014

Source: AMAA; CAB Total Distribution Audit for further information visit auditedmedia.org.au

Journalists: Liz Bell, Stephen Taylor, Neil Walker 5973 6424 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Ricky Thompson 0425 867 578 or ricky@mpnews.com.au Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production/Graphic design: Maria Mirabella, Marcus Pettifer Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Andrew Kelly, Craig MacKenzie, Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough. ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group, PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@mpnews.com.au Web: mpnews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURSDAY 9 FEBRUARY 2017 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: TUESDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2017

An independent voice for the community We are the only locally owned and operated community newspaper on the Mornington Peninsula. We are dedicated to the belief that a strong community newspaper is essential to a strong community. We exist to serve residents, community groups and businesses and ask for their support in return.

NEWS DESK How to help RESIDENTS and visitors to the Mornington Peninsula are being asked to help native wildlife affected by high temperatures. Prolonged heat can makes animals appear lethargic, disorientated or unresponsive, so it’s important to take care when helping them. Tree-dwelling and nocturnal animals, such as possums and koalas, which are suffering from heat stress, may be seen on the ground during the day searching for water. Birds will often pant and stretch their wings to cool down. To help, place bowls of water around shady areas and spray mist into trees and shrubs from a garden hose. Place small animals which appear lethargic or sick on a damp towel in a well-ventilated, cool container and give them a bowl of water. Use gloves when touching the animals. Larger animals, such as kangaroos, koalas and wombats, or disease carrying animals like flying foxes, should only be treated by trained wildlife experts. Wildlife shelters and foster carers help heat-stressed, sick or injured wildlife. Vets, licenced shelters and rehabilitation organisations can provide advice and assistance.

Netting a death trap A RISE in the number of flying fox deaths and injuries has prompted a plea for residents to use smaller aperture wildlife-safe netting to protect fruit trees. Flying foxes play an important ecological role by pollinating native trees. “Delayed eucalypt flowering this season may mean fruit bats and birds are more likely to seek food and nectar from fruit trees, leading them to become entrapped,” Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning manager Suriya Vij said. “Deaths and injuries caused by fruit netting can easily be prevented through the use of the right net type which has five

millimetre by five millimetre apertures or smaller. “The best way to check if fruit netting is wildlife-safe is to poke a finger through the net holes. “If you can fit your finger through, the net is not wildlife friendly and flying foxes can get their wings and feet stuck and it’s very difficult to extract them. “Many sustain terrible injuries and often have to be euthanised.” For more information and information on wildlife rescue groups visit delwp.vic. gov.au

DONATE TO

THE BOURKE STREET FUND The Victorian Government has set up a fund for the families affected by the incident For more information and to donate www.vic.gov.au/bourkestreet

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Southern Peninsula News 7 February 2017

Profile for Mornington Peninsula News Group

7 February 2017  

Southern Peninsula News 7 February 2017

7 February 2017  

Southern Peninsula News 7 February 2017

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