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Students explore the science of life ROSEBUD Secondary College students took a peek into the fascinating world of biomedical sciences at the fifth annual Biomedical Sciences Day in Parkville last week. They were among 60 years 10 and 11 students from regional and rural Victoria to attend the event which gave them a rare opportunity to experience life as a biomedical scientist. The event was presented by the School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Melbourne, and the Gene Technology Access Centre (GTAC). Professor Matthew Watt, head of the university’s Department of Physiology, encouraged the students to think about the science behind what creates, sustains and threatens people’s lives here and overseas. He shared his journey into biomedical academia, including his laboratory’s ground-breaking research into the pathogenesis of fatty liver disease and diabetes. Prof Watt discussed some of the revolutionary work under way at the school and at GTAC, including: Biological processes – how and why researchers now have a better understanding of human health; 3D printing to replace bones; Genomics – new tools for cancer treatments, and new vaccines to combat disease. Students worked alongside researchers to photograph specimens using light, fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes. They entered their images into the university’s Under the Microscope competition. They also took a behind-thescenes look at the university’s Harry Brookes Allen Museum of Anatomy

Eye-opener: Josh Reilly and Tahlia Spencer-Allen at the Biomedical Sciences Day. Picture: Supplied

and Pathology and uncovered real tissue specimens and historical anatomical models. Later, at a tour of the Virtual Reality Learning Studio, they experienced how cutting-edge digital technology is used to study the human body.

The Rosebud students loved both the learning studio and the museum and were said to be fascinated by the virtual human hearts. They also learned about Access Melbourne, a program that helps students from rural or regional areas

gain entry to undergraduate courses at the university. Each year, 20 per cent of domestic undergraduate places are reserved for Access Melbourne applicants.

Fox fined over beach land A $10,000 FINE and an order to pay $10,000 in costs to Mornington Peninsula Shire Council was an expensive lesson in planning protocols for Portsea resident Lindsay Fox last week. This came after one of the trucking magnate’s private companies pleaded guilty to two charges of failing to comply with the council’s planning scheme at Dromana Magistrates’ Court. Photographs of a 4600 square metre area of foreshore outside the Fox property show it had been levelled and irrigated turf laid without shire approval and that protected native plants and grasses had been removed. The area is covered by overlays requiring a permit to remove, destroy or lop any vegetation. The mayor Cr David Gill said landowners intending to clear areas of vegetation should first consult the shire’s planning department to get the all-clear. “It’s not a difficult process and then they would know what they need a permit for,” he said. “It doesn’t matter who the offender is, we will act for the Mornington Peninsula Shire.” The mayor said the council “doesn’t have a good reputation for enforcement and compliance” but that “if we can continue to get results that reputation will improve”.

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Southern Peninsula News 11 September 2019

PAGE 5

Profile for Mornington Peninsula News Group

10 September 2019  

Southern Peninsula News 10 September 2019

10 September 2019  

Southern Peninsula News 10 September 2019

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