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SEPTEMBER 5–11, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 33 NO. 10 | PITCH.COM


SEP T E MBER 5–11, 2013 | VOL . 3 3 NO. 10 E D I T O R I A L

Judging tip

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Lybarger, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel

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Character is as important as pedigree.

CANDIED CAMERA CandyCam wants to give filmmakers a cheaper aerial shot. B Y B E N PA L O S A A R I

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A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Christina Larkins

J I M CLAS S

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Collin Click, Sharon Donat, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

Round 2 has begun!

Choose your favorite from the Top 3! VOTE NOW!

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

“FAScInATInG And pRoVocATIVE.”

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

damon Wise, The Guardian

“onE LonG AcT oF SEdUcTIon.” - Fan Zhong, W

N A T I O N A L

Shawnee Mission’s new superintendent brings his Independence lesson plans to a new state.

A D V E R T I S I N G

B Y S T E V E VO C K R O D T

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

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D I S T R I B U T I O N

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The CORNER RESTAURANT stops serving dinner. Opposition to Jackson County MEDICAL-RESEARCH TAX is starting to organize. Kansas woman gets two days in prison for STEALING LAWYER’S WALLET from a courtroom.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

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QUESTIONNAIRE

STACEY MILLION

Group sales manager, Starlight Theatre

Hometown: Birthplace of Designing Women, Poplar Bluff, Missouri

Current neighborhood: the Crossroads What I do (in 140 characters): I bring cor-

porate and family groups to Broadway performances at Starlight Theatre, KC’s iconic and beautiful outdoor event venue. I also T A E IN ONL .COM get to work with some PITCH amazing young professionals through Starlight’s new Center Stage — Young Professionals of Starlight membership group.

MORE

What’s your addiction? Traveling, my Starbucks gold card, good books and happy people.

What’s your game? Scrabble

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

Q&As

vodka gimlet

“I just read …” Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life From Dear Sugar; Start; and Mountains Beyond Mountains. Currently reading The Orchardist and rereading Eat, Pray, Love.

Where’s dinner? Usually at home, but I love the

The best advice I ever got: Go with your gut.

What’s your drink? Cider and the occasional

Bristol, Kona Grill and Gates (especially when visitors are in town or I crave some delicious “turkey on bun”).

What’s on your KC postcard? An oversized col-

Worst advice: Don’t worry about buying the incorrect train ticket in Paris — the conductors never check.

lage of Kansas City’s gems, including Starlight Theatre, Union Station, KC Zoo, the NelsonAtkins’ Shuttlecocks, the “K,” Powell Gardens, KC Museum, etc.

My sidekick: My 11-pound disabled pug, Manny

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right …” With the revitalization of the downtown/

My brush with fame: Mixing and mingling with stars at the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival, which I attended in support of my mentor’s new documentary, Bridegroom.

Crossroads area. When I worked downtown right out of college, it was a ghost town. The new businesses and renovations have totally changed the KC landscape!

“Kansas City screwed up when …” It allowed its

public schools to become unaccredited.

“Kansas City needs …” A young professionals’

travel club.

“In five years, I’ll be …” On a gorgeous beach

in the Italian Riviera.

“I always laugh at …” Anchorman and the picture of my pug’s “smelly pirate hooker” Halloween costume.

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” House of Cards, Breaking Bad and Downton Abbey.

“I can’t stop listening to …” Brandi Carlile

My dating triumph/tragedy: How much time do you have? I’ll tell you over a drink.

My 140-character soapbox: I have a love-hate

relationship with my phone. While I love the convenience and quality photos/apps that smartphones offer, I think they disrupt genuine social interactions and seriously restrict the concept of living in the moment. And, yes, I write this as I’m checking my phone for updates.

My recent triumph: Introducing young professionals to Starlight Theatre through events like our ’80s after-party and Jason Mraz concert VIP passes. And, in July, I finally got to ride the Swan Boats in Boston’s Public Garden. That was a really good day. To join Starlight’s young professionals group, contact Million at stacey.million@kcstarlight .com or 816-997-1137.

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BE N PA L O S A A R I

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CandyCam wants to give filmmakers

M

Beasley dropped out of the University of Missouri–Kansas City in 2010. Torn between a career in art and one in math, he started Beasley Creative, a branding company that also built websites. His office neighbored filmmaker Spencer Walsh. Beasley and Walsh struck up a friendship and built a crane for Walsh to use on his shoots. But the process was long and labor-intensive, and their finished crane could get only one kind of view: a crane shot. “What we realized was that these cranes and jibs are limited in their functionality,” Beasley says. “Why are we just doing what everyone else is doing? There might be a business here if we try to take it to the next level. “We found out that a lot of people don’t do these four-line systems because there’s a lot of complicated math involved beyond what a three-line system requires,” he adds. “We’re having to do multidimensional calculus.” CandyCam employs 15 full-time workers. Beasley and Walsh are focusing their efforts on getting investors and placing the SkyHook system in the hands of fi lmmakers. So far, they’ve raised $400,000, but they’re looking for another $1 million. “We need this next round of funding to get us into production,” Beasley says. “As a company, we’ll need to staff up.” CandyCam workers will build the units by hand, which Beasley calls “a garage startup situation.” From there, a few beta testers will be selected to use the cameras in the field. After the cameras are tested, a few will be sold. Beasley says the “democratization of tech” — DSLR cameras that shoot high-definition video can be had for about $600 — means more people will consider a system like SkyHook for film projects. “The barrier to entry in this industry has become as low as it’s ever going to be,” he

iles of cable cover CandyCam’s headquarters on the fifth floor of the Think Big Partners building at 18th Street and Baltimore. A swamp of parts, tools and prototypes spills out of the work spaces. Chief design officer Coty Beasley’s desk is a mess of scattered parts and a busted-open radio controller. The 25-year-old’s messy tangle of brown hair and dark-rimmed glasses make him the real-life doppelgänger of cartoon character Steve Smith from Fox’s American Dad. Beasley hopes that by January, his yearold startup will be one of the cheapest cablesuspended camera systems in an expensive market dominated by Skycam, the brand featured in NFL and NASCAR broadcasts. “Seven guys [to operate it], three days to set up — you can’t buy one, really,” Beasley says. “You’re looking at half a million to a million [dollars] just to rent one.” With Skycam units priced out of reach of most filmmakers, Beasley says CandyCam offers a cheaper alternative. His company hopes to sell the cameras initially for about $18,000, then drop the price to $5,000 as production ramps up. “What we’re doing is trying to give filmmakers a new tool to get all kinds of different shots,” he says. CandyCam is designed to replace cranes and jibs and other camera equipment needed by fi lmmakers for hovering shots, Beasley explains. Here’s how CandyCam’s system works. The camera is made up of two parts. On the top is a box, with motors in all four corners, called the SkyHook platform. Each motor controls a reel that pulls on two cables anchored high on walls or pillars. Below the platform is an attached gimbal. Filmmakers mount their camera to the gimbal and use radio controllers to move the camera gimbal and the platform around a space to get a desired shot.

Dogs World Beasley (far left) hopes to start production of the SkyHook (in action, above) by year’s end. says. “I mean, there are people shooting action sequences on the big screen on iPhones.” CandyCam will eventually produce four models: a professional version for Hollywood productions, a sports model, a base model, and a slightly upgraded base model. “The Holly wood version ends up having to be fireproof and bulletproof, things like that,” he says, adding that it’s a long way off. On August 16, Beasley and the CandyCam team tested the latest model in a downtown parking garage’s glassed-in stairwell. The shoot was set up to demonstrate the system’s ability to glide upward in the open space in the center of a stairwell, with the camera turning to track actors running. About a half-dozen friends dropped by, all dressed as thugs. They wore leather jackets, masks and an assortment of hats while wielding crowbars, sledgehammers and bats as they chased another group up the stairs. The 3-foot-wide space proved to be too perilous for the SkyHook and the Canon DSLR camera mounted to the gimbal. On a couple of trips upstairs, it swung to the side and bumped the stairs, causing all six CandyCam employees working the shoot to shout, “Stop! Stop!” After one bump, the rig appeared to be damaged and stopped responding to radio controllers. But a quick restart had it flying again. Two hours later, the last shot was completed. Standing on the third floor of the parking garage, looking down as the SkyHook gently slouched into the dark garage basement, Beasley shook his head slightly and grinned. “We get to do this kind of stuff every day,” he said.

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com pitch.com

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J

im Hinson has faced plenty of audiences since July 1, his first day on the job as the Shawnee Mission School District’s superintendent. Many days, his meetings have looked like this one, an August 28 gathering of about 30 local elected officials and bureaucrats at the school district’s administrative headquarters in Merriam. At one point, he poses a question to the group: Had any of them seen a television news

segment about how William Jewell College in Liberty opened a new library that has no books on its shelves, but instead a bunch of iPads that store literature electronically? He gets no response. Hinson begins to explain why the approach that William Jewell is taking with its new library is emblematic of how educators must consider their work differently from the traditional model. Technology plays a role, he points out.

“I’m not saying we’re eliminating the library,” Hinson says. “Thank you!” says Nancy Hupp, a Merriam City Council member and vice chairwoman of the Johnson County Library Board. This is how Hinson, former superintendent of the Independence School District, has spent his summer. During what the Shawnee Mission Board of Education is calling a “listening tour,” administrators, teachers, parents, businesspeople

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and politicians have been testing Hinson’s firm handshake, and he in turn has been gauging what his constituents think about the school district. The 87-day period is ticking down to September 25, when he’s due to give what amounts to a state-of-the-district address at the Shawnee Mission Education Foundation’s annual meeting, at the Overland Park Convention Center. Hinson likes a challenge. That, he says, is why he left his last continued on page 8 SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

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Jim Class continued from page 7 job. After 12 years as superintendent of the Independence School District, he had run out of obstacles. “It was like there wasn’t anything new,” Hinson says. “I don’t mean that in a derogatory sense … I’m not good at treading water or stagnation.” “In his mind, I don’t know if he had another big challenge in Independence that he could step up and find,” says Dale Herl, Hinson’s successor as Independence superintendent. Hinson started as a sixth-grade teacher in Carthage, Missouri. Six years later, he became an elementary school principal in that district, a job he held for six years. From there, he was a superintendent for the school district in Greenfield, Missouri, and then superintendent in Newton County, Missouri, before arriving in Independence in 2001. He was working a three-year contract with Independence when a Shawnee Mission School District recruiter earmarked him as a good fit to replace Gene Johnson, who was due to retire at the end of the 2012–13 school year. Shawnee Mission’s Board of Education had begun a national search, but its new top administrator turned out to be in the same metro. Shawnee Mission agreed to pay him a base salary of $217,950, about the same as what he made in Independence. There, his salary for 2013–14 was supposed to be between $215,000 and $225,000, according to that contract. “Dr. Hinson is very charismatic and dynamic,” Shawnee Mission board president Deb Zila tells The Pitch. Hinson, 51, had also maxed out his Missouri retirement benefits — but not his marketability. “Honestly, he could retire from Missouri with full retirement and go to Kansas and have a full salary,” Herl says. “Financially, it was very beneficial for him. To a greater extent, he’s a man who loves challenges.” He has come to the right district.

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ver the past three years, Shawnee Mission — besieged by a lousy economy that has led to state funding cuts and decreasing

property valuations — has eliminated more than 400 staff positions. That doesn’t make the district unique among other school systems in Kansas, but the developments have felt especially severe to those who recall Shawnee Mission’s history. In 1970, as Shawnee Mission began to earn national attention for its academic performance, the district had an enrollment of 45,702. Today, enrollment stands at 27,770, and Shawnee Mission is distinct among other Johnson County school districts in that, despite the area’s reputation for affluence, it’s grappling with an influx of financially distressed families with school-age children. About 8,250 children in the Shawnee Mission School District live below the federal poverty line, which means a household income of $23,550 for a family of four. Some 40 percent of students in the district are eligible for free or reduced lunches — up from 10 percent in 2001. The reasons for this are straightforward, and they start with the 2008 recession and the fact that the Shawnee Mission School District covers mostly inner-ring suburbs. Those communities can’t expand and are slow to redevelop, which leaves an older housing stock that’s affordable for those looking to get out of the urban core. “I think one of the other things, one of the trends that’s happening, is there’s more employment in Johnson County, and a lot more of it is low-wage employment,” says Karen Wulfkuhle, executive director of United Community Services of Johnson County, a community-planning nonprofit. She adds that about a third of the 300,000 jobs in Johnson County pay less than the $30,000 median income. “I think we will continue to see greater income diversity in Johnson County as jobs don’t pay wages that sustain an individual or a family,” she says. Those financial pressures within a family command more resources from the school district. “From a nutritional standpoint, are they [families] trying to buy the most inexpensive food they can find that may not have the highest nutritional value, but it puts food on the table?” Hinson says. “Kids might come to us with dental concerns, and the parents can’t afford to see a dentist, so we have to

Shawnee Mission School District students taking the ACT had an average score of 24 in 2012, outpacing the state average (21.8) and the national average (20.9). But the district’s cutbacks have put a sharper fee burden on parents. In some cases, they’re paying for additional instruction for their children. Judith Deedy, a Mission Hills parent, started an ad hoc parents group called Game on for Kansas Schools, originally centered on Belinder Elementary School. The idea is to call attention to public education’s funding shortage. Deedy has watched class sizes go up and has sent her daughter to school with things like reams of paper that the school can’t easily afford. She has chipped in with other parents to hire math and reading aides at the school, at a total cost of $20,000. “Shawnee Mission is struggling,” Deedy tells The Pitch. “When I talk to other people around the state, they may have other issues, they’re struggling, too. Blue Valley and Olathe aren’t facing the same restrictions we are.” The Shawnee Mission School District Hinson wants a new challenge. gets $3,838 from the state for every student say as a school district: How can we help? — the same as every other Kansas district. We might have parents living in poverty, Trouble is, Shawnee Mission is supposed to but they don’t know the resources that are get $4,492 for each student — same as every available for them, so we have social workers other district should. that put adults in contact with the appropriFor this, Deedy blames the Kansas ate resources available.” Legislature. But resources have been limited for the The $4,492-per-student level is what the district as its finances have eroded over state courts require, but the Kansas Legislature the past few years. has ignored that mandate by appropriating The district pulled in $233 million for the less, with the claim that the state doesn’t have 2008–09 school year. This enough money. year, it has $212.9 million to Compounding matters “We have to say work with. The district has is the fact that the Kansas been running a deficit most Legislature commissioned as a school district: years since 2008–09, which its own study for what How can we help?” has reduced its fund balance funding level makes sense (basically a savings account for public education. That for the district) from $11.2 was in 2006, and the report million in 2009–10 to $4.9 million this year. found that 2013 funding should be $6,142 per Beyond cutting those 400 staffers, this has student. meant an inability to provide early childhood The conflict between lawmakers and the education, buy new library books, fund allcourts is heading for a showdown during next day kindergarten or assign social workers to year’s legislative session. homeless students. Lawyers for the state and for 52 school disStill, the district has managed to stay afloat tricts are suing the state on the claim that Kanin terms of academics. sas hasn’t met its constitutional requirement

THURSDAYS 7pm 8

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BERRETT EMKE

to adequately fund schools. The case is set for oral arguments starting October 8. A decision is expected in January. If the Kansas Supreme Court rules that the state needs to return funding to the $4,492-perstudent level, a state finance and constitutional crisis could follow. Some legislators have said they’ll continue to ignore the court’s order if it comes down in favor of the schools. John Robb, a Wichita-area lawyer representing various school districts, says, rhetoric aside, lawmakers will go ahead and give extra funding to the schools despite their willingness to ignore the mandate in recent years. “I’m an optimist, and I believe the Legislature is going to live up to their constitutional oaths and support the constitution,” Robb tells The Pitch. “Although there’s been a lot of posturing that they’re going to ignore the courts, I’m hopeful that they’re going to follow their oath and the constitution. If that doesn’t happen, I think what you will wind up with is an unconstitutional school-finance system. The most likely scenario is, the courts shut down the education system until such time as the Legislature does its job.” That would be an embarrassing prospect for Kansas, but one not without precedent. Kansas schools came within two days of closing down in 2005 when the Kansas Supreme Court issued a similar order to increase school funding. Legislators acquiesced to the order at the 11th hour. Unlike 2005, however, Kansas in 2013 has cut taxes, specifically corporate income taxes for certain businesses. That has bean counters in Topeka predicting a budget shortfall of up to $300 million for the state’s next budget year. “I don’t believe the state under the current tax law can sustain over the next five years,” says Rep. Melissa Rooker, a Republican House member from Fairway who sits on the House Education Committee. “If you add the ramifications of losing the court case, I don’t think it’s a sustainable plan, and that’s why I voted no. I don’t have enough experience to know how we navigate the crisis, but I think such a crisis is on the horizon.” Hinson is more circumspect about the state’s fiscal issues and their impact on education. He says he hasn’t studied Kansas’ new tax plan to know how it will affect education.

State funding is a big deal for school districts like Shawnee Mission, which has no other way to increase its own funding. School districts have local option budgets, a way to increase local mill levies to raise more cash. But Shawnee Mission has hit the stateimposed limit on how much it can increase local taxes, and the Legislature has been inflexible in lifting that cap. Johnson County legislators are split on whether schools need more money. Lawmakers such as Rooker think the state can and should increase education funding. Other, more conservative and small-government-minded members say school districts have more than enough and should instead operate more efficiently. Hinson hears those people. “I trust we’re going to find efficiencies,” he says. “For me, coming outside of the district, I can look at our budget from a different lens. Am I going to find enough [efficiencies] to appropriately fund education at the Shawnee Mission School District? Based on current state funding, the answer is no. To me, the answer is between the two.” Hinson’s résumé suggests one path toward that answer. He was superintendent of the

Van Horn came back from the brink on Hinson’s watch. Independence district in 2007, when voters there and in Kansas City approved the annexation of seven low-performing Kansas City, Missouri, School District schools into the Independence district. One of them was Van Horn High School, one of the worst in Missouri at the time of the annexation. Since joining the Independence School District, the once seemingly hopeless school — it graduated only about a third of its students back then — now sends 90 percent of its senior classes along with a diploma. Hinson’s work in that transition has earned him plaudits in northeast Johnson County, and may provide some clues on how Hinson might work with schools in distress.

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nce an established haven for blue-collar jobs, western Independence and Sugar Creek became a no man’s land in the 1980s, abandoned by employers and homeowners. The Ford Motor Co. Assembly Plant left western Independence for Claycomo. Stan-

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dard Oil closed a refinery there. Retail and catalog operations for Sears and Montgomery Ward followed suit. Left jobless, families departed for Blue Springs and Lee’s Summit. Empty houses were scooped up by slumlords. Drug use and crime surged. Residents who remained found their community’s problems compounded by the Kansas City, Missouri, School District. The district was a defendant in the nation’s longest-running desegregation lawsuit, a case that sought to reverse the racial divisions in the district but in many ways made the problem worse. A ruling by federal Judge Russell Clark ordered the state to throw money at the school buildings themselves. Rebuilding schools with appealing amenities, the thinking went, would make the district attractive to the white population that had headed to the suburbs. Clark’s ruling funneled more than $2 billion into the KC district, which converted the properties into magnet-style schools. Paseo High School became a performing-arts school. Central High School catered to athletics and computer-based education. Van Horn High School, in western Independence, was modeled as an engineering school, while nearby elementary schools such as Fairmount Elementary and Mt. Washington Elementary became foreign-languageimmersion schools. The busing program, designed to transport students from one side of the Kansas City district to another to reach the various specialized schools, steered kids in western Independence away from nearby Van Horn in favor of downtown KC. Longtime residents of western Independence say this siphoned off the community’s connection to its local schools. Van Horn didn’t host a homecoming for four decades. Bob Spradling, the pastor at Maywood Baptist Church, near Van Horn High School, watched families leave his congregation if they could find a way out and move elsewhere in the metro. “We weren’t getting served by Kansas City,” Spradling says of the KC district. “Disenfranchised might be a little too strong of a word, but continued on page 11 there was that sense.”

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Jim Class continued from page 9

in the students. This was how he set about reversing the previous district’s culture. “The level of expectation was set high and it was set high intentionally, but the message was, ‘Every student, regardless of anything else, can perform at the appropriate level, and there are no excuses,’” Hinson says. “By the way, kids respond really well to that. I think kids respond really well to expectations set before them if you show you care and you’re willing to go the extra mile. There had been a culture of failure and a culture of low expectations, a lack of parental involvement, virtually no community or business involvement in the schools.” Performance has inched upward at Van Horn since the annexation. In 2007, the average ACT score was 16; in 2012, it was 18. “They’ve made the transition fully into our school district,” says Herl, Hinson’s successor in Independence. “I don’t see any more of a transition. The buildings, we continue to do things to improve them but we do that with all our schools.” Herl in 2011 wrote his dissertation about the transition of the KC district schools into Independence as a blueprint for turning around struggling schools. He concluded that the changes were successful. “I think, number one, he [Hinson] has an unfailing belief in kids and that good teaching will prevail if you care about kids,” Herl says.

The money flowing into the Kansas City schools didn’t improve academic performance. “It was one of those experiments we tried and then realized, ‘Gee, maybe this didn’t work so well,’” Spradling says. “School is a real key sense of community.” Bill Rogers, a Fairmount-area resident who now lives next door to the house where he grew up, worked in Van Horn High School for the Local Investment Commission in the late 1990s and 2000s. Rogers says students at Van Horn didn’t seem to have much connection to the school, and the teachers there perhaps less so. “They felt it was better if you [students] didn’t come, they didn’t have to deal with you,” Rogers recalls. While talk stretches back to the 1970s about having the Independence School District annex schools on the west side of town, the effort didn’t hit its stride until former state Sen. Victor Callahan undertook some legislative gymnastics to compel a vote in Independence and Kansas City, Missouri, with the support of local businesses and churches. “It wasn’t led by the school district,” says Hinson, who arrived in Independence in 2001. “Eventually those leaders came to me to say, ‘OK, if we can get this on the ballot and it’s approved, how is the school district going to respond to this?’ My response was, ‘If you get it on the ballot and it’s approved, I can guarantee you as a school district this hatever his No. 1 priority turns out to be, will work.’ “ Hinson is reluctant to shed much light The measure passed easily among both In- on his plans for the Shawnee Mission School dependence and Kansas City voters. District, at least for another month. He has arAfter a string of lawsuits from the KC district rived, he says, without any prescribed ideas failed to stop the annexation, the Indepenabout what to change. dence district had schools in its boundaries “My goals and vision for the district are that were in dismal shape aesthetically and really based on what the community wants,” academically. Hinson tells The Pitch. “It’s highly inappropriThe Independence district issued $85 mil- ate to ride in on a horse and say, ‘You’re doing lion in bonds to fix up the this right and this wrong buildings. and here’s what we’re going At Van Horn, volunteers to do.’” “Shawnee Mission painted many of the classSome lessons from Inis struggling.” rooms’ walls. An old footdependence, however, may ball scoreboard that had carry over to his new job. been covered in vines was He leaves open the posreplaced, and the football field reconstructed sibility of making staff changes in the district, and surrounded by a new synthetic track. if not to the extent that followed the IndepenHinson ordered that metal detectors be redence annexation of 2007. moved from the entrances at Van Horn. “That “That experience also helps me underwas a cultural change,” he says. “That told the stand, regardless of a student coming from kids, ‘We have a different expectation for you an affluent family or a family that can’t find and we’re going to trust you. We don’t need a way to put bread on the table, all these kids this any longer.’” in the school district can be extremely sucThere were also staffing changes. cessful,” he says. Hinson required that all current employees He pauses when asked if he’s staying in in the annexed schools interview for their posi- Shawnee Mission for good. Six weeks into the tions alongside new applicants. The existing job, he says, no one had asked that question yet. employees didn’t fare well; only 12 from the “I think the answer is, I don’t know,” Hinson seven annexed schools stayed on after the insays. “I don’t have any ambitions to go anyterview process. where else.” Hinson says the district needed staffers who were invested in the schools’ performance and E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

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eptember’s First Friday is a tough call. A big street party at 19th and Locust is ready to draw your attention, but so is the opening of M.A. Alford’s last major showing of work under that persona. Like Gerhard Richter, he’s marking the transition with fire. Selections from the nearly 1,000 works the artist “left behind” (the exhibition is being pimped as a show by “the late” Alford, curated by his “twin brother,” Mark Allen; uh, he’s alive, and there’s no twin) include photographs, paintings, videos and sculptures, and everything that doesn’t sell this month goes up in flames in a ceremony. It’s at Beggar’s Table — site of Alford’s first solo show before the gallery moved to 2010 Baltimore. continued on Art, page 15

Daily listings on page 28

“Cain and Abel” by M.A. Alford pitch.com

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ART

IN THE LOOP

Reeling through H&R Block Artspace’s

BY

comprehensive performance-art showcase

L I Z C O OK

A

t H&R Block Artspace, Performance Now enlivens the gallery with a visual carnival of pop music, parachutes, IKEA furniture and claymation gore. And that’s just the first floor. Your first visit to Performance Now can feel a little like window-shopping, as you peer into each of curator RoseLee Goldberg’s carefully chosen curiosity boxes. There’s more here than the sort of performance art that can feel deliberately inscrutable or self-consciously provocative, but if you’re looking for shock value — crotch close-ups, blood and guts, satanic imagery — you’ll find it in this exhibition. Explore a little longer, though, and the power of these artifacts as instruments of political and personal inquiry rises to the surface. Marina Abramović’s human-endurance tests offer a potent reminder of this power. Each of the divisive artist’s “Seven Easy Pieces,” for example, is a seven-hour-long challenge of will in which she must hold demanding postures without rest. Performance Now displays an undoctored video record of each piece on its own monitor, the screens arranged in a circle similar to the circular supporting in its form what her original piece pedestal on which she performs. cultivates in content. In Abramović’s “Lips of Thomas,” an A few artists, like Bartana, deal in narraalmost sensual asceticism emerges. Over tive, but most of the artists on display seem the course of the seven-hour piece, a nude more concerned with visual composition Abramović consumes 2 pounds of honey and a liter of red wine (without bathroom than knitting together a linear progression of happenings. Ryan Trecartin’s “A Fambreaks), taking small sips and spoonfuls beily Finds Entertainment” plays like a Terry tween periods of extreme self-flagellation. She whips herself, carves a pentagram into Gilliam fever dream. Through the artist’s video and audio manipulation, a lush junher belly with a razor blade, and lies down gle of colors, textures and feedback-laced on a cross of ice. She also shows up in Valie Export’s “Action screams becomes the sensory backdrop for a coming-out tale with the Pants: Genital Panic,” takfrenetic energy of a glowing a circular stage in black Performance Now stick rave at a clown college. leather and combat boots Through October 12 at H&R Trecartin’s fi lm is remarkand clutching an Uzi to her Block Artspace, 16 East 43rd able in its mashing of camp chest as gallerygoers walk Street, 816-561-5563, aesthetics with moments by, their sneakers squeaking kcai.edu/artspace of spiritual transcendence. on the museum’s cold floors. There’s the baptismal kidShe moves only occasiondie pool. There’s the front-yard fireworks ally — her presence alone is confrontational, show while Trecartin’s protagonist, Skippy, transgressive. dances with wild and infectious abandon. Performance art seems dependent upon That sense of joy and play is more simply just that kind of encounter, and there’s an initial coolness in seeing these pieces on moni- expressed in Christian Jankowski’s “Rooftop Routine,” a brief but buoyant encountors rather than live. Still, Performance Now is ter with hula hooper Suat Ling Chua, his more than mere archive. Yael Bartana’s video neighbor. Chua, all smiles in a bright-red “Mary Koszmary (Nightmares)” fully emtracksuit, instructs viewers on proper hoopbraces its medium, appropriating traditional ing technique while sneaking in her daily cinematic shot sequences and emotionally exercise on the rooftop of her Chinatown evocative music, and editing to both capture apartment building. Jankowski splices shots and critique the nationalistic fervor of World of Chua mouthing along with an earworm War II propaganda films. Bartana’s artifact becomes a new vehicle for the performance, Chinese pop tune against brief glimpses of

FIRST FRIDAY HIT LIST

“Anthology (Maren Hassinger)” by Clifford Owens the fi lm’s supporting cast: dozens of hoopers on nearby rooftops joining in the cheery morning routine. It’s hard not to feel charmed by Chua’s complete lack of self-consciousness as she sings and whirls the hoop around her core, grinning and flashing dual peace signs to the sky. The Artspace’s staging invites a closer encounter with the piece — a stack of multicolored hoops rests against the wall in case you feel inspired to take Chua’s lesson to heart. Though many of these performances are video recordings, the exhibition’s still images are every bit as dynamic and intriguing. Nikhil Chopra’s “Yoj Raj Chitrakar: Memory Drawing IX” captures the creation of an anachronistic character, preserving layered and well-composed shots of an artist engaging in his own process of documentation. The sheer scale of Performance Now is daunting enough to make repeat visits necessary, at least if you want to gather more than surface impressions. The depth in Goldberg’s exhibition is in its genuine, nostalgic love for performance — for preserving and cataloging these seemingly ephemeral projects. The result is a traveling scrapbook of comedy and confrontation, ready to fascinate and prod but also to entertain.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com pitch.com

continued from page 13 On a lighter note, an actual set of twin brothers shows together for the first time at Alpha Gallery (2014 Main). Ben and Matthew Hawkins are known, respectively, for quirky sculptures of found objects and for small-run 3-D shadowbox paper sculptures that take on pop-culture staples such as zombies, beer and baseball. Over at Red Star Studios’ ceramic gallery (the one at Belger Crane Yard Studios, 2011 Tracy), resident artists Jo Kamm and Keira Norton show off the fruits of their 24 months there. In video and live, Kamm dares to join up with Kansas City’s juggling community Friday. That’s right — they’re going to throw around highly breakable handcrafted sculptures. Norton’s work is a quiet contrast of meditative and provocative explorations of the eerie folk creature known as El Encantado (“enchanted one”). Like an Amazon river dolphin fairy, rumored to appear suddenly and seductively, taking female victims away in the night, this creature is Norton’s muse, and she renders it beautifully. A number of international artists debut work Friday in Kansas City. Lei Yan, a former Chinese Liberation Army member, is at Todd Weiner Gallery (115 West 18th Street). The Kansas City Artists Coalition (201 Wyandotte), which still has the show Islamic Exchange on view, opens a ceramic exhibition by Carmen Riu de Martin, who is from Spain and has been the coalition’s international artist-in-residence. Hilliard Gallery (1820 McGee), in conjunction with the Norman Arts, brings us Entre Huellas y Arenas, a collection of 37 bold photographs — horses! — by Peruvian artists Sandra Cannock Graña and Alejandra Iturrizaga. John Lamberton, the senior collections photographer for the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art’s imaging services department (and an adjunct professor at Johnson County Community College), is a KC native who graduated from the Kansas City Art Institute the year the first digital “photograph” was made. At City Ice Arts (2015 Campbell), he shows us his latest work, which is an evolution past holographic imaging. The knock-your-eyes-out, 3-D-type process, called ChromaDepth, uses more accessible technology than holography. Slip on a pair of special viewing glasses and visually get into his Spatial Studies. — TRACY ABELN SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

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FILM

APOCALYPSE DRIVE-IN I

believe that by the end of the year, we will only have 100 drive-ins left,” says Tamara Maichel of Osawatomie, Kansas. Maichel would know. She’s leading an effort to save Miami County’s Midway Drive-in, which could close if the theater doesn’t raise $100,000 to upgrade its projector. About 400 drive-ins are still in operation, but only 32 have converted to digital projection, according to Project Drive-In, an effort by carmaker Honda to save the theaters. The conversion is crucial. Next year, Hollywood studios plan to cease production of 35 mm movie prints. It’s easy to understand why. Digital hard drives weigh less than a pound. Even in a 4-pound case, the drives ship much cheaper than 50- or 60-pound prints. The problem facing drive-in theaters is that converting to digital isn’t cheap. Running only during summer weekends — Midwestern winters are too harsh for outdoor moviegoing — makes paying for the new equipment cost-prohibitive for operations such as the Midway. Even in states like California, where theaters can run year-round, profitability is far from certain. TV writer Steve Pepoon, a KC native who grew up in Paola, Kansas, tells The Pitch that one of his first jobs in Los Angeles was managing drive-in theaters. “Sadly, most of those drive-ins are now gone — the land got too valuable,” Pepoon writes in a Facebook message. Pepoon wrote an Emmy-winning script for The Simpsons, “Homer vs. Lisa and the Eighth Commandment,” in 1991; co-created The Wild Thornberrys; and penned episodes of Roseanne, Get a Life and It’s Garry Shandling’s Show. “Now condos sit where I used to chase down people who dared to sneak into my theatre.” The transition to digital also comes as another uniquely local enterprise ends. For several years, Kansas City, Kansas’ SPECO was the only company in the world that made speakers for drive-in theaters. Two months ago, Detroit Diecast bought out the operation. SPECO had been selling speakers since 1948; the company later manufactured its own models. Jaren W. Higginbotham says his company made speakers because he, like drive-in customers, loved the experience. But it wasn’t a profitable venture. “Our internal numbers told us we should shut the line down,” Higginbotham says. “But if we did that, none of the drive-ins would have anywhere to go for the equipment. We sold basically at cost or cost plus 2 percent.” SPECO’s loyalty was rewarded by theaters

The signs seem sadly clear for drive-ins. ditching their speakers and converting to AM and FM broadcasts. “But the experience isn’t about listening to it on your car radio,” Higginbotham says. “It’s about hanging out with friends or taking up an entire row and hearing the music through the drive-in speakers. We had several customers that, when they put in their AM or FM broadcast equipment, razed all their speakers because they didn’t think they needed them anymore. Some of them went out of business. Some of them bit the bullet and bought another 800 speakers and put them all back in, because the customers wanted the drivein-speaker experience.” The Midway has faced make-or-break situations since opening in 1953. In the 1970s, a tornado tore down the theater’s screen as a giant ape scaled the the World Trade Center with Jessica Lange in hand. As the screen was being repaired, the marquee read, “King Kong Did It.” Maichel argues that the Midway is more than just a nostalgia trip. “People go there because it’s affordable,” Maichel says. (The Midway charges $7 for a double feature.) “It keeps teenagers off the streets, and it gives kids a safe atmosphere to be at. It passes down from generation to generation to generation. Maichel says some families tailgate at the theater. They shop at the local groceries and fill up their tanks in town. “We have people who stop in from Topeka, and they spend their money here,” she says. “You’re talking about 240 cars a night.” Pepoon, who has returned to Miami County, hasn’t forgotten the experience of seeing films at the Midway. “I remember seeing Silent Running and being kind of blown away, how they made the

The Midway and I-70 drive-ins struggle

BY

to survive the digital conversion.

D A N LY B A R G E R

small droids so lifelike,” he writes. “Later, I found out there were [bilateral amputees] inside the costumes. That was creative, outsidethe-box thinking, something I strive to do with my writing. Something unexpected.” The Midway has sentimental value to Pepoon for other reasons. “The first time I kissed my wife was after a date at the Midway,” he says. “This was four years ago.” It’s hard to imagine that sort of romance blooming from streaming video on an iPad. Like the movie heroes they feature, driveins shouldn’t be written off. Honda is rallying fans with the Project Drive-In campaign, asking people to spread the word about the crisis and vote for their favorite theaters. The Midway and Kansas City’s I-70 Drive-In are among 81 drive-ins competing to win one of five projectors (projectdrivein.com). Daryl Smith, owner of the four-screen I-70 Drive-In, says Honda’s contest could be a lifeline. Next year marks the I-70’s 50th anniversary, and its concession stand is already selling T-shirts to raise money to keep the screens from going dark. “We just don’t have $300,000,” Smith says. “We’d love to have one of our four projectors taken care of. That would be a tremendous help.” The deadline is looming. Project Drive-In’s contest ends September 9, and fans of both drive-ins can vote once a day. Maichel calls the prospect of winning a projector a “dream come true,” but she and other Midway fans aren’t leaving the drivein’s future to chance. Supporters are selling T-shirts and ice cream outside the concession stand and running a Facebook campaign with several fundraisers scheduled. One drive-in that has successfully made the digital transition is KCK’s Boulevard, which has seen crowds grow since the conversion. Wes Neal, whose family has owned and operated the drive-in since 1953, says his family has had to be creative to stay in business. He attributes Boulevard’s survival to the Swap & Shop flea market.  “The Swap & Shop, which I started in ’75, blossomed enough to keep us going,” Neal says. “Maybe we would not have been here if it was not for the Swap & Shop, because in the ’90s it was so expensive.” Boulevard celebrated the 80th anniversary of the creation of the first drive-in on June 3. In Boulevard’s box office, Neal keeps a list pinned to a wall of local drive-ins that have folded, as a reminder.

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OUT THIS WEEK

ADORE

A

dore, according to the movie’s press materials, is “an unpredictable tale of misguided love and a heartfelt celebration of the enduring nature of female friendship,” but you know it as the one where Naomi Watts and Robin Wright play bikini moms who fuck each other’s shirtless sons. Called Two Mothers when it started making this year’s festival rounds, it’s based on the Doris Lessing story “The Grandmothers” (scripted here by Christopher Hampton for Coco Before Chanel director Anne Fontaine), a title that suggests just how long we’re going to spend with Roz (Wright) and Lil (Watts) as they negotiate forbidden lust on an unnamed Australian coast. Except it’s not actually all that forbidden. After a couple of the usual “No, no, you mustn’t, we mustn’t — wait, you’re not wearing underwear?” encounters, everybody gets comfortable, and you wonder what could possibly fill the next hour and forever. Always there is the sea, always the sky and the beach, rarely Wright’s accent. No one does much except sigh at the scenery and the sex and share a few Sapphic giggle fits and wave goodbye to sad jilted Ben Mendelsohn. Bye, only deep character, bye. Usually someone in a story like this dies, so that we may be reminded that with great fucking comes great responsibility. Maybe one of the interchangeably hot young guys (Xavier Samuel, James Frecheville) contracts pec cancer? No. It spoils none of the movie’s tepid goings-on to reveal that everybody makes it through to the end, though at the emotional expense of various age-appropriate life partners. RIYL: General Foods International coffees. —SCOTT WILSON

SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

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SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

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hould we just get into it?” chef Aaron Confessori asks, moments after slipping on a blue apron. Confessori, the owner of the Westport Café and Bar, dips his hands into the aluminum tray, where a dozen Peanut wings are snuggled together. A day earlier, Peanut owner Aaron Whiteside delivered to my house a Styrofoam cooler packed with two vacuum-sealed bags of wings. I had tried to have them shipped, but he insisted on dropping them off after learning that I live in Kansas City. For the last 10 months, Whiteside has been cooking (the wings are fried with the pan sauce poured on top), packing (they’re vacuum-sealed, frozen and nestled under dry ice) and shipping the wings to former Kansas Citians longing for a taste of home. This week, he started selling the sauces, sans wings, online at peanutwings.com. I wanted to give the Peanut’s at-home wings a try, and Confessori, a Peanut regular for a decade, agreed to prepare them. “I hope this doesn’t ruin it for you,” I tell Confessori. “I once made the clone version of Cadbury creme eggs, and I didn’t eat those for six or seven years after.” I hand Confessori a Ziploc bag with a trio

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Confessori plays the Peanut home game. of wings — the results of my experiment the night before. I had picked up 25 uncooked wings at the Peanut’s Main Street location and turned my kitchen into a one-night chicken shack. The massive wings — both the drumette and the flat — could be fried only in threes in my new tabletop fryer from Target. Confessori puts the baggie of three in the fridge and sets the timer on his iPhone to 17 minutes for the tray of wings in the oven. “These look pretty darn good,” Confessori says as he removes the tray from the oven. The wings have a bright-red pop of hot sauce. Confessori uses tongs to stack the V-shaped pieces into a tower on the plate. He pries the tops off a few beers, and we dig in. “They’re tasty,” Confessori says, his fingers splotched with sauce. “What sets the wings at the Peanut apart is the black pepper. And they’re still messy. I thought they’d be drier.” The meat is tender, but the skin isn’t quite crispy enough. A Saturday regular at the Peanut, along for today’s tasting, easily pulls apart a wing. The drumettes that stayed in the fryer the longest have browned and the skins tightened. They’re deemed the best approximation of the real deal.

“It’s pretty close,” Confessori says. “I think we’d just have to perfect the technique. I’d do it like we do at the restaurant: Everything is 500 degrees. That way, we get that caramelization, and it’s done as fast as can be. Next time, I’d just blast them at 500 degrees for five minutes at the end.” Next time. Those are the key words. Confessori texts me a few days later: “Cold leftovers were very good.” Next time has already happened without me.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com.


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oe and Carolina Shirley want to open their own restaurant. But they’ll have to wait, at least eight more years. “Our son, Zion, is 10 years old,” Joe Shirley says. “I promised my wife that I wouldn’t even consider opening a restaurant until we get him through school. When you own a restaurant, you’re married to it.” Shirley has worked in enough restaurants to know that truth. He met Carolina in 2001 when they both worked at the Grand Street Café on the Plaza. Shirley was cooking in the kitchen, under the direction of talented executive chef Michael Peterson. Carolina was a server. Joe Shirley is now the executive chef for a major bank in Kansas City. It pays well, but there isn’t a lot of creative freedom — definitely not the freedom of chefs who operate their own restaurants. (Ryan Brazeal, Ted Habiger and Colby Garrelts come to mind.) So Shirley is expressing his creativity in Uberdine, a new part-time pop-up restaurant. (“The word über translates as a ‘superlative example of its kind or class,’ which is what we’re doing with dining,” Shirley says.) Serving a prix fixe dinner in an offbeat venue, for rarely more than a few days, isn’t a novelty in Kansas City. Chef Alex Pope and food blogger Jenny Vergara have hosted several popular “restaurant/art installation” pop-ups under the name Vagabond since 2011. Shirley had hoped to partner in some way with Pope and Vergara, “but Jenny declined, saying that she would attend my dinners as a guest and supporter, but that she and Alex were too busy to take on a third partner.” “Since Alex opened Local Pig, we have stopped doing the public events,” Vergara says. Shirley decided to start modestly: a onenight affair for about 40 guests eating a multicourse meal and sampling different vintages. He held a test dinner July 27, a collaboration with Kansas City–based Yummy’s Choice,

The Bauer: site of the next Uberdine event whose Mediterranean foods are sold in area supermarkets. “I used the Yummy’s products in most of my dishes,” Shirley says. He’s doing a similar collaboration with the Roasterie September 20 — the 10-course dinner sold out a week after he sent out a notice on his small e-mail list. “The dinner will be in the Roasterie’s event space, the Bean Hangar, and almost all 10 courses will feature Roasterie products,” he says. Shirley was considering hosting monthly Uberdine dinners, but after the first event, he discovered that the pace was grueling. “I’m planning to have Uberdine events lasting an entire weekend next year,” Shirley says, “or even five nights with two seatings of 40 people each. But I’m going to space them out a bit.” The next Uberdine dinner is in December, tentatively slated for the Bauer Building. It won’t be a collaboration. “It will be my take on a holiday dinner,” he says. “My own holiday dinners were a combination of my father’s Southern background and my mom’s Ozark roots. I’m sure this dinner will be influenced by both.” Reservations to his dinners can be made only by e-mailing him: chefjoeshirley@gmail.com. Although Joe and Carolina Shirley’s future plan is to open a traditional restaurant, Carolina — the former mastermind of the Synergy raves in the West Bottoms a decade ago and now a social-marketing planner — doesn’t work the Uberdine events. “Oh, no,” Joe Shirley says. “She’s there to have a good time like everyone else.”

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SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

MUSIC

PORTUGAL THE BAND

KC trio Fado Novato explores a historic Portuguese folk tradition.

BY

ANGELA LUTZ

W

atching Shay Estes sing fado, no one would guess that the Kansas City jazz singer was introduced to the 200-year-old style of Portuguese urban folk music only a year ago. Estes doesn’t speak much of the language, either, but as she sings, her hands flow with the Portuguese vowels, shaping the story she’s telling. She understands fado. “On an emotional level, it almost instantly made sense to me,” Estes says. “It tells a story that almost every single person can relate to, unless you’ve lived a life without any sort of pain or any sort of great joy.” Estes is one-third of the Kansas City trio Fado Novato, whose name translates to “fado beginner.” The group also features Jordan Shipley on classical guitar and Beau Bledsoe on Portuguese guitar. The three musicians traveled to Lisbon to perform at a fado festival in June after securing funding from local and national arts organizations through Artist Inc. The project sought to document Fado Novato’s journey from greenhorns to fadistas. The intrepid trio might be the world’s first fadistas with no connection to Portugal, other than a love of the music, which requires a Portuguese guitar, a classical guitar and a singer. Singers in the genre typically have an important story to tell, relating often-mournful experiences of the sea, lost love and the lives of the poor. Such emotion seems appropriate for this style of music. “Fado means fate, but you don’t use it in the same way you use destiny,” Estes explains. “To be full of fado is the same as a person who’s full of the blues. You’ve seen so much life and you’ve experienced the fullness of the range of human emotion — not just the bad parts, but the happy parts that are so ecstatic that they become painful almost.” The way fado is performed also hearkens back to this sense of fate. The members of Fado Novato played for the first time in Lisbon only 48 hours after arriving there. They were jetlagged from their 4,000-mile trip, but that didn’t matter at the fado house. According to Estes, a fadista going to one of these clubs and not singing “isn’t really going to fly.” The crowded fado house was quite different from a Kansas City bar. When the lights went down, it meant someone was about to sing — maybe someone famous, maybe someone from the neighborhood. Anyone who talked during a performance got kicked out. “Your eyes adjust to the low light, and there’s not a peep from anyone,” Bledsoe says of the experience. “There’s definitely a public catharsis taking place. Then they’ll turn the lights on again, and everyone goes back to partying. And this goes all night.”

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Fortunately, the group had spent months memorizing and rehearsing many fado standards and was ready to perform. But once in Lisbon, they realized how little they actually knew. Estes describes the Portuguese people as warm, friendly, humble — and brutally honest. Their early critiques sounded like backhanded compliments: “That was amazing. That was incredible. You guys are not very good at this.” “They were so excited about how much we cared and how much we were trying,” she says. “They could not wait to tell us every single thing we did wrong so we could get started doing it right.” In order to do it right, Estes, Bledsoe and Shipley embraced the fado lifestyle. Fado is deeply ingrained in Portuguese culture and is passed down in an oral tradition from generation to generation. In this way, it occupies the same social space as the American blues. The group got to know entire families of fadistas, many of whom took the three Americans under their wing and helped them gain access to the fado community, which Bledsoe says has approximately 100 people at its core. “It was very surprising to them that a couple of Americans who had no attachment to their country chose to seek out the music and culture of one tiny city, when there’s so much else to choose from here already,” Estes says.   As evidenced by its devotees, fado has a way of sucking people in; Estes says it’s “like a drug.” At least one member of the group immersed himself in fado a little too fully during the group’s stay in Lisbon. After one too many late nights, Shipley, the youngest member of Fado Novato, wound up in the hospital. “The literal diagnosis was ‘no more fado,’” Bledsoe says.

Passing fado: Shipley, Bledsoe and Estes But the hospitalization was only a temporary setback. Thanks to the support of the fado community, Bledsoe and Shipley each received lessons on their respective instruments — Shipley had purchased a new guitar specifically for the project, and Bledsoe had a Portuguese guitar custom-made by a KC-area luthier. Meanwhile, Estes learned how to finetune her pronunciation of Portuguese vowels. “It almost sent me back to my early days when I was more of a storyteller,” she says. “I think that was one of the best lessons I learned, was just to return to the roots of honoring the story more than anything else.” Because the story is so central to fado, the music is designed to be shared. One of Fado Novato’s eventual goals is to give the music a Midwestern home by opening a fado house in Kansas City. Estes and Bledsoe would love to see more KC musicians embrace the art form. Plans are temporarily on hold, however, until Shipley comes home. He fell hard and fast for Lisbon, and has remained overseas. The time for Fado Novato’s next step may be uncertain, but Estes knows Kansas City is definitely the place. “If there’s any community that can relate to [the Portuguese] level of humility, cultural pride and generosity, I think it’s Kansas City,” Estes says. “I can’t imagine another city where artists will be like, ‘Come sit down and play with me and drink with me and dine with me. Come be my friend, and let’s take this musical journey together. Let’s make something.’”

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Samantha Fish’s latest strays a bit from her blues roots.

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the pitch

SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

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he night almost never happened earlier this summer when Samantha Fish jammed with blues pioneer Buddy Guy. Fish and her band had hauled ass from a gig in Canada to make it to their sold-out show with Guy and Jonny Lang at VooDoo Lounge in Harrah’s Casino. “We’d befriended Buddy’s son, Greg, when we were in Chicago playing at his club [Buddy Guy’s Legends],” Fish explained. “He was in KC for Fourth of July weekend and had jammed with us a couple nights before at E MOR B.B.’s.” Fish had an informal invitation to join Guy T A E IN onstage, but nothing was ONL .COM PITCH set in stone. “You could tell that he really didn’t want to do it, but that night Jonny Lang gave this speech during the show about how Buddy really helps out the youth. So after that, he really couldn’t deny me.” And so the 24-year-old Fish, wearing a pair of black-leather pants and high heels, joined the 76-year-old legend to jam. The petite blonde from KCK, with her custommade Delaney guitar (complete with a fish carved into the body), held her own. “See, when this kinda shit happens, I’ll play all night. I’m serious, man!” Guy said to the packed crowd. Last month, fresh off what she called a “leisurely West Coast tour,” Fish met up to chat about her new album, Black Wind Howlin’, at a coffee shop in Waldo. She parked her 16-passenger van in the lot across the street and walked in wearing a sequined top and big sunglasses. She pulled out a copy of her not-yet-released CD and handed it over. “This record isn’t rushed,” she said. “The songs are more mature, more deliberate. They’re ideas that make sense to me.” The album is her third. Her first effort, Live Bait, is a compilation of live pieces that was released in 2010. The second is Runaway, a full-length that was recorded in Berlin while she was on Ruf Records’ overseas Girls With Guitars tour. “That was kind of rushed,” she said of Runaway. “And the people we worked with to record it were all German, so it just came out kind of different than what I expected. I mean, it was my first record, so I didn’t really know what I wanted.” Despite Fish’s misgivings, Runaway was awarded a Blues Music Award last year by the Blues Foundation for Best New Artist Debut — a huge accomplishment by most standards. Runaway was produced by one of Fish’s mentors, the St. Louis guitarist, singer and

M US I C

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songwriter Mike Zito. “I met Sam at Knuckleheads when she was still in high school,” Zito said recently, from New Orleans. “Her dad brought her to my show, and she was learning to play and sing. We’d have her sit in, and she was just getting started, but every time I saw her, she kept getting better.” Fish re-enlisted Zito for Black Wind Howlin’, which was recorded at Dockside Studios, in Maurice, Louisiana — Cajun country. Charlie Wooten and Yohann Rico, Zito’s bandmates in his blues-rock supergroup Southern Royal Brotherhood, were also brought in for the session. The album scans as more mature than Fish’s previous output, largely because she’s incorporating different elements: more roots, rock, Americana and country sounds. It’s bigger than just blues. The fi nal song on the album, “Last September,” is a twosteppin’ ballad; listening, you can picture Fish wearing a long white skirt and cowboy boots, singing at a barn dance. She gets kind of sexy on “Let’s Have Some Fun” — just Fish on a steel resonator. Fish credits the emotional nature of the songs on the album to Zito. “There’s more

Fish got worked up for the Howlin’. storytelling on this record, and the writing is more focused,” she said. “But there were definitely times when we’d butt heads.” She acknowledges that’s part of the game: “It’s his job to piss you off and rough you up a bit, but he also knew when to pick me up. I get the best takes when I’m worked up.” “Sam and I have very similar musical tastes,” Zito said. “We like real music — emotional, raw, passionate music. And she’s never satisfied. She wants to get better. And that’s what it’s all about.” And these tastes — combined with Zito’s wheedling and Fish’s enthusiastic experimentation with guitars — do contribute to Fish’s acknowledgment that some segments of the blues crowd might not embrace this album. “Most of Black Wind Howlin’ is a departure from the traditional blues sound, but to me, it’s 100 percent genuine to my sound,” she said. “I want the fans to like us for our own sound, not a genre they think we should fit into.”

E-mail berry.anderson@pitch.com


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MUSIC

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417 Owens and Merle Haggard. It’s excellent stuff, revivalism at its finest. Expect Gill to try on a few of those Bakersfield-style tunes, plus some of the prettier stuff that makes up his vaunted back catalog, at this show. Sunday, September 8, at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7222)

Michael Bublé

Red Kate

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KC’s Red Kate just released its new album, When the Troubles Come, via Lawrence’s Replay Records. On it, frontman L. Ron Drunkard (real name) leads his band through 11 careening tracks that carve out some common ground between punk and alternative rock. Bent Left also put out a punk record this year: the vaguely academic, politically charged Fabergé, which owes equal debt to Against Me and NOFX. With Nado Coles and the Blue Diamond Band. Thursday, September 5, at Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

Diarrhea Planet

To these ears, punk that veers into power pop is a combo up there with peanut butter and chocolate, and with acts like King Tuff, Titus Andronicus and Japandroids, the last few years have been a golden age for it. Both bands on this bill are also working the territory. Nashville’s Diarrhea Planet (which somewhat preposterously tours with four guitarists) channels Cheap Trick, the Descendents and Weezer in equal doses on its recent full-length, I’m Rich Beyond Your Wildest Dreams. The So So Glos, high priests of the Brooklyn DIY scene, are a little snottier, but

Jim James

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It’s not entirely clear to me how Michael Bublé became a global superstar instead of, say, a guy working the wedding-reception circuit in Vancouver. Which is not to say I’m not a fan; I am. Surely we can all agree that his bouncy, piano-based megahit “Haven’t Met You Yet” is satisfying on all possible levels? (I also enjoy referring to the crooner as “my boy Bubes,” though I will allow that’s not quite as strong a supporting argument.) Bublé’s act — lots of American-songbook standards and lounge-y original ballads — calls to mind the Rat Pack, if they were polite and Canadian instead of menacing, sex-crazed drunks. What’s not to love? Sunday, September 8, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

Jim James their beery hooks are plenty charming. With Warrensburg’s Vandal? Vandal! Saturday, September 7, at Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

lowercase KANSAS

Marty Hillard, of Lawrence acts Cowboy Indian Bear and Ebony Tusks, this week launches a new, all-ages showcase of local, regional and national artists at the Bottleneck. “It’s rapcentric but not bound to those parameters per se,” Hillard says. First up is a smorgasbord of local hip-hop talent — Ebony Tusks, Heartfelt Anarchy, MilkDrop — plus a few headliners at the top of the Tulsa scene: 1st Verse and Algebra. Friday, September 6, at the Bottleneck (737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483)

Vince Gill

On his latest album, Vince Gill — who owns one of the smoothest voices in country music — has teamed up with steel-guitar player Paul Franklin to explore the old Bakersfield sound. They’ve picked five songs apiece to cover by the two men who popularized the genre: Buck

F O R E C A S T

26

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SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

Jim James has led My Morning Jacket through a lot of shape-shifting over the past decade: alt-country, Southern rock, psych rock, funk. More recently, oddball soul sounds have crept into MMJ albums, and they’re especially pronounced on James’ first solo record, this year’s electronic-tinged Region of Light and Sound of God. The songs are spacey, spiritual and driven by James’ trademark plaintive wail, but they’re anchored by steady grooves (played expertly by the touring band he has assembled). Space funk from the future? Dance music for yogis? I don’t know what to call it, but it’s working for me. Wednesday, September 11, at Liberty Hall (644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972)

MGMT

I wasn’t bothered by the heady art-rock zag MGMT took on its sophomore effort, Congratulations. “Kids,” from MGMT’s surprise-hit, 2007 synth-pop debut, Oracular Spectacular, is probably still the group’s best song, but Congratulations is weirder, richer and braver, and three years later it sounds better than the debut. That said, the group has a new self-titled record out later this month, and one of the first singles, “Your Life Is a Life,” is so bizarre, tuneless and juvenile that it’s almost impossible to defend. But I’m holding out hope, and this Grinders show should be instructive in regard to what the rest of the album holds. Saturday, September 7, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 785-749-3434)

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

.................................................. Locally Sourced

.....................................................Honeyed Voice

............................................................. Canadian

............................................... Scatalogical Rock

......................................... Amy Grant’s Husband

..........................................Reluctant Rock Stars

..............................................................Crooning

.........................................................Solo Project

......................................................My Boy Bubes

................................................................... Okies

........................................................ Weirdo Funk

................................................ Punks Screaming

............................................................... No Caps

............................................................So Druggy

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98285.7 | The Pitch | 09-05-2013

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September 21, 2013

September 15, 2013

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November 30, 2013

UPCOMING SHOWS: 9/6 VooDoo Presents: Samantha Fish CD Release

9/13 Blue Corner Battles

9/7 Ultimate Karaoke Summer Series Final

9/20 Flirt Friday

9/14 Sexy Saturday 12/8 Blue October

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8/27/13 3:32 PM


AGENDA

continued from page 13

Thursday | 9.5 |

RYAN BEYE FOUNDATION BLOCK PARTY

F E S T I VA L S

The 52nd Annual Greek Festival | 6-10 p.m.Greek

FOOD & DRINK

Orthodox Church of the Annunciation, 12001 Wornall, greekfoodfest.org

FRIDAY

Briarcliff Village Farmers Market | 3-7 p.m. Briarcliff

9.6

Village, 4175 N. Mulberry Dr.

KC Crew’s Think Pink Happy Hour | 5-7 p.m., $25,

Johnson County Old Settlers | Park and Cherry streets, downtown Olathe, johnsoncountyoldsettlers.com

4 2013 C Fest

Valencia Place, 448 W. 47th St., crewkansascity.org

La Chalupa Farmers Market | Mattie Rhodes North-

Kansas City Juggling Festival | 5 p.m.-2 a.m. Rock-

hurst High School, 9301 State Line

east, 148 N. Topping Ave.

Weston Tunes & Tobacco Weekend | 4 p.m. Flashback Restoration, 17985 State Rte. 45 N., Weston, westontunesandtobaccoweekend.com

F E S T I VA L S

Johnson County Old Settlers | Park and Cherry streets, downtown Olathe, johnsoncountyoldsettlers.com

F I R S T F R I D AY PA R T I E S

Booty Guild | 6 p.m. The Guild, 1621 Locust

FILM

Banff Mountain Film Festival | Liberty Hall, 644

Music by Schwervon!, Lazy | 9 p.m. Midwestern

SPORTS

Perpetual Motion Dance on the LIVE in the Crossroads Stage | 8 p.m. Mid-America Arts Alliance,

Royals vs. Mariners | 1:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium DANCE

Musical Co., 1830 Locust

CHRIS MULLINS

Massachusetts, Lawrence, banffmountainfestival.ca

City in Motion dance showcase | 7-9 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

MUSIC

Betse Ellis, New Country Rehab | 8 p.m. Davey’s

Uptown, 3402 Main

Bent Left, Nado Coles & the Blue Diamond Band, Red Kate | Czar, 1531 Grand

MORE

EVENTS

ONL

INE

AT

M PITCH.CO

The Bluz Benderz | Trou-

ser Mouse, 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

Counter-Culture | Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St. Bleu Edmondson | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

2018 Baltimore, maaa.org

FILM

When Ryan Beye, the music-loving entrepreneur behind scene mainstay Bandwagon Merchandise, died late last year, his family knew they would keep up the screen-printing and design business. They’ve also started the Ryan Beye Foundation to help back local creatives. The group puts on its first block party Friday night, with booths by artists and a lineup that includes the Pedaljets, Ruddy Swain, poetry and four new murals. It starts at 5 p.m. on Locust, between 18th and 19th streets.

Peter Schlamb Trio with Max Cudworth | 8 p.m.

Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

SHOPPING

Spoonfed Tribe | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Good Ju Ju | 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m., 1420 W. 13th Terr.

Victor & Penny | The Brick, 1727 McGee

Urban Mining Sale | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urban Mining Homewares and Co., 3924 Walnut

Roger Wilder Quartet | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

PERFORMING ARTS NIGHTLIFE

Feel Good | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire,

Lawrence

The Floozies, Freddy Todd | 8 p.m. The Granada,

1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big

Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

Jason Kayne | 9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop, 13412 Santa

Friday | 9.6 |

DJ Highnoone | Empire Room, 334 E. 31st St. DJ Tequila Bear | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway Karaoke Lime Light | 8 p.m. Fat Fish Blue, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

DJ Keenan | 9 p.m. Port Fonda, 4141 Pennsylvania

Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa

Playe | 10:30 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

David Nail | KC Live Stage, 14th St. and Grand

Brent Tactic | Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

Asphalt Orchestra | 7:30 p.m. Lied Center of Kansas, 1600 Stewart Dr., Lawrence, lied.ku.edu Free happy-hour concert: Beethoven and Brahms

| 6 p.m., Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org

Banff Mountain Film Festival | 7 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, banffmountainfestival.ca FOOD & DRINK

Blue Springs BBQ Blaze-Off | 6-11 p.m. Hidden Valley Sports Complex, 6500 N.W. Valley View Rd., Blue Springs, bluespringsblazeoff.com

Friday Farmers Market at BadSeed | 4:30-9 p.m.

The BadSeed, 1909 McGee

Troostwood Youth Garden Market | 3-8 p.m., 5142

Paseo, troostwoodyouthgarden.info SPORTS

Royals vs. Tigers | 7:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium MUSIC

Alien Jones | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts,

Lawrence

Blood of Kings, Vomit Assault, Mischief of Rats

| 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

COMEDY

Two Improv Comedy Shows | 7 & 9 p.m. Roving Imp Theate, rovingimp.com

Blues and BBQ for Sherwood Center with Four

Fried Chickens and a Coke, Brody Buster Band, Katie Guillen Trio, Shinetop Jr. | 6 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

EXPOS

Not in the Face, Cherokee Rock Rifle, Coward | 8 p.m., The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

28

the pitch

SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

Trivia | 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market, 817 Westport Rd.

pitch.com

Greater Kansas City Home Show Fall Edition |

10 a.m.-6 p.m. Overland Park Convention Center, 6000 College Blvd., Overland Park

Cajun Blowout Party with Billy Ebeling and the Late for Dinner Band and Briar | 9:30 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

continued on page 30


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the pitch

29


THEATER

PERFORMING ARTS

PRAIRIE VILLAGE JAZZ FESTIVAL

Dance in the Park 15th anniversary performance

DAY

9.7

SATUR

Jazz in k on Par Harm

| 6:30 p.m. Roanoke Park, 38th St. and Roanoke

Miss Saigon

Susan Werner: The Hayseed Project | 8 p.m. Polsky Theatre at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park COMEDY

Two Improv Comedy Shows | 7 & 9 p.m. Roving Imp Theate, rovingimp.com

EXPOS

Greater Kansas City Home Show Fall Edition |

10 a.m.-6 p.m. Overland Park Convention Center, 6000 College Blvd., Overland Park FOOD & DRINK

Pitch contributor and local jazz champion Larry Kopitnik has put together a strong bill for the fourth annual Prairie Village Jazz Festival. Headlining: the Bobby Watson All-Star Big Band (with guest Jon Faddis). Also, there are the Andy McGhie Quintet, Parallax, the Mutual Musicians Foundation All-Stars, and more. It’s all free, and it’s at Harmon Park (7700 Mission) starting at 3 p.m. Saturday.

continued from page 28 David Hasselhoff on Acid, Troglodyte, Janet the Planet, Instant Empire, Opossum Trot, Conflicts, See the Elephant | 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048

Jason Vivone and the Billybats| Coda,1744Broadway The Zeros | KC Live Stage, 14th St. and Grand

Broadway

NIGHTLIFE

Dread Zepplin with the Living Deads | 9 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Samantha Fish | VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Johnny Lee & Tony Ramey | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Uptown, 3402 Main

Cinemaphonic with DJ Cruz & Cyan | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

DJ Dynamic | Milieu, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

lowercaseKANSAS, Ebony Tusks, Heartfelt Anarchy, Algebra, Milkdrop, D/Will | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Lonnie McFadden | 4:30 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W.

Eighth St.

DJ E | The Quaff, 1010 Broadway Friends with Benefits Fridays | Empire Room, 334

E. 31st St.

The Rumblejetts | 8 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack, 5835 Lamar, Mission

Poncho Sanchez featuring James Carter | 8 p.m. Gem Theater, 1615 E. 18th St.

The Slowdown, the Legend of Red Ghost, Parts of Speech | 9:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Grand

Soul Providers Block Party | Birdies, 116 W. 18th St. Team Trivia | 7 p.m. The Brooksider, 6330 Brookside Plz.

Saturday | 9.7 | SHOPPING

Son Venezuela | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Good Ju Ju | 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., 1420 W. 13th Terr.

Steddy P & DJ Mahf, Info Gates, Joey Cool, Dutch Newman, Sir Adams | 10 p.m. RecordBar,

Saturday swap meet | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Cowtown Mall-

1020 Westport Rd.

TSS Band | 8 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy, 1601 E. 18th St. 30

the pitch

SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

room, 3101 Gillham Plz.

Urban Mining Sale | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urban Mining

Homewares and Co., 3924 Walnut

pitch.com

Long Day’s Journey Into Night | Kansas City

Actors Theatre, H&R Block City Stage, Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., kcactors.org

The Miss Firecracker Contest | City Theatre of Independence, 201 N. Dodgion Rd., Independence, citytheatreofindependence.org

Brookside Farmers Market | 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Border

Miss Saigon | Starlight Theatre, 4600 Starlight Rd., kcstarlight.com

City Market Farmers Market | 6:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. City Market, 205 E. Fifth St.

Mother%$!#Hood | Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence, lawrenceartscenter.org

Downtown Overland Park Farmers Market |

Murder at the Royal | Golden Ox, 1600 Genessee,

Grand Court Farmers Market | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Grand

The Session | Just Off Broadway Theatre, 3051

KC Organics and Natural Market | 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Minor Park, Holmes at Red Bridge Rd.

The Tallest Tree in the Forest | Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Copaken Stage, 13th St. and Walnut, kcrep.org

den Valley Sports Complex, 6500 N.W. Valley View Rd., Blue Springs

Star Montessori, 6321 Wornall

6:30 a.m.-1 p.m., on Marty between 79th and 80th streets

Troostwood Youth Garden Market | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 5142 Paseo

Vignoles Grape Harvest Party | 8 a.m. Jowler Creek

Vineyard & Winery, 16905 Jowler Creek Rd., Platte City, jowlercreek.com

Village West WineFest | 6 p.m., $75 (GA), $150 (VIP), Schlitterbahn, 9400 State Ave., KCK F E S T I VA L S

KC Improv Festival | 8 p.m. Off Center Theatre, 2450

| KCMT Tiffany Ballroom, 903 Harrison, grimprov .com/kansas-city

Blue Springs BBQ Blaze-Off | 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Hid-

Court Retirement Center, 501 W. 107th St.

Burlesque with Cher D. Blame, Ruby Foxx, Fifi Glitterbomb, Romany Jewel, Ave Martini, Anya Neeze, Kinsey Scale, Annie Thrax | 9 p.m. Davey’s

Best Laid Plans — A Murder Mystery Dinner

30th Annual Lenexa Spinach Festival | 9 a.m.4 p.m. Sar-Ko-Par Trails Park, 87th St. and Lackman Rd., Lenexa

The 52nd Annual Greek Festival | 12-10 p.m. Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation, 12001 Wornall. greekfoodfest.org Johnson County Old Settlers | Park and Cherry

streets, downtown Olathe, johnsoncountyoldsettlers.com

KC Renaissance Festival: Pet Fest | 10 a.m.-7 p.m.,

kcmysterytrain.com

Central, kcmeltingpot.com

Venus in Fur | Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main, unicorntheatre.org

Kansas City Cigar Festival | 11 a.m.-3 p.m., $35, $125, $225, Country Club Plaza, Broadway between Ward Pkwy. and J.C. Nichols pkwy., kccigarfestival.com Kansas City Juggling Festival | 9 a.m.-7 p.m. &

9 p.m.-midnight, Rockhurst High School, 9301 State Line Rd., kansascityjugglingclub.com

Weston Tunes & Tobacco Weekend | 10 a.m. Flashback Restoration, 17985 State Rte. 45 N., Weston, westontunesandtobaccoweekend.com COMMUNITY EVENTS

Colors of India — A musical extravaganza | 4 p.m., $15-$100, MidAmerica Nazarene University, 2030 E. College Way, Olathe, ashanet.org/kansascity De-Feet Hunger 5k & Lunch Packing | 7:30 a.m.

633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs, kcrenfest.com

55th St. and Paseo

Kansas City Chalk & Walk Festival | 11 a.m.-8 p.m.

Dippin’ Dogs | 12-2 p.m., $10 per dog, the Bay Water

Crown Center, 2450 Grand

Park, 7101 Longview Rd.

continued on page 32


MON: RURAL GR IT THU 9/5 VICT 6PM // KARAOKE 10PM OR & PENNY W / RICK WILLO JAMES ISSACUG- HBY & 8:30PM SAT 9/7 BLUE BOOT FIGHT THE QUHEIEELERS, I AM NATION, FRI THE 13TH TH E HAUNTE T JASON AND THDECREEPYS, PUNKNECKS, AM SAT 9/14 CROSY FARRAND SR FRI 9/27 HELE OADS MUSIC FEST N GILLET & JAM ES SINGLETON CD-R SUN 9/29 GRIS ELEASE LY HAND & RACH EL PIES

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SAINTS PUB & PATIO (Lenexa) - 7:30PM SULLY’S PUB (Mission) - 7:00PM

CHARLIE HOOPER’S (KC) - 7:30PM SNOW & COMPANY (KC) - 7:30PM

THE CHESTERFIELD (KC) - 8:00PM

(STARTS MAY 1ST)

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SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

the pitch

31


continued from page 30 Fall Family Festival | 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Kansas City Com-

MGMT

munity Gardens (KCCG), 6917 Kensington

First Saturdays | 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Shoal Creek Living

History Museum, 7000 N.E. Barry Rd.

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

9.7

NIGHTLIFE

s hit The kid KC. ds a o r Cross

| 11 a.m. Main between 34th and 40th streets FILM

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Ultraviolets, Paper Buffalo, Monster | 8 p.m. The

DAY SATUR

Main Street Day: Main Street Mile and Cyclovia

Tjutjuna, Low Forms, Karma Vision | 10 p.m. Replay

DJ Beelzebilly | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway DJ Mike Scott | Milieu, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

Banff Mountain Film Festival | 7 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, banffmountainfestival.ca

and Wornall

Falldo Waldo Crawldo | 6 p.m. Waldo, 75th Street

MAPA Animation Celebration | Gates at 5 p.m.,

Figgy, DJ Sheppa | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048

showtime at dusk, Boulevard Drive-In Theatre, 1051 Merriam Lane, KCK

Broadway

KC Cabaret variety show | 9:30 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Uptown Film Showcase | 6:30 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar,

3611 Broadway

KC Improv Festival | 8 p.m. Off Center Theatre, 2450 SPORTS

Bike the Summit | 8 a.m., $25, Lee’s Summit Suburu, 2101 N.E. Independence Ave., Lee’s Summit, lsparks.net Kansas vs. South Dakota | 6 p.m. Memorial Stadium,

11th St. and Maine, Lawrence

Royals Charities 5k Run/Walk | 8 a.m. Kauffman

Stadium

Royals vs. Tigers | 6:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium Run Fast | Eat Slow 5k | 8 a.m., $30/$25, Powell

Gardens, 1609 N.W. Hwy. 50, Kingsville

Sporting KC vs. Columbus Crew | 7:30 p.m. Sport-

ing Park, KCK

MGMT, Black Bananas, Kuroma | 6:30 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St.

Deja Vu tribute night with Landslide (Fleetwood Mac), Revelation (Journey), Petty Theft (Tom Petty) and Journeyman (Eric Clapton) | 6:30 p.m. Cricket Wireless Amphitheater, 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs

Jesse Lafser, Claire and the Crowded Stage, Fancy Tramp, Drew Black and Dirty Electric |

Diarrhea Planet, the So So Glos, Vandal? Vandal!

2715 Rochester

| 9:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

8:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Kansas City Blues IBC Finals | 2 p.m. Knuckleheads,

Dolewite | The BrewTop Pub and Patio, 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave.

Charlet Embry | 8 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

9 p.m. Sky Zone, 6495 Quivira, Shawnee

Late-night jam session | 1 a.m. Mutual Musicians Foundation, 1823 Highland Ave.

Mark Lowrey | 9 p.m. Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

MUSIC

The Greencards | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Solid Gold Easy, the Big Sea | 7 p.m. Coda, 1744

2013 Sounds for Tomorrow Music Fest | 4-9 p.m.

Molly Hammer Trio | 5:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

Main

South Park, 1141 Massachusetts, Lawrence

1809 Grand

Matt Alber with Tom Goss | 8 p.m. Spirit of Hope

Blues and BBQ for Sherwood Center with

Crosseyed Cat, Linda Shell and Blues Thang, King King, Jeremy Butcher and the Bail Jumpers, Shannon and the Rhythm Kings, Mama Ray | 3 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

The 52nd Annual Greek Festival | 12-6 p.m. Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation, 12001 Wornall

KC Renaissance Festival: Pet Fest | 10 a.m.-7 p.m., 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs, kcrenfest.com Kansas City Chalk & Walk Festival | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Crown Center, 2450 Grand

Kansas City Juggling Festival | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Rockhurst High School, 9301 State Line Rd. COMMUNITY EVENTS

Dippin’ Dogs | 1-4 p.m. Springs Aquatics Center, 9400

N. Congress

Most Endangered Trolley Tour | 1 & 3 p.m., $20,

$25, on Baltimore between 18th and 19th streets, historickansascity.org

Americana | Northland Exposure Artists Gallery,

Permanent Collection Highlights Walk-in Tour, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

FOOD & DRINK

110 Main, Parkville

Art Westport 2013 | Westport Rd. and Pennsyl-

Polychrome Fiction | Nerman Museum of Con-

Oak, nelson-atkins.org

The Brick, 1727 McGee

Cadillac Flambe | 9 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

Nomads: Traversing Adolescence | Kemper

SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

Greater Kansas City Home Show Fall Edition | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Overland Park Convention Center, 6000 College Blvd., Overland Park

Patterns in Time: New Work by Gary Pycior,

Halvorson, Gabriel Hartley, David Livingston and Scott Wolniak, opening September 6 | Greenlease Gallery, Rockhurst University, 1100 Rockhurst Rd.

the pitch

EXPOS

About Face | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525

Blue Boot Heelers, Root & Stem, I am Nation |

32

Broadway

8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

vania, September 6-8, artwestport.net

Stacie Collins | 10 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Rochester

Doug Talley Quintet with Kathleen Holeman |

Blood on the Dance Floor, Heavygrinder, Farewell My Love, the Relapse, Haley Rose, Enemies Laid to Rest | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Mockingbird Sun | 9:30 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS

MCC, 3801 Wyandotte

Sunday | 9.8 |

F E S T I VA L S

KC Sky Zone Concert Series: Making Movies |

Forte Records Reissue Release Party, with Eugene Smiley’s Marva Whitney Tribute Band and Dave Creighton Organization | 2-7 p.m. Zebedee’s RPM, 1208 W. 39th St.

Stiletto Run | 10 a.m., $30, Alamo Drafthouse, 1400

Grand

L’Hourloupe, artwork by Anthony Baab, Josephine

East, 200 E. 44th St., kemperart.org

pitch.com

Kiosk Gallery, 3951 Broadway

temporary Art. JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, nermanmuseum.org

City Market Farmers Market | 8 a.m.-3 p.m., 205

E. Fifth St.

SPORTS

A Painter’s Pad | Thomas Hart Benton Home,

Broadway Bridge Run Half Marathon | 7 a.m.

Sticks and Stones: recent artwork by Melissa Furness | Three Link Gallery, 106 N. Bridge St.,

The American Royal Quarter Horse Show | 8 a.m.

3616 Belleview

Smithville

City Market Park, Third and Main, broadwaybridge run.org

Hale Arena, 1701 American Royal Ct.


Royals vs. Tigers | 1:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium

Matt Otto Quartet | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E.

IRON MAIDEN

18th St.

MUSIC

The Acacia Strain, Within the Ruins | 6 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Michael Bublé | 8 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

Rural Grit Happy Hour | 6-9 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee

Waldo Jazz Collective | 7-10 p.m. The Piano Room, 8410 Wornall

40 Watt Dreams, Eddy Green | 6 p.m. Replay Lounge,

946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

NIGHTLIFE

Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Vince Gill | 7 p.m. Kauffman Center McKenzie Journey with Federation of Horsepower and Outlaw Jim & the Whiskey Benders |

Tuesday | 9.10 |

7 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Y S U N DA

9.8

FOOD & DRINK

Parachute, Matt Hires, Paradise Fears | 7 p.m. The

Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

KCK Greenmarket | 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Keeler Women’s

People’s Liberation Big Band | 8 p.m. RecordBar,

1020 Westport Rd.

Dominique Sanders Trio | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1809 Grand

Set Out Side, the Family Bed, I Am Nation | 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Monday | 9.9 |

your Put on Beast. y a Sund

Center, 2220 Central, KCK

MUSIC

The Black Lillies | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester Boy Big | 9 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway Caves, Wild Rompit, Rebella Rising | 10 p.m. Rec-

ordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Cherub, Probcause, DJ Oblivious | 8 p.m. The

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Iron Maiden | 7:30 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

Trivia with Teague Hayes | 7 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway

Wednesday | 9.11 |

PERFORMING ARTS

Max Groove Trio | 6 p.m. Chaz, 325 Ward Pkwy.

PERFORMING ARTS

Musical Monday | 7 p.m. Musical Theater Heritage, at Off Center Theatre, 2450 Grand

Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco, the Invisible World | 7 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand Josh Sallee, Roosh Williams, That Kid Ty | 7 p.m.

Poetic Underground open-mic series | 9-11 p.m.

Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

FOOD & DRINK

Jim James, Basia Bulat | 7 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644

Massachusetts, Lawrence

Phil Neal and the Wornalls | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads,

Stardeath & White Dwarfs | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge,

MUSIC

NIGHTLIFE

FOOD & DRINK

946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Chris Hazelton Trio | 5:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1809 Grand

CIRCUS

KCK Greenmarket | 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Juniper Gardens, 100 Richmond Ave., KCK

Folkicide, Joseph Conklin, Jason Beers | 10 p.m.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey: Dragons |

7 p.m. Sprint Center, through September 15

2715 Rochester

The Rackatees, Parasites, Flamingo Nosebleed

Nick Africano, the Adopted | 7:30 p.m. The Riot

| 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Room, 4048 Broadway

Cantina, 408 E. 31st St.

DJ Highnoone and DJ Ashton Martin | 9 p.m. Sol

City Market Farmers Market | 9 a.m.-1 p.m., 205 E. Fifth St.

Broadway

Automatic Wolf | 7:30 p.m. Gaslight Gardens, 317 N.

Karaoke with Paul Nelson | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Steddy P & DJ Mahf, Brett Gretzky, Dom Chronicles, John Price | 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Daniel Ellsworth & the Great Lakes | 8 p.m. The

The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Downtown Overland Park Farmers Market | 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m., on Marty, between 79th and 80th streets

Second St., Lawrence

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Shameless Management | 9 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand K.Flay, Martian Face, Sirah | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

The Low End with Nmezee & Sigrah | 10 p.m. com.

Open-mic comedy night | 9 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s, 101 Southwest Blvd.

DJ HoodNasty, Brent Tactic & DJ B-Stee | 10 p.m. Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

MUSEUM EXHIBITS Alien Worlds and Androids, Science City-Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd.

NIGHTLIFE

Fresh Promises Farmers Market | 4:30-7:30 p.m.

Kill Creek Farm, Kill Creek Road, just off K-10, Gardner

Waldo Farmers Market | 3-7 p.m. Habitat for Human-

3810 Broadway

Drew Six | 6-9 p.m. Cactus Grill, 11849 Roe, Leawood

Westport Plaza Farmers Market | 4:30-7:30 p.m.

Lawrence Amateur Burlesque | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

MUSIC

MOKAN Twang Vinyl Country Night | 8 p.m. Frank James Saloon, 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville

Westport Rd. and Wyoming

Real Pirates | Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd. That’s the Idea! Patents and Inventions From the Kansas City Museum Collection, Kansas

9 Plus 1 | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

City Museum, 3218 Gladstone Blvd.

Dan Bliss | Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

Harmonies of the Homefront |National World

Truman Home Tours | 219 Delaware,

Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge | 7:30 p.m. Knuckle-

Independence

DJs Mike Scott, Spinstyles and Bill Pile | MiniBar,

ity ReStore, 303 W. 79th St.

American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music, American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St.

War I Museum, 100 W. 26th St.

Spacesuit, the Caves | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048

heads, 2715 Rochester

Tango dance night | 8 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

pitch.com

SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

the pitch

33


S AVA G E L O V E

QU I C KI E S

ask: a one-time, once-in-a-lifetime threesome or regular (and pretty damn elaborate) bondage sessions?

Devastated in Denver Dear DID: You could’ve laughed and said

something like, “Yeah, I was quite the little pervert back then, bro, but weren’t we all at that age?” Your parents, your new wife, your brother’s son, et al. would’ve imagined your brother doing something much worse than wearing women’s clothes. But it’s too late for that comeback. My advice now: Pick a special, solemn occasion — your brother’s anniversary party, midnight mass, his son’s graduation — and show up in full fuckin’ drag.

Ruling on Private Enquiry Required Dear ROPER: Let me guess, your partner is

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SEPTEMBER 5 -11, 2013

Dear Dan: I’m a single hetero male. I had a female FWB for several months. She started dating a new guy, and he asked that she stop talking to me. That seems like a red flag. If he’d asked that we stop having sex, that would be one thing, but asking her to completely end the friendship seems like a warning sign of a controller. Am I overreacting? Does that seem like a red flag to you? Should I say anything to her?

Can’t Understand Lover’s Loss Dear CULL: Isolating a romantic partner from her family and friends is a red flag — that’s a classic abuser move — but asking a girl you’ve just started dating to cut off a friend she’s been fucking for months isn’t necessarily an abuser move. If he’s asking her to cut non-FWB friends and family members in addition to you, then it’s a red flag and you should speak to her. But if it’s only you, then it’s just some garden-variety insecurity on the new BF’s part. Let your friend know that you hope you can re-establish your friendship once her new BF is feeling more secure or her BF is out of the picture — whichever comes first. Dear Dan: Hetero, 44, female. I can’t orgasm

when I’ve been drinking. Isn’t that the opposite problem of most women? And oh, baby, I orgasm fast and hard when I’m sober. Also, what is a bad mama jama? I have always wanted to know.

Where Did O Go? pitch.com

D A N S AVA G E ish, I know, but what else can I do to save face?

Dear Dan: Settle this for us? Which is the bigger

into bondage, and you’re not. But you’ve been doing the hard work of tying up him/her/someother-point-along-the-gender-spectrum for months, years or decades … and the partner you’ve gone to great lengths to indulge (and restrain) regards your request for a once-in-alifetime/standard-issue-fantasy threesome as too much to ask of him/her/SOPATGS. My ruling: Regular and intense bondage sessions are the bigger ask in terms of time and effort — particularly if I guessed wrong, and you’re the person who’s getting tied up and bondage isn’t your thing — but a threesome, even just one, is a bigger ask emotionally for most people. While the former requires patience and endurance, the latter requires revisiting feelings about monogamy, sharing your partner with another person, etc. It’s a smaller ask in terms of time and effort, certainly, but a higher hurdle in fee-fee terms.

BY

Dear Dan: I’m a 33-year-old lesbian. A year ago,

Dear WDOG: Shakespeare diagnosed your

problem centuries ago: Boozing “provokes the desire, but it takes away the performance.” As for “bad mama jama,” I wasn’t familiar with the expression — first guess: a Martin Lawrence comedy about a male FBI agent who goes undercover as the first black woman to edit the Journal of the American Medical Association — but the Google tells me it’s a song about something or other.

Dear Dan: My boyfriend and I have been having problems. I’m way too critical, and he has “erectile dysfunction,” aka issues getting and staying hard. But I recently discovered that he can get hard in an instant by licking my feet or using them to masturbate! This is great! He’s finally opening up sexually! I want to explore this with him and let him know that his sexuality is a beautiful thing. But I can’t find enough information on the Internet on how to support him.

Truly Over Erotic Slump Dear TOES: Your boyfriend doesn’t have “erec-

tile dysfunction” and never did. Your BF, like millions of other men who are presumed to have ED, simply wasn’t doing the things that turn him on. Now that he is — now that your feet are in play — he doesn’t have any issues getting and staying hard. And you don’t need anything off the Internet. You already have everything you need to support your boyfriend: the shit in your shoes (those lovely feet of yours) and the shit between your ears (your supportive, sexpositive attitude about his kinks). Have fun.

Dear Dan: At my 50th birthday party, my older brother announced to everyone — including my new wife, our parents and his teenage son — that I used to wear women’s clothes. I was humiliated and deeply hurt. I wanted to punch him and tell all his secrets. But I didn’t. Now I am planning to humiliate him on a special occasion of his. Child-

my partner and I split up for five months. During that time, I dated a girl while my partner engaged in multiple sexual relationships — all with men. We ended up getting back together. One problem keeps me from moving on: I’m the only woman my partner has been with, and I can’t stop thinking that she spent so much “quality time” with so many men while we were apart. I can’t help but wonder if she’s bi or straight! It also hurts that she feels like she can’t be honest with me about what she likes or wants or needs sexually. We are a little over a year into our “new” relationship, and we never have sex. I initiated sex a week ago — the first time we’ve had sex in four months! — and she came, I didn’t, and she didn’t care. Anytime I try to talk about it, she gets defensive and says she’s attracted to me and insists she doesn’t like sex with guys. What do I do?

Fixing to Explode Dear FTE: Thought experiment: Let’s pretend

your girlfriend is a lesbian. (And why not? Your girlfriend does.) What kind of a lesbian GF is she? The kind of lesbian GF who doesn’t fuck you much, sucks in bed on those rare occasions when she does fuck you, and manipulates you emotionally to keep you from calling her on her bullshit. So our GF — lesbian or not — is selfish and inconsiderate and she’s making you miserable. End it.

Dear Dan: I’m a submissive gay boy into puppy play. And I have a huge crush on a certain sexadvice columnist and his crazy-hot husband. How do I get to be their owned puppy?

Boy After Real Kinks Dear BARK: Good news! Terry says we can get a

puppy! But he says we’ll have to get our puppy fixed. That’s a big ask, I realize, but we wanna be responsible dog owners.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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The Pitch: September 5, 2013