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Nov ember 14–20, 2013 | vol . 33 No. 20 E d i t o r i a l

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, April Fleming, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Lybarger, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage

teed o ff Former business partners chip-shot each other in a legal battle over Hillcrest Country Club. b y s t e v e vo c k r o d t

a r t

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Christina Larkins

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P r o d u c t i o n

Uptow N cr ow d

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

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Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Collin Click, Sharon Donat, Becky Losey Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland Digital Marketing Specialist Lisa Kelly Sales and Marketing Assistant Anna Brescia

Are Larry Sells’ dreams of a shiny Uptown district finally coming true? b y dav i d h u d n a l l

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Circulation Director Mike Ryan

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Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

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Teed off

Former business partners chip-shot each other

By

in a legal battle over Hillcrest Country Club.

S t e v e v ock rod t

F

rom the back of the Missouri Court of Appeals’ dimly lighted courtroom in Kansas City, David Francis fixes his gaze on his former business partner, Terry Clark. Francis shakes his head often as Clark, a military veteran, pleads with the court’s threejudge panel to reverse a 2012 decision by the Circuit Court of Jackson County that sliced away Clark’s stake in Hillcrest, a struggling south Kansas City country club that narrowly avoided being sold in 2011 on the steps of the Jackson County Courthouse. Since 2003, Clark and Francis had done golfcourse business together. Now their paths cross only in courtrooms; the two have been locked in a protracted legal battle over the fallout from their failed partnership at Hillcrest. Hillcrest has long been a troubled enterprise and it fared worse after Francis bought it in 2006 for about $3 million. Members left in droves due to the way Francis and Clark managed the course. Hillcrest sued former members for leaving, and the former members filed countersuits. In 2010, Francis testified under oath that Clark owned 50 percent of the business, even though Clark had no direct financial stake. The Clark-Francis partnership was an odd pairing. Francis, a Mission Hills resident, comes from old Kansas City money; his father made a fortune running the Puritan-Bennett Co. Clark, a Kansas City, Kansas, native, has a blue-collar background. On this early October morning, Clark represents himself; he says he can no longer afford a lawyer. Judges Karen Mitchell, Lisa Hardwick and Gary Witt listen patiently to Clark, who won’t win this appeal. The law, the appellate judges rule on October 29, isn’t on his side. But the long-simmering feud between former friends may not be over.

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avid Francis met Terry Clark in 2001. Clark was a course marshal at Prairie Highlands, an Olathe golf course owned by Francis. Clark was a former air-traffic controller (one of the 11,000 fired by President Ronald Reagan in 1981 when union controllers went on strike). Francis flew planes as a hobby. They struck up a conversation about aviation in the Prairie Highlands’ pro shop. In 2003, they became reacquainted when the city of Olathe wanted to open a municipal golf course near Prairie Highlands. Clark argued that the city was wasting taxpayer money by getting into the golf business, and Francis wasn’t keen on having competition. Francis eventually sued Olathe over the proposed golf course, which never came to fruition.

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That same year, Clark took on more responsibilities at Prairie Highlands, but he wasn’t getting paid. Francis comped him rounds of golf, meals and various golf accessories. In turn, Clark would do improvement projects. He built a couple of bridges on the course, installed garage doors on the pavilion and held tournaments at Prairie Highlands. “I really turned it around businesswise,” Clark tells The Pitch. “He didn’t care. He’s just greedy.” Francis and his attorneys did not respond to messages for this story. But in court testimony, Francis minimizes the role that Clark played in his golf business. Francis refers to Clark as a consultant who was using Prairie Highlands to test his ideas for other golf courses that he wanted to run. “And I said, ‘Why are you doing this?’” Francis testified during a January 3, 2012, Jackson County Circuit Court hearing. “He said, ‘Because I’m looking at the future.’” In testimony, Francis passed Clark off as a mere acquaintance, but the two were frequently seen together in Johnson County in the mid-2000s, vexing city officials and institutions. At Olathe City Council meetings in 2006, Clark and Francis often spoke in favor of a small-business owner who wanted to build a small convenience store but was running into opposition from city officials. But what really brought the two together — and would eventually pull them apart — was a sloppy business arrangement struck to manage Hillcrest.

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illcrest Country Club was founded in 1916. Famous Scottish course architect Donald Ross designed the course, located south of Swope Park and north of where U.S. Highway

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Hillcrest’s lot, like its course, is empty. 71 and Interstate 435 meet. Ross fashioned hundreds of courses in the United States in the early part of the 20th century, including Pinehurst No. 2, the site of next year’s U.S. Open. Hillcrest was known as an “easy in, easy out” club; it was neither expensive nor exclusive, relative to Kansas City’s other country clubs. At some point before 2006, Clark told Francis that the club was having financial issues. Clark suggested that Francis buy the course. Francis opened his wallet, but not before striking a deal with Clark outlining how the two would work together at Hillcrest. One part of the arrangement seemed clear: Francis was the money; Clark would be the brains, overseeing operations. But exactly how the whole thing was divvied up depends on whom you ask. Clark insists that Francis made him a 50-percent owner of Hillcrest. He didn’t put up any money but said sweat equity held up his end of the bargain. Francis testified in 2012 that it was simply a profit-sharing arrangement, and Clark would get half of the future profits — once Francis recouped the money he had invested. But that’s not what Francis testified in 2010 during a lawsuit filed against Hillcrest by pissed-off former members: Attorney: Mr. Clark is here today. I take it he’s attending this deposition as a representative of Heartland Golf [the ownership entity of Hillcrest]? Francis: That’s correct. Attorney: OK. Does he have any ownership interest in Heartland Golf Development II? Francis: Yes, he does. Attorney: And what is that interest?

Francis: He owns 50 percent of it. Francis would later testify that he misspoke when he said Clark was a half-owner of Hillcrest. Clark says that’s proof that Francis is lying. However, neither Clark nor Francis ever put their agreement in writing.  “I guess I should have,” Clark tells The Pitch. “I was stupid. I trusted him. My word means something. His doesn’t.” In 2012, Francis said Clark didn’t want a written agreement. “And I said, ‘Well, why wouldn’t you want your name on this thing?’” Francis testified. “He goes … ‘I don’t want my name on it. I like to be below the radar screen. If you want my name to be on anything, I’m going to walk away. I won’t work with you.’” Clark ended up walking away from Hillcrest in 2011, just not on his terms.

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olf wasn’t an easy business, even before the 2008 recession. Hillcrest was owned by a group of members, but they were having trouble keeping membership up and the finances afloat. A former member, who asked to remain anonymous due to the history of litigation involving Hillcrest, tells The Pitch that running Hillcrest was difficult but not impossible. “It’s in a part of town that’s viewed by some as dicey, and that was always the reason we got pushback from membership, especially from Johnson County types,” the former member says. Francis made them an unsolicited offer to buy the property, which the members took. Though financial pressures affected many golf courses and country clubs in the years leading to the recession, Francis and Clark’s management of their business made matters worse for Hillcrest. “David let Terry be in charge, and Terry is a very difficult person and he seemed to be intentionally chasing members away, just making decisions that made you feel like you were a fool for paying them money voluntarily every month,” the former member says. Hillcrest, at the time, required up to $550 a month. As membership declined, so too did the quality of the course. “The way the club was going, to pay the fees it cost, it wasn’t worth it,” says Jim Glynn, an advertising executive and former Hillcrest member. “The food was gone. Events were gone. They weren’t taking as good a care of the course.” The property was headed toward a fore-


closure sale when Francis put it in bankruptcy — seven months after he had run off Clark.

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lark says his problems with Francis started in 2010. Francis’ wife, Janis, was in charge of Hillcrest’s financial ledgers. Clark says she couldn’t keep the accounting straight, which caused Clark to attempt to get his 50-percent ownership in writing. “David had made the statement before that if he wasn’t married to our accountant, he would have fired her years ago,” Clark testified in 2012. Those tensions led to a May 10, 2011, confrontation at Hillcrest, where Clark was living in a small apartment. Francis fired Clark, turned off Clark’s cell phone, stopped his health-insurance benefits, and shut off his access to the company’s accounts. Clark filed a lawsuit about a month later. The court ordered Francis to allow Clark back onto the grounds until the lawsuit was sorted out. The trial record reads as though well-paid lawyers and a judge had to oversee a turf battle between fifth-graders. Francis complained that Clark left Hillcrest but not before taking such things as a 32-inch television and a $300 gun safe. Clark responded that Francis couldn’t prove he had them. At one point, attorneys spent considerable time trying to track down a gun that Francis had bought at Cabela’s five years earlier. Francis said he bought the 40-caliber pistol, registered it in his name and left it with Clark at Hillcrest. When Clark was rousted from the apartment, the gun was nowhere to be found. Francis’ attorneys complained several times to the Jackson County judge overseeing the case that Clark wasn’t giving it back.  After the judge ordered Clark to return the gun, Clark said he couldn’t find it. The lawsuit did return a more substantive finding: Clark couldn’t prove that he was a half-owner of anything because nothing was in writing.

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lark says he has lost in court because of the Francis family’s stature in Kansas City. “His family is old-money Kansas City. The judges all know him,” Clark says. “I don’t have a prayer. I’m not going to beat him.” Meanwhile, Francis brought Hillcrest out of bankruptcy and has now placed it on the market. He told the Kansas City Business Journal that he would consider selling it for $9 million. The October 3 article, which includes a photo of Francis on one of the greens holding the pin’s flag taut to highlight the Hillcrest logo, says the club’s membership is at 150, down from 600 in its heyday. Membership now costs about $150 a month, which comes with preferred tee times, among other fringe benefits. But anyone can call the clubhouse nowadays and schedule a round.

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UPTOWN CROWD

Are Larry Sells’ dreams of a shiny

By

Uptown district finally coming true?

D av iD HuDn a l l

C

autiously optimistic is how you might describe Larry Sells, owner of the Uptown Theater, these days. In 1989, the historic theater, at 3700 Broadway, closed after the previous owner failed to pay back taxes. The building eventually fell into the hands of the Land Trust of Jackson County, which Sells was president of at the time. He spent a few years trying to sell the property to developers, but nobody was biting — the building and the area around it were crumbling. “There wasn’t anything in the neighborhood,” Sells recalls. “It was totally crimeridden. There were prostitutes everywhere, drug houses all along Washington behind the theater, drug dealers living in hotels, and rotting high-rises. It was bad.” Still, Sells saw an opportunity to preserve a historic building and make some cash. So in 1994, he resigned from the Land Trust and bought the Uptown himself. He planned to restore not just the theater but also the commercial corridor of Broadway between, roughly, 38th Street and Armour Boulevard. He lined up investors and accepted millions in taxincrement financing from the city to secure the Uptown’s renovation. And he purchased the strip mall north of the theater, eventually renaming it the Uptown Shoppes. But over the years, various factors have prevented Sells from transforming the area into the vibrant district that he had envisioned. Stalls in labor and battles with the city and with neighborhood associations meant that five years went by before the new Uptown started booking concerts. When it did finally get on solid footing, there were issues across the street. “The shopping center was a mess,” Sells says. “It was full of asbestos and it had an antiquated HVAC system. And we had to overcome all that during two terrible recessions in the 2000s, during which there were not a lot of funds available.” More recently, the area that Sells has hoped to revitalize was best-known as a go-to spot for the synthetic marijuana drug K-2, which was sold at dubious coffee shops along Broadway. Most of the prostitutes had been cleared out, and a handful of respectable businesses had leased space, but the overall upgrade was relatively minor. The area had gone from “really sketchy” to just “kind of sketchy.” Now that the nation — at least those in the upper middle class and higher — is crawling out of a recession, there are encouraging signs that Sells’ 20-year-old goals for the Uptown district might finally be realized. A few weeks ago, the local owners of gayfriendly burger joint Hamburger Mary’s — Eric

Change is coming to the Uptown. Christensen and Jeff Edmondson, of ECCO Holdings — announced that they were fed up with Crossroads rent and would be relocating to the Uptown Theater. The restaurant means to take over what is now the Conspiracy Room, an event space adjacent to the theater, next summer. Christensen and Edmondson have also announced a second venture: a videothemed bar of some kind, which may open next to the Conspiracy Room as soon as December. That is not the only chatter out of the ECCO Holdings camp. It plans to open two additional nightlife spots across the street, in the Uptown Shoppes, by 2015. One will be a sports bar, and the other will be a combination Tex-Mex restaurant and microbrewery (possibly with a country-music theme), according to Edmondson. “It’s a big project, a very big project,” Edmondson tells The Pitch. “The Uptown is very eager to work with us, and we’re ready.” Meanwhile, comedy club Stanford and Sons — a Westport staple in the 1990s and early 2000s but now located at the Legends — is dipping its toe in midtown again with a winter comedy series at the Conspiracy Room. It starts November 21, with comedian A.J. Finney, and runs eight weekends. Owner Craig Glazer says opening a permanent location in the neighborhood is a strong possibility, should the series draw well. Sells wants Stanford’s to move into the Uptown Shoppes, next to Prospero’s Uptown (a satellite of the 39th Street bookstore that opened last year) and the GymKC fitness center.

“I think Larry’s trying to make this area an ‘area,’” Glazer says. “The Valentine district or Uptown district, whatever you want to call it, has been sort of a pass-through between the Crossroads and Westport. Not very many big anchor tenants besides the Uptown. But I think if you put us in there, this Hamburger Mary’s stuff, the new jazz club, it starts to look like a pretty happening place.” About that jazz club: It’s called Broadway Jazz Club and it’s located in the space formerly occupied by Outabounds (3601 Broadway). Pat Hanrahan (the former Jardine’s general manager) is going to run the place, which is set to open sometime next week. Broadway Jazz Club is just a few doors down from another culture-minded establishment, the Uptown Arts Bar. It opened last year and has been quietly hosting poetry nights, live music and all kinds of midtown misfits. Also slated to open in the near future on the east side of Broadway: the French-Vietnamese bistro iPho Tower (3623 Broadway) and an Edible Arrangements (3629 Broadway). Greg Patterson, who owns a good chunk of the real estate on that side of the street, says, “It’s been difficult and depressing at times over here. I’m the longest-running property owner in the neighborhood — going back 28 years. We’ve seen P&L come along and impact our businesses and Westport’s businesses. But now we’re getting better-quality tenants excited about being over here. And there’s a lot of spectacular historic renovation happening with these old high-rise apartments, too.”

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The Valentine Apartments, a run-down high-rise just south of the Uptown, at 3724 Broadway, has been restored and is now leasing. The Chatham building across the street, at 3701 Broadway, was a vacant squatting place for 20 years before it was recently renovated and converted into elderly housing. And MAC Properties is in the process of rehabbing the Ambassador Apartments (the old Ambassador Hotel), at 3560 Broadway. “It’ll be open to the public next year and offer $15 million in market-rate housing,” Patterson says. (Sells is also mulling entry into the booming apartment game, with a possible four-story tower on the west side of the Uptown Shoppes.) Sells’ Uptown utopia is far from a sure thing. CSL Plasma (3715 Broadway) continues to be a blighted scuzz magnet in the neighborhood. Some of these prospective tenants are still a question mark, and the ones who do move in might find that they can’t get the numbers to line up right. And there is certainly a precedent for quashed hopes on this stretch of Broadway. “Changing a neighborhood, it takes an inordinate amount of time,” Sells says. “You work on it for years, you invest in it, you see improvements, you see setbacks. Now you look outside around here and you see people jogging up the street, you see new buildings. And all of a sudden, there’s this wave of new businesses set to come in. It’s kind of that thing where, you know, when it rains, it pours.”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com november 14-20, 2013

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Week of November 14-20

Janelle MonĂĄe comes home to Kansas City with a show Friday at the Uptown Theater. See more in Music Forecast, page 24.

Daily listings on page 26 pitch.com

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Floyd WEbbEr

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L i z C ook

A gifted performer justifies Egads’ revival of Tell Me on a Sunday.

I

Stage

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AngelA DonAhue

admit it: I’ve never been fond of Andrew Lloyd Webber. If this is a flaw, I accept responsibility for it and do so without blaming, say, a very early exposure to Starlight Express and a vague memory of dancing onstage in a fur-covered bodysuit. But surely I’m not the only person whose nightmares are scored to “Jellicle Cats” on a ceaseless, disturbing loop. So it may not have been with an altogether open mind that I approached Egads Theatre’s production of Tell Me on a Sunday, one of the come Mor poser’s less frequently performed shows. The one-act, one-woman t a e in song cycle follows Emma, Onl .com pitch an English hat designer who courts adventure (and a string of wealthy men) in Manhattan. Kansas City’s Shelby Floyd tackles the Sex and the city: Floyd onstage. role with bubbly aplomb. Her London accent But I would happily listen to Floyd sing is subtle but consistent as she sings through out the names of every Smith in the phone her romantic misadventures with New York book (a prospect that might still prove men who seem, as she puzzles, so proud to slightly less repetitive than a Webber hook). be neurotic. She flounces through trysts with Her affable mugging and sharp comedic tima Queens drummer, a Hollywood producer ing keep the energy high, and her parody and a Manhattan executive, with the highs of a Nebraskan suitor’s Midwestern accent and lows of each relationship told through earned a big laugh on opening night. Webber’s earworm hooks and sweeping The onstage band gives her a strong asromanticism. The opening numbers are sugsist. Keyboardist and conductor Lenora ary but fun — “Capped Teeth and Caesar Remmert masters Webber’s tinkling piano Salad” takes the kind of easy potshots at lines, and Erik Blume offers skilled accomthe Beverly Hills lifestyle that go over well paniment on both alto sax and flute. with a Midwestern audience. Director Steven Eubank’s staging of the Floyd is a powerhouse performer, and multi-interior script makes smart use of Alex her Broadway-grade belting is formidable, Perry’s functional, twoeven if it’s a tool with too level set design. Production much torque for parts of Tell Me on a Sunday assistants Tyler Eisenreich this job. Many of the tunes Egads Theatre Company and Bobby Turnbough rip would benef it from the Through November 23 through scene changes like more nuanced treatment at Off Center Theatre a NASCAR pit crew, and she offers in the wistful Crown Center, 2450 Grand egadstheatre.com the pacing of the hourlong opening passages of “Tell show never dips as Emma Me on a Sunday.” The title finds love, loses it and loses number is an unmistakable herself along the way. highlight, showcasing her rich resonance Tell Me on a Sunday isn’t going to shatter and full range. any anti-Webber bias — not mine, anyway. But you can’t take the Webber out of a Even with Floyd playing her, Emma comes Webber show, and even Floyd can’t preoff as a caricature of a kept woman. But vent a number such as “English Girls” from Egads’ sensitive production tempers the sounding like a ringtone. The script, by Don musical’s sexism, and it lets an exceptional Black and Richard Maltby Jr., at times falls young performer shine. Floyd is a remarksimilarly f lat. Hackneyed sentimentality able talent. Kansas City would be lucky to and creaky jokes (“If they gave Oscars for hold on to her. deceit, you would win,” Emma admonishes one of her lovers) remind you why this show usually isn’t revived. E-mail feedback@pitch.com

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14

the pitch

november 14-20, 2013

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FILM

EYE CONTACT

BY

JIM R IDL E Y

The face, not the gaze, tells the story in Blue Is the Warmest Color.

B

lue Is the Warmest Color is a movie about a lesbian, not a movie about all lesbians. But ever since it took top honors at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, it has become a source of international notoriety, thanks to some juvenile press coverage. First came gawking at the movie’s pivotal sex scene, then clucking over whether the lead actresses had been exploited. And the fi lm’s U.S. release has been met with panels of gay women, convened to assess the technical accuracy of the acts depicted onscreen. (You know, just like heterosexuals did when The Brown Bunny came out.) Part of the problem is that the movie’s director is a man: Tunisian-born Abdellatif Kechiche. This raises again the old specter of “the gaze” — whether women are objectified and eroticized under a male filmmaker’s scrutiny. A lot of the time, yes. The grammar of film, as established by men, often reduces women to parts — not as in roles but as in choice cuts. But it’s another part of the movie’s lead, the remarkable Adèle Exarchopoulos, that Kechiche wants us to study: her face. As Adèle, a French teen starting a painful and exhilarating passage into adulthood, Exarchopoulos gives the kind of performance that engraves an actor in legend, conveying a transformation from awkward, unformed kid to experienced, bruised adult. Over Blue’s three hours, the character grows up before our eyes while Exarchopoulos’ face transmits thought, desire, deceit and even the passage of time. That’s where you look, even when she’s sprawled nude across the screen. From the instant when Adèle passes a bluehaired, boyish art student on a crosswalk, a moment that takes only seconds of screen time, we sense that the movie belongs only to them. The relationship that blooms between the heroine and Emma, the painter played

Exarchopoulos (left) and Seydoux by Léa Seydoux (unrecognizable as Mission: Impossible–Ghost Protocol’s chic assassin), passes from curiosity to confusion to lust, in long, unhurried scenes. These sequences never bore but remain utterly involving, not just because both leads are so good, so right, so alert and present in moment, gesture and chemistry, but also because cinematographer Sofian El Fani’s intense close study of their faces keeps us attuned to them as people. That’s not to say Kechiche’s gaze is innocent. But his hovering, anxious directorial style (which calls to mind the Dardenne brothers and John Cassavetes at his most unblinking) conveys a teen’s sense of always being the focus of unwanted attention, of being a screen for everybody else’s movie while trying to project her own. Whatever objectification is at work here is complicated. Kechiche and Ghalia Lacroix have adapted Blue from a graphic novel by Julie Maroh, whose widely circulated remark that the movie’s sex scenes showed there wasn’t a lesbian present on the set has been cited in much of the criticism. What the movie offers, though, is something better than a committeeapproved facsimile of realism. Kechiche and his actors give us the messy, electrifying interaction of characters we come to understand as individuals. That doesn’t make just their couplings more intense; it also fuels the emotional devastation of the film’s second half, as Adèle and Emma continue to develop in ways that are all the more heartbreaking for seeming wholly true to their natures. Adèle is going to turn out just fine. As usual, it’s some of the audience that needs to grow the fuck up.

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CAfé

Bayou Si de

Lagniappe doubles down on Cajun flavors and wins.

By

Ch a r l e s F e r ru z z a

Lagniappe: Nica’s Cajun Kitchen • 320 Southwest Boulevard, 816-471-2900 • Hours: 4–10 p�m� Tuesday–Thursday, 3–11 p�m� Friday–Saturday, closed Sunday–Monday • Price: $$–$$$

ast summer, chef Bryan Merker celebrated the second anniversary of Nica’s 320, his Southwest Boulevard restaurant, by revamping it altogether. The interior of the building is still the same, and a few of the dishes from the previous incarnation have survived the transition, but this new restaurant — now called Lagniappe: Nica’s Cajun Kitchen — is far more focused, polished and accessible than Merker’s original. Nica’s 320 was a little too ambitious for its own good. It served breakfast, lunch and dinner, drawing from a complicated menu — complicated to me, anyway — that required diners to choose from mix-and-match “preparation choices” that found room for Thai, Italian, Cajun and Caribbean, among other notions. It might have made sense at, say, Walt Disney World, but for grown-ups who simply wanted a cocktail and an unfussy dinner after a long day at work, this kind of decision making could bring on a migraine. No one wants to think that hard after 6 p.m. — or before noon, for that matter. So Merker is now shining his spotlight on a single culinary style: Lagniappe is all about New Orleans. This allows him to offer fewer but more interesting choices, including some of the best Cajun and Creole dishes in the metro. Still, Merker is a stubborn kind of fellow, and he hasn’t completely abandoned his mixand-match ways. The entrées listed under the “Blaze and Broil” category, for example, have six sauce options that are consistent, at least, with the French, Spanish and African cuisines traditional to the Creole repertoire and the more brawny country cooking of the Louisiana Acadians. His take on most of these classic Southern dishes is reverent. The beautifully seasoned gumbo comes loaded with chunks of andouille sausage, crabmeat, shrimp, chicken and crawfish (still tucked into their crispy shells), and conveys just the right note of peppery heat. I felt a moment’s hint of burn on my tongue on the cusp of the dish’s complex flavors. The collection of small plates is more generous than is typical among starter menus. The combination called the St. Phillips Platter is easy enough to share, but I made it my own dinner one evening. It’s an excellent way to sample a range of Merker’s seafood without committing to any one dish. On a wooden cutting board, in a carefully composed tableau, you get a pile of silky pink smoked salmon in one corner, a heap of crawfish bits in a delicate remoulade in another, a few pieces of seared andouille here, and a little blue crab

AngelA C. Bond

L

Chef Merker has reimagined Nica’s 320 as the New Orleans–inspired Lagniappe�

fresh arugula. I didn’t think grits could be sexy, over there. (The decorative accents are edible, but this dish is — and delicious, too. too: deep-magenta pickled onions, slices of Posing more choices, Merker has put two kick-ass habanero pickles, wedges of grilled different jambalayas on the menu. At a minibread baked in-house. The sweet-potato frites are a sublime con- mum, I needed to hear why one of them is trast to the chewy, soggy, rubbery version of called “Drag Queen” jambalaya. “It’s a faux jambalaya,” explained my the side served at far too many local restauserver. “Instead of meat, it’s made with canrants. The ones I tasted were crispy under died jalapeño, spicy tofu and seitan.” an almost evanescent exterior, feather-light It sounded so healthy. inside. Naturally, there So I ordered the smoked, are three dipping sauces: Lagniappe: braised pork shoulder. I a punchy chili ketchup, a Nica’s Cajun Kitchen wasn’t going to turn down creamy peppercorn aioli and Oak Alley gumbo, cup����$6�95 meat, and I wanted to taste Merker’s subtle remoulade. Kiss My Grits ������������������$11�95 something that had been They’re fine, but you don’t Sweet-potato frites ������$8�50 brined (it’s a little salty) and need any dressing to love Red beans and rice �������$15�95 then marinated in Midnight the fries. Poche pork ������������������� $20�95 The Divine Tartufo ��������$6�50 of the Moon cinnamon-apple Merker also operates a moonshine. It’s a richly flapopular beignet joint in the vored and tender hunk of City Market, and he has become a master of the yeasty, deep-fried pastry. pig, but the standout on that plate turned out to be some first-class au gratin potatoes, more With this in mind, I wanted to like the savory creamy than obnoxiously cheesy. version on the starter menu here, a chewy I sampled pan-roasted Louisiana rainbow golden square stuffed with a concoction of trout and found it tasty but somewhat on the herbed goat cheese, bits of smoked bacon and stingy side. More comforting was a hefty bowl blue crab. But the finished product was closer of long-simmered red beans and rice, topped to a Hot Pocket than a delicacy of the French with pieces of broiled andouille. Quarter. All of Merker’s desserts are reassuringly Instead, order the parmesan cheese grits, soothing, particularly four puffy squares of which arrive dappled with a sweet fig glaze, a white-chocolate bread pudding under a lavquartet of grilled prawns and a frilly cap of tart

pitch.com

ish blanket of bourbon-caramel sauce. And, of course, many variations on the beignet theme are offered here, but I prefer the fried apple fritters. I can’t quite explain Merker’s artistic construction called a tartufo. The word is Italian for truffle, which is why most restaurants present it as a ball of ice cream rolled in some confection, like white chocolate, but the one here looks nothing like a truffle. It could pass as four tiny wedges of pumpernickel bread with pimento-cheese filling, but it’s actually an ice-cream sandwich of white-chocolateand-strawberry ice cream between slices of a chocolate “cookie” with an unfortunate lack of flavor. Did I mention the apple fritters? Lagniappe proves that Merker likes risk (the peculiar tartufo comes to mind). He attempts to adhere to the integrity of the Cajun and Creole cuisine while also stubbornly sticking to his own innovations. Now that he has focused his talents on a distinctive culinary style — and now that he’s doing a damn good job of it — the chef seems to have found the winning concept for his Crossroads boîte. There’s nothing faux about it, except maybe that meatless jambalaya.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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IN THEATRES NOVEMBER 27

Fat C i t y

Band aid

the pitch

november 14-20, 2013

Guy Foods caters to rock stars.

By

Jon at h a n Be nde r

A

dishwasher and an aging rock star chatted about their shared love of bow hunting backstage at Bonner Springs’ Sandstone Amphitheater (now Cricket Wireless Amphitheater). “He wanted a piece of meat, so I gave him a whole chicken,” Cody James Wyatt says. “The next thing I knew, Ted Nugent was inviting me to have lunch at his table.” A decade later, he’s still washing rock stars’ dishes. But Wyatt, 27, also cooks their meals, as the chef and co-owner of Cool Guy Foods. “I grew up backstage at concerts,” Wyatt says. “I played with David Crosby’s kids and stuff. I love music and I love food, and I guess that’s where it all started.” Wyatt’s father, Dennis Wayne Wyatt, was a chef at Sandstone before moving his family to Wichita, where he opened Panama Red’s Café and Roadhouse. Six nights a week, Panama Red’s featured live music, with such touring acts as Ween, No Doubt and Reel Big Fish. And they all ate his father’s “Catfish Pie,” a mashup of the fish and jalapeño hush puppies. “He taught me how to cook,” Wyatt says of his father, who now manages Wichita Public Schools’ kitchens. “He still is teaching me.” When he reached 18, Wyatt wanted out of Wichita. So he enrolled in the Art Institute of Colorado, in Denver. In the Mile High City, he spent 10 hours a day at school and then another eight working a line. “I had a culinary instructor who told me all you need is six hours of sleep,” Wyatt says. “I guess that’s the format I started to live my life by: Sleep six hours and get as much done as I can while I’m awake.” Wyatt graduated in 2007 and helped launch a series of restaurants in unconventional spaces: Islamorada Fish Co. in Bass Pro Shops, and Mesa Verde, a Tex-Mex fusion restaurant on the concourse of Denver International Airport. In 2008, Wyatt returned to the Kansas City area and started working for Reves Catering (as his father had years before). In high school, Wyatt had spent summers working as a dishwasher for the company, saving money to fix up a Volkswagen Beetle that he’d been restoring since he was 16 years old. Deb and Larry Reves had owned the catering business for 30 years and had regularly cooked for touring acts passing through KC. Wyatt’s first road gig came in 2008 as executive chef for the Trans-Siberian Orchestra. “You just have to pretend you’re on a desert island when you’re on tour,” Wyatt says. “I’ve cooked on an inch of ice, washed dishes in bathrooms and been in the middle of a 200-acre field. You just think, What can I do

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18

Cody James Wyatt’s Cool

pitch.com

to make this happen? And always be prepared for the worst circumstances.” His stints in unusual kitchens made him a natural fit for Kansas City Southern Railway Co., where he has spent the last four years cooking in a galley aboard the company’s business train. “It only gets tough when you’re out there for a week,” Wyatt says. “You have to buy everything ahead of time and make sure it doesn’t spoil, that it’s all prepared.” Wyatt met Jeff Berges on the railroad. Berges, a former chef at the Majestic Steakhouse, had been cooking for the railroad for the last decade. In July 2012, Wyatt and Berges bought Reves Catering and launched Cool Guy Foods. Fat City met Wyatt at his midtown commissary to learn more about cooking on tour. The Pitch: How do you shop on the road? Wyatt: I ask the show runner what’s a good place. And just from being on the road, I kind of know the places to go. You’ve got Pike’s Place in Seattle and the city markets in Dallas. And when you’re in Biloxi, Mississippi, you go to the shrimp boats. You ask the locals and you walk around, you see something good. Sometimes I buy things and then lay them all out on the table and try and figure out what to make. Let’s pair some music and food. What would you make for a classic-rock group? How about Van Halen? They’re starting to eat healthier. Their bodies are getting old. Let’s say it’s summer. For lunch, I’d give them an Aleppo-pepper chicken taco and for vegetarians a lentilada, a vegetarian enchilada with quinoa and lentils. Maybe a chicken-enchilada soup, Santa Fe corn and steamed broccoli, and I’d go with churros and flan for dessert. For dinner, I’d do red snapper with a tomato-balsamic relish and a strip steak Florentine with a port-wine reduction. Some herb-roasted potatoes and

Wyatt is on the rock-and-roll express. sautéed green beans, a café-mocha tart, and a strawberry blue [blueberries] and angel food, too, for dessert. Country? It might be a low-budget tour. Hamburgers and hot dogs, chili, and mac and cheese for lunch. Dinner would be Deb’s meatloaf. It’s made with onions and green peppers, and the sauce is ketchup, brown sugar. Then you write “happy” with mustard in it. And lemonchicken Dijon, stewed green beans with bacon and potatoes, and cobbler desserts. Alt rock? They want all organic, things cooked clean and crisp. For lunch, I’d do grilled assorted sausages and a grilled chicken sandwich with honey-basil mayo. For dinner, I’d do pistachio-encrusted salmon with cilantrolime chutney, a boeuf bourguignon, roasted root vegetables and a salad bar. Is there a dream gig for you? I don’t get starstruck, I guess because I grew up in the business. But I’ve always got those few gigs that I never got to see. I’ve pretty much closed that [list] up these past few years. I cooked for Phish. They were one of the ones I was waiting for, and I just did the Eagles, Eric Clapton and Billy Joel. I’ve still never done a Rage Against the Machine show. What’s been the best moment in the kitchen for you? Lil Wayne came back and asked who cooked the greens. My dad was like, “I did.” And he said, “They were better than my mama’s.” That was awesome. That makes me feel good when someone comes back, and they love your food so much and they chat you up. When you’re on tour, you don’t have a home; you have a tour bus. Our job is to make them feel at home.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com


Fat c i t y

Freaky Fast

Just like that, Jimmy John’s is

By

ready to maybe jack up Broadway.

Ch a r l e s F e r ru z z a

I

Farm to Market to table: a couple of the student-created lunch dishes.

B r o o k e Va n d e V e r

n the 1920s and ’30s, the red-brick building at 923 Broadway was an auto-repair shop. Now the building is being demolished so that cars can drive up to a Jimmy John’s. Denise Phillips, a contract administrator for the Kansas City Parks and Recreation Department, confirms that the project has been approved. “It was first approved by the Downtown Council,” says Phillips, whose office must sign off on drive-thru venues built adjacent to city boulevards. The drive-thru brings not just a cosmetic change to the historic neighborhood but also an altered traffic flow along an already busy street that leads to a heavily used bridge. “The Jimmy John’s project was approved because the city zoning allows it,” 4th District Councilwoman Jan Marcason tells The Pitch. “I was completely floored. I only found out about the project after the demolition had already started. The franchise owners never came to talk to us [the City Council]. Our development people and planning department never came to us about this. “I do understand that the Jimmy John’s owners made some concessions to the parks department because of the location,” Marcason adds. “But I don’t know exactly what those concessions are.” “We have asked them [JJRE of Kansas City LLC, which owns the property and holds this Jimmy John’s local franchise license and others] to redesign the site because of the heavy traffic on that stretch of the boulevard,” Phillips says. “We would have liked the driveway planned for the restaurant to be somewhat narrower, but it’s a safety issue for pedestrians, so the driveway will be larger.” The Jimmy John’s is planned for the heart of the iconic Garment District, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. Ann Brownfield, the executive director of the Garment District Museum, tells The Pitch: “I’m against the Jimmy John’s location because it just doesn’t belong there. This is a historic district with turn-of-the-century buildings. A drive-thru does not belong there.” Frank Sebree, owner of the Majestic Restaurant and the building at 931 Broadway, directly south of the property, says he’s not opposed to the restaurant. But he says he had no idea that the city had green-lighted the project until shortly before the barricades were erected around the building. He tells The Pitch that other business owners in the neighborhood should have had a chance to weigh in on the decision. “We did not get a voice or a chance to express our own approval or disapproval of the

project,” Sebree says. “They’re adding a new curb cut on one of the busiest streets in the city, and it seems it was approved without the usual process.” Steve Noll, executive director of the Jackson County Historical Society, tells The Pitch that 923 Broadway was a later addition to the Garment District and doesn’t have significant architectural value. “It was an in-fill building, probably replacing an older structure that was originally on the spot,” he says. “For most of the past three decades, it was used as a storage facility.” The board of directors of the Historic Kansas City Foundation may not be first in line to get a No. 5, either. In a statement, they write: “We are concerned this proposal departs from best practices for urban downtown development and will negatively impact the surrounding historic buildings and neighborhood. The City’s development policy and process should afford more opportunity for public and community input. Neighbors, investors and the public should be considered and have the opportunity to weigh in when matters of urban design and historic character are in question.” The media office for the Illinois-based Jimmy John’s did not return phone calls for this story. Rick Truman, managing director of Quality Hill Playhouse, just around the corner from the Jimmy John’s project, is among those ready to wait and see what happens. “I like Jimmy John’s,” he says. “But I can’t help wonder why

they’re opening on a street that already has a Quiznos and a Subway restaurant.”

From russia … Farm to Market’s Black Russian bread isn’t just for sandwiches.

F

arm to Market Bread Co.’s latest limitededition bread, a robustly dark pumpernickel loaf called Black Russian, was created as a collaboration with the Roasterie, using the company’s Sumatra Concentrate Toddy coffee, cocoa and raisins. Both local companies are celebrating 20th anniversaries this year and decided to do a joint release. Farm to Market began delivering loaves of the fragrant, richly flavored Black Russian to supermarkets November 8; the bread will be available only through Sunday, November 17. Lindsay Borum, Farm to Market’s director of sales, says this bread can be frozen for up to two weeks. “I suggest wrapping it in plastic,” she says, “letting the loaf defrost in the plastic and maybe, after defrosting, popping it in a 300-degree oven for a few minutes to freshen it.” To find out the best ways to use the Black Russian bread in holiday recipes, The Pitch delivered a half-dozen loaves to students in the culinary arts program at the Fort Osage Career & Technology Center at Blue Springs South High School. Under the direction of

pitch.com

chef Lisa Burgess, the students used the bread in two of the lunch dishes they prepared for 25 human-resources directors in the Independence School District. The students created the menu using as many local ingredients as possible: a hearty French onion soup topped with a Black Russian bread crouton and melted gruyère cheese; cider-braised chicken breast topped with a roasted-butternut-and-spinach salad with a warm bacon vinaigrette (the recipe for the salad follows at the end); Black Russian bread stuffing; and pound cake topped with a warm Michigan cherry compote. “The most time-consuming part of the process was making the French onion soup,” says Desirae Cox, a 17-year-old senior in the program (and one of the few students in the class who isn’t sure she wants to make the restaurant business a career; she works as a waitress at an Independence IHOP). Burgess confirmed that the soup was a four-hour project, involving chopping 40 pounds of onions, caramelizing them and cooking them in chicken stock. The students working on the meal included 16-year-old Burl Purdom (who cooks at the Independence Fazoli’s), 17-year-old Ashlynn States (who works part time at Culver’s), and 17-yearold Erica Bryant (another IHOP employee who’s considering a restaurant career). Burgess has been coordinating Blue Springs’ two-year culinary program since its inception six years ago. Farm to Market’s Black Russian bread is available at Hen House stores, Cosentino’s Brookside and downtown markets, Hy-Vee at 76th Street and State Line, Marsh’s Sun Fresh in Westport, and the Price Choppers in Brookside and at 95th Street and Mission. — C.F.

Black Russian recipes at pitch.com

november 14-20, 2013

the pitch

19


Music

MEtal trEatMEnt

Tech N9ne makes his new Therapy appointment.

hree days before his 42nd birthday, Tech N9ne sits at the head of an enormous, shiny conference table inside his Strange Music headquarters in Lee’s Summit. He’s dressed in dark denim, a black button-up, and the snake-and-bat pendant that seems never to leave his body. Without face paint, Tech seems oddly friendly — the brown eyes kind, the smile easy, the handshake warm. He doesn’t come off like the man whom Forbes recently named rap’s “secret mogul.” It’s Tuesday, November 5, and Tech’s latest release — the hotly anticipated rap-metal fusion EP Therapy: Sessions With Ross Robinson — is just out. That means he has already had a heavy press day. Now, just outside the meeting room, the three men making up his social-media team are hunched in front of computers, fighting for more Internet attention for the boss. These days, they may not have to work so hard to get noticed. Across the street from Strange Music headquarters is Strangeland Studios, a four-month-old, $4 million addition to the Tech N9ne empire. After the rapper debuted Something Else earlier this summer, the album spent weeks running against Jay Z’s Magna Carta Holy Grail for the top spot on hip-hop charts. Not bad for an artist whom many still consider outside the mainstream. “I’m not mainstream. If I was, you would see me on television every day, and you would hear me on the radio more than you do,” Tech says. “I don’t see me on TV at all. You don’t see my videos being played. Mainstream — that hasn’t happened. But mainstream is going Tech. It will. Because real shit always shines.” On Therapy, Tech gets very real. While he has always been open about his interest in heavy metal — he liked the music as a kid — the rapper dives here into battleworthy, metalcrunching guitars. He yells, he screams, he sings, and he raps over savage beats. This is a Tech N9ne no one has seen before. Therapy’s seven tracks are broken up by three “therapy skits,” outtakes from conversations that Tech recorded with Robinson. They provide intimate insight into the mind of an artist eager to explore his own process and push it further. “It [the EP] has the potential to be something massive,” Tech tells producer Ross Robinson (whose credits include SlipKnot and Korn) between songs. “Not just some fucking bullshit-ass EP that we just dropped right after Halloween. I think it’s something that’ll prompt me to do more of it.” The clips feel private rather than jokey, as though they weren’t really intended for consumption. 20

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Chris Mullins

T

“This is me until I die,” Tech says.

november 14-20, 2013

“It was accidental,” Tech says of the skits. “We got to the end of recording, and I was like, ‘Oh, man, I wish we had got some of that talking that we were doing in the middle of the recording.’ But my VP, Dave Weiner, had been recording video, so we pulled it from that, and I was so glad because that’s what I wanted it to be.” And there’s other therapy for him on Therapy. On “Public School,” he angrily calls out his high school teachers for not delivering the education he wanted. “I’ve learned, throughout my life, that with more information, you can talk to more people,” he says. “The more information you have, the more opportunity. I have a lot of information up here.” He gestures toward his head. “I’m a very smart person, but I could have had so much more if my teachers were

pitch.com

there for me, to really give me the classes that I wanted. I think about how much more I could have learned if I wasn’t bored with the classes that I had. I’d be so much farther.” Perhaps that’s part of why Tech keeps himself approachable to fans. “There’s a reason why they feel like they know me — because they do,” he says. “The fucked-up thing about Tech N9ne is that I write my life. Everything you hear me write, I’ve lived it. When fans meet me, I’m that guy that they listen to. What if this was an act? This would be exhausting to me.” So if his music sounds tough — the songs on Therapy could cut through a barbed-wire fence and keep on going — the pain in the songs is something you recognize. At the beginning of “Shame on Me,” he recounts overhearing his girlfriend on the phone discussing the unknown paternity of her unborn child. “That’s the story of the first time I got my

By

N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

heart broken to the point where I couldn’t walk,” Tech says. “I maybe shouldn’t have told that story because I had to call that person and be like, ‘Hey, I’ve got this thing coming out, and I kind of told this story, and I hope you’re OK with that.’I have to do that because I talk about my life, and people are involved. My music is so serious.” Though he paints his face before every show as though going to war, Tech says he doesn’t have an act. Tech thinks of himself as transparent. For him, there is no schism between Tech N9ne the artist and Tech N9ne the brand. “It might seem that there’s a character along with it,” he says. “There’s an image that doesn’t look common in hip-hop, and it might look scary, but I don’t give a fuck. I never separated it, and I don’t want to.… Quincy Jones told me, when I was signed to him in ’97 [on Qwest Records], ‘Tech, write what you know, and people will forever feel you.’ I found out what I know is myself, so I started writing my life.” Tech’s life now is very different from that of his youth spent in Kansas City’s rough Wayne Miner projects. Despite all that he has accomplished, he says he’s not anywhere near where he wants to be. “Don’t get it wrong — we’re far,” Tech says. “Me and Travis [O’Guin, Strange Music cofounder] are boastful brainiacs. It’s wonderful, where we are, but we’re not complacent. We have the goal to shoot beyond the stars, and we’re going in that direction still.” Even as he and O’Guin have their eyes on bigger prizes, Tech is grateful for the “normal dude” he says lives inside him, the voice that keeps him grounded while he shops at WalMart — and occasionally gets recognized. “I guess I’m supposed to be more mindful of being out by myself,”he says. “I just feel like this is me until I die. With a trillion dollars, this’ll still be me. The only thing about me that’ll change is the amount of people I take care of. I feel like I’m here to help.” This is how Therapy comes full circle for Tech N9ne. It takes him right back to his frustrated youth — even then, he wanted more out of life — and ends on a high note, full of hope, looking on to the next thing. “I soothe the savage beast,” he says. “I do music. That, people say, is therapy for them, but what’s therapy for me is to see me helping them through song. That’s amazing. “I got both my wishes: I wanted to be a psychiatrist before I was a rapper, but I never pursued it after my 12th-grade year. Now I end up my fans’ therapist and a rapper. That’s beautiful.”

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com


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november 14-20, 2013

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21


Music

STILL ALIVE

The Dead Girls sit up again with a new album.

C

M us i c

22

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Michelle Bacon

ameron Hawk and JoJo Longbottom always look a little surly, even when they’re in a good mood. The two have played in bands together for the past 16 years, since they met in high school in Manhattan, Kansas. With all that time invested in the local music scene — including the nine years they’ve spent as half of the Dead Girls — Hawk and Longbottom have earned the right to be as grumpy as they want to be. Still, the two are in relatively high spirits as they split some nachos at Fric & Frac on a chilly Wednesday night, ready to discuss Fade In/ e r o M Fade Out. The album was completed in January and released digitally on t a ine Onl .com Bandcamp in February, h c pit but it wasn’t until September that the band had the hard copies in hand and a CD-release show on the books. Fade In/Fade Out is the third album by 1970s. This, you imagine, is how many band the Dead Girls, in which Hawk and Longpractices end up. bottom share guitar and lead-singer duties, The Dead Girls hold an interesting posiwith Nick Colby on bass and Eric Melin on tion around here, having gotten started at the drums. The band still describes its sound height of what the band’s members say was a as “guitar-driven power pop,” and Fade golden age in local music. This was before the doesn’t disappoint on that front. But that Get Up Kids broke up — and here there’s another label doesn’t quite do justice to the new argument as to whether that was truly a golden music. “Find Your Way Back to Me (Oh My age — and since then, other Soul)” uncovers a talent local bands have risen and for gentle, old-fashioned The Dead Girls fallen. The Dead Girls have folk, while “Naysayer” and with the Pedaljets endured. “The Beast Inside” recall and Beta-Vox “We’re old, jaded basearly 2000s Guided By Friday, November 15, tards,” Hawk says with a Voices. Throughout, Fade at the Bottleneck laugh. “We started playing has the polished feel of a in Lawrence when we were band confident with its 16 years old, and we were voice. Dear Diary: Casual Encounters, so wide-eyed, like, ‘This is “We did a lot of more hosted by Lucky DeLuxe awesome!’” mature guitar sounds and “We hit the road when a lot of different chord 7 p.m. Saturday, November 16, and Sunday, November 17, at the we were 18, and we defichanges,” Longbottom Fishtank Performance Studio nitely had the goal in mind says. “There’s a lot of exto be a rock band and make perimentation on this rerecords for a living and play cord and pushing the limit music,” Longbottom says. “The only way that in certain ways. Songs ended up being more goal has changed is that I don’t want to make subtle. We had a distinct plan when we went records for a living, but I want to make records into this one. When people come see us live, while I’m living.” they come expecting an energetic live show, With Fade finished nearly a year ago, the but on the album, there are a lot of soft, Dead Girls have been gathering material for acoustic, more mellow things.” the next album. They’re in no hurry, though. Longbottom, dressed in a red Chiefs The four veterans are content to leave feverish sweatshirt, says this with the intense glare industry pressures to others. of a linebacker. Some 15 minutes go by before “We’re not entertaining any idea of suche cracks a smile, though he and Hawk have cess,” Hawk says. “We’ve all got full-time jobs, bickered good-naturedly the whole time, two and we like our lives. We like being able to cynical music nerds debating just who was say, ‘OK, today we’re gonna chill and hang the most successful power-pop band of the november 14-20, 2013

pitch.com

By

The Dead Girls (left) and Lucky DeLuxe out with our friends or family, and tomorrow we’re gonna work on music and it’s going to be fulfilling.’ Just because we’re in bands, it’s not necessarily going to be our whole identity.” “All I really care about is putting on music that I can be proud of,” Longbottom says. “Hopefully that comes with an audience, and I think if you’re passionate about what you do, then people come around. They see that and they enjoy.”

DATE NIGHT Meghan Whelan and Lucky DeLuxe get Casual.

M

ultiple analysts have somehow determined that Kansas City is the worst city in America for dating. Well, yeah. But instead of wallowing in that truth, Meghan Whelan is fighting back. Her weapon: humor. This weekend, Whelan’s two-night storytelling event, Dear Diary: Casual Encounters, reminds us that misery loves company. The Pitch: How did the idea for Casual Encounters come to you? Whelan: One night I was standing in the kitchen with my best friend, Ashlee, and she was reading me the messages she had been getting on OkCupid. We were laughing hysterically at the absurdity and audacity of these potential suitors. I realized there was something there: As ubiquitous as online dating has become, there is probably a trove of stories

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about meeting people online. Ashlee and I have worked together on Dear Diary, a live reading of diary entries that I’ve produced off and on since 2010, and we thought we could combine that concept with the online-dating material. Tell me a little bit about the structure of the event. It will be hosted by the incomparable Lucky DeLuxe [Susanna Lee], a comedian and burlesque performer who left Kansas City for Los Angeles three years ago. She was the original host of Dear Diary when it began, and I couldn’t imagine anyone else hosting this show, so I’m bringing her home. The show will be part comedy, part game show — we’re doing a version of The Dating Game, where the “bachelors” will read their answers from actual messages and profiles from dating sites — and the rest will be storytelling by various readers: male and female, gay and straight. What’s your all-time-worst dating story? Probably the time I showed up drunk and sweaty to a dinner date with a guy I met online. I’d never met him in person before and got to his house about four whiskeys deep, at 6 p.m., wearing clothes I’d been working out in earlier. There was not a second date. It’s a long story, but let’s just say I’d much rather end a date that way then start it off on that note.

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

J a z z B e at Matt Carrillo QuartEt, at takE FivE CoFFEE + Bar

Matt Carrillo started sitting in on Kansas City–area jazz jams while still in his teens. His rich, full-bodied tenor sax evoked the bluesy sounds of this city’s heritage, and he’d swing with sophistication as his solos grew more adventurous. He matured as a regular in Everette DeVan’s quartet. Then, three years ago, Carrillo moved to New York, which makes a one-night-only return to his hometown quite special. Saturday at Take Five, Carrillo is joined by Eddie Moore on keyboards, Micah Herman on bass and Brad Williams on drums. Carrillo’s sound may have grown from KC traditions, but it’ll be channeled this night through a group of young KC jazz masters. — Larry Kopitnik Matt Carrillo Quartet, 8–10 p.m. Saturday, November 16, at Take Five Coffee + Bar (5336 West 151st Street, Leawood, 913-948-5550), $5.


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23


WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

NOVEMBER 13 the music of

hank williams

NOVEMBER 14

brandon

jenkins w/ logan brill & scott ford

NOVEMBER 15

with Bill Kirchen

& Joy Kills Sorrow

NOVEMBER 16

atlantic express

Music

Music Forecast Selena Gomez

Athens, Georgia’s Dead Confederate makes dark Southern-rock music that goes down like an acid cocktail. The band’s recently released In the Marrow sounds equal parts Kurt Cobain tribute (thanks to lead singer Thomas Hardy Morris) and Murder By Death (with more edge). Five years ago, consensus was that Dead Confederate was on the verge of a huge breakthrough; retrospectively, it probably should have just added suspenders and a banjo to its gear. Thursday, November 14, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Nora Jane Struthers

Janelle Monáe

Janelle Monáe is weird. You might not notice because she’s so pretty and has such a big, soulful voice, but this Kansas City–born diva has an elaborate plan to reinvent R&B. On Monáe’s latest album, The Electric Lady, she fuses funk beats and bombastic vocals with a vaguely dystopian story line that she has been building since her 2007 debut, Metropolis. Monáe’s talent has been endorsed by OutKast and Prince — His Purpleness has essentially crowned her R&B’s newest princess — and her strange star seems to keep on rising. Friday, November 15, at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

Saxophonist James Pobiega has multiple aliases — Little Howlin’ Wolf is just one of the many under which he performs, sometimes as a blues street musician in Chicago, sometimes as a recording artist of experimental, improvisational jazz. He’s one of those artists who probably did too many drugs in the ’70s, but damn if he doesn’t have some fantastic stories to share. Friday, November 15, at FOKL (556 Central, KCK, foklcenter.com)

Moon Taxi

Mountain Sprout

Wiping Out Thousands

Nora Jane Struthers

Trevor Terndrup, lead singer of Nashville altrock five-piece Moon Taxi, has got quite a set of pipes. His voice sidles up next to you, as casual as an afternoon bike ride on a warm summer day, nonthreatening and friendly, and sucks you in. Moon Taxi’s latest release, Mountains Beaches Cities, traipses through genres like a child playing hopscotch: We hear country-rock power anthems, gentle folk songs, and even splashes of electronica. Somehow, it seamlessly folds together. Saturday, November 16, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Alaine Dickman and Taylor Nelson make up the Minneapolis duo Wiping Out Thousands, an experimental electronic band for all the nerds out there. They take their name from the Alvin Toffler novel Future Shock, if that tells you anything. Dickman and Nelson make music that sometimes sounds like agitated robots at a peace conference — in a good way. Dickman has a pop voice, but maybe that’s what makes it so entrancing, mashed up against abrasive electro-rock and computer bleeps. Tuesday, November 19, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

f o r e c a s t

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com

2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

24

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november 14-20, 2013

n ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

Dead Confederate

People love using words like “wholesome” and “classy” to describe 21-year-old Disney Channel graduate Selena Gomez. Compared with her pop-culture counterpart Miley Cyrus, Gomez certainly is the more family-friendly car-ride CD choice. I have a hard time believing that there’s anything beyond marshmallow fluff between Gomez’s ears. The starlet’s latest record, Stars Dance, is filled with polished pop songs that lack personality. Maybe we’ll find it in her live show, tucked away somewhere between her moderate vocal talent and chastity. Sunday, November 17, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

Little Howlin’ Wolf

NOVEMBER 19

By

It’s rare when “hillbilly music” sounds even remotely appealing, but exceptions must be made in the case of Mountain Sprout. The Arkansas four-piece features bass, guitar, banjo and fiddle, and the band’s unpretentious twang sounds like a throwback to the riotous days of moonshine and shotgun weddings. With songs like “Screw the Government” and “Town Drunk,” it’s clear that Mountain Sprout cares very little about making a good first impression, which is probably why the band is so much fun. Saturday, November 16, at Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club (3402 Main, 816-753-1909)

Singer-songwriter Nora Jane Struthers makes sweet, apple-pie Americana for the ages. Her easygoing songs carry elements of comfortable bluegrass and old-timey nostalgia, with plenty of room for Struthers’ warm vocals to nestle in. On her recent Carnival, Struthers proves that even though she may not have the brassy charm of Dolly Parton or the Grammys of Alison Krauss, she does possess a timelessness that makes her an emerging leader in an old category. Tuesday, November 19, at Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

K e Y

Pick of the Week

 Dust off your Boots

 Eclectic

Electronic

 Chaste

 Hillbilly Music

Nerds

 Prince-approved

Saxophones

 Kinda Country

 Hot off the Disney Channel

Not Dead Yet

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d t h n g i l a t o p B S

TRAMPLED UNDER FOOT In 2008, Trampled Under Foot, a trio of siblings playing revved-up blues music, set out for Memphis, where the International Blues Challenge was being held that year. Days later, they left Memphis with the best hardware available: The band won the award for first place in the competition, and guitarist Nick Schnebelen won the Albert King award for best guitarist. The family band – which also features Kris Schnebelen on drums and Danielle Schnebelen on bass – has been turning heads ever since. There’s little indication of the Schnebelens slowing down – either here in Kansas City, where they recently took home another Pitch Music Award for Best Blues Act, or at the national and international levels, where they continue to win over new fans. In the last months of this year alone, Trampled Under Foot will play everywhere from pubs in Norway to a preThanksgiving set at hometown venue Knuckleheads Saloon to their popular, long-running TUF Tuesdays at B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ. What's up? We just released our first studio album with Concord Records, Badlands, and we toured all over the country and Scandinavia this summer and fall to share the word of TuF. In 140 or fewer characters, our sound is… Hard blues. I like to say it's like Freddie King, Led Zeppelin, and Etta James wrapped into our original material. What are you liking/not liking about the KC music scene right now? As far as the KC Blues scene goes, I think it's great! We travel all over the world and get to meet a lot of musicians and music supporters. Kansas City has a very wonderful scene and it's more like a family. I've always felt welcome at every jam that I've been to over the last 15 years that I've been attending/hosting them, and the fans are so loyal to music in general, not just specific bands. The best song/album we heard this year: Curtis Salgado, Soul Shot The best show I/we saw this year: Curtis Salgado, he's amazing. We got to see them at a festival in Norway recently and they just killed! Who's your favorite local act at the moment? The Old No. 5s are really great! Great songs, great musicians, great cats!! pitch.com

november 14-20, 2013

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25


AGENDA

continued from page 11

Thursday | 11.14 |

DEEPAK CHOPRA

NATIONAL THEATRE

LITERARY EVENTS

D THURS

AY

1 1 .1 4

Pat Conroy | 7 p.m., $28.95, Unity Temple, 707 W. 47th St., rainydaybooks.com

d vents Live e ht or nig

SPORTS

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $6 ($3 for skate rental), 2450 Grand, crowncenter.com

ay

SHOPPING

Holiday Boutique | 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Overland Park Convention Center, 6000 College Blvd.

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Ararat Shrine Temple Circus | 7:30 p.m. Municipal Auditorium/Music Hall, 301 W. 13th St.

An Evening With Deepak Chopra | 7 p.m., $37.50,

FILM

$55, Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

National Theatre Live: The Habit of Art | 1:30 p.m., $10-$15, Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania, tivolikc.com

K. Michelle, Sevyn Streeter | 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

National Theatre Live: The Habit of Art | 1:30 p.m., $10-$15, Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania,

tivolikc.com

Ophil, Iron Guts Kelly | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946

Sandman the Hypnotist | 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy

Randy Rogers Band, Will Hoge | 7 p.m. The

XO Blackwater with Steve Gardels | 10 p.m. Mini-

Massachusetts, Lawrence

Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

MUSIC

John Keck’s Angels and Devils | 8 p.m. Coda, 1744 Steven Cooper, thePhantom*, Landes, DJ Lee |

Broadway

Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Counter-Culture | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

M-Bird Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall | 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Tommy Ruskin & Julie Turner | 7 p.m. The Blue

Dead Confederate, Spindrift, Snake Island | 8 p.m.

Travis Marvin, Lance Pollard | PBR Big Sky Bar,

Jon Wayne & the Pain, Arm the Poor | 7 p.m. The

7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Bar, 3810 Broadway

Friday | 11.15 | PERFORMING ARTS

The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big

111 E. 13th St.

Mime Game with Dalton Gomez | 10 p.m. Jazzhaus,

Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Grand Marquis | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

No Justice, Johnny Cooper, Bryant Carter Band | 6:30 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat

Dr., North Kansas City

John Paul’s Flying Circus | B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ,

One Night Stand: An Acoustic Evening With the Boys of Rock and Roll | 9:45 p.m. RecordBar,

1205 E. 85th St.

Village West Pkwy., KCK

7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

The Magic Flute | 7:30 p.m. Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcopera.org SPORTS

Luxury Bump | 10 p.m. Firefly Lounge, 4118

Pennsylvania

1020 Westport Rd.

French Cabaret with Beth Byrd and Belleville |

NIGHTLIFE

Tom Arnold | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867

Brandon Jenkins with Logan Brill & Scott Ford | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Playe | 10:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Blizzard Bash Demolition Derby | 7 p.m. Kansas

Expocentre, 1 Expocenter Dr., Topeka

continued on page 28

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS About Face: Contemporary Portraiture | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

of Art, 4525 Oak

Lynn Benson: Sidetrip | Opening Friday, Kiosk

Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd., kemperart.org

Gallery. 3951 Broadway

Edgar Degas Pastels | Nelson-Atkins Museum

Dressed Up | Kemper Museum of Contemporary

Echoes: Islamic Art and Contemporary Artists Celebrating Picasso: Through the Lens of David Douglas Duncan | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

the pitch

Family Tour Hour | 2-3 p.m. Saturday, Kemper Mu-

seum, registration required, 4420 Warwick Blvd.

Charlotte Street presents We’ll Make Out Better Than Okay | La Esquina, 1000 W. 25th St.

26

| Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

november 14-20, 2013

Impressionist France | Nelson-Atkins Museum

of Art, 4525 Oak

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Kaws • Ups and Downs; Dylan Mortimer • Illuminate | Nerman Museum of Contemporary

Art, JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

KC Swing: Jazz Photography, by Diallo Javonne French | Box Gallery, 1000 Walnut

Maya Lin artist talk | 6-7 p.m. Friday, Atkins

Auditorium, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

Lost and Found: A Group Show | Opening Friday, PLUG Projects, 1613 Genessee

MicroChromatic | 6-10 p.m. Friday, Paragraph

Gallery, 23 E. 12 St.

Nomads: Traversing Adolescence | Kemper East, 200 E. 44th St., kemperart.org

Test Patterns and Floor Samples: New Work by Garry Noland | Opening reception, 6-9 p.m.

Friday; gallery talk, noon-1 p.m. Saturday, Studios Inc., 1708 Campbell

James Turrell: Gard Blue | Spencer Museum of Art, 1301 Mississippi , Lawrence


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2 CHAINZ FRIDAY

11.15

Story: T.R.U. int at Spr z in a 2 Ch r Cente

2 Chainz, Juicy J, Rocko, Tyga, Tech N9ne and Kidd Kidd | 6:45 p.m., $27-$122, Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

continued from page 26 Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-11 p.m., $6 ($3 for skate rental), 2450 Grand, crowncenter.com

Jeremy Butcher and the Bail Jumpers | 9 p.m.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Dan Doran Band | 9 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

F00D & DRINK

Friday Farmers Market at BadSeed | 4-9 p.m.,

1909 McGee

Irish Whiskey Tasting | 7-9 p.m. Irish Museum and Cultural Center at Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., $40/$50, irishcenterkc.org

LA Fahy & the Argyle Sky, Michael Buck | 6 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Federation of Horsepower, Dollar Fox, Death Valley Wolfriders, Tilford Sellers and the Wagon Burners | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Filthy 13 | Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

SHOPPING

Holiday Boutique | 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Overland Park Convention Center, 6000 College Blvd.

Owl+Mouse Annual Holiday Party and Sale | 5-9 p.m. Owl + Mouse Textile Designs, 1600 Genessee COMMUNITY EVENTS

Ararat Shrine Temple Circus | 7:30 p.m. Municipal Auditorium/Music Hall, 301 W. 13th St. MUSIC

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Garage Kings | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Max Groove Trio | 7-11 p.m. Chaz, 325 Ward Pkwy. Albert Hammond Jr., Rathborne | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Hillbillies for Harvesters with Bill Kirchen, Joy Kills Sorrow, Miss Major & Her Minor Mood Swings, the Rhythmbusters | 6 p.m., $10 or $10

Almost Kiss, Poison Overdose | 7 p.m. The Granada,

Victor Jacob Band | The BrewTop Pub and Patio, 8614

Main

november 14-20, 2013

Funk Trek | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

worth of canned food, Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Blue Riddim Band | 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402

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1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Adam Evolving, Molehill, Waiting on Forever, Red Velvet Crush | 9 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

28

Flirt Friday | 9 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino,

N. Boardwalk Ave.

Lonnie McFadden | 4:30 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W.

Eighth St.


TheaTer Dates and times vary. Ain’t Misbehavin’: The Fats Waller Musical Show | Spinning Tree Theatre, Just Off Broadway

Molly Gene, Amy Farrand | The Brick, 1727 McGee Janelle Monáe, Roman GianArthur | 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Phil Neal and the Wornalls | 10 p.m. Coda, 1744

Theater, 3051 Central, spinningtreetheatre.com

Broadway

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Tell Me on a Sunday | Egads Theatre, Off Center Theatre, 2450

The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

An Evening with Jack Kennedy | 6 p.m. Shaw-

Snake Island, the Conquerors, Witch Jail, DJ Kimbarely Legal | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Mas-

Grand, egadstheatre.com

nee Mission East High School, 7500 Mission, Prairie Village

Beyond Glory With Stephen Lang | 8 p.m. Friday, Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

Dead Air | 6:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday,

The Pedaljets, the Dead Girls, Beta-Vox | 9 p.m.

sachusetts, Lawrence

Sons of Brasil | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Tyrannosaurus Chicken | 10:30 p.m. Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

the Golden Ox, 1600 Genessee. $54/$64, kcmysterytrain.com

Ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro | 8 p.m., $21-

Dear Diary: Casual Encounters | 7 p.m. Sat-

NIGhTLIFe

urday-Sunday, Fishtank Performance Studio, 1715 Wyandotte

Fairy Tales’ End | 9:30 p.m. Kansas City Masonic Temple, 903 Harrison Forever Plaid | Chestnut Fine Arts Center, 234 N. Chestnut, Olathe, chestnutfinearts.com

How to Succeed in Business Without Even Trying | Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre, 3614

$59. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway

Tom Arnold | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK Come, Let Us Drink: bawdy songs from ye days of olde | 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611

Broadway

DJ B-Stee | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway Indigo hour with Lady D. | 5 p.m. The Blue Room,

Main, metkc.org

1616 E. 18th St.

Les Misérables | White Theatre at the Jewish

Kathleen Madigan | 8 p.m., $29.50-$34.50, the Mid-

Community Center, 5801 W. 115th St., Overland Park, jcckc.org/lesmis

Memphis | 7:30 p.m. Thursday, $20-$51, Lied Center of Kansas, 1600 Stewart Dr., Lawrence, lied.ku.edu/events

The Mystery of Edwin Drood | The Barn Play-

land, 1228 Main

Sandman the hypnotist | 7:30 & 9:45 p.m.

Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Saturday | 11.16 |

ers, 6219 Martway, Mission, thebarnplayers.org

PeRFoRMING ARTS

No Sleep November | 8 p.m. Sunday-Monday, the Living Room, 1818 McGee, thelivingroomkc.com

Audra McDonald with the KC Symphony | 8 p.m., $40-$110, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org

The Wiz | The Coterie, 2450 Grand, Crown Center, thecoterie.org

MUSeUM exhibiTS & evenTS American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St. Music Is My First Love: Lupe M. Gonzalez Dance Orchestra | Kansas City Museum, 3218 Gladstone Blvd., kansascitymuseum.org

Real Pirates | Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd. Take Five Tour | 6 p.m. Thursday, American

Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St., americanjazzmuseum.org

Rita Moreno | 8 p.m. Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

Newear presents Tours de Force | 8 p.m., $12-$25,

All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church, 4501 Walnut, newear.org

Pianist Luis Fernando Perez | 7:30 p.m., $15, Park University, 8700 N.W. River Park Dr., park.edu/icm

Poesia Flamenca – Flamenco Poetry | 8 p.m., $17-$25, Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence continued on page 30

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november 14-20, 2013

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29


continued from page 29 Literary events

Bell tower Bash, benefitting Kids with Crayons | 7 p.m. Arts Asylum, 1000 E. Ninth St.

Bitches Gotta eat blogger samantha irby |

Missouri Marijuana policy Conference | 9 a.m.,

7 p.m. Barnes & Noble - Zona Rosa, 8625 N.W. Prairie View Rd.

$10 (advance), $15 (door), EventPort, 208 W. 19th St. MusiC

sports

Blizzard Bash Demolition Derby | 10 a.m. & 6 p.m.

Kansas Expocentre, 1 Expocenter Dr., Topeka

Crown Center ice terrace | 10 a.m.-11 p.m., $6 ($3 for skate rental), 2450 Grand

Kansas vs. West virginia football | 11 a.m. Memorial

Stadium, 11th St. and Maine, Lawrence

Missouri Comets vs. Milwaukee Wave | 7:35 p.m.

admiral of the red, rocket Blue opera | The Brick, 1727 McGee

atlantic express featuring Hal Wakes | 8:30 p.m.

Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Blue orleans | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Brody Buster | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence

the Conquerors, Middle twin, Full Bloods | 9 p.m.

Missouri vs. Hawaii men’s basketball | 6 p.m.,

Crizzly, Figure | 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachu-

C u Lt u r a L e v e n t s

the noah Davis Band, still Line, What i’ve Become | 10 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

$12-$77. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

28th annual British Faire | 10 a.m. Lenexa Community Center, 13420 Oak, Lenexa

Czar, 1531 Grand

setts, Lawrence

Fight the Quiet, uncountable Kings, attic Light, Minor rewind | 6 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

F00D & DrinK

Brookside Farmers Market | 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Border Star Montessori, 6321 Wornall

Bryan Hicks Quartet | 5 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

the insanitones, villains Dance | Danny’s Bar and

City Market Farmers Market | 6:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.,

Grill, 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa

Downtown overland park Farmers Market |

12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park

205 E. Fifth St.

John paul Drum’s Flying Circus | 9 p.m. Quasimodo,

6:30 a.m.-1 p.m., on Marty, between 79th and 80th streets

Grand Court Farmers Market | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Grand Court Retirement Center, 501 W. 107th St. irish whiskey tasting | 2-4 p.m., $45, Celtic Ranch, 404 Main, Weston

strong ale Fest | 1 p.m. McCoy’s Public House, 4057 Pennsylvania. $30/$35, beerkc.com sHoppinG

Diffa’s Holidays by Design: A silent auction with

Little river Band, Brewer & shipley, the nace Brothers | 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway the Lost Weekend Brunch with the Latenight Callers | Noon, RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Moon taxi, Quiet Company, Mime Game, spirit is the spirit | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway Mountain sprout | 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main the people Depot, Hot air saloon | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

creations by local designers and artists | 6 p.m. The Roasterie, 1204 W. 27th St.

1744 Broadway

Holiday Boutique | 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Overland Park Convention Center, 6000 College Blvd.

saintseneca, vikesh Kapoor, Field Day Dreams, DJ Cruz | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts,

saturday swap meet | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Cowtown Mallroom, 3101 Gillham Plz.

the promise Makers Dinner show | 7-9 p.m. Coda,

Lawrence

shades of Jade | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

CoMMunity events

ararat shrine temple Circus | 10 a.m., 2:30 &

7:30 p.m. Municipal Auditorium/Music Hall, 301 W. 13th St.

30

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november 14-20, 2013

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strike Back | The BrewTop Pub and Patio, 8614 N.

Boardwalk Ave.

thee Devotion, the ned Ludd Band | 10 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway


HARRY CONNICK JR.

Sunday | 11.17 | PERFORMING ARTS

The Chenaults organist duo | 4 p.m., $19-$39, Kauff-

man Center, 1601 Broadway

The Magic Flute | 2 p.m. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broad-

way, kcopera.org

SPORTS

Blizzard Bash Demolition Derby | 2 p.m. Kansas

Y S U N DA

11.17

ry k: Eve Connic now K ld u ho Ma n S

Expocentre, 1 Expocentre Dr., Topeka

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $6 ($3 for skate rental), 2450 Grand

Kansas vs. Creighton women’s basketball | 5 p.m.

Allen Fieldhouse, 1651 Naismith Dr., Lawrence SHOPPING

Harry Connick Jr. | 6:30 p.m., $59.50-$125, the

Midland, 1228 Main

Holiday Boutique | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Overland Park Convention Center, 6000 College Blvd. COMMUNITY EVENTS

3 Son Green | 10:30 p.m. Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Ararat Shrine Temple Circus | 1 & 5 p.m. Municipal Auditorium/Music Hall, 301 W. 13th St.

Truckstop Honeymoon, Wells the Traveler |

8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

James Ward Band | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616

E. 18th St.

FILM

Kenneth Branagh’s Macbeth | 1:30 p.m. Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania, tivolikc.com F00D & DRINK

Week of Wonders, Lazy | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

The Zeros | 10:30 p.m. The Brooksider, 6330 Brook-

City Market Farmers Market | 8 a.m.-3 p.m., 205

E. Fifth St.

side Plz.

MUSIC NIGHTLIFE

Club Wars Fall Free-for-All | The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

All Things Kansas City Comedy Show with Mike Smith, James Johann, Brad Meehan, Bobby J, B-Rich and Mike Baldwin | 8 p.m. Folly Theater, 300 W. 12th St.

Tom Arnold | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy

Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

DJ Rico | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Selena Gomez | 7 p.m., $28.50-$99.50, Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

Rich Hill | 7 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania Rich Hill’s jazz brunch | 11 a.m. The Majestic, 931

Broadway

Mark Lowrey jazz jam | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931

Don’t Blink: A Doctor Who Quiz | 6 p.m. Snow &

Broadway

KC Improv Co. presents Underground Throwdown | 8 p.m. Kick Comedy Theater, 4010

Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Co., 1815 Wyandotte

Pennsylvania

Sandman the Hypnotist | 7 & 9:45 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

UFC #167: St. Pierre vs. Hendricks | 7 p.m. The

Lee McBee and the Confessors | 6-9 p.m. B.B.’s

The Queers, the Copyrights, the Kingons | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Dominique Sanders Trio | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Brooksider, 6330 Brookside

continued on page 32

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november 14-20, 2013

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MON: RUR AL GRIT 6P M // KARAO FRI 11/15 KE 10PM SAT 11/16 MOLLY GENE, AM ADMIRAL O Y FARRAND F TH FRI 11/22 ROCKET BLUE OPE RED, SAT 11/23 SOUL PROVIDERS ERA C BAND 13, BARRON V REW R E D V ELVET CR ON SWAGGER, WED 11/2 FRI 11/29 7 THE HEARERS, THUSH SAT 11/30 THE ACB’S, THE H IS IS MY CONDITIO IPS N SIMPLE LIN ES, LEERIN G HEATHEN S

LITTLE HOWLIN’ WOLF

continued from page 31 The Townspeople with Nick Howell, Matt Otto, Jeff Harshbarger and Arnie Young | 8 p.m. Record-

Bar, 1020 Westport Rd.

NIGHTLIFE

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417

Sandman the Hypnotist | 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Taproom Poetry Series | 5 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom, 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence

WIFI NOW AVAILABLE!

Monday | 11.18 |

CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

AY TUESD

11.19 t, No shir all sax

SPORTS

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $6 ($3

Need some

EAR CANDY?

for skate rental), 2450 Grand

TECHNOLOGY

Get in the Ring: The American Startup Clash | Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, 4801 Rockhill Rd. MUSIC

Little Howlin’ Wolf, N Colyar P | 10 p.m. Replay

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

American Hitmen, Justin Andrew Murray | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Sign up for MUSIC NEWSLETTER

Arkona, Stonehaven | 7 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048

Lawrence

Wayne Hawkins | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E.

Main

Broadway

18th St.

LOST WEEKEND!

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32

the pitch

november 14-20, 2013

WI•FI

MONDAYS @ 7pM: SONgwriter SceNe

THU | 11.14 tilFOrD Seller AND the wAgON BurNerS 8PM | $6 FRI| 11.15 rOugher AllStArS/ 9PM | $10 Blue riDDiM BAND SAT | 11.16 7PM | $10 BluegrASS 10PM| $6 the NOAh DAViS BAND

the BreAKiNg YArD

MOuNtAiN SprOut

Still liNe whAt i'Ve BecOMe TUE | 11.19 A .J. gAither

8PM | $5 WED| 11.20 7PM | $10 FRI | 11.22 9PM | $8 SAT| 11.23 8:30PM|$7 WED| 11.27 8PM | $5 THU| 11.28 FRI| 11.29 8PM|$8

DANNY KAY & the NightliFerS

FOLKICIDE • CHAD bRYAN rABBit Killer MAJOr MAtt MASON ZAch MuFASA the greeN riVer KiNgS the high riSe rOBOtS

GUY MORGAN • THE RACKATEES the hADDONFielDS the tiMMYS

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ANTLER SALMON • SLOW YA ROLL 77 JeFFerSON SeeDlOVe SAT| 11.30 THE REx bROTHERS • GARAGE KINGS 8:30PM | $7 StAND BY ANchOrS pitch.com

Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire,

Millie Edwards & Friends | 7 p.m. The Phoenix, 302

Trivia with Matt Larson | 8 p.m. Bulldog, 1715

Tuesday | 11.19 |

W. Eighth St.

LITERARY EVENTS

Rural Grit Happy Hour | 6-9 p.m. The Brick, 1727

Writers Place Poetry Series: Showcases the work

Singer/songwriter open mic with host Jon Theobald | 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

SPORTS

Waldo Jazz Collective | 7-10 p.m. The Piano Room,

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., 2450

NIGHTLIFE

Kansas vs. Iona College men’s basketball | 7 p.m.

McGee

8410 Wornall

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | 8 p.m. Green Room

of local poets | 7 p.m. Johnson County Central Resource Library, 9875 W. 87th St., Overland Park

Grand

Allen Fieldhouse, 1651 Naismith Dr., Lawrence

Burgers & Beer, 4010 Pennsylvania

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | 7:30 p.m. Rhythm and

Booze, 423 Southwest Blvd.

Getting Lucky 2: Getting Luckier | 8 p.m., Fishtank

FILM

Filmmaker Magazine’s “25 New Faces of Independent Film” | 7:30 p.m. Fine Arts Theatre, 5909

Johnson Dr., Mission

Performance Studio, 1715 Wyandotte. $12/$15

Karaoke Relaunch | 10:30 p.m. The Brick, 1727

McGee

No Kids Allowed Night: Pirates Take Over |

6-8 p.m., Legoland Discovery Center, 2475 Grand. $15/$19, legolanddiscoverycenter.com.

Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

MUSIC

Rick Bacus Trio | Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. Billy Beale’s blues jam | 10 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

The Crayons | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Matthew Curry and the Fury, Brody Buster Band, Billy Beale | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway


Foundation Big Band | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

MUSIc

1809 Grand

Andy Frasco & the Un | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

A.J. Gaither, Danny Kay & the Nightlife | 8 p.m.

Acoustic jam session with Tyler Gregory | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Billy Ebeling | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Folkicide, Rabbit Killer, Major Matt Mason |

Les Izmore, Emjay, Dutch Young, OP2MUS, Brief, Reece | 10 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Max Groove Trio | 6 p.m. Chaz, 325 Ward Pkwy.

Freedy Johnston, Thom Hoskins | 6:30 p.m. Czar,

7:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

chris Hazelton Trio | 5:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1531 Grand

1809 Grand

Less Than Jake, Anti-Flag, Masked Intruder, Get Dead | 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts,

Let the Beat Build | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 West-

Lawrence

port Rd.

Hermon Mehari Trio | 6 p.m. Majestic, 931

M.O.D., Koktopus, Vanlade, Iron Guts Kelly, Dogs of Death | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Naughty Pines Happy Hour Band | 6-8 p.m. Coda,

Morbid Angel, Tennessee Murder club, Torn the Fuck Apart, Marasmus | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020

Broadway

1744 Broadway

Massachusetts, Lawrence

Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio | 7 p.m.

Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern | 9 p.m. Green

The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

Nora Jane Struthers & the Party Line | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Trampled Under Foot | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ,

Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Phox, Sad American Night, Junior Rangers | 8

p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Shinetop Jr. | 7-9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E.

1205 E. 85th St.

85th St.

Wiping Out Thousands | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020

Drew Six | 6-9 p.m. Cactus Grill, 11849 Roe, Leawood

Westport Rd.

Sleepy Sun, Psychic Heat | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, NIGHTLIFE

946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Dropout Boogie | 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611

Wednesday MidDay Medley’s 500th Show |

Jazz Poetry Jam | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

NIGHTLIFE

Broadway

Karaoke with Paul Nelson | MiniBar, 3810

DJ Approach | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Open-mic comedy night | 9 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s,

DJ Ashton Martin | Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

DJ HoodNasty, Brent Tactic & DJ B-Stee | 10 p.m.

3810 Broadway

Broadway

101 Southwest Blvd.

Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

Trivia Bang Bang | 7:30 p.m. Helen’s Just Another Dive, 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City

Wednesday | 11.20 | PERFORMING ARTS

Poetic Underground open-mic series | 9-11 p.m.

The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

HAPPY HOUR DAILY 4-7 PM

1531 GRAND KCMO 816.421.0300 . CZARKC.COM

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TAXI

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10 a.m., KKFI 90.1, wednesdaymiddaymedley.org

DJs Mike Scott, Spinstyles and Bill Pile | MiniBar,

Karaoke | The Quaff, 1010 Broadway MOKAN Twang Vinyl country Night | 8 p.m. Frank James Saloon, 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville Nerd Nite #18: Tribal Sovereignty, Printmaking, the First Thanksgiving | 7 p.m. MiniBar, 3810

Broadway

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a week

Trivia | 9 p.m. Lew’s Grill and Bar, 7539 Wornall

LEcTURES

Trivia | 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market, 817 Westport Rd.

Park University’s Xerox Global Business Lecture featuring Barbara corcoran | 7 p.m. Folly Theater,

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

300 W. 12th St.

UPCOMING EVENTS NOV 13 JESS KLEIN W/ HAVILAH MARIE & THE FREIGHT TRAIN NOV 14 STEPHEN COOPER, THE PHANTOM, DJ LEE NOV 15 MOLEHILL, WAITING ON FOREVER, ADAM EVOLVING NOV 16 (MATINEE) FIGHT THE QUIET, UNCOUNTABLE KINGS, ATTIC LIGHT, MINOR REWIND NOV 16 GOLDEN SOUND RECORDS PRESENTS: ON THE HOUSE, THE CONQUERORS, MIDDLE TWIN, FULL BLOODS NOV 19 FREEDY JOHNSTON W/ THOM HOSKINS

816.561.2444 www.erniebiggs.com nsas 4115 Mill Street West Port Ka pitch.com

november 14-20, 2013

City

the pitch

33


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S ava g e L o v e

SlutS and Such

Dear Dan: I’m a 24-year-old gay man living in a major urban center. One of my very good friends — I’ll call him Jerry — helped me out of a huge jam last summer. I received notice that I had to vacate my apartment while I was overseas, and Jerry volunteered to pack up my stuff and put it into storage. Needless to say, I’m extremely grateful. Jerry saved me a huge amount of money and hassle. Recently, though, I was house-sitting for Jerry while he was on vacation, and I found some intimate items of mine — a cock ring and a bottle of lube — that I thought had been lost in the move. In the interest of full disclosure, Jerry and I have fooled around before, but I find it strange that he took these items, and I don’t really know what to do. Do I confront Jerry about the items or just leave them as “payment” for helping me move? Or should I just take them back without saying anything and let him figure it out? Unsure in Canada P.S. Your work is one of the big reasons I was able to come out to my friends and family in eighth grade. I just wanted to thank you.

Dear UIC: Two gay men living in the same city

— two gay men with similar sexual interests (including an interest in each other) — could wind up owning two identical bottles of lube and a pair of identical cock rings. It’s unlikely, of course, and it’s even less likely that Jerry owns the exact same lube and cock ring as the lube and cock ring of yours that went missing when Jerry packed your place up. But seeing

34

the pitch

november 14-20, 2013

pitch.com

D a n S ava ge

on Reddit to some real lesbians, and they clearly feel like I’m an asshole. One woman told me I need help. So, believe it or not, I stopped. But I can’t help but wonder: Was this really that bad? It’s the Internet, and for all I know I’m chatting with other straight dudes who are pretending to be lesbians. And if I’m not trying to pursue these women in real life, where’s the harm?

Dear Dan: Why am I such a slut? Girl, Corrupted Dear GC: Are you a slut? Or are you a woman who loves sex, has a high libido, and has consensual sex with a lot of willing and grateful partners? Don’t buy into the sexist double standards. As long as your sex life isn’t negatively affecting your relationship(s), your health, your friendships, your family life, your classwork or your career, you aren’t doing anything wrong. Don’t let shitty, sexist people make you feel like you have to slap a shitty, sexist label on yourself for the crime of enjoying sex. Have fun out there, be thoughtful, be safe, be considerate of others' and your feelings. And remember: What works for you now may not work for you always. Don’t look back on this part of your life with shame or regret if or when you elect to downsize your sex life — less sex and fewer sex partners, a lot of sex and one sex partner. Do what’s right for you, eliminate the risks that can be eliminated, mitigate the risks that can’t be eliminated, and don’t worry about what other people think.

By

Don’t You Know Everything, Savage?

as Jerry helped you out of a jam, you should repay his kindness by either giving him the benefit of the doubt or turning a blind eye to what amounts to a little harmless perving. Lube isn’t that expensive, and that cock ring wasn’t from Tiffany’s — or was it? — so replacing them isn’t going to ruin you. P.S. Thanks for the very sweet postscript! P.P.S. Assuming Jerry didn’t leave your intimate items out in plain view, that means you snooped. If you have the kind of friendship with Jerry where you can confront him about his theft, admit to your snooping and have a laugh about it — and maybe put the lube and cock ring to good use. Leave him a cheeky note in the drawer where you found your intimate items: “I see you like my cock ring. Let me know if you want to see me in it.”

Dear Dan: I’ve been reading your column for

years, and I feel like I should know your answer, but I’m stumped. I’m a man. Recently I discovered Omegle, the online chat site that allows you to “talk to strangers,” and I’ve had some fun posing as a lesbian. I would talk to women my own age (mid-20s) about life, love and, of course, sex. Many times, like 99 percent of the time, these chats included role play or sexy chat. We would both be masturbating on our respective ends, and from what I can tell, I’m pretty good at writing this stuff. I want to be clear: I’m just chatting. I wouldn’t trade pics because I’m missing the goods the women I’m chatting with are interested in, and it’s certainly not fair for me to accept pics without being able to provide them. I don’t keep in touch with my chat partners after our chat is over, and I’m pretty sure everyone is satisfied. Am I an asshole for doing this? I made a post

Dear DYKES: Loath as I am to contradict the Lesbians of Reddit, I don’t think you’re an asshole. If you created fake personal ads, if you actively misled lesbians who contacted you, if you sent women pics that weren’t yours in an effort to trick them into believing that you were an actual lesbian, if you strung lesbians along via e-mail for weeks or months — if you were doing any of that — then you would be an asshole. But spinning out a few masturbatory fantasies on a site designed to facilitate oneon-one conversations between people who are never going to meet? That’s not asshole behavior. You found a way to enjoy your wannabelesbian fantasies without doing harm to any actual flesh-and-vulva lesbians. And yes, most of the “lesbians” you chatted with on Omegle were other straight dudes. Dear Dan: Is drag done by cisgender straight men for “humor” problematic? I thought drag was mostly about humor. I’m acquainted with a bi trans woman who thinks this is offensive, and at risk of further offending her, I haven’t asked why. Maybe you know? Haven’t we come a long way if straight men are comfortable enough with their sexualities to dress as women? Not Feeling Offended Dear NFO: “Freedom means freedom for every-

one,” as a huge asshole once said. That means straight guys who want to do drag are free to do drag, and bi trans women who want to take offense are free to take offense. For the record: Good/funny/subversive drag is a burlesque on what it means to be male, not a denigration of what it means to be female. And while gay men seem to have an innate affinity for drag, there are straight guys out there who do it and do it right. Instead of arguing with a bi trans friend who wants to police the freedom and gender expression of others, get your hands on the DVDs of An Audience With Dame Edna, and invite your bi trans friend over to watch. This week, foot fetish shame on the Savage Lovecast, at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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The Pitch: November 14, 2013